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The History of the Wedding Cake By Michael Kabel After the wedding dress and bride's bouquet, maybe nothing is so powerful a wedding symbol as the wedding cake. It's so ubiquitous, many people just assume the wedding cake has always been a part of wedding celebrations everywhere. Like all popular beliefs, there's some truth to that idea, though of course the real facts are much more fascinating and a whole lot more colorful. The Wedding Cake's Early Days During the heady days of the Roman Empire, wedding guests were served not one cake but a sumptuous collection of many small treats and pastries as a kind of wedding party favor. In some parts of the empire, one single cake was dropped over the bride's head at the reception, as a way of wishing the couple good luck in the future. -See Celebrations, page 23

For more wedding planning needs, visit www.newportcelebrations.com

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NEWPORT MONTHLY • J U LY 2 0 1 2 •

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FLEET GROWS FOR

OCEAN STATE

Tall Ships Festival

Excitement is mounting for the Ocean State Tall Ships® Festival 2012, scheduled for July 6 – 9, 2012, at the waterfront in downtown Newport. There are presently eleven ships scheduled to attend the festival, which is expected to bring thousands of spectators and visitors to Newport, Rhode Island.

have signed on to attend the festival this summer,” said Erin Donovan, Executive Director of Ocean State Tall Ships Festival 2012. “This event will be enjoyed by people of all ages, and will provide a much needed economic boost to Newport and the state,” she concluded.

As an official host port for the TALL SHIPS CHALLENGE® series on the Atlantic Coast, the festival promises to be a tremendous economic generator for Newport and the State of Rhode Island. In 2007, when the Tall Ships® last sailed to Newport, an estimated 200,000 attended, delivering an economic impact of over $20 million to the State of Rhode Island (according to a study commissioned by Tall Ships America®, which highlighted multi-year attendance of the Tall Ships Challenge® 2001-2010).

The immensely popular HMS Bounty, built for the 1962 movie, “Mutiny on the Bounty”, and most recently featured in the film “Pirates of the Caribbean Dead Man’s Chest”, will take part in the festival. Additionally, the Picton Castle, Mystic Whaler, the Pride of Baltimore II, the Tree of Life, Unicorn, Lynx, Providence, Gazela, the Spirit of Massachusetts and Summerwind are certain to bring inspiration and educational experiences for all ages. The brief descriptions that follow in this publication are only a sampling of the rich history of these magnificent ships.

“We are so excited that many of the nation’s premier vessels

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Newport Harbor-perfect setting for the splendor In July of 2012, the pageantry of the tall ships will sail into Newport Harbor once again for the Ocean State Tall Ships® Festival. The scenic and historic waterfront of Newport is the idyllic setting to observe the splendor of the tall ships, and families will delight in the majesty of the Parade of Sail through Newport Harbor. This event will also feature exhibits, food, music and family entertainment. Children especially enjoy boarding these remarkable vessels, and the opportunity to meet international crew members provides all visitors with insight into the many unique cultures that have helped to shape the past and future of sailing. For more information, contact Erin Donovan at 401.474.7009 EDonovan@OceanStateTallShips.com.

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HMS

BOUNTY

Known for the storied mutiny that took place in Tahiti in 1789 on board the British transport vessel, the current Bounty is one of the largest and most famous tall ships in the world with 18 sails and over 180 feet long. This storied vessel is a vehicle for teaching the nearly lost arts of square-rigged sailing and seamanship.

Photo courtesy of Jennifer Spring NEWPORT MONTHLY • J U LY 2 0 1 2 •

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Lobster, lobster recipes, lobster tails, maine lobster, soft shelled lobsters, green lobsters, and red lobsters. The choices seem endless when it comes to lobsters. But hard core aficionados have stated again and again that all it takes is a little know-how and the most simple and practical solutions to fully enjoy this king crustacean. Below is a simple guide for choosing lobsters for your palate. Color, gender, shell texture, and age are the basic choices lobster, lobster recipes, lobster tails, maine lobster fans and cooks alike face when picking their lobsters. There are basically two colors to choose from: the red or the green lobster. There is no debate in this since they basically taste the same. The subtlety of the difference between their flavors are effectively masked by the butter sauce. A more pressing choice is the choice of getting which gender. Lobstermen agree that the female is a better choice. Female lobsters may have roes, or unfertilized eggs which are tasty and considered as delicacy. Also, female lobsters have more tail breadth which means more meat. They need the extra size for carrying the eggs. How to tell a male from female lobster? Aside from the added breadth, females' swimmerets (the appendages under the tale) are light and feathery unlike the males' which are bony and hard. Another issue still in debate is the choice between getting soft shelled or hard shelled crustacean kings. This is usually settled by preference. Lobsters with soft-shells have just undergone moulting, which means that their shells are easily breakable. This translates to easier cooking and eating. Their flesh are also deemed to be sweeter-tasting. However, these soft and sweet lobsters are not without disadvantage. They are not good for traveling because of the delicate condition of their shells. Hard shells are then preferred when a lobster is expected to travel long distances especially in delivery. Hard shell lobsters are also bigger and meatier.

By Pat Murphy

Though, lobstermen, fish market operators, and chefs agree that the choice of lobster is basically dependent on the consumers' preference, the method of preparation is still a big factor in choosing lobsters. Chefs and cooks usually choose their lobsters based on how they plan to prepare it. In planning to do whole lobster, lobster recipes, lobster tails, maine lobster specialties, or seafood soups, the kind of lobster to be used is vital. Hard shells are usually preferred for rough cooking like grilling, roasting, or baking as their shells can withstand the heat. Soft shells are usually prepared by steaming to avoid causing damage to the delicate shell. Females are preferred for soups and other savory dishes because of the added flavor of their roes. Male lobsters are best eaten boiled. Yet, almost everybody agrees, that with lobster, you can't go wrong with butter! NEWPORT MONTHLY • J U LY 2 0 1 2 •

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THE

TREE OF

LIFE

The Tree of Life was first launched in 1991 from Nova Scotia, Canada. With its 4,800 square feet of sail, this beautiful schooner has a paneled interior of koa and teak. The Tree of Life has circumnavigated the globe and now sails up and down the New England coast from its home port of Newport, R.I. The crew of the ship conducts sail training for volunteers and trainees and provides sea education in marine science and maritime history.

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THE

PRIDE BALTIMORE

OF

Pride of Baltimore II is a reproduction of an 1812-era topsail schooner privateer. Berthed in Baltimore, the privateer is Maryland’s working symbol of the great natural resources and spectacular beauty of the Chesapeake Bay region. Pride of Baltimore II’s mission is to educate the public on U.S. maritime history and Maryland commerce opportunities.

Photo courtesy of http://bkollar.blogspot.com


Make a plan- Are peanut butter crackers from the vending machine your typical lunch? You need a plan. Everyone has to eat at some point during the day. With some nominal advance thought and a once a week trip to the grocery store, you could have a more nutritious and tasteful lunch. A salad with some protein like chicken or tuna, a sandwich or last night’s leftovers would all make lunch something to look forward to.

How do you feel? - Good nutrition makes us more productive. If you are the type of person who can feel when your blood sugar is taking a dive a couple of well planned snacks will make a world of difference to your energy and focus. Eating less more often is also a great way to maintain your energy and lose weight.

Containerize it! – There are so many great products that make it easy for you to take your food with you. I love the Fit and Fresh System that has built in cold packs for any food that requires it. So if you don’t have access to a refrigerator, no worries.

Here are 5 easy tips to start eating better today. Easy snacks – For better health avoid prepackaged foods as much as possible. Although many brands of granola or nutrition bars are without hydrogenated oil or high fructose corn syrup, they typically have a laundry list of ingredients 20 deep. Find a couple of snacks that you love, feel good about eating and will look forward to in the afternoon or mid morning. My favorites: Hummus and raw vegetables, apple and peanut butter as well as cheese and a piece of fruit.

What’s for dinner – That ever plaguing question of young and old alike? There are at least five dinners I can think of that can be made in 30 minutes or less. Pick up a few beautiful food magazines or browse the cookbook aisle at the bookstore for inspiration. Occasionally I pull out my phone and take a picture of a inspiring recipe and then I have my shopping list with me. Here again, you need a bit of advance planning to have what you need on hand but once you get the hang of it you’ll be eating more nutritiously in no time flat.

-by Candita Clayton NEWPORT MONTHLY • J U LY 2 0 1 2 •

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THE

SPIRIT MASSACHUSETTS OF

In 1984 the Spirit of Massachusetts was launched from Boston, MA, and modeled after the 1889-fishing schooner, Fredonia. The Fredonia was known for its speed, which is fully embodied in the Spirit of Massachusetts.

The ship’s original owners built it as a sail-training vessel for young people, and the vessel has continued to be used by Ocean Classroom for students and teachers where traditions, values and adventures of maritime life are taught.

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COOKING

Lobster at Home

By Richard Massey

Lobster has always be one of those extravagant meals which few people ever try because of the high cost. With restaurants paying thirty dollars a pound, by the time they put their markup on it, you’re easily paying sixty dollars for a ten ounce tail. This high cost leaves lobster dinners for the wellto do or at least only for special occasions. But, this doesn’t have to be. With more and more retail store offering lobster, you can create a romantic dinner for two at a reasonable price. If you buy two eight ounce tails for thirty dollars, that’s only fifteen dollars a person. Add a starch and vegetable and it’s still cheaper than going out to dinner and having steak or even chicken. Turn the lights down low, add a candle and ship the kid’s off to grandma’s house. Cooking lobster is relatively easy. There are hundred’s of recipes on the internet or in books. The simplest way is to split the shell down the top, pull the meat out of the shell about 90% of the way and lay it on top of the shell. Place in a pan with a little water and cover with foil (do not let the foil touch the lobster). Cook at 350 degrees until the meat turns white (around 140 F) then baste with butter and season with salt and pepper. As with any food, avoid the temptation to overcook it. When overcooked the lobster meat will become tough and less appealing.

About Lobster Lobsters are ten legged arthropods, meaning they have no backbone. The lobster creates its skeleton on the outside in the form of a shell with joint appendages. There are two major types of lobster on the market. Maine also

Why not give it a try? called Canadian or American lobster and spiny sometimes call rock lobster. The Maine lobster inhabits

the cold waters of the Atlantic in the area of Canada and the northeast United States. This lobster has two claws, one claw very large and flat, while the other is smaller and thinner. These lobster take up to seven years to reach one pound and average about one to three pounds when harvested. The Maine lobster is sold live or already cooked and usually the meat used in mixed dishes or dishes like lobster thermador The spiny lobster is a clawless warmwater variety, which are actually large seagoing crayfish. There are 49 species of spiny lobster which swim the world’s warm waters. Because the tail is the only real edible part of the spiny lobster, it is usually sold frozen as a lobster tail. The spiny lobster found off Florida, Brazil and the Caribbean are called “warmwater tails”, while those found off South Africa, New Zealand and Australia are markets as “coldwater tails”. The coldwater variety of spiny lobster is considered superior and favored among restaurants. Cooking lobster at home can be a delicious alternative to going out. Why not give it a try?

NEWPORT MONTHLY • J U LY 2 0 1 2 •

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THE

MYSTIC

WHALER The Mystic Whaler is a reproduction of a late 19th century coastal cargo schooner. With its warm interior featuring Italian oak floors, fir wainscoting and mahogany accents, the schooner will allow adults and children over the age of five to learn first hand how to raise sail to a sea chant and experience the thrill of turning the ships wooden wheel.

THE

LYNX The Lynx is an interpretation of an actual privateer named The Lynx built by Thomas Kemp in 1812 in Fell’s Point, Md. It was among the first ships to defend American freedom by evading the British naval fleet then blockading American ports, and serving in the important privateering efforts.

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Celebrations continued from page 4 Later, during the Middle Ages, many guests would bring small cakes to the wedding celebration. The cakes were all piled atop a single table, creating the beginning of the tiered wedding cake known today. As a tradition, a bride and groom that could still kiss over the pile of cakes were considered to have good luck in the upcoming marriage. Modern Times Wedding cakes began to change and grow in the 19th Century, when new means of refrigeration could keep their ingredients fresh for much longer periods. The modern wedding cake is a kind of homage to St. Bride's Church, a famous English Medieval Chapel. The church's spire includes several spires, much like a tiered cake. Many modern couples have adopted the wedding cake design to display their own interests or passions. For example, a couple fascinated by the Renaissance may choose to decorate their cake with decorations specific to that time period. The bride and groom figures atop the cake may also reflect their hobbies and pastimes. Because modern wedding cakes have become so elaborate, their preparation time has steadily grown. Wedding planners are encouraged to make arrangements with a pastry chef up to three months in advance of the wedding reception. Wedding Cake Traditions Some popular wedding cake traditions taken from around the world include: • a bride who cuts her own cake will have to work hard all her life. • if the groom lays his hands over the bride's hands as the cake is cut, they will share their possessions their whole life. • the bride cuts the first piece of cake as a way of hoping for children.

For more wedding planning needs, visit www.newportcelebrations.com NEWPORT MONTHLY • J U LY 2 0 1 2 •

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THE

UNICORN

Unicorn was originally built in 1947 as a motor fishing vessel andwas converted into a sailing ship in 1979. The current owners of the Unicorn created the leadership program, Sisters-Under-Sail, in 2005. The program is aimed at mentoring teenage girls, and the Unicorn is now sailed by an all-female crew. Daughters of U.S. military, ages 13 – 18, whose parent is either Active Duty or on Active Status, including the National Guard, Reservists and the U.S. Coast Guard, have been invited to sail aboard Unicorn to honor their parents’ service for our country.

THE

GAZELA

The Gazela was built in Portugal, and her records date back to 1901. It was originally built to carry fisherman to the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. The Gazela’s movie career has included “Interview with the Vampire”; the PBS documentary, “The Irish in America: The Long Journey Home” and “La Veuve de St. Pierre,” a French film released in Paris.

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THE

PICTON

CASTLE First built as a fishing trawler in Wales, the Picton Castle has worked as a minesweeper and a freighter. The ship was later converted into a square-rigged barque and has since completed 5 circumnavigations of the globe. Today, the ship’s main mission is deepocean sail training and long-distance education. Sail trainees participate fully in the ship’s operation as well as in training classes in seamanship and navigation.


THE

PROVIDENCE This 110-foot fully rigged sailing vessel is the faithful replica of the first commissioned ship into the Continental Navy, and John Paul Jones’ first command. The replica was built in 1975 in Portsmouth, R.I. for the bicentennial of 1976. The Providence is the official flagship and tall ship ambassador for the state of Rhode Island, and has won the “Best Dressed Vessel” award from the Sailing Ambassador.

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THE

SUMMERWIND The schooner Summerwind was built in 1929, served during WWII as part of the Coastal Picket Patrol and was instrumental in the classic yachting movement that began in the late 1960′s as older vessels were joined by newly built replicas. As the newest vessel to join the fleet at the United States Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, N.Y., the Summerwind provides sail training to the Midshipmen of the academy.

Source cited for Ocean State Tall Ships Festival information: Erin Donovan, Executive Director of Ocean State Tall Ships Festival 2012 NEWPORT MONTHLY • J U LY 2 0 1 2 •

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Newport Monthly July 2012  

Newport Monthly Magazine July 2012

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