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What is “trafficking in persons”? Trafficking in persons involves the organised recruitment and removal of a person from his or her usual place of stay or environment and subsequent exploitation by others. The removal of a person is usually by deception, coercion, abuse of power or force; by those who recruit, procure, transport and receive the unsuspecting victims. In some cases the recruiters and procurers are known to the victims. When a person is trafficked, he or she might be trafficked for various exploitative purposes such as the following: • Labour Exploitation – domestic work, farm work, back-yard industries, illegal manufacturing, car theft and remodelling operations; and pushing drugs and consumable via the informal markets; • Sexual exploitation – prostitution, sex slavery, forced marriages or use in the production of pornography; • Slavery, practices similar to slavery and servitude – when persons are held captive, no chance of escape, treated like a slave and kept in slave-like conditions; and • Other – adoption, removal or organs / body parts. All over the world children, women and men are trafficked into a variety of exploitative situations in both domestic and international economies. Trafficking in persons is fundamentally a violation of a human being’s right to freedom from harm, freedom of movement and freedom from abuse and exploitation. Various individuals, groups of individuals, gangs and syndicates operating in networks are largely responsible for trafficking in persons. These criminal networks often also engage in other criminal activities, such as money laundering, drug trafficking, smuggling and selling counterfeit commodities and consumables. Traffickers view the people they traffic as another commodity that can be trapped, used, traded, sold and rented out for money, protection or some other gain. The trafficking industry’s influence on economies and its ability to generate wealth have led some commentators to see it as a shadow economy in competition with but not entirely excluded from domestic economies or the global economy. South Africa has not escaped the attention of local and foreign traffickers and is in fact the destination of choice for some traffickers. Trafficking in persons is a money-making operation fuelled by demand and supply factors that makes especially women and children vulnerable. The supply factors are usually seen as: • Poverty & lack of job opportunities; • Family break-up & economic stress; • Violence / domestic violence; • Low levels of education and lack of marketable skills; • Peer pressure & consumerism; • Gender discrimination; and • The prospects of a better life in another place. The demand for cheap and exploitable labour and services, including sexual services; by the global formal and informal economies make those from poor and marginalised groups and communities particularly vulnerable to trafficking.

What to do about Trafficking in persons - Resource Manual produced by Molo Songololo & UNODC

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Resource Manual  

What to do about Trafficking in persons - Resource Manual produced by Molo Songololo & UNODC 1 Produced by © Molo Songololo 2007 A resou...

Resource Manual  

What to do about Trafficking in persons - Resource Manual produced by Molo Songololo & UNODC 1 Produced by © Molo Songololo 2007 A resou...

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