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You can help trafficking victims get assistance they need by looking beneath the surface for the following cues. •

Evidence of being controlled;

Evidence of an inability to move or leave their place of employment;

Bruises or other signs of battering;

Fear or depression;

Foreign victims are unlikely to speak any of the official languages of South Africa;

Victims may be from provinces other than the Western Cape; and

Lack of identification - identity book, passport, refugee or asylum papers.

Traffickers use various techniques to keep victims in an exploitative situation. Some traffickers keep their victims under lock and key. However, the more frequent practice is to use less obvious techniques including:

Debt bondage – financial obligations, honour-bound to satisfy debt;

Isolation from the public – limiting contact with outsiders and contact is monitored;

Isolation from family members and members of their ethnic and religious community;

Confiscation of passports, visas and/or identification documents;

Use or threat of violence toward victims and/or families of victims;

The threat of shaming victims by exposing their circumstances to their family;

Telling victims they will be imprisoned or deported if they contact authorities; and

Control of the victim’s money, e.g., holding their money for “safe-keeping”.

The result of such techniques is to instil fear in victims. The victim’s isolation is further exacerbated because they cannot communicate effectively with service providers and they fear that they will be harmed if they expose people in the trafficking chain.

What to do about Trafficking in persons - Resource Manual produced by Molo Songololo & UNODC

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Resource Manual  

What to do about Trafficking in persons - Resource Manual produced by Molo Songololo & UNODC 1 Produced by © Molo Songololo 2007 A resou...

Resource Manual  

What to do about Trafficking in persons - Resource Manual produced by Molo Songololo & UNODC 1 Produced by © Molo Songololo 2007 A resou...

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