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Trafficking in persons for labour exploitation It is very difficult to tell trafficking apart from exploitative labour practices. A person who was trafficked to do farm labour or domestic work might experience the same abuse and human rights violations. They will do the same work under the same conditions and will get little or no pay. The difference that separates trafficking from labour exploitation is that the trafficked person was deceived and coerced by recruiters who knew that the person will enter into an exploitative labour situation. However, non-trafficked persons can also be tricked and forced into exploitative labour practices and be deprived of their rights. The table below illustrate the features that can involve forced labour. Route into forced labour •

Birth / decent into slave or bonded status

Abduction or kidnapping

Sale of a person into ownership of another

Physical confinement

Psychological abuse

Threat of penalty for non-compliance

Induced indebtedness

Deception

False promises about the types and terms of work

Retention of identity documents

Retention of other valuable possessions

Keeping someone in forced labour •

Actual or threatened

Physical or sexual violence

Supernatural retaliation

Imprisonment or other physical confinement

Financial penalties

Denunciation to authorities

Dismissal

Exclusion from future employment

Exclusion from community and social life

Removal of rights and privileges

Deprivation of food, shelter or other necessities

Shift to even worse working conditions

Loss of social status

What to do about Trafficking in persons - Resource Manual produced by Molo Songololo & UNODC

15

Resource Manual  

What to do about Trafficking in persons - Resource Manual produced by Molo Songololo & UNODC 1 Produced by © Molo Songololo 2007 A resou...

Resource Manual  

What to do about Trafficking in persons - Resource Manual produced by Molo Songololo & UNODC 1 Produced by © Molo Songololo 2007 A resou...

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