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Digital Design - Module 01 Semester 1, 2019 Molly D’Arcy

913230 Samuel Lalo - Studio 17


Week One

Reading: Zeara Polo, A. 2010. Between Ideas and Matters.

According to Zeara-Polo, the diagram does not play a representational role in the design process but provides an organisational and can have a performative quality depending on how it is deployed. Explain how Diagram is different from Signs and Symbols? (100 words Maximum)

Where signs and symbols are entrenched in the physical and real elements of a space, diagrams can take whatever form or method suits its purpose. Diagrams have no responsibility to be directly representative of a physical space, hence can communicate abstract concepts that can convey a more nuanced understanding or idea of a space or idea. As described by Zeara-Polo, a diagram is generally focused on one site or space and can convey notions such as movement patterns or space geometries. It conveys the overarching themes of these topics, giving a visual overview as opposed to a more technical representation that symbols and signs provide, which can often be less visually communicative due to the increased analysis needed to interpret.

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Week One

Precedent Analysis

LEFT: Internal Courtyard. Julien Lanoo. 2016. https://www.dezeen. com/2016/02/12/video-interiviewpeter-zumthor-serpentine-gallerypavilion-2011-solitude-calm-movie/ MIDDLE TOP: Framing MIDDLE BOTTOM: External entrances RIGHT: Internal coutyard

Peter Zumthor’s 2016 Serpentine Pavilion is a structure created by a timber frame covered in thick scrim and coated with black waterproofing sealant. Hence, its modelling involved the repetion of a cross-sectional timber frame that joined the floor, internal and external walls and the sloping roof, each at 600 mm spacings, obtained through the ‘array along curve’ function on Rhino. Such details were deducted from plans and sections, as well as images of the pavilions construction obtained online. Resolving the corners of the structure prooved a tedious task, as each timber member had to meet at a right angle with another on the adjacent side,yet using the ‘split’ and ‘reflect’ tools enabled me to produce a clean and precise digital model of these elements.

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Week Two

Reading: Hertzberger H. 2005. The in-between and The Habitable Space Between Things, from Lessons for Students in Architecture. Herzberger discusses how design should not be extreme in its functionality. Use your precedent study to explain how the pavilion allows for an appropriation of use. (100 words Maximum)

As Herzberger resonates throughout his 2005 writings, the ability of a user to craft a space to their needs increases the usability, enjoyability and effectiveness of a space. Such theories of the ambiguities of threshold and transitional zones boldly underpin the design of Peter Zumthor’s Serpentine Pavillion. There is no prescribed route through Zumthor’s pavilion, no single door that leads to a specified path. Instead, a visitor to the pavilion possesses full agency of their own experience through the space. Choosing the closest door down the narrow pathway could lead one directly into the garden. However a more adventurous visitor could encircle the space, admiring its many vantage points and allowing a greater experience of the dark corridor. Hence, experiences of the pavilion can vary greatly on the desires of the user, allowing them to own their interactions with it and instil a greater connection to the structure.

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Week Two

Isometric

Zumthor’s Serpentine Pavilion Isometric | 1:400 I constructed my isometric view of Zumthor’s pavilion to achieve multiple intentions. The first of these was that, while modelling, I realised the incredible visual effect of the repetitve frame work, something that remained hidden when the completed structure was pictured. Hence, I chose to create a partially deconstructed isometric of the pavilion to uncover this. In addition to releaving the structure, this partial deconstruction reveals some of the most intriguing parts of the design, including the isolated corridors created around the perimiter of the courtyard, and a more insightful vista of the courtyard itself. Using muted tones, the vegetation depicted serves both to exhibit the contrast of this pavilion to its context, while also softening the harshness of the design. This captures the surprising warmness of the dark pavilion as experienced by visitors through the space, something instilled by the textured mesh surface that reflects a dim light from the black facade.

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Week Two Diagrams

Pavilion Structure | 1:400

Spatial Experience | 1:400

Through this diagram, I wanted to convey the contrast between the heavy, dark structure and the soft, green context. It is this reinforcement of threshold and sturcture that forms an integral part of Zumthor’s pavilion design.

The above diagram communicates three underlying themes to the design; graded thresholds, circular and unprescribed movement, and shadow movement. Each of these factors shape how a user interacts with a space.

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Appendix

Process

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Reference Images Used 1- https://www.wemadethis.co.uk/blog/2011/10/serpentine-pavilion-2011/ 2- https://inhabitat.com/peter-zumthor-unveils-2011-serpentine-pavilion-with-a-secret-garden/?variation=c 3- https://www.dezeen.com/2011/07/10/serpentine-gallery-pavilion-2011-by-peter-zumthor-photographedby-julien-lanoo/ 4 & 5- https://www.serpentinegalleries.org/exhibitions-events/serpentine-gallery-pavilion-2011-peter-zumthor 6 & 7- https://www.bdonline.co.uk/technical/serpentine-gallery-pavilion-by-peter-zumthor/5020460.article 8- https://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/home/atelier-zumthors-anna-page-on-building-the-serpentinepavilion/8615594.article

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Appendix Process

Modelling

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The structure of Zumthor’s pavilion is created by a timber frame covered in a thick mesh and painted with sealant. In order to model this, I began with the timber frame. Using the provided plans and sections, as well as images from construction for reference, I created the cross-sectional frame section (figure 1). I then duplicated this frame element at 600mm centres (figure 2), before resolving the corner detailing (figure 3) using the split and reflect tools on elements I had already created. This created the final framed structure (figure 4) with the corridor, internal courtyard, sloped roof and frame for bench seat. Through cutting stud elements and inserting lintels, I created the 10 openings at the positions specified in the plan. Again using the plans for reference, alongside images of the finished pavilion, I modelled the mesh cladding as well as key surrounding elements (figure 5).

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Appendix

Process

In order to get an indepth understanding of the circulation of the pavilion, I used Google Earth to obtain satelite imagery of the site and its context.

IThe first scale I looked at was with the purpose of looking

This second image allowed me to understand the greater

at the sites direct access points in relation to immediate

context and where vistors are likely to be travelling from at

paths and landmarks. From this image I discovered that

different times of the day.

the site is situated tightly within a network of footpaths, al-

For instance, people commuting to the city by foot in the

lowing access to each side of the pavilion easily. The site is

morning may take the purple and green paths on their way

also placed closely to the Serpentine Gallery itself,aiding a

to work, stopping momentarily to enjoy the pavilion sipping

direct flow of traffic from the tourist hotspot.

their morning coffee. This effect could be reversed for the

The satelite image also aided me to discover the sunpath

afternoon commute home.

in relation to the site and how shadows fall across its sur-

Yet as mid-morning approaches and tourists emerge, a

roundings, something that will impact upon the flow of

greater spread across the access points could be observ-

padestrian traffic as well as where people sit and relax.

able, with people drawn from surrounding attractions and

This prompted me to undertake the shadow modelling

thoroughfares (denoted in blue).

(see left).

These are all apsects that change how an why the avilion is used.

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Digital Design - Module 01 Semester 1, 2019 Molly D’Arcy

913230 Samuel Lalo - Studio 17

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Molly D'Arcy - Digital Design M1 Journal  

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