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MOJTABA HOSEINI mojtaba.h010@gmail.com

M.Arch., Intern Architect Selected Projects


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Professional Practice

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Academic

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Workshop

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Hand Drawing & Sketches

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REVIT Sample Projects


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SHIRAZ RESIDENCE

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UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN ICE FACILITY

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YAZD RESIDENCE

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AHVAZ MUSEUM

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FABRIC CONCRETE TECHNOLOGY

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OXYGEN RESTAURANT

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REVIT SAMPLE PROJECT

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METRI RESTAURANT

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TRAVESIA

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THESIS

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DRAWING & SKETCHES

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Shiraz Residence / Sakhtae-e-Yekom Consulting Engineers Shiraz, Iran, 2015

Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Common space

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try en

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Possible building area

Programming/ Site Analyses

Longing for south light

Shadow/Light Analyses

In this 3-units condominium the main idea was to capture as much as south light as possible for most of the spaces and to prevent from catching west light which is not desirable in that semi-arid climate. This idea on the west side shaped some overhangs and vertical indent in the building which defines the entry, and on the South side, it creates some balconies which prevent interior space from overheating in the summer while provide some intriguing outdoor space for each units. Later during the design process, Revit Energy Modelling Tools, have been used to test the natural light in the building more scientifically. This constant design from inside and outside resulted in a building that has its own specific character with three different units that have their own uniqueness with enough south light, livable interior spaces and balconies.

Ground Floor

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West Elevation


Second Floor

Third Floor

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U of S Ice Facility / Calnitsky Associates Architects Saskatoon, Canada, 2014

College Dr.

Preston Ave N

Site

geometry and structure

Main Floor

Second Floor Practice Rink Main Rink Spectator’s access to the second floor Outdoor access to the second level

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The firm was asked to submit a proposal for an Ice Facility Complex consisting of one main rink with seating for spectators and three practice rinks as well as amenities such as restaurants and kiosks. The design takes a holistic approach, where the architecture, structure and landscape inform each other and integrate in a manner that can enrich the active life of the university.


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Yazd Residence / Narenjestan Consulting Engineers Yazd, Iran, 2009

We were asked to design a house within a tight budget that could be easily replicated. By designing terraces, which provide enough shadows for openings, and using brick with a variety of patterns, we ensured the design was not boring and repetitive. Each block comprises of two completely separate units which have their own specific entrances and yards.

South Elevation uper yard

Uper floor unit

Yard

Ground floor unit

Entrance to upper Unit

Second Floor

Main Floor

Entrance to Ground Unit

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AHVAZ MUSEUM / Narenjestan Consulting Engineers Ahvaz, Iran, 2010

A H VM AU ZS E U M Vertical Access on the Site Ground Level to the Basement Level Ground Level to Level 1 Level 1 to Level of the Existing building on top of the hill

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This project was a museum in the hot southern part of Iran, Ahvaz, with a size of over 6,000 square meters and needed to be connected to one existing building on top of a nearby hill more than 8 meters higher. The idea was to design well responding to the site features while considering accesses to different levels of the museum and the site.


Renovated building on top of the hill

South Elevation Court Yard

Vertical Access Visual Axis Lobby Galleries Interior Yards

Each gallery space catches natural light indirectly from roof. This will help illuminating art pieces efficiently.

East Elevation

Galleries connect by bridges on the second level.

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Fabric Concrete Technology /Centre for Architectural Structure and Technology

Controlled Lines

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Regulator Points

Winnipeg, Canada, 2013

Plastic used to prevent plaster attach to plywood)

I conducted a research on Fabric Concrete Technology at CAST. In this method, a flexible fabric membrane is used as a formwork (or part of a formwork) for making concrete components. “The flexibility of a fabric formwork makes it possible to produce a multitude of architectural and structural designs from a single, reusable mold. The use of a permeable formwork fabric produces improved surface finishes and higher strength concrete as a result of a filtering action that allows air bubbles and excess mix water to bleed through the formwork membrane.


Controller poles

Action

Action

A flexible fabric mold awakens concrete to its original wet, plastic nature by naturally producing concrete members with complex sensual curvatures. The sculptural and architectural freedom offered by this method of construction is matched by new possibilities for efficiently curved structures.”1 I started by making 1/20 and 1/10 models of a cast concrete wall using fabric formwork. In an analogue model of this technique, plaster is used to model concrete and a thin plastic film models a coated (waterproof) structural fabric, such as a woven polyethylene or polypropylene fabric, usually used in this type of construction at full-scale. In first model (Fig.24), a “spandex” stretch knit fabric was used which, while difficult to control, may be used at full-scale using multiple layers.4 The formwork that I developed consisted of three major parts (Fig.23-24): 1- The rigid part: a sheet of plywood modelling a standard plywood wall formwork. 2-The flexible membrane: which can be different type of fabric. 3-The controllers: in this case some poles tied back to the rigid side. 1- http://umanitoba.ca/faculties/architecture/cast/research/fabric_formwork/index.html

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Oxygen Restaurant / Adran Architectural Group Shiraz, Iran, 2006

material composition gives rise to something unique. Material is endless.� Peter Zumthor “Materials react with one another and have their radiance, so that the

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We were asked by the owners of a 2-storey retail building to redesign it into a restaurant. The redesign included demolishing some interior walls, adding new spaces and an interior stairway for customers. I was responsible for all phases of the project and was free to do experiments with a variety of materials and to prepare appropriate practical construction details.

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New interior stair

A reception desk and swinging door was designed by utilizing bike wheels as the main structural components.

Main Floor The serving counter was designed with travertine stone of different sizes and thicknesses.


Everything can be used in a new way. With this idea we used salt shakers and designed and built light fixtures (LED compatible). We also used very thin travertine stones to create a permeable membrane in the front wall. Placing sources of light behind them illuminated the space in an exceptional way.

Light & Reflection. We used black shiny plexi-glass with custom made details for the ceiling and added lighting to create a dream-like atmosphere.

Second Floor

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Sendai Mediatheque in Revit - Parametric Technique Following a research on technical details of Toyo Ito’s Sendai Mediatheque project, I developed a parametric method in Revit for creating the vertical structural tube features of this building. In this method one tube has been created as a family and imported in Revit file for replicating other tubes just by changing its parameters.

One vertical parametric structure was created with all rolled beams and horizontal parts in it. By changing the parameters different tubes of the project were replicated.

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Section 2 1 : 20


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Section 1 - Callout 1

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Section 2 1 : 20

1 : 20

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Consultan Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Consultan Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Consultan Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

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Level 3 - Callout 1 1 : 20

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Curtain Wall Detail: Section 2 Double curtain system was created 1 : 20 as a Revit curtain wall family and imported to the project.

Consultan Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

Consultan Address Address Phone Fax e-mail

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Project numb Date

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Drawn by

Level 3 - Callout 1

Checked by

1 : 20 Scale

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Metri Restaurant Shiraz, Iran, 2011

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HANGING BOOK Black

/ Sakhtae-e-Yekom Consulting Engineers

This was a time-limited renovation project as we had less than three weeks to complete the demolition and construction. Rather than looking at it as an interior design project, we viewed it as conceptual art. I did not want to design just a beautiful space, but my idea was to create a challenging piece of art. It held a paradox, featuring books hanging from the ceiling in a fastfood restaurant. The hanging books symbolized authors who were easily eliminated from our society, while at the same time represented objectionable items in a place where people just cared about their food.

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Travesia / Workshop Clearwater, Canada, 2012

Explore the broader context

Site Community Centre Folk Music Festival’s Site Broader Environment Closer Environment

Deconstruction

How architecture, human life and more-than-human world affect each other? With this question, we started a three-weekend workshop called “Travesia” in Clearwater a small community in the southern part of Manitoba. We explored the area and participated in a folk music festival during the first weekend. The second weekend our time were allocated to tearing down an abandoned barn. And finally we found a specific place to build a structure near the community centre and the music site which later became known as the Yoga Spot.

Construction

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Determined and Indeterminate Moments of Architecture University of Manitoba, Thesis project- 2013

“A great building, in my opinion, must begin with the immeasurable, must go through measurable means when it is being designed and in the end must be immeasurable” Louis Khan These days in the world of architectural design, emphasis seems largely have been placed on solving technical problem or designing more impressing architecture while the thing that easily has been neglected is providing a place for life (with its all concrete aspects) to occur. Life is a totality comprises of variety of unpredictable and informal moments and things that sometimes conflict with each other. How can this “informal, unpredictable and immeasurable” nature “inform” the rational act of designing and building architecture? Agreeing with Khan that the result of building should remain “immeasurable”, and seeing this as directly related to immeasurable aspects of human life, this thesis asks the question: how can the logical acts of designing and building would lead to that kind of non-rational outcome? One answer may be related to the way we treat with materials and tools and the level of control we place on them. Following this theory, I started a procces of using different materials, tools and doing a variety of actions in order to find how the process of making might result in an architecture with immeasurable aspects. During this process according to what was found, two different building was proposed.

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I decided to extend to the previous process of discovery through constructing, based on action and reaction. In addition it was not just about the object that is made but was also about its role and consequences on others over the time. It is not just about the point where a stone drops into water but is also about the radiating ripples and effects it causes. Because this type of model action and architecture occurs and grows, it is not completely controllable which means many unpredictable things are bound to happen over time. For that, return to the physical world of action, tools, materials, mistakes etc., to see what might happen in the chance events and complexity of the physical world – and this is the path I took. In this work I continued making a 1:20 model

First proposal; From Walls to the roofs.


This new approach, following the ideas given by the mold-making process began to re-defined other aspects of the design, like the placement of the walls, windows, etc. This discovery was a fundamental change in process of doing something; it is a shift from “designing” and producing to finding and “growing”. The Canadian thinker and scientist Ursula Franklin draws a distinction between a “growing model” and a “production model” of technology, she states that “Growth occurs; it is not made. Within a growth model, all that human intervention can do is to discover the best conditions for growth and then they try to meet them.”7

A Growing Model Following the growth model, the placement of exterior walls were made according to the flat line between those capitals and the vault which was already there - one flat, horizontal, consistent line which provided a situation for walls or windows to be attached to this flat part of the roof. This curved line implicitly proposed a curved wall. Consequently there is a gap between walls and columns which provides shade for the windows placed on the top of the walls. The ending walls also could be placed under one of the guide curves of the roof which are measurable curves.

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Thanks for your time and consideration

Moj H.  

Architecture & Design Portfolio

Moj H.  

Architecture & Design Portfolio

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