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EDITORIAL

PUBLISHING

Editor in Chief MOJEH IZADPANAH

Publishing Director RADHIKA NATU

Associate Editor SHERI IZADPANAH

Publishing Assistant DESIREE LABANDA-GAVERIA

Assistant Editor KELLY BALDWIN

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Guest Fashion Editors Guillaume Boulez Michela Buratti Sofia Odero

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ART

LOUIS FOURTEEN FOR MOJEH

Producer LOUIS AGENCY

Concierge Service Management ASSMA AHMED

Art Director AMIRREZA AMIRASLANI

Head of Lifestyle OLGA KOVALCHUK

Digital Strategy LOUIS AGENCY

Corporate Manager JUBRAN HAMATI

Contributing Photographers Amber Gray Cecile Bortoletti Dorothée Murail Karina Twiss Pieter Henket Riccardo Vimercati

Senior Stylist MARIAN GIRGIS Personal Shopper HELENE CHECHIK

Cover photographed by Dorothee Murail, model wears yellow gold pieces all from the Panthère de Cartier collection, CARTIER

Published under HS Media Group FZ LLC Registered at Dubai Media City Building 10, Office 345 P.O.Box 502333, Dubai, UAE

WWW.MOJEH.COM Louis Fourteen for MOJEH Follow us on Twitter @MOJEH_Magazine MOJEH Swiss Representative Office: Rue de Rive 4, 1204 Geneva, Switzerland Average qualified circulation (July-December 2013): 13,108 copies. For the UAE printed by Emirates Printing Press LLC. Distribution- UAE: Al Nisr Distribution LLC. Qatar: Dar Al Sharq. Bahrain: Jashanmal & Sons BSC (C). Oman: United Media Services LLC. Lebanon: Messageries Du Moyen-Orient The publishers regret that they cannot accept liability for error or omissions contained in this publication, however caused. The opinions and views contained in this publication are not necessary those of the publishers. Readers are advised to seek specialist advice before acting on information contained in this publication which is provided for general use and may not be appropriate for the readers particular circumstances. The ownership of trademark is acknowledged, therefore reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. All credits are subjects to change. Copyright HS MEDIA GROUP FZ LLC 2011

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Contents

Society

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5 MINUTES WITH… She’s known for her impeccable sense of style. Italian-born and raised stylist, Elisa Nalin, gives us an interesting insight into her day-to-day life.

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TURN AROUND

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In light of winning MaxMara’s Women In Film Face of the Future Award, we speak to actress-of-the-moment, Rose Byrne, about the recent turning point in her career and more.

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THE QUEEN OF GREEN She’s a born campaigner and the wife of Oscar-winning actor, Colin Firth, explore the life of Livia Firth, the future of eco-friendly fashion and the Green Carpet Challenge.

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MY STYLISH LIFE

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MOJEH delves into the glamorous life of two treasured members of the Middle East’s community, Raju and Simran Shroff. It’s style all the way, everyday.


A B U D H A B I T H E G A L L E R I A A L M A R YA H I S L A N D D U B A I M A L L O F T H E E M I R AT E S D O H A V I L L A G G I O M A L L J E D D A H K H AY YAT C E N T E R R I YA D H C E N T R I A M A L L K U W A I T C I T Y T H E A V E N U E S P R E S T I G E M A N A M A B A H R A I N C I T Y C E N T R E S A K S F I F T H A V E N U E


©2014 COACH®

FALL 2014

Rhyder 24 and 33 in gunmetal Shearling Coat on Lexi

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Mojeh

Contents

Fashion

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Designer 2.0 From boys to men, chart the rise of fashion’s newest dynasty. How have the pair taken a constantly evolving industry and turned it into their playground?

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STYLE NOTES

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We ask industry experts for their analysis and opinions on fashion’s most topical agendas and trends. It’s question time.

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FASHION IN FOCUS How do they do it? We turn to fashion’s elite – from Olivia Palermo to Joan Smalls and Miroslava Duma – for style inspiration. It’s time to dress to impress.

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A BEAUTIFUL NEW MOOD Peruse our edit of trends and catwalk coverage for the season ahead. Adopt a beautiful new mood for autumn.


- Quais de Seine, Paris Extremely Piaget Collection, Haute Joaillerie.

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PIAGET BOUTIQUES: Abu Dhabi: Avenue at Etihad Towers, 02 667 0044, Dubai: The Dubai Mall, 04 339 8222, Mall of the Emirates, 04 347 6336 Dubai: Ahmed Seddiqi & Sons, Atlantis 04 422 0233, Burj Al Arab, 04 348 9000, Burjuman Centre, 04 355 9090 Abu Dhabi: Al Manara International Jewellery, St. Regis Hotel, 02 6673535, The Galleria Sowwah, 02 6743444

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Contents

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MOVING WITH MODERNITY In the fantastical world of Haute Couture a change is in motion. MOJEH investigates if it’s moving with modernity or remaining in the past.

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The point of Philo Is Céline’s Phoebe Philo one of fashion’s biggest game changers? We certainly think so.

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EMBELLISHED ENCHANTMENT Follow MOJEH’s story of the masters, makers and their muses behind the scenes at Chanel, where the storytellers weave their couture fairy tale.

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Pretty Little Things

Stylist Guillaume Boulez heads to the woods with fashion’s bright young star models to explore winter’s penchant for forestry styles and prints.

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Nicolas Ghesquiere’s first collection for Louis Vuitton revisits the house’s original codes, with a 21st century Ghesquire twist. Envision it here first.


Mojeh

Contents

Accessories

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ACCESSORY TRENDS

From oversized to subtle to daring, indulge in our 10page edit of this season’s hottest accessory trends.

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WHEN THE CLOCK STRIKES COUTURE

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We look at the history of the House of Dior’s love affair with watches and their place within modern day society.

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THE WOMEN’S MOVEMENT It’s time for change. MOJEH investigates why luxury watchmakers are moving towards women in a big business way.

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242 FELINE FOREVER

It has power, speed and influence. We discuss the inspiration behind the cat and its feline qualities in high jewellery.


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Contents

Beauty

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Hair and beauty trends Straight from the runways and backstages, we bring you our edit of the hair and beauty trends to adopt over the coming months.

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I WOKE UP LIKE THIS

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On a daily basis models and celebrities post images of their workout routines, MOJEH investigates why this shift from elusive to intrusive has occurred.

272 SUMMER LOVIN’

Take note from our edit of beauty picks to keep your tan going strong after the summer sun has set. Be the girl with the golden touch.

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SUPERFOODS: MYTH OR MISUNDERSTANDING?

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What does it mean to be super? MOJEH investigates the label ‘superfood’ and discusses the super, or not-sosuper, myths and misunderstandings.


Mojeh

Contents

Culture

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THE MOOD BEHIND THE MELANCHOLY We sit down with American music maestro, Lana Del Rey, to chat about her new album and those emotionally charged lyrics.

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THE SISTERHOOD OF THE TRAVELLING BAG Keeping it in the family is vitally important for Italian brand Ferragamo. We speak to other female duos, who too value the concept of family business.

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A Subtle climb to the top

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We discuss career success, the City of Light and fatherhood with Hollywood’s rising star, Bradley Cooper.

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314 MY TOKYO

See the city of Tokyo through the eyes of designer Olivia von Halle. It’s her haven and her home at heart.


Letter

Editor’s

No Strings

Attached A

New Life, photographed by Cecile Bortoletti

City Limits, photographed by Riccardo Vimercati

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s I watched my favourite designers showcase their work to the masses during last February’s Paris Fashion Week, I realised how uncomplicated things have become, which is certainly no bad thing. A little less than a decade ago, we would view a collection and the first evaluation would be on its design and the second on the woman soon to be wearing it – who she was and how that wardrobe would enable her to portray herself to the rest of the world. But that is no longer the case. Women, for the most part, have empowered themselves to a point where their very way of being is enough, no decoration and certainly no armour needed. Today we enjoy fashion in the purest of forms, with an appreciation for good design, craftsmanship and functionality. More importantly, we wear it and not the other way around. Putting things to the test, when talking to Jack and Lazaro, of Proenza Schouler-fame, we asked who they have in mind when designing. ‘We do not design for any type of woman. We always say that making clothes is only half of it. We need the woman to take the garment home and make it her own to really complete the process and make it come alive,’ they revealed. As it should be, the power is left in the hands of the wearer. Then when speaking with Céline’s Phoebe Philo, we found that she encourages the same sentiment, and more. ‘I have no problem with a woman wearing anything as long as she has chosen to wear it for herself,’ she told us. ‘But I do think there are too many images of women that are sexualised and too many examples of women dressing for other people and disempowering themselves in the process.’


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Letter

Editor’s

Here she hits the nail on the head… As do this season’s collections. We see little evidence of frills or fancies, instead the clothes speak to us with liberation and sophistication, for today’s woman doesn’t need a uniform or a disguise, she lusts after fashion, simply for the love of fashion. From a 21st century take on Twiggy and the Normcore revolution, to new power pastels – autumn is about hand-picking trends purely because you want them in your wardrobe. No hidden connotations, no subliminal messaging and certainly no strings attached. Turn to our trend pages and see which ones talk to you. But first, take in our cover shot. Here our model stands as an entirely blank canvas ready for any trend that comes her way, decorated only by Cartier’s Panthère pieces – emblems of a free and fearless beauty whose might and power outruns anything and anyone. It was for these very reasons I embraced our body feature, I Woke Up Like This. In a small but very real glimpse at where our industry is at, we look at the models who are showcasing their au naturel faces and tough workout regimes to the world. What a turnaround from a decade ago, when these very same women were asked to project visions of perfection, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. In a reaction to those who demanded the latter, we’re now seeing the reality – the body that takes work to achieve, the mind that shines just as bright as any other and the lifestyle that appreciates the simpler things – and it’s a million times more perfect than it’s ever been. We’ve taken all these sentiments and ran with them throughout the issue. In society we talk to Livia Firth, a woman who uses her business accruement, firm friendships and style sentiment for the greater good. In accessories we look at the improvements being made to the women’s watch industry and through fashion and beauty you’ll find those very trends to enjoy this winter. Finally, in The Sisterhood of the Travelling Bag, we look at an eclectic set of women, all hand picked by the Ferragamo family, each noted for the passion they hold for their industries and the love they have for each other. Like everything else we’re celebrating this season, it is simple, pure and exactly as it should be. Follow me on Twitter and Instagram @Mojeh_I and write to me at editor@mojeh.com

Mojeh Izadpanah Editor in Chief

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Pretty Little Things, photographed by Amber Gray


Our tribute to women. Pavonina

Pavonina. A brilliant tribute to women in all their facets. Glash端tte Original introduces a new collection of glamorous timepieces that combine seductive femininity, timeless elegance and highest precision. Timepieces from the Pavonina Collection are available at selected retailers. For store locations please refer to: www.glashuette-original-pavonina.com.


Snapshots

Editor’s

The Blue

Époque September means two things: the start of a new season for our wardrobes and a prelude to another on the runways, because in fashion we are constantly moving forward. Welcome in international fashion weeks with prints and fabrics that make you smile - try some quilting with Chanel and a playful pattern from Charlotte Olympia. Keep it clashing cool with a controlled colour palette of light and dark blues.

1. CHLOÉ @matchesfashion.com | 2. EMPORIO ARMANI | 3. JIMMY CHOO | 4. GIAMBATTISTA VALLI COUTURE @ matchesfashion.com | 5. BVLGARI | 6. DEREK LAM @matchesfashion.com |

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Snapshots

Editor’s 7. CHARLOTTE OLYMPIA @ Harvey Nichols Dubai | 8. ANITA KO @stylebop.com | 9. MESSIKA | 10. chanel | 11. OSCAR DE LA RENTA @net-a-porter.com | 12. ROLEX | 13. VERSACE @stylebop.com

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Inspiration

fendi

Pin Interest Sat on the front line of fashion, one thing was clear: brooches are back. Grab a classic pin and pull it in to the 21st century. Fancy a frog from Vhernier or a can from Chanel? Playful pieces guarantee that brooches are anything but boring.

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1. CHANEL | 2. DSQUARED2 | 3. CHANEL | 4. TIFFANY&CO | 5. VHERNIER

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NINA RICCI

Purple Me Pretty It was backstage at Nina Ricci’s show that we completely fell for the soft and very workable palette of dusty lilac and rich purple. Add some deeper shades of chocolate brown and small dashes of a lighter pink to take this autumn colour mix from one scene to the next.

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5 1. COLLECTION PRIVÉE | 2. CÉLINE | 3. FENDI | 4. DIOR | 5. CHANEL | 6. ROGER VIVIER

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© 2014 CHLOe. ALL RIGHTS ReSeRVeD.

Fashion avenue, The Dubai Mall - Dubai avenue aT eTihaD Towers - abu Dhabi chloe.coM

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Mojeh

The Vault T is for Tiffany

What’s in a name? If it’s Tiffany, then it means everything. Francesca Amfitheatrof, the newly appointed design director of Tiffany & Co. has taken a new direction – with a new heart – giving Tiffany’s a new feather in their diamond encrusted cap. ‘The design pays tribute to the Tiffany name,’ she says. ‘But there’s also a verticality and intensity to the letter itself that I associate with the energy and optimism of New York. And there is a lot of New York in Tiffany T. This is a place of courage and reinvention that constantly sparks creativity.’ The Tiffany T Collection is simple, yet chic. With pieces made from 18-carat gold – rose, yellow and white – and sterling silver, there’s a modern appeal to each design. Like the shape of the letter T, the collection encompasses the global traveller who visits great cities and lives life on the edge.

In The Beauty Box Plush Preening

With note after note perfumed by Hermès, our bath time ritual has changed forever. Through time, the world-renowned French house has given us the means to incorporate luxury into every daily necessity. From a spritz of perfume to silk-lined pillowcases, the daily mundane is now magnificent. The Le Bain collection holds host to an array of exquisite shower treats. From made-to-order soap to hair and body products, each has a sensation to savour all day. It’s plush preening made easy. With the desirable smell of pamplemousse rose, to sweet scents of mandarine ambrée, to a deeper eau de narcisse bleu, you can discover a cologne-inspired aroma to suit you. Like applying perfume, the soapy scent lingers for a long time and leaves your skin feeling supple and soft. You’ll be pampered, preened and perfumed to perfection, every day.

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Style

5 Minutes With… Famed for clashing colour, prints and her impeccable sense of style, Paris-based stylist Elisa Nalin is every inch the street-style star. We speak to the Italian about fashion and more.

What’s the first thing you do in the morning? I kiss my son. What are your everyday wardrobe staples? A masculine silk shirt in a simple baby blue colour. Men’s trousers (a bit short on the ankle) and a pair of flat shoes, lately I’ve liked to wear loafers or slip-ons. Do you have an everyday motto? Be nice to people, smile and never give up! What items of clothing will you be investing in over the next few months? I don’t like to spend too much money on clothes or accessories, but when I do I always end up spending my money on Dries van Noten and Pierre Hardy shoes. What does style mean to you? It’s about personality and being yourself. I don’t follow trends. It’s important to have a natural and effortless charm, elegance and as Parisians say, ‘Un certain je ne sais quoi’. In what ways do your Italian heritage and culture influence your style choices? I think it is in my DNA, in my roots and blood - always feeling the need to be well dressed, not for others but for you. As Tom Ford once said, ‘Dressing well is a form of good manners’. Do you have ‘rules’ you follow for styling? Not really. Maybe there is one: I always have to believe in the woman I’m dressing and in the image I’m creating of her. When the model or actress is all set and dressed, I’m always asking myself, ‘Do I believe in her? Would she dress like that?’ In what ways does Parisian culture influence your day-to-day dressing? It’s certainly an endless sort of inspiration. Paris is so varied in all of her styles. All you have to do is sit down at a café and watch people passing by - I love to do that!

Do you have an all-time favourite outfit? No, I change everyday depending on the mood I wake up in the morning. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received? Follow your dreams and listen to yourself.

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Images courtesy of GoRunway

What emerging fashion talent from Italy and Paris should we be keeping an eye on? Lahssan is a very talented and creative young man in Paris. His trenches are to die for! And Marco de Vincenzo from Italy, I thought his last collection was gorgeous.


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Insight

Turn Around It’s honoured to actresses who are at a ‘turning point’ in their careers. As MaxMara crowns Rose Byrne with its Women In Film Face of the Future Award we speak to the Australian beauty about her chosen path.

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Image courtesy of Max Mara | Stylist: Penny Lovell | Make-up: Jessica Nedza | Hair stylist: Franco Gobbi

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ose Byrne is not your typical Hollywood starlet. She’s more than a little modest and surprisingly shy. With cascading caramel locks and deep hazelnut eyes, she’s exotically interesting. It comes as no surprise that she’s often featured on best-dressed lists the world over. Today she is opting for a less-is-more ensemble for her petite frame, she oozes insouciant cool. This deep-rooted interest in fashion started from a young age. ‘I love meeting the stylists, being invited to fashion shows and reading fashion magazines. It’s been a hobby of mine since I was very young, when I stole clothes from my mum and sister and experimented to create my own style,’ she recalls. Although, Byrne is the first to admit that her taste has been a work-in-progress. During her teenage years she dyed her hair full-on blonde and experimented with her style. ‘I feel so ashamed whenever I look at certain photos from that time – I had this craze for fluorescent T-shirts!’ she bashfully admits. Now, Byrne prefers to fuse masculine and feminine styles for a more modern take. Her laidback demeanour appears to stem from her childhood. Growing up in Balmain, Sydney, she was the youngest of four. Her mother was a schoolteacher and her father worked in market research. It is her tight relationships with her siblings and parents – two sisters and a brother – that help to keep her grounded from the dizzying heights of Hollywood. In 2000 Byrne won the best actress award at the Venice Film Festival for her role in the Australian film The Goddess of 1967. But it’s understood she didn’t believe for a second she would win, so left before her name was announced. She was probably just as aghast winning the WIF Award too. This lack of confidence from Byrne reads as though she is completely terrified of falling into the trap of becoming arrogant like many an actor before her. Maybe it’s for this reason that she currently resides in New York City with her boyfriend, actor Bobby Cannavale. ‘I prefer it here to L.A. because it has a


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Insight

lot of places for walking, and I’m a great fan of walking. It’s also far more stimulating and varied. L.A. is too centred around Hollywood.’ When she isn’t on set, she prefers to keep things simple and stress-free, admitting to a rather boring lifestyle, saying, ‘I prepare breakfast, go for a short walk, maybe meet a friend for lunch and then go on various errands: shopping, laundry, that kind of stuff.’ At 35, Byrne’s career is pivoting from indie films and supporting roles to Hollywood blockbusters. She has come a long way since her debut role during her teens. After being spotted by a casting agent she was given a part in the film Dallas Doll with Sandra Bernhard. After which came a role in Australian soap Echo Point, when she was just 15. It is apparent that she is utterly ambitious and driven by her passion for the world of acting. After moving to the USA in the hope of living the American Dream, she landed roles in two major productions. First, Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones, and then she played Briseis, a slave and lover to Achilles (played by Brad Pitt), in Troy. Although, originally she had auditioned for the famed role of Helen of Troy, but lost out to German actress Diane Kruger. In the past, Byrne has encouraged the importance of female solidarity and supporting other actresses and this mind set is evident in her choice of roles. From her appearance in Marie Antoinette, directed by Sofia Coppola and starring Kirsten Dunst, to her brilliant performance as Helen in laughout-loud comedy Bridesmaids – a role which had everyone asking, ‘Who’s that girl?’ Now, Byrne’s career is reaching new heights, and at the end of this year, she will star in the long-awaited musical Annie alongside Jamie Foxx and Cameron Diaz. Performing in an all singing, all dancing role – it is set to be another big hit for her. This climb to the top failed to go unnoticed by Nicola Maramotti at MaxMara Group. Picking her as a winner of WIF came with ease. ‘Rose defines a modern and contemporary woman with a sophisticated and refined image and she shows passion and talent for what she is doing. She is a real woman who embodies style and character. She just wrote me a handwritten letter to thank me for the Milan Fashion Shows where she came to visit,’ she says. When the premiere for Annie comes around it will be through the help of her stylist Penny Lovell (who often travels with her) that red carpet perfection will be achieved. ‘Penny and I work out my different looks depending on the occasion, it may be work but it’s also one of the most enjoyable aspects. At the end of the day they’re just garments, so they shouldn’t be taken too seriously,’ she said of working with her stylist. And it is plausible that Byrne doesn’t take anything too seriously: not herself, work or life. As the WIF Award diligently recognised, she’s at a career turning point and savouring every moment of it, with her feet firmly on the ground.

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Mojeh

Name to know BEDOUIN

A wardrobe for all occasions is the goal of many a style maven, and a feminine play on masculine design lends a cool elegance, which creates a capsule collection of easy wearability. Channel this season’s sports luxe trend with London-based label, Bedouin. The designer, Central Saint Martins graduate Andraya Farrag, combines her years in the Middle East with the training she received whilst working with design houses Marchesa and Matthew Williamson. Inspired by her travels, Farrag draws on the knowledge of embroidery and the stunning fabrics that she sourced whilst in India, creating pieces that merge eye-catching fabrics with an athletic edge. Simple silhouettes are combined with feminine accents, think petal pinks and sheer accents. Launched in January of this year, keep Bedouin in your little black book to stay ahead of the fashion pack. You will be glad you did.

style note LIZZIE MCQUADE

The tastemakers-that-be say it’s time we brought headwear back into our everyday wardrobes, so let us introduce London-based milliner Lizzie McQuade. A broad spectrum of shapes and trends will sit pretty and complete any look as the winter months allow us to make the most of strong accessories. Whether you go for a whimsical flower crown or a striking wide brim hat, these pieces were not made to be hidden away in your wardrobe, but worn out and about on all occasions. A soft mohair beret will keep you warm when you head to cooler climes, or opt for a glamorous turban-style wrap that will pull a look together at home or on holiday. Lizzie McQuade already counts catwalk shows and fashion magazines within her impressive CV, and boasts a list of private clients who clamor for her bespoke hats. Will you be one of them?

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The Queen of Green She may stand beside her Oscar-winning husband Colin Firth, but ‘the queen of the green carpet’ has successfully shone the spotlight on eco style. We speak to the creative director Livia Firth about her campaign and the future.

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ince rejecting big labels for more sustainable fashion, Livia’s pioneering ways have had the fashion world’s big names following suit. With the UAE holding its first eco-friendly fashion show earlier this year and Middle Eastern designers like Mochi and Maryam Omaira moving towards a more eco-friendly manufacturing and design process it’s becoming a necessity within every aspect of daily life – no matter which industry. And it’s no easy feat being the leader of the pack. Having once told the Telegraph newspaper she was ‘a born campaigner’, Livia appears to be more than well suited to the job. Why did you start the Green Carpet Challenge? I originally launched the Green Carpet Challenge (GCC) to raise the profile of sustainable fashion and address the huge issues of its sourcing and supply, by harnessing the power of the red carpet – dressing celebrities and style-setters in ethical dresses, gowns or suits. Since we launched, the GCC has involved all the top international fashion designers and an array of A-list celebrities at the biggest red carpet awards worldwide. In what ways has the GCC evolved? Today, our focus is a bit less on red carpets and more on supply chain and tailor-made projects for brands which want to start a sustainable journey. It is very exciting to have created such a dynamic project which has managed to pair glamour and ethics to raise the public profile of sustainable fashion. We now have the ‘GCC Brand Mark’ (GCC®) as well, which, within a year, has become recognised as one of the principal brand marks in global fashion and a guarantor of sustainable excellence. What is your main goal? Our goal is to assess the environmental impact of textiles and to also connect the story of where an item of clothing has come from with the consumer. By working with all of the key people within the industry, we are able to create compellingly powerful, bespoke product-led initiatives that allow us all to think about our fashion in a different way. In what ways are you managing to achieve this? Our first big step towards this was at London Fashion Week last year, where we unveiled our very first GCC Capsule Collection, featuring five of Britain’s leading fashion designers - Christopher

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Bailey, Christopher Kane, Erdem, Roland Mouret and Victoria Beckham. The collection was launched at an exclusive event at Apsley House during London Fashion Week in September 2013 and was co-hosted by Anna Wintour, Natalie Massenet and myself. The Green Carpet Capsule Collection was exclusively retailed through Net-A-Porter and was a complete sell out. We have our next very exciting Green Carpet Challenge Event happening this September – it is going to be huge! How do you manage to persuade designers to get involved? If you hear Tom Ford’s story he will tell you that I never take ‘no’ for an answer and never give up until I have someone on board. A lot of the high profile collaborations are decided over a simple cup of coffee with a designer. Sustainability has started to become mainstream – lots of brands realise it is not a box to tick on the balance sheet anymore, but that it is the only way forward. What does each collaborator bring to the GCC? Each collaboration has been very different and special in its own way. Armani was the first ever luxury designer to create a stunning GCC gown for me which I wore at the Golden Globes in 2012. Valentino was the first one to do a GCC gown for a celebrity (Viola Davis) and Lanvin designed the GCC gown for Meryl Streep when she won an Oscar. Gucci was the first brand for which we created an entire new supply chain of leather and launched the GCC brand mark with a beautiful handbag collection made with the first ever zero deforestation certified leather in the world. NetA-Porter was the first ever retailer to commission an entire GCC collection with stunning designers such as Victoria Beckham, Burberry’s Christopher Kane, Erdem and Roland Mouret. And then there is Chopard… An incredibly inspiring story of a true leader in the luxury jewellery sector, Caroline Scheufele (Chopard’s creative director and copresident) who decided to go to the bottom of her supply chain – the gold mines – and change the lives of the small community miners in Colombia. Not everyone has been behind the GCC – how do you deal with that? I never take ‘no’ for an answer and never give up until I have them on board!


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Society

Colin Firth and Livia Firth wearing a recycled dress by Gary Harvey at The Oscars, 2011.

What role is Chopard playing? You now have a leader in the industry, Chopard, which is acting directly at the starting point of their supply chain. Chopard is not buying something different – they want to be part of something different! How beautiful it is that today is possible to connect directly the glamour and beauty of a Chopard high jewellery piece directly to the artisanal community in South America? Making this connection is so powerful. The smiles on the faces of the men and women when

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they learned that Chopard was going to transform the way they dig gold is a testament to the difference that luxury brands can truly make to people, showing that although they live half way around the world, they are treated as equals. It’s priceless. When you add pieces to your wardrobe, what do you look for? In fashion terms a very simple question that my friend Lucy Siegle said, ‘When you are about to buy something, ask yourself, ‘Will I wear it at least 30 times?’’ If the answer is yes, then go ahead. You wore a recycled dress by Gary Harvey to the Oscars in 2011. When you look back at this moment how do you feel? Whenever I walk the red carpet in GCC I always feel proud. The Gary Harvey dress was a very special project as it was made from eleven repurposed vintage dresses. It was so beautiful – I felt like Cinderella. Where do you see the GCC in five years’ time? I hope that we are continuing to change the fashion world through the marriage of ethics and aesthetics, and delivering a more equitable relationship for all people involved in the supply chain, who we must ultimately view as equals.

Image courtesy of John Shearer

Recently, you have been involved in the production of pieces – why was this important? We now know that being a profitable business and a good stewardship of environmental and social justice is not only possible, but it’s a must-do. In the case of jewellery, when I first learned that there are 15 million people using little more than stone age tools to dig precious metals in the world, I was both shocked and determined to find a champion to help do something about it – and Caroline Scheufele is definitely a champion! She immediately saw that this was a community they could and had to support. Now through the unique partnership with ARM (Alliance for Responsible Mining) Chopard is helping the mining communities that had been forgotten and pushed to the margins and give them a leg-up – a legitimate place in society.


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Memo

Thoughts from the Top Finding and forging a friendship is all about the laws of attraction: Who is like me? As supermodel Karlie Kloss and Ken Downing, fashion director and senior vice president of American luxury store Neiman Marcus, form a fashion friendship MOJEH asks him to reflect on his companionships within the fashion circle. With a great philosophical mindset, Ken Downing shares his fashion memo. It is often said opposites attract. A far less true statement now, than decades ago. Today, it is far more modern, and certainly more common, to find like minded individuals enjoying the camaraderie of compadres with shared interest. Gone are the days when industry insiders shunned the thought of fraternising with the proverbial enemy for fear of the risky realities of sharing secrets of their success. Too much talk could find ones head on the chopping block! Discretion was dignified. Secrecy was serious business! With the onset of the Internet, secrets are rare, if all but a memory. In a world where work is a 24/7 proposition, we find our associates our friends, our friends our associates. Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, amongst the other social media litter, have all but changed the landscape of social continuity. Today, talk is tantamount amongst competitors and sharing secrets is socialisation. Secrets are now the new press release; you share insider information when you want it to become public by morning. Like groups gather, share and revere in the exchange of knowledge, with little fear of risking exposure, with hopes of gaining it. People of similar taste congregate, for the pure pleasure and sheer enjoyment of sharing similar interests. The realities of life seem far less daunting, more manageable and much more interesting, when you can celebrate, and commiserate with individuals who have a complete understanding of what it’s like walking through life in your shoes. We find comfort in individuals who have a mutual understanding, compassion and absolute passion for

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Ken Downing and Karlie Kloss for Neiman Marcus

what we hold most dear. More than ever, knowledge is power, the power clique is the new social circle. I am no exception, I find safety in numbers and relish time spent with the creative and the clever and consider them kindred spirits. As a citizen of the world, my social circle is surrounded by the talents and the tastemakers of our time. Friendships that foster familiarity offer reassurance and confidence, which bring relevance and authenticity to our time-pressed lives, And who doesn’t covet a conversation about one’s similar passions and preoccupations with a confidant, friend or foe. Let’s face it, lawyers like lawyers, artists like artists, designers like designers, models like models, I find that I like them all. The basic fact is, like likes like! Collaboration is key, shared interest are more interesting than time spent surrounded by those socially studied. Socialisation is the integration to your chosen industry and field that fuels your imagination. By Ken Downing


Insider

Style

My Stylish Life

R aju and S i m ran S hro f f

Raju and Simran Shroff in their home, photographed by Sarvenaz Hashtroudi.

Raju and Simran first met in Bangkok before getting married two years later, they now live in Dubai with their two children. Raju was raised in India and moved to the Middle East at the age of 16, where his family has taken an active hand in building some of the cities’ most burgeoning industries, including textile and property development. His work on the Young Presidents Organisation is widely celebrated having set up the EO chapter. Simran, on the other hand, is viewed as one of the region’s tastemakers through both her own style choices and her talent in spotting brands right for the regional women – she has hosted numerous trunk shows for designers, such as Judith Leiber and Isharya. Together the couple are treasured members of their community.

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S i m ran shro f f One piece of advice I would give anyone: Keep spreading kindness | Motto to live by: What goes around comes around | Hidden talent: I love to sing | Best childhood memory: A family cruise around Singapore | Most loved fairy tale character: Rapunzel | One thing that money can’t buy: Good health | Most treasured belonging: My cocker spaniel, Trixie | Most desired belonging: The first ring bought for me by my husband | Early bird or night owl: Bit of both | People I look up to: My mother and my husband | How I like to relax: Eating cupcakes and playing with my dogs | What I collect: Good books and great recipes | Best discovery: Teatoxing and Bounce! | Favourite book: The Fakir by Ruzbeh N. Bharucha | Best home comfort: My pups waiting to greet me at anytime of the day | Favourite restaurant: La Serre Bistro | Favourite place in the world: Definitely Dubai | Favourite city: Los Angeles | Favourite artistic expression: Gift wrapping | Make-up must haves: Crème de la Mer concealer, Mac Prep and Prime and Bobbi Brown Shimmer Bricks | Signature scents: Love by Chloe, Dot by Marc Jacobs and Jour d’Hermes | Go-to beauty brands: YSL, Shiffa, Mac, Crème de La Mer | Best moisturiser: Shiffa’s Healing Balm | Favourite hairstyle: Curls and more curls! | Fresh faced or full glamour: Fresh faced | Bad hair day product: Moroccan Oil | Style icon: Queen Rania of Jordan, she has a rare combination of beauty, poise, style, intelligence and grace | Describe your style: Elegant bling | Best purchases: Pink bags and pink lipsticks | Favourite designers: Dolce & Gabbana, Peter Pilotto, Missoni, Valentino and Oscar de la Renta | Ultimate accessory: My husband at my side | Most treasured wardrobe item: My Judith Leiber collection, especially the new Empress bag | Heels or flats: Flats | Favourite pair of shoes: Valentino Rockstuds and my sneakers

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Favourite past-time: Lazing around and watching the TV | Beach or city break: Beach, the Maldives | Favourite city : Los Angeles too! | Favourite time of the year: Autumn | Gadget I can’t live without: Blackberry and my iPad | Most used iPhone app: Bloomberg | Favourite coffee: Cappuccino | Best breakfast food: Eggs Benedict | Watch TV or read: TV | Favourite sport: Golf | Favourite car: Bentley Continental GT Sport | Best suit brand: Bespoke from Regal Stitch | Go-to shoes: Tod’s | Signature scent: Tom Ford | Most worn watch: Patek Philippe

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1. SHIFFA, Healing Balm | 2. Queen Rania of Jordan | 3. CHLOE, Love | 4. VALENTINO | 5. THE FAKIR, Ruzbeh N. Bharucha | 6. Los Angeles | 7. Tod’s | 8. The Maldives

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Exclusive

Designer

Designer 2.0 What do you do when you have four opportunities a year to capture a market of fashion hungry women who could be anyone, anywhere and at any one time? At Proenza Schouler, you push the boundaries of design and technology and make up your own rules.

‘We do not design for any one type of women,’ Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez of New York based fashion house Proenza Schouler tell us. ‘We think that it is really inspiring to see how women around the world put our clothes together, bringing a sense of their own culture to their individual style,’ continue the pair. For young designers like Jack and Lazaro – born in Tokyo and Miami respectively – a globalised world has meant that they are exposed far further afield and at a much faster pace, than their predecessors. Meaning that in design they have access to cutting edge technology and therefore muster up avant-garde and

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experimental collections. In business, well, the world and its women are quite literally their oyster, but only when tackled in the right way. ‘In general, we feel that to our generation ‘business’ is not a bad word like it, perhaps, was back in the day,’ say the designers. ‘We try to focus on craft and creation and primarily design, but ultimately we understand that this is a business as well and the better we do in the latter the more freedom and resources we will have to create what is in our heads.’ Not a small task, but one that in just 10 short years the designers have excelled where many others have failed. They’ve faced a market more cosmopolitan, well informed and fastidious than ever. Instead of crumbling under its vastness, the pair has imagined collections that speak to it with just the right sentiment. ‘When we started Proenza Schouler we were so young – 22 years old and just kids. We had absolutely nothing to loose,’ say the designers with the same freethinking and fearless attitude that has sketched many a great thing from their generation. ‘The idea was to try this for a while and see where it went. If, in the end, we could do it, and if not, we would just look for a job with someone else. 11 years later and we are still here with 150 employees working alongside us.’ The pair met at Parsons The New School for Design, in New York, and after graduating they teamed up with the house’s now chief executive officer Shirley Cook, who would help shape them into an internationally recognisable brand making in excess of


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Designer

$60million (if rumours are correct – the brand keeps its finances private). ‘Things are now moving way faster than they used to. With the advent of the pre-collection and so many different product categories things have gone from 0-60 in just a few years, every season you must put in more effort than the last,’ adds Cook. Eleven years ago, however, fashion wasn’t moving so fast, or at least sales weren’t. The world was in the midst of an economical crash and ostentation and excess were forbidden words on the runway. Proenza Schouler defied the odds and garnered the attention of the masses. Their first collection in look complied with the minimal aesthetic of the early Noughties, with wardrobe basics such as leather coats and skinny tailored trousers transformed into luxury items. ‘Women today need clothes that are a mix of sophistication and practicality. They want something that they can both dress up and dress down,’ say Jack and Lazaro. By custom developing fabrics and pushing the boundaries of what luxurious surfaces could mean, prints quickly became their ‘thing’. The 2005 summer collection, for example, blended

Hawaiian prints with moody hues and sat atop typically couture-esque fabrics and later their spring 2013 collection melded endless patterns and colours inside simple silhouettes. ‘We tend to keep the silhouette fairly standard and neutral because women know what does and doesn’t work for them, so instead we focus on using technology to create textiles and surfaces that have never existed before and that are both luxurious and truly new,’ they say. Adornment is found in the fabric and not on top of it – experimental and novel thinking, but still sitting within the barometers of what the modern woman yearns. A storyteller’s answers to the stealth wealth generation. ‘The way a woman takes one of our pieces and incorporates it into her own

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Designer

wardrobe is always incredibly exciting for us,’ they went on to say. But it could so easily have gone the other way. Jack and Lazaro came up in the industry by the way of Marc Jacobs and Michael Kors respectively. But the playing field for them, as a young house, was very different from their mentors when starting out. ‘The fashion world is much more densely populated these days. Everyone has an opinion and everyone thinks they can be a designer,’ says Jack and Lazaro. ‘A lot of the barriers have been broken, which is a great thing, but it also makes for a lot of noise.’ In terms of barriers, what should be considered is today’s consumer and where she can be found. 15 or so years ago – before

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technology and travel allowed for such vast outreach – the Michael Kors of the industry were still crafting collections for a very specific audience with very specific needs, today however, designers could be speaking to anyone, anywhere. ‘To rise above it, one must have a much more precise, clear vision than was needed 20 years ago. There is no room for error,’ they say. Being cutting edge or avant-garde isn’t enough, you need to somehow remain relevant. An attitude that is certainly not lost at Proenza Schouler. Take the most recent offering for autumn/winter this year, where the pair sculpted pieces from thick jacquards in multi-layered prints of psychedelic hues including electric blue,


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Designer

burnt orange and seaweed green. ‘We were inspired by the colour, abstraction and spontaneity seen in the work of artist Ron Nagle and by his use of colour blocking and the mixing of different surface textures,’ the pair explains. ‘We also looked at industrial materials like carpet pads, insulation and moving blankets. Abstract things that have nothing to do with clothing or fashion excite us.’ Silhouettes were powerful with rounded shoulders, cinched waists and geometrically cut skirts – if it wasn’t for the leather and slight slick of grunge, the pieces were little short of couture worthy. Whether worn head-to-toe or taken as separates and open to the wearers own style interpretation, the look is completely kick-ass. This design DNA taps into the idea that their customer may at any one moment be down the road from their New York studio shopping at 121 Greene Street’s flagship along Soho, while another is picking up her beach essentials from Thailand’s Club 21 and someone else is in Jeddah’s Etoile choosing her work attire. ‘We always say that making clothes is only half of it, we need the woman to take the garment home and make it her own to really complete the process and make it come alive,’ they explain. Also reflected in the eclectic list of celebrities choosing to step out in their pieces – from actress Keira Knightley, known for her

Brit-cool style, to Californian ‘surferchic’ Kate Bosworth and then the ever eloquent Cate Blanchett, to name a few. ‘We’ve never designed for any particular kind of woman. It’s more an attitude that is interesting to us, a kind of confidence and strength. It is fascinating to travel around the world and see how different women take the same piece and wear it in completely different ways, bringing their own sense of style to the conversation.’ Travel and life experience are two very important components for the designers – always looking forward and never back. ‘Our inspiration and all of our designs come from our own experiences, it is almost autobiographical in a way. We find it endlessly inspiring to travel around the world and borrow bits and pieces from different cultures to try and create something that is both very personal, and yet somehow feels universal.’ They like to be where their wearer is. With an almost overnight success – Proenza Schouler’s senior thesis collection was brought in its entirety by Barneys New York – things have only sped up since. You have to question what the designers make of it all. ‘Trends come and go and sometimes your ‘it’ and sometimes you’re not, but if you stay true to your vision, fashion has a way of returning to your side,’ they say. With five Council of Fashion Designer of America Awards under their belt – all voted for by industry

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Designer

members – including Womenswear Designer of the Year in 2007, 2011 and 2013, it’s fair to say that so far these boys are ‘it’. ‘That feeling of total satisfaction is not something we let ourselves feel. We know you are only as good as your last collection and therefore work tirelessly, alongside our team, to produce the best work we can season after season. We’ll have time to look back and be happy about all that we accomplished when we’re 100.’ ‘You must constantly produce newness. This is both one of the most beautiful things about fashion, how it reflects the immediate moment so intensely, but also what can burn some people out,’ they say. Is ‘burning out’ something that Jack and Lazaro worry about? ‘We draw our collections at our cabin in the woods, it’s really important to get away from the hustle of New York to really get into one’s own head and be able to think clearly. What we do is very fast paced and exciting, but the only way to sustain that kind of energy is to be kind to ourselves once in a while and really escape it all.’ And when they can’t be found scouring the planet in search of their next inspiration or hiding at their cabin in the woods sketching it all down, you

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can find the design stars way off the beaten track. ‘Sometimes you just need a break! We tend to escape to our farm in Massachusetts often as the antidote.’ For an internationally recognised fashion house that knows no borders and has grabbed technological advancements by the horns, a farm in Massachusetts is quite the juxtaposed landscape. ‘We design clothes that are sophisticated but can be worn with a sense of ease and a little imperfection – so that unexpected contrast is always important to us!’


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Style

Look At Me Fashion shows are no longer just about the clothes. We’re now as interested in the people wearing them. MOJEH looks at the perils of having famous faces on the runway. By Emma Grace Bailey

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Burberry Prorsum

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y now the entire world knows who Cara Delevingne is. What she does, what she likes, where she goes on holiday, her friends, sisters and rabbit, (follow @cecildelevingne, it’s actually kind of cute). She’s almost untouchable, and as such garners as much attention for her presence on the runway as the designs that she’s wearing. In some cases even more. Take the Giles AW14 presentation in London for example. A wild affair that saw strobe lighting and a set by East London magnet James Jeanette turning the whole event into an effortlessly cool imitation of a Dalston super club, all showcasing a collection peppered with birds of paradise, giant bugs and darkly monochromatic ensembles. But that’s not what people remember, that’s not what I remember from sitting in the audience. What everyone really recalls from that show, is the surprise of seeing Miss Delevingne sauntering down the runway taking selfies and filming the audience on her iPhone as she went. Her trademark ‘sticking-my-tongue-out-at-the-camera’ pose was recorded for all to see as she traded in the traditional model walk for her ‘wild-child’ bump and grind instead. The audience was gripped, we loved it, but none of us were looking at what she was wearing, and doesn’t that slightly defy the point altogether? She’s not the only one, of course. The entire tribe of Burberry girls, Suki Waterhouse and Jourdan Dunn included, are waited for with baited breath. And it doesn’t help when the likes of Waterhouse bring in tow their equally, if not more, famous partners. This season actor Bradley Cooper sat front row, brushing shoulders with Anna Wintour, and I’ll hedge my bets that more smartphones, eyes and cameras were pointed in his direction than anywhere else. Kendall Jenner and her debut at Marc Jacobs in New York got much the same reaction. What will she look like? How will she walk? Heaven forbid will she fall? These were the questions on everyone’s lips, not what Jacobs had been painstakingly pulling together for the best part of six months, and this furore followed Jenner throughout the fashion month, to a point where shows were more highly anticipated for her brief appearance than anything else. And so we must ask if the celebrity of models is getting a little too out of hand? We’re all for these girls being more than the mere coat-hangers of yesteryear. They’re not objects, they’re people and as such deserve to express themselves as much as the designer for whom they’re walking, but when the purpose of a show is to present a new collection to the press, the buyers and the customer at large, it is a little distracting if the person wearing said collection is arguably the most talked about person in the world. In a society so fuelled by celebrity mania, it’s of no surprise that the runway has morphed and adjusted with the times - publicity is publicity after all and when has that ever been a bad thing? But for those of us who really do have a love affair with the clothes, this shift towards a focus on the faces rather than the fashion is a little disheartening. For as much as we all like catching a glimpse of the latest It-girl or model de-jour, front row should be about studying the wares of next season, for that review isn’t going to write itself and ‘Harry Styles sat next to Alexa Chung’ doesn’t make for the most interesting of reads.


Note

Style

The Short of It No longer just a trend, but a way of life, flats are fast becoming just as common as heels on the runway. But do they demand as much authority as their towering predecessor? Net-aPorter’s fashion director, Holli Rogers, takes a moment to reflect on the burgeoning trend.

Giorgio Armani

Heels naturally lengthen the leg, elongate posture and push you to stand taller. Whether it’s in the form of a super sharp stiletto or a chunky platform, a heel has traditionally provided women with an extra boost in confidence, as well as their height. In the past, the selection of flats was far sparser and very masculine, forcing women who wanted to appear feminine to resort to heels. But that is now long in the past, with designers offering a superb array of flats and flatforms, which has helped encourage women to feel just as confident when their feet are firmly on the ground. Merging masculine looks with fun prints and styles, brands like Marni have really led the revolution with cool, powerful flats. And with this trend emerges a new confident woman, who allows

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herself to be playful because, of course, a truly buoyant woman doesn’t need accessories or extra height to make her feel more self-assured. For FW, trends include pointy-toe flats, flatforms, creepers, brogues and even sneakers. And this growing choice encourages women to feel more and more free when choosing their office footwear. Heels will always be a popular option, but now we’re just as happy to pull out a pair of chic flats, which is where the difference now lies. The very nature of trends means that there will always be new options, but flats are here to stay. And, what more, it’s a long distant stereotype that assumes women who wear flats aren’t as powerful or senior as those in heels – and style has certainly helped fuel this societal shift.


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Collection Angel

for ENGLISH AD

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for ARABIC AD


Note

Style

Paul Smith

Calm Down Dear London’s wild. London’s crazy. London’s experimental. Or so we thought. AW14 marks the dawn of a new attitude and MOJEH was there to watch it rise. By Emma Grace Bailey

Walk down any East London street at the moment and you’ll notice a number of things. Firstly, it’s overpopulated, but that’s inevitable for any city center haunt that’s had as much press as Shoreditch. Secondly, everyone looks decidedly more comfortable than they used to. Comfortable in their footwear, their dresses, their skinny jeans and their jumpers. As for the relaxed wares, it’s a shift in attitude for the city’s fashion elite that’s been a long time coming, and as it hits London it filters out to us as well. Last season we had the emergence of Normcore, which is more prominent on the streets of NYC than London and the UAE, but summer still saw a steady stream of comfort driven pieces infiltrating our wardrobes. Birkenstocks were back in full force. The once ‘ugly’ shoe of elderly gentlemen and middle aged women graced the feet of every budding fashionista going - ours included - and trainers replaced heels left right and center. Garments were looser, less form-fitting and restrictive and the idea of teetering along, dressed up to the nines for dinner with friends, just seemed down right ludicrous, and that’s where this season comes in. Sitting front row at the shows in London, it was clear to see that AW14 would be just as nonchalant as its predecessor. Offering up an array of collections that looked to the practicalities of the wearer rather than their inner showgirl persona. For Paul Smith, this meant night-wear - or night-wear worn as day-wear, with all the coziness that our most beloved set of pyjamas can bring us. Set to the sixties vibe of Fleetwood Mac, effortless night shirts and bottoms

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hung loosely from the shoulders and hips, adorned in paisley, wallpaper inspired prints or masculine looking stripes. All-in-one varieties tied at the waist like dressing gowns and backstage the designer’s buzzword for the day was ‘wearable.’ It was. Tom Ford had a similar approach. Eschewing his usual OTT aesthetic, this season took a more sombre mood, with sensible, everyday pieces taking to his usually sequin laden runway. Upping the ante with a decidedly luxurious range of fabrics - everything from crocodile skin in fiery red to golden fox and oodles of velvet - the cuts were simple, loosely fitted and anything but outlandish. Most noticeably we had an abundance of roll neck jumpers, dresses and jackets in the softest of finishes - a key and reemerging silhouette for the season that could be spotted making an appearance throughout the week. House of Holland, J.W. Anderson and David Koma all reinterpreted the turtleneck, a wardrobe faux-pas for so many years that is only now seeing a re-birth. Holland’s red, white and black varieties peaked out from beneath shirts, dresses and jackets galore whilst Anderson supersized his for a statement effect. Koma meanwhile, went for the subtle approach - elongating necks with strips of black atop sheer bustiers or layering black on top of black, on top of black. The effect? Warming. For this is a garment designed to keep the frost at bay during the winter months, nothing more nothing less, and its reappearance on our radar means fashion is finally taking note of life’s little trials and tribulations. Long may it last.


IN FOCUS

Fashion

Modern Lady Think like a lady when you take to the streets with the socialites and editors. Mix up classic shapes with eye-catching prints to keep it interesting so the camera is firmly on you come fashion week. Keep your look in-check with pared back beauty that is polished to perfection.

Olivia Palermo

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1. CARTIER | 2. GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI DESIGN | 3. CAROLINA HERRERA | 4. MAX MARA | 5. CHARLOTTE OLYMPIA @Harvey Nichols Dubai | 6. CHANEL, Le Vernis in Atmosphere


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Fashion

IN FOCUS

Uptown,Downtown Seen pounding the pavements between shows, models are known for mastering the art of off-duty cool. Make like the genetically blessed and add an air of uptown cool when dressing down. Be sure to maintain your glow even when working in 10 places at once with beauty musts such as an elixir and a heavy-duty balm.

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1. LA MER, The Lip Balm | 2. EMPORIO ARMANI | 3. MICHAEL KORS | 4. KENZO @stylebop.com | 5. MULBERRY | 6. 3.1 Philip Lim @Harvey Nichols Dubai | 7. CAUDALIE


AVAILABLE AT - BURJ AL ARAB, WAFI CITY, MALL OF EMIRATES, MINA A’SALAM, DUBAI MALL, ZABEEL LADIES CLUB, ZABEEL SARAY, JEBEL ALI GOLF RESORT AND SPA, LE MERIDIEN JUMEIRAH, JUMEIRAH BEACH HOTEL, ROYAL MIRAGE HOTEL, MADINAT JUMEIRAH, WWW.DAMASJEWELLERY.COM 04-4270336 FACEBOOK.COM/DAMASJEWELLERYARABIA DAMASJEWELLERY TWITTER.COM/DAMAS


IN FOCUS

Fashion

Ice, Ice Baby Crisp colours keep it clean. The all-white look may be high maintenance, but it is worth the work (and dry cleaning bill). Offset your look with pretty in pink shades and adorn yourself with elegant jewels. There is nothing wrong with dressing to feel like a princess.

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1. BOUCHERON | 2. CHRISTIAN DIOR, Lipstick in Rose Tutu | 3. ROGER VIVIER | 4. SANDRO | 5. GUCCI @bysymphony.com | 6. L’AFSHAR | 7. NARCISO RODRIGUEZ, Narciso Eau De Parfum


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pop Shrinking violets need not apply. The front row is a place to stand out, with your sartorial choices being played out on the world stage. Now is the time to break out the most daring of dresses and play with your beauty look. Make your pout pop and bring out your inner fashion diva.

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IMAGE BY TEJAL PATNI


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SHOPPER Shopping can be a sport, so make sure you dress comfortably to compete. As the new season takes hold and we head out to update our wardrobes, turn to Chloé’s sliders to provide you with endurance. Just don’t forget your wallet – Chanel, of course.

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1. BOUCHERON | 2 & 4. CHANEL | 3 & 5. CELINE | 6. ISABEL MARANT @net-a-porter.com | 7. NOON BY NOOR @ Saks Fifth Avenue

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OASIS Escape the city this Eid, with sandy tones adding a touch of the desert to your wardrobe. Go on a voyage with Noon By Noor’s playful print, or stand out with sunset shades from Fendi. Wherever you venture, keep it glamorous with Gaydamak’s drop-down earrings, which are sure to turn heads.

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1. BVLGARI | 2. GAYDAMAK | 3. D2SQUARED | 4. ETHAN K | 5. versace | 6. MULBERRY | 7. TEMPERLEY LONDON @bysymphony.com

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ARABIAN

NIGHTS As the Middle East steps up to the style plate with Fashion Forward next month, it’s time to take hold of the wealth of talent from the region. From the more established Zuhair Murad to Dubai-based Zayan The Label, add a touch of Middle Eastern glamour to your eveningwear.

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1. SHAMSA ALABBAR @ Symphony | 2. ZUHAIR MURAD | 3. CHARLOTTE OLYMPIA | 4. BOUCHERON | 5. ELIE SAAB @boutique1.com

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6. ZAYAN THE LABEL @ S*uce | 7. NOON BY NOOR @ Saks Fifth Avenue | 8. KISMET BY MILKA | 9. GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI DESIGN

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girl Who’s that girl? With a debut role in Lars von Trier’s experimental film Nymphomaniac with Shia LaBeouf, to being chosen as the new face of Miu Miu’s AW14 campaign, the future is shining bright for Stacy Martin. We speak to the model-come-actress about fashion, film and much more.

Photographed by Steven Meisel for Miu Miu

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ith her whip-like frame, long chocolate-brown locks and silky porcelain skin, it’s not hard to see why this 23-year-old is finding fame at her feet already. And her Franco-English demeanour – an insouciant cool mixed with an impeccable sense of style – has not failed to go unnoticed either. From sitting front row at Chanel, Rag & Bone and Miu Miu, the fashion world has found its new rising star. But Stacy openly admits this hasn’t always come with ease. ‘To be honest I’m not sure I had a sense of style when I was a kid. My relationship to fashion was, let’s say, quite ‘non-existent’. I would mainly wear baggy jeans and T-shirts,’ she remembers. ‘Over the last few years I’ve found my own way of having a relationship with fashion that’s true to me and matches what I do day-today. My favourite experiences and items are those that allow me to still get along with my day without having to think about what I’m wearing.’ Born in France, Stacy moved to Tokyo with her parents (her father is a hairstylist) at the age of seven before returning to her home country during her teenage years. At eighteen she ventured to London to study media and cultural studies at London College of Communication. It was during this tenure she signed with Premier Model Management. Stacy openly admits she undertook modelling to pay the bills and to become financially independent, rather than through a burning desire to strut the runway. Subsequently, she has appeared in several fashion spreads and publications. More recently, Stacy has become the face of Miu Miu’s autumn/winter 15 campaign. Shot with famed photographer Steven Meisel in New York City, she recalls an intimate setting of a tailor-made alternative universe. ‘It was a great experience, the way Steven Meisel shoots is unlike any other photographers I’ve worked with before. He creates a very intimate atmosphere and has such a sensibility in the way that he works. We shot the autumn/winter campaign in New York, but once we were in the studio it was almost like we were in a different world, almost like being in a Jean-Luc Godard film in the Sixties,’ says Stacy. ‘Steven shoots so quickly because he knows exactly what he wants,’ Stacy continued. ‘Which made the shoot so pleasant and easy for me.’ When pressed for any interesting experiences on set, ‘Anything interesting? Well, apart from a

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few surprise visits, I would say that the tarot card reader was pretty cool,’ Stacy muses. With a dark and sombre veil falling over the final photographs, Stacy’s beauty shines through, in focus. Presenting a new type of Miu Miu girl: she’s utilitarian. The autumn/ winter collection allows normality to reign and she has a few items on her wish list for the season ahead. ‘I like the pure fun of Miu Miu and how feminine the items are. Yet they still have a boyish and cool touch to them. I love the chunky knits, leather skirts and the sheep coat from this collection,’ she says. It’s not just the fashion experts who have noticed her chameleon-like qualities but the film industry wants her too. After her debut film role in Lars von Trier’s Nymphomaniac, starring Charlotte Gainsbourg, Stacy’s film career is off to a flying start. With an A-list cast in tow, Stacy plays the role of Gainsbourg’s younger self. The similarities between the two are uncanny, from a likeness in appearance and fashion taste, to Stacy’s resemblance to Seventies fashion icon, Jane Birkin, Gainsbourg’s famous mother. With several nude scenes with Shia LeBeouf and tackling a role of many dimensions, it appears that Stacy is a natural. By modelling whilst studying at university, fortunately she earned enough to be able to pay for acting lessons at the Actors’ Temple where she still studies. Unlike many other acting students before her, she hasn’t had to slog it out by receiving knock back after knock back after attending auditions. She’s one of the lucky ones. Over the past few months, Stacy has been working on a new project in Italy. ‘I’ve recently been shooting in Rome with Italian film director Matteo Garrone on his new film The Tale of Tales. The film is based on a collection of fairy tales by 17th century author Giambattista Basile,’ she says. The year ahead for her is set to look like a busy one too. ‘I’m also due to shoot with British film director Ben Wheatley for his new film High-Rise. Later this year, I have Nicolas Saada’s new film Taj Mahal. So there’s lots going on and I feel extremely privileged to be working with such talented people,’ she says, humbly. With her uncanny resemblance to Jane Birkin, this ‘Girl with the Fringe’ (who is more than a little mysterious), is only getting started. It’s not luck, but her multiple talents and cross-culture allure that are shining through. Now that you know who she is, you won’t forget her name.

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Image courtesy of Ellen Rooney/Robert Harding World Imagery, Corbis.

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A Beautiful

Pick a flower for you. As fashion brings us to a field full of the unknown, stop to smell the flowers. It’s not a walk through the Secret Garden, it’s a roaming escapade through blossoming gardenia. With this season’s beautiful new mood in tow, designers are letting us build our bouquet, our own way.

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utumn’s ready-to-wear runways were laden with cosy, comforting and cascading ensembles – a true ode to normality. Prada led the way with cuddly shearling covered coats. As ever, contrasting the tough with the delicate in a way that only Miuccia Prada can fully achieve. Sacai let us see that bigger is always better with their take on an oversized biker classic with Mongolian-lamb. It’s the perfect wintry weather comforter to accompany your knitted jumper. The runway was claimed by the knitting nimbleness of a multitude of designers. Michael Kors’ fisherman’s cardigans and sweaters gained momentum, along with Celine’s knitted numbers accessorised with luxury mink muffs, muted autumnal hues were the cream of the crop. Taking from the past and placing into the present were Sixties silhouettes. Designers breathed a new life into the forgone era of dressing by slicing, cutting and deconstructing. Valentino opted for a swirling and popping configuration of graphics – swinging in, swinging out. Keeping things short, but sweet Saint Laurent produced glittery dolly bird dresses with a touch of rock ‘n’ roll. In Paris, Louis Vuitton brought forward A-line cuts, thigh-grazing hems and leather-bound riding boots in an eye-catching formation. It was a welcomed beginning for Nicolas Ghesquière as onlookers waited with baited breath for the new creative director to produce his own magic. The inspiration may have been Sixties, but the vision was 21st Century. With the most decadent of detailing fashion flounces into a forest of fantasy. Sweeping through the forest floor Dolce & Gabbana brought squirrels, owls, foxes and fairies to the runway. With a plethora of embroidery and gilding, nature’s glory was in full view. Mary Katrantzou took a single, streamlined silhouette and made it sway. Instead of her usual surplus of print-on-print, Katrantzou brought forth a solo slice of symmetry with symbols – panelled down the front of dresses. It was a new direction and a new chapter for the designer. Tonal greens and deeply rich blues with autumnal browns were laid bare – moving from the forest and swinging into the jungle. From Balmain to Burberry Prorsum, a glam military vibe was prevalent – without a threatening aesthetic – but in-your-face boots were mandatory. And the colour combination of the season goes to a vibrant hue hybrid of green and pink. A fun fusion that has filtered down to many a collection over the past few months. It was in the City of Lights that this shade took force from Dior to Balenciaga, it was a stand-out shade. In concurrence, Gucci and Altuzarra played with rainbow-

brights in abundance. It would appear there’s nothing quiet about this season’s artistic vision. The light bulbs were constantly lit from one fashion capital to the next throughout fashion season. From Olivia Palermo to Kim Kardashian, the rising style stars were the ones doing the star-gazing. Perched on the front row were the chicest of crowds (as expected at the most glamorous showcase of the fashion calendar). It was at Dior on day two that the starlets were really drawn to the light – from Emma Watson to Jennifer Lawrence to Marion Cotillard – the highest earning actresses in Hollywood were ready to watch the fairy tales unfold in front of their eyes. Change, diversion and progress were at the forefront for Haute Couture. Across the board designers were in unison, for once. Memory, modernism and a makeshift were prevalent. Karl Lagerfeld leapt from decade to decade with his historical references for Chanel, then concluding at a more youthful vision. At Dior, Raf Simons leaped from the past into the future. Taking Marie Antoinette-inspired corsetry and giving it a very modern appeal. As designers wrestled with a creative struggle between old and new, a very futuristic and eloquent endgame was present. Fantasy and romanticism was still the cornerstone of the collections. Each dress evoked: dream a little dream of me. The realm of couture allows the make-up artists to weave a dreamy story or two as much as the designers do. Couture placed plenty of focus on the eye – a continuation of readyto-wear. Stirrings from Film Noir musings and shaped eyebrows were in competition with Cara Delevingne and Audrey Hepburn - screaming as a trend to trial for many. Super long and super sleek hair fell beyond shoulders – from Versace to Elie Saab – fairy tale-esque locks were a must. If long hair is out of reach, petite ballerina buns and loose chignons were pulled together from make-up artist Peter Gray at Armani. Time after time, the nude or peach-hued lip paired with bright dewy glowing skin was the fuss-free, but luminous look. A space-age lustre of bright white was cast over faces. Marc Jacobs and Alexander McQueen dusted faces to near transparent – fusing theatrics, futuristic musings and anonymity. In September, the leaves fall to floor and the weather heads towards transformation. It is a new beginning for all, as autumn arrives before us. These months are perfect for reinvention or starting a new vision with fresh eyes. Change always allows for the adoption of a beautiful new mood. This season is a game of two halves: refreshingly down-to-earth or out of this world. The decision is in your hands, pick wisely.

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1. TEMPERLY LONDON | 2. ALBERTA FERRETTI | 3. DOLCE&GABBANA | 4. ERDEM | 5. MARY KATRANTZOU | 6. RODARTE | 7. SACAI

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Fashions come and go and the Sixties are here again, with a twist. Designers sought out shapes of the swinging sixties in updated prints and fabrics. Groovy baby.

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1. CHRISTOPHER KANE | 2. DSQUARED2 | 3. EMILIO PUCCI | 4. LOUIS VUITTON | 5. SAINT LAURENT | 6. TORY BURCH | 7. VALENTINO

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Attention! 1

As military does the rounds in your wardrobe this season, take on a look of authority and never miss a step.

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1. BALMAIN | 2. SACAI | 3. BURBERRY PRORSUM | 4. FENDI | 5. ISABEL MARANT | 6. JONATHAN SAUNDERS | 7. LANVIN

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Pick’n’Mix 1

Fabric exploded on to the runway, with designer’s using as many varieties as possible. The more, the merrier.

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1. CHANEL | 2. BALMAIN | 3. GIVENCHY | 4. JONATHAN SAUNDERS | 5. MARNI | 6. RODARTE | 7. SACAI

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Whether you make like Miu Miu or channel Chanel, sportswear isn’t just for the gym as autumn styles evoke some energy.

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1. MIU MIU | 2. ALEXANDER WANG | 3. ASHISH | 4. BALENCIAGA | 5. CHANEL | 6. FENDI | 7. TOM FORD

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Never Normal 1

Normcore needn’t mean boring. Instead the subdued style allows for ease of dressing with clean cuts and unfussy fabrics. Effortless perfection.

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1. HERMÈS | 2. ACNE | 3. CHRISTOPHE LEMAIRE | 4. HAIDER ACKERMANN | 5. JIL SANDER | 6. LACOSTE | 7. MICHAEL KORS

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Jumpers are luxurious when mixed with sumptuous silks and soft cottons. This is loungewear that will go to waste indoors.

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1. RALPH LAUREN | 2. ACNE | 3. JONATHAN SAUNDERS | 4. MICHAEL KORS | 5. MIU MIU | 6. NINA RICCI | 7. SONIA RYKIEL

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SKY HIGH 1

Hemlines soared this season so put your best leg forward and choose which way you want to wear your slit.

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1. PRABAL GURUNG | 2. CHALAYAN | 3. CUSHNIE ET OCHS | 4. LANVIN | 5. MARY KATRANTZOU | 6. MOSCHINO | 7. RALPH LAUREN

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Beam Me Up 1

Look to the skies and reach for the stars this winter, as designers take an intergalactic spin on the runway. No need to hide from this alien invasion.

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1. AKRIS | 2. ALEXANDER MCQUEEN | 3. CHADO RALPH RUCCI | 4. DIANE VON FURSTENBERG | 5. FENDI | 6. PREEN | 7. RODARTE

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Introduce a touch of the slopes. Shearlings add a shaggy vibe to an otherwise sleek style whether you’re spending your winter in snow or exploring cold city sights.

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Little Red Riding Hood has swapped her signature shade for a host of colours and prints. When it comes to capes, there are no rules.

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1. Michael Kors | 2. BORA AKSU | 3. emilio pucci | 4. SAINT LAURENT | 5. PETER PILOTTO | 6. VALENTINO | 7. Issey Miyake

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We All Scream For

Ice Cream Pastels work as well for winter as they do in spring. Now all we need to know is, what’s your flavour?

1. MARC JACOBS | 2. GUCCI | 3. ERMANNO SCERVINO | 4. BLUGIRL | 5. JIL SANDER | 6. RALPH LAUREN | 7. VALENTINO

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Fancy Look to the woodlands for inspiration. From moss green to evergreen, find a clearing in your wardrobe for the forest.

1. HERMĂˆS | 2. ALBERTA FERRETTI | 3. CEDRIC CHARLIER | 4. DAKS | 5. MAX MARA | 6. valentino | 7. EMILIO PUCCI

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Cold Coordinate your neutrals to add interest. The head-to-toe white of summer is replaced by stony shades that add warmth to frosty tones.

1. COSTUME NATIONAL | 2. chloe | 3. ERMANNO SCERVINO | 4. GIAMBATTISTA VALLI | 5. JC DE CASTELBAJAC | 6. MARC JACOBS | 7. HELMUT LANG

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Cool Stand out on the street in coca cola colours. This trend is not for sipping, instead gulp down in head-to-toe.

1. HELMUT LANG | 2. ANTHONY VACCARELLO | 3. PAUL SMITH | 4. PRADA | 5. TOM FORD | 6. VICTORIA BECKHAM | 7. VERSACE

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Night Plunge into darkness as moody hues take hold. Stepping away from black and into the deep blue sea keeps us fashionably afloat.

1. MARNI | 2. ALEXIS MABILLE | 3. BLUMARINE | 4. CHRISTIAN DIOR | 5. CAROLINA HERRERA | 6. CHLOÉ | 7. LANVIN

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Sapphire and amber and emerald, oh my! Take inspiration from your gems and envelop yourself in jewel tones.

1. ANTONIO BERARDI | 2. PREEN | 3. ALTUZZARA | 4. CHRISTIAN DIOR | 5. GUCCI | 6. DIANE VON FURSTENBERG | 7. CAROLINA HERRERA

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Classic Step away from black and into warmer shades. A burgundy base brings your look forward into autumn.

1. JASON WU | 2. ELIE SAAB | 3. ERDEM | 4. FRANCESCO SCOGNAMIGLIO | 5. GIAMBATTISTA VALLI | 6. RICK OWENS | 7. SONIA RYKIEL

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An Endless Summer 3.1 Phillip Lim aw14 It’s clear that Phillip Lim’s muse is soleil this season, as referenced in his warm, cultured pieces. Highly accustomed to trends, today’s woman also wants tangible clothes – a glossy bias-cut, silk dress of mid-length is one of many accessible looks hinting at a new direction for the brand. Cool, easy and chic. In a reimagining of winter, Lim swaps typically heavy materials with neat, light layering. His women aren’t afraid to play with bright hues and this season she’ll infuse splashes of colour with contrasting leathers, adding dimensions to her work and city wear. Pastel tones form the base of this collection – particularly successful on thick shearling coats with patchwork designs – adding softness to otherwise sharp pieces. Whilst maintaining a flattering silhouette, Lim also experiments with bold, statement pieces. Take the knee length sequin jacket. Embedded with purple, silver, navy and gold, the piece can be worn zipped up as a dress in warmer climates or thrown over jeans and a shirt for an office-to-event look. The same sequin design is used in smaller patchwork versions across skirts, tops and accessories. Beautiful enough for evening wear and understated enough for daywear. Bold

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yellow and tangerine coloured flowers reminiscent of the Sixties add flashes of summer, even when printed on darker pieces such as black tailored trousers and dresses – these art deco visions add a jovial energy when the collection hits a slightly sombre note (a conscious design decision from Lim we’re sure). In line with many other collections this season emphasis is placed on the waist with chunky elasticated belts and oversized bombers that finish just above the hips. Layering is used in the same fashion with shirts falling below small knit jumpers or thin polos neatly tucked into high wasted skirts. Waterfall knits offer a feminine touch to otherwise boyish pieces with cascading designs from the neck downward. For evening, a black full-length gown with a silk body and chiffon skirt takes centre stage, and when teamed with delicate sandals it will make for the perfect dress on a brisk desert evening. In a collection that marries the rich attitude of winter with a light summer aesthetic, Phillip Lim flawlessly blurs the lines between seasons and unintentionally envisages a collection made for the Middle Eastern woman.


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With Ease Vanessa Bruno AW14 Away from the heavy fabrics that show up in most autumn collections, Vanessa Bruno offers an easy amalgam of simple, slinky clothes to charm the modern woman, showcasing the austere purity that’s ever present in her aesthetic. Toned-down, sheer fabrics are presented in a muted palette wavering from slate greys, to dusky browns, crisp whites and deep blues. Hemlines are short and silhouettes remain unfussy – all in-line with Bruno’s signature casual but luxe Parisian style. The simple grey embroidered shift dress – barely scraping the thigh – can be paired with high-heeled pumps for a prim office look, revealing legs in a demure way. Mesh dresses, decorated with delicate chiffon straps, are available with a sheer peplum top shielding a sweetheart neckline and a finely ribbed skirt. Alternatively, a simpler design has a ballerina feel and still holds enough elegance to make for an evening outfit. The eyelash lace hemlines are so sensual and delicate, designed with gauzy textures

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to be worn with a turtleneck, anorak or a leopard print wool trench coat. Even the sports pieces are made from wispy, billowing fabrics, in pastel colours with zip detailing to reinforce the strong feminine accent on sportswear. What is simple in silhouette, Bruno makes up for in innovative textures, spinning classics into statements with the chiffon topped bomber jacket or the oversized wool pockets and decorative seams. Carnal pieces include the fish scale mini dress – perfect with a pair of mules for an effortless evening look. And in the darker hues, a tulle black tutu skirt, with a cascading frill hemline, showcases a sophisticated take on girly. Even the sequined dresses and skirts don’t take away from the functionality of this collection where minimalism remains a strong focus. Pure in construction and simple to throw on either as head-to-toe Bruno or mixed with other brands, these are clothes for the wearer to do things in. Uncluttered, uncomplicated and music to our ears.


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Tailor Made Hugo Boss AW14 What happens when a designer with a signature feminine style heads up a predominantly masculine label? Well, in Jason Wu’s first season designing a complete collection for Boss, a brand to only now debut at NYFW, powerful looks, that ere on the side of sensuality, are encouraged. We’re expecting a new Boss woman to emerge, confident, glamorous and endearingly darling. With options ranging from a simple grey dress and a sand coloured wrap jacket, to black leather separates, Wu does the modern woman’s work-wear wardrobe exceptionally well. Where florals and femininity might be his forte at his namesake label, here tailoring has become his strength. Take the grey v-neck dress with a midriff cutout – great at highlighting the shoulders and waist. Or the double jackets in which he layers a shorter tux over a buttoned-up blazer – a future emblem for the brand perhaps? A slightly subdued seductiveness hinted at through some of his cuts – low neck lines, figure hugging

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skirts and panels of sheers – offers some serenity to the otherwise controlled pieces. Stripped graphics are reimagined in haphazard orders, jolted, unsystematic and sort of fun. Pants in the collection are long and lean with a slight bagginess, worn perfectly with flats for a tomboy feel. Camel toned, militant inspired outerwear comes belted and cinched at the waist. And this is a collection not short of shimmer either. Breaking up a colour palette of charcoal, camel and ivory, are sparkling dresses. They are soft and light – made from sequin embellished silk, especially impactful in a brightly coloured pastel pink. Covetable bags designed with exotic skins like python leather will complete looks for the Boss woman on the go, while mannish loafers are a constant reminder of the juxtaposition between hard and soft. This is a strong offering, saluting the brand’s masculine history, but revised for a modern woman who is not afraid to show her softer side.


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In The Mix Altuzarra AW14 For Joseph Atluzarra, it’s always been about the women wearing his clothes – what she needs to carry her through a busy day. A huge triumph for a designer who manages to awe his audiences with forward thinking designs, straddling functionality with innovation. Culture also sits high on his list as shown through artsy-tapered pieces – an ode to the work of Sheila Hicks and her Seventies textiles – in which he’s morphed into light halter tops and dresses, exposing a bare back. Alluring, strong and charismatic in either its bright or muted down versions mixing pinks with sand hues. The collection fluxes from dynamic pieces like these to cleaner wrap dresses in silver coloured silks. Outerwear graduates from a double faced navy cashmere wrap coat with a cobalt blue shawl collar, to more structured forms in shearlings and thick

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camel coloured wool. The signature horizontal slits, which received recognition back in autumn/winter 12, exemplify a French sensuality. Other standouts come as tailored pieces – whether a sheath dress, or a long, lean pant suit – revealing contrasting satin lining of coral orange, fuchsia and red. Organic furs, like the intarsia minks work well in creating his high-impact clothing. The best part about this collection? Its ability to be layered, and then layered some more. An oversized leather trimmed fleece thrown over a grey streamlined cotton dress or a sandstone coat on top brightly coloured tweed twopiece. Not forgetting the accessories: art-deco twisted wiring in the form of bracelets, metal chokers, kneehigh boots and work-appropriate shoe boots. These pieces are future icons that work perfectly today.


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in focus

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Giambattista Valli

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Modernity

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Moving with

It’s like two opposing forces trying to come together. Over the past few seasons the world of couture has tried to change and progress – but can it ever be truly modern?

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hen the world witnesses a change or division, society will usually follow suit and reflect this evolving mood and the world of fashion will usually react to it. Or, with division comes unity. This is, perhaps, why this season a pivotal moment occurred: all designers had the same goal, for once. During Paris Haute Couture AW15 the word modern was on repeat. At Dior, creative director Raf Simons, said, ‘I was interested in the process of finding something extremely modern, through something very historical.’ In concurrence, creative directors at Valentino Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli stated, ‘We were thinking about how memory can become modernity.’ Designers were looking at their collections with a fresh and new perspective. Donatella Versace, creative director of Atelier Versace was completely direct and thorough in her approach, said, ‘I wanted to make couture modern.’ It’s a creative struggle between new and old. Donatella Versace turned to the Fifties for historical inspiration. From the long leather gloves to the sultry side slits on skirts, Versace struck a balance between ‘Donatella sexy’ and the era’s deconstructed elegance. The fluid movement of designs allowed for streamlined modernity, moving from constructed and restrictive jackets and trousers to all-out fringed avant-garde dresses. Paris-based stylist Guillaume Boulez believes there’s good reason for this assembly of a battle between the two elements. ‘I think when people like [Thierry] Mugler or [John] Galliano were designing couture it became a show, a business card for a house like Dior or Chanel – a spectacle to advertise off of,’ Boulez said. ‘Now, in 2014, designers have to modernise the materials and silhouettes by bringing casual elements into the wardrobe. They realised that there is an actual market for couture and the demand is not only from collectors, but from a clientele who will want a ‘sur mesure’ wardrobe.’ Following suit, Simons took a leap, a giant leap. His designs were in such stark contrast the runway was juxtaposed between two halves – wrestling between modernism and historicism. Moving from past centuries with Marie Antoinette-inspired corsetry to ‘here and now’, with tailored court jackets and trousers cut in a very modern silhouette, even sci-fi inspired jumpsuits made the cut. Fusing soft fabrics with a hard historical reference gave the collection as a whole a fresh take. Simons is not one known for looking back instead he makes it his mantra to look ahead, always. Is he telling us this is the only way forward for couture is to fuse the past with the future? At Valentino this sense of design direction and fusion was equally evident on the runway. A pre-Raphaelite influence was showcased through classical

interpretations in the form of goddess-esque dresses paired with gladiator sandals stopping at the knees. In between, were shoulder-covering single shaded dresses with a well-structured silhouette – very modern, very sleek. Lagerfeld cherry-picked his historical references for Chanel, moving from decade to decade to showcase a more youthful collection. Taking lace and covering it in plastic for a regal Russian inspired coat, completing it with casual, but cool sandals. Designers were playing with our historical knowledge, emotions and futuristic visions. What position does this put couture designers in, who have built a reputation on a clear-cut aesthetic? Zuhair Murad and Elie Saab’s clients have come to expect the expected: a couture dream gown. It’s a juxposition of modernisation and escapism. Both designers reclined from entertaining a smooth interplay between old with new. Saab produced heavily beaded ball gown after ball gown – the words ‘casual’ and ‘daywear’ were nowhere to be seen. Instead Saab incorporated an after-dark vibe, with eveningwear very much at the forefront. Murad gave his clients on the front row exactly what they wanted, tradition, with glamorous gowns gracing the runway. It was evident Murad has entered a new creativity zone by catering for the younger generation with a heavily-beaded short and tight playsuit, but he’s teetering on the edge, for now. The history of couture has always brought romanticism to the forefront. It’s the exclusivity factor. Buyers want the oneoffs, the must-haves, the crème de la crème. Do beautiful things need to be useful, functional or modern? The world of haute couture is a dream-maker’s factory. If it moves with modernity will it consequently compete with ready-to-wear, cruise, pre-fall or even high street? The clients want the fairy tale. ‘In general, I feel we romanticise history, fantasise about Marie Antoinette and the 18th Century. Considering the events happening all over the world these days, I think the couture customer is looking for a little dream herself, a little romance in her everyday life,’ says Boulez in agreement. Couture is about tradition: handmade and unique. It has always been a vision of historicism, without modernity. We imagine women of great importance being dressed in such gowns. We imagine her story, her love and her loss. More importantly, we want to be her – in her handmade world. ‘The origin of couture was not only about red carpet worthy dresses, or decadent eveningwear. Couture meant that someone was making you a garment with your own specific measurements as opposed to making the dress yourself,’ recalls Boulez. As the world progresses, changes and evolves, maybe, just maybe, couture should remain the same: In the past.

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Heavily embroidered skirts and dresses in metallic shades were prevalent throughout Chanel’s collection. Hemlines and silhouettes were kept consistently short. Coattails, jackets and skirts hung over shorts – all paired with a sandal. But for Karl it was all about sculpture, as architectural shapes took force.

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Fashion Above: Valentino designers Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli had two themes in mind: ease and youthfulness. As the collection swayed with effortlessness down the runway, a feeling of simplicity was at the forefront. Long shift dresses in cream played with a sense of innocence and were juxtaposed against gladiator-style sandals – wrapping around legs and halting at the knees. Left: It was a feast of red, white and black from designer, Giorgio Armani. Like Chanel, Armani focused in on haute shorts. Displaying frenzy for youth, the entire collection gave off an air of complete careless confidence. It was his swathes of net wrapped around bodies that claimed the spotlight.

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Above: Sweeping long-line coats gave a modern feel and aesthetic to one part of Dior’s collection. Court jackets – with an Edwardian influence – were embroidered and placed against an allout black silhouette. It was streamlined, succinct and extremely sophisticated, but with a fusion of youthfulness. Right: In contrast, silk-jacquard 18th Century dresses with a Marie Antoinette-inspired silhouette were playing ode to a foregone era. A sumptuous and shimmery material, which appeared as light as a feather to the eye, formed each dress. Raf Simons made old look new through the lightness.

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Fashion It is evident Elie Saab refuses to question the traditions of couture. He gave us glamour in all of its glory. Two-tone ombre sweeping gowns graced the runway – all pearlized to perfection. The dresses looked heavy, but sophisticated. It was elegant eveningwear at its finest.

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They knotted, wrapped and tied bows around dresses to aplomb, making it clear that it was all about the bigger the better at Viktor and Rolf. Showcasing a theme of scarlet fever, it was red on red. Dresses appeared heavy, structured and lacked movement. The collection was a well-balanced play between concept and craft.

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Style Up

A Style

Playground

Basma Abu Ghazaleh

Alanoud Badr

Rima & Dina Zahran

One of our favourite parts of each new season is seeing how trends are interpreted away from the runway, especially when the tastemakers in question are the stylish women of the Middle East. From an eclectically minded blogger, to an achingly cool designer and then over to sisters who each bring their own peppy personality to the table, we caught up with four of our favourite ladies for a first look at the clothes they’ll be coveting this autumn.

Photographed by Sarvenaz Hashtroudi

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(Left) Alanoud wears abaya, LADY FOZAZA (Above) Alanoud wears cape, VINTAGE | Blazer, LADY FOZAZA


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Alanoud Badr, designer and blogger of Lady Fozaza How would you describe your style? It’s a bit of rock and a lot of runway. My style has evolved over the years based on how much I’ve grown as a human being and a designer. It tends to reflect my journeys, accomplishments and life lessons. Lately it’s bold and fierce, with a hint of femininity. How has it evolved over recent years as you’ve come into your own? I started with the innocence of pastel colours and flowers as a child, to leather and python as I got older. My style became not only mature in terms of cut but also in terms of colour and fabric. Today it shows a more solid, strong, fierce and edgier self. What AW14 trends are you tapping in to? I really love global chic, tribal patterns and mixing textures together, such as fur and leather as well as wool and some feathers. I recently wore a LadyFozaza leopard and lace patterned blazer and mixed it with a feather and wool shrug on top to add character. I believe fashion isn’t about playing it safe, it’s about playing it smart and keeping it simple yet busy enough to keep you interested. As a designer, how do you approach each new season? I approach a new season with a new trend so that I’m offering a new direction. I believe in creating trends that last more than one season so that women who invest in my blazers invest in a lifestyle, and feel a sense of fashion independence. When working on your own wardrobe at the change of the season, how do you approach it? I tend to build gradually throughout the season and try to go for key pieces that will last me for the whole year, such as that perfect pair of nude pumps or a statement oversized bag. I used to buy the latest must have items but now I look at other things such as quality and usage. Who are your favourite designers and why? Victoria Beckham. I like her transition from a Nineties girl band member to modern day style icon who’s now a respected designer and filling catwalks worldwide which is such an inspiration. Her sunglasses are all I wear. I also love Diane von Furstenberg – she is simply phenomenal and always sets the trends for young designers. What are your thoughts on the fashion industry in the Middle East? It has huge potential and houses some incredibly talented designers such as Zuhair Murad and Elie Saab. Elie Saab is in a league of his own, I love everything he designs, even his perfume. What do you most enjoy about your job? I love being a change in people’s lives and giving back everything I have learnt over the years.

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Rima and Dina Zahran, cofounders and designers of Dinz Clothing Do you always follow trends? Rima: Not at all, I’ll always alter them according to my style and personality. I would hate to look exactly the same as the catwalk. It has to feel like me. How do you prefer to shop? Dina: I like to continually add new pieces because to be perfectly honest I don’t have the self-control to wait for a specific time of year to shop. It’s more fun that way! What’s your sartorial preference? Rima: I like to mix it up. I honestly buy whatever I like, I do splurge on special pieces when I fall in love with something but I also wear a lot of high-street brands. I also like supporting local designers as much as possible. Most of my designer pieces are investment buys, things that I believe can stay in my closet for a long time to come. Dina: I would say mine’s a mix between seasonal and timeless pieces. I try my best to go for timeless pieces – they’re the ‘smart purchases’. But I am obsessed with anything loud and bright and unfortunately these tend to be seasonal pieces that go out of style faster. So as a fair compromise to myself, I try to maintain a balance between both. Why have you chosen these outfits in particular to represent your AW choices? Rima: I’m obsessed with puffy skirts and I’ve always been a really colourful person but lately I’m leaning more towards black, deep gold, silvers and maroons. I’m also a big fan of jeans and this season I’m all about red, there are so many different ways to wear them and they always make a statement. When designing, how do you approach each new season? Dina: We try not to always follow the latest trends as we want the pieces to last in our customer’s wardrobes. We might do something subtler such as focus on shapes and silhouettes that are popular at the time. I get most of my inspiration when I’m relaxed, usually when I’m travelling and a lot of the time just before I fall asleep. Sometimes we also look at fabrics to help inspire us so that we can work on a cohesive collection. What are you most looking forward to for autumn? Dina: I’m so happy that fringe is everywhere, it’s so much fun. I love that we’re in a period of time where almost anything and everything goes in fashion. The tricky bit is making it work for you, which is why it’s so important to personalise a trend and make it your own by choosing the right colours and styles to suit you. You can then make them your own with the smaller touches such as shoes and jewellery – that’s the really fun and exciting part of fashion.

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Style Up Dina wears top, DRIES VAN NOTEN @Harvey Nichols Dubai | Skirt, TAMARA MELLON @Boutique 1 | Shoes, AMINAH ABDUL JILLIL | Earrings, OSCAR DE LA RENTA | Cuff, ASSAD AWAD Rima wears sweater, ALEXANDER MCQUEEN | Jeans, DINZ | Shoes, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN (Image on left) Rima wears top and skirt, MARTIN GRANT @Boutique 1 | Shoes, MANOLO BLAHNIK Dina wears top, DINZ | Skirt, PETER PILOTTO @Harvey Nichols Dubai | Shoes, NICHOLAS KIRKWOOD | Earrings, OSCAR DE LA RENTA (Image on right) Dina wears clutch, DINZ | Cuff, ASSAD AWAD

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170 Basma wears shirt, KAGE | Jeans, J-BRAND | Shoes, NICHOLAS KIRKWOOD


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Basma Abu Ghazaleh, cofounder and designer of Kage What’s your favourite thing about the autumn season? I love that you can go back to basics, layer up, wear oversized clothes and throw on boots. After long summer months in Dubai I always look forward to a new season where I can put aside my summer clothes and wear pretty much anything from my fall closet.

KAGE AW14 collection

Has your style evolved over the years? Yes, I used to like dressing up a lot more than I do now, today I’m much more relaxed. You grow to become more comfortable with who you are, I pretty much dress up depending on how I feel on the day. How do you tend to shop for yourself? I really go through phases. There can be a month where I feel like I need to shop every day and then there can be a month where I really don’t care and don’t want to shop at all. It depends on my mood and how I wake up. Do you shop when you travel? Yes, definitely. I like to look at local designers in different countries and places around the world, it’s more unique and different. I’ll go to the high-end stores when I want to find something that I know will last for a long time, if it’s expensive but it’s timeless, then I can wear it seasonto-season. I’m not the kind of person that will go and buy something because it’s on trend and feel the need to have it. Do you always follow seasons? Not at all and we don’t go by that at Kage either, it’s very non-seasonal. You do find some trends that might be ‘in’ for that time but in general if you purchased something from our collection, say two years ago, you can still wear it today. We are more about where the woman is, what she’s doing and generally she’s going to be in a hot climate. Your collection of shoes is fantastic, what does it say about you? Comfort comes first for sure but I have to say that my shoes are probably the only accessories I have that are never classics, I like fun, statement pieces. What colours do you lean towards? I love neutrals and black for autumn. Tell us about your first fashion memory. When I dressed up my younger cousin Sumaya in a dress and a headband made out of a garbage bag!

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The Point of Philo What if we told you there’s a women out there who knows what your next move is, before you yourself do? Well she exists in the form of Céline’s creative director Phoebe Philo, a woman whose designs signal change.

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t was the second of March this year when we woman wearing anything as long as she has chosen to all gathered at the Tennis Club de Paris on the wear it for herself. But I do think there are too many outskirts of the city, the location of Céline’s images of women that are sexualised and too many autumn winter 14 runway show. The space had been examples of women dressing for other people and morphed into a garden where rich, full-bodied plants disempowering themselves in the process.’ and gardenia stood magnificently in between each of This is perhaps a common understanding today, us, like an indoor orchard. We sat on our seats built but one that wasn’t so widely acknowledged even from woodland materials and pondered, where was six years ago. That’s where Philo came in, one of Philo taking us today? Lights out, music on – Dove fashion’s game changers. The English designer – who by Cymande – and here it comes, another collection lived some of her childhood years in France – took from the designer who, with each season, presents a the helm at the Parisian house in 2008 forecasting lifestyle that we hadn’t yet realised we wanted. that what we needed were wardrobes that stood for Today the existence up for grabs was life itself. With, functionality and power, without being swallowed everything in the room from the mismatched wooden alive by androgyny, or feeling explicitly lavish or flooring to the clothes, overtly minimal, for that reminding us how to live, matter. Her first collection wild and free. The wardrobe was met with a collective Her first collection was met – with emphasis on the gasp of fresh air from the word wardrobe, not just industry; here was the with a collective gasp of fresh pieces – consisted of pared change women had been air from the industry; here back silhouettes from lean waiting for. It felt sexy trousers with slight flares without being sexualised, was the change women had to double breasted coats, minimal but far from dull been waiting for. minus the double and and powerful minus the the breasted. A shrewd manly. Always one for array of fabrics turned the experimenting with fabrics traditional on its head and accentuated the word and shapes – since her days as a Central St Martin’s functional from heavy-duty cottons to unstiffened student in London, Philo was well known for her wools and light furs. Philo later said she imagined novel uses of fabric – heavy silks were cut into bold her women running through fields, ‘wild, tender, capes and dresses, while light leathers were teamed strong.’ The entire set-up was utterly intoxicating. with even lighter wools. These are clothes that hold Women sat on the edge of their seats, liberated and their own on their hangers, built for women who hold ready to run free, if only it wasn’t for the great metal their own in life. Like any good relationship, neither doors keeping this great garden inside. As with each relies on the other, but together, they’re a force to be of Philo’s collections, this is for women who reject all reckoned with. ‘I hope that when women wear Céline frills and fancies and crave real clothes. ‘I guess there they feel confident and strong,’ she says. This was a is a bit of a political statement behind Céline, which style that the designer already channelled through is that we should be teaching young girls to feel good. her own wardrobe choices of subdued colours and I am not a big fan of women being sexualised through clean silhouettes –she was after all championing clothes,’ says the designer. ‘I have no problem with a trainers as appropriate street and office wear long

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Easy Does It, photographed by Michael Schwartz, MOJEH issue 18

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before Lagerfeld and Simons sent them down their with mid-range retailers, the accent was placed back runways. The look signalled independence and on the é. ‘When I started at Céline five years ago, what emancipation. ‘It felt quite clear from the offset I found attractive was that it wasn’t an iconic brand, it about what I wanted to do in terms of fashion – or didn’t have a very strong silhouette or a very famous certainly what I didn’t want,’ Philo told the Financial historical designer, and I found that quite liberating – Times in 2010. ‘I wanted something that felt honest, I didn’t have to follow a path that had been trodden,’ that was a mixture of what I want to wear and how she says. ‘But it did stand for quality – it had never I want to live. I felt it needed to be quite simple and licensed itself out, in the Seventies, Eighties and very honest and very real.’ Nineties, like so many other companies.’ And so But before Céline there was Chloé. Philo had there it was, an almost blank canvas for the ultimate grown from first assistant for Stella McCartney to stealth-wealth designer. LVMH was ready, Philo was creative director in 2001, it was then that her design ready, and more importantly, women were ready. philosophy’s first acted as a catalyst for movement ‘I think it would be unrealistic to think that and change. Her baby doll dresses, floral prints and human beings are not going to have some kind effortlessly thrown-together style offered a relaxed, of worshipping of beautiful people, because they laid-back vibe reminiscent of the swinging Sixties. always have,’ she says. ‘It’s unrealistic to think that the As we faced terrorism and war, Philo took women fashion industry, the film industry, the sex industry back to a time of creativity and liberation. The world are not going to have extreme ideas of beauty as couldn’t get enough – think ‘it’ bags, wooden wedges a way of selling themselves. I don’t really like it and ponchos – and so it’s of little wonder that Pierre- sometimes.’ A sentiment that remains clear in her Yves Roussel, head of the fashion division at LVMH, autumn collection. From the simple elegance of pursued the designer for autumn 2013 to her graffiti two years after she left and African inspired Chloé in 2006. She was on collection for spring of this From the simple elegance sabbatical, concentrating year, Philo’s visions never of autumn 2013 to her on family and balancing lack beauty, instead they life, but if rumours are depict accurate ideals of graffiti and African inspired correct, Roussel travelled it. This season the slightly to London once a week to dishevelled, deconstructed collection for spring of this convince her to take the components such as wisps year, Philo’s visions never lack position at Céline. Plans of fur left exposed on coats, had initially been for an or sleeves falling an inch beauty, instead they depict eponymous brand but the too long, are all emblems accurate ideals of it. heads at LVMH needed of nonconformity and the someone to take on what personal touch – a little was then their sinking ship. human imperfection here And Philo had never been one to lust over visions of and there. Even when you spot what you may believe her own eponymous label anyway. ‘I have an innate to be ornamental detailing, don’t be fooled, nothing fear of fame. I don’t know where it comes from, but I in this collection is crafted without purpose. The have never thought famous looked like a good place use of one earring as opposed to two – insignia for to be,’ she says. ‘I love being incognito and very much independence perhaps, ‘I come as me, not me with value my freedom.’ Like the women who invest in you’? The belt that falls nonchalantly to the side Céline each season, the natural and understated instead of fastening around the body as it should? beauty holds herself with the type of self-assurance You get the idea. that needs very little public recognition. ‘What I really do believe is that anybody – and it Once the deal with LVMH was struck, everything was really doesn’t matter what shape your body is – can to be Philo’s way. ‘I find mediocrity hard. I find that be seductive and sexy and gorgeous and beautiful,’ whole area difficult as I care very much about what says the designer. ‘I use an extreme idea of beauty as I do,’ says the designer. The idea was to make the a way of showing Céline but I don’t believe it has to be French brand appealing for women internationally, like that outside of the fashion show.’ There lies the which made Philo’s demand for a London based point of Philo, and her entire existence in the fashion studio appear all the more reasonable – a feat that world. She shows women the very extremes of their had been turned down by previous creative directors power and potential. And then she leaves it in their Michael Kors, Roberto Menichettie and Ivana Omazic hands to decipher how far they’re willing to take it, who were all asked to move closer to the brand and what are they and aren’t they ready for? It’s never not vice versa. She took the house back to its basics: ever aspirational, it’s inspirational. And nor is it ever all bar one store in America were closed, ties were cut fashion for that matter. It’s a lifestyle, a state of being.

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Embellished Enchantment The beauty has always been in the details. From handstitched perfection to mosaic masterpieces, Chanel has never faltered on the frontline of creating complex couture. MOJEH takes an exclusive look behind the scenes of this season’s Haute.

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Images by Anne Combaz

Mirror, mirror on the wall, who’s the best designer of them all? Karl, of course. Placed on the runway – in front of his audience – were a full terrace, hanging mirror and fireplace. It had been a long-time dream of the designer’s to recreate the apartment that once belonged to well-known architect, Le Corbusier, in Paris. But behind the mirror is where the dream really begins. The masters, makers and their muses start to weave the fairy tale. In a studio in Paris the tempestuous process began. As though studying a map of the world, seamstresses intensely worked on their fabric


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with focus – nimble, steady hands are mandatory. Encased on one finger of these storytellers, is a silver thimble, the choice accessory of a professional seamstress. The very word couture always implies cutting, sewing and seaming – this is now a given. So Karl extended a hand towards moulding and mounting. Mastering a move of creativity is a common occurrence to any atelier, and they conquered his vision. Concrete was the cornerstone of the entire collection. Tiny tiles in the colour and form of concrete were created in armour-like pieces. Yet, with such a heavy substance at the heart of the process, it appeared weightless. That’s the beauty of couture. The mosaic moved through the makers’ hands like water. Miniature granite scale blocks were delicately placed on sheets of sheer fabric – it was a complete contrast of textures. In colours of regal opulence, lavish embroidery flowed. Petite petals were sewn together to showcase a bed of flowers. Like a regal red carpet laced in gold, the detailing was intricate. With a manipulation of fabric, dresses were finished, covered from head to toe in gold beaded clusters. Sculpted and structured with precision every design moved with ease and weightlessness. It was the multitude of substances, textures, elements and movement that made complex couture complete. Like every great fairy tale there’s a beginning, middle and an end. The finale ends on the runway. Designed for the woman who wants to be noticed – and has a high level of appreciation for craftsmanship and quality – couture optimises these expectations on every level. Chanel’s ateliers produced an array of exquisite designs, mirroring one after one, in a dreamy vision.

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All clothes and shoes, JOHN GALLIANO | Socks, FALKE

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Photographed by Amber Gray, Styled by Guillaume Boulez

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All clothes and shoes, LANVIN | Tights, FALKE

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All, CELINE

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(From left to right) Xenia, dress, PAUL SMITH and shoes VIKTOR & ROLF | Madeleine, dress, GIAMBATTISTA VALLI, shoes, WALTER STEIGER and socks FALKE | April, dress, CHANEL, shoes, VERONIQUE BRANQUINOH 185 and socks FALKE | Lidi and Pauline, all, PAUL SMITH


All, ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

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(From left to right) All clothes, MAXMARA and shoes CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN | All clothes, 187 JEAN PAUL GAULTIER and shoes, MAIYET


All, PRADA

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All clothes, BURBERRY PRORSUM | Socks, FALKE | Shoes, WALTER STEIGER

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All clothes, CHRISTIAN DIOR | (From left to right) Shoes, Pauline, DOLCE & GABBANA, April and Lidi, both CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN

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All dresses, DOLCE & GABBANA | (From left to right) Shoes, April, Xenia and Madeline, DOLCE & GABBANA | Pauline, EMANUEL UNGARO | Lidi, DOLCE & GABBANA 192 | Quirine, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN


Dress, STELLA MCCARTNEY | Socks, FALKE

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All, GIVENCHY BY RICCARDO TISCI

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(Clockwise from left) Pauline, dress, BOTTEGA VENETA and tights, FALKE | Lidi, dress, ROBERTO CAVALLI | Xenia, dress, EMANUEL UNGARO | April, dress and boots, GUCCI | Quirine, all SAINT LAURENT BY HEDI SLIMANE | Madeline, dress, CHANEL and shoes, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN

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Model: Lidi Kochetkova and Pauline Goli at IMG Models, Xenia Ryzhkovets and April Mithieux at Marilyn Agency, Quirine Engel and Madeleine Mosterd at NEXT Model Management Hair stylist: Nabil Harlow at B Agency Make-up artist: Yazid Mallek Photographer’s assistant: Julian Bernstein and Gabriel Pruvost Stylist’s assistant: Noemie Ferre Hair stylist’s assistant: Adrien Boukharouba Production assistant: Alexandra Rougier Local production: Olivier Herold Production: Louis Agency

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All, VERONIQUE BRANQUINOH

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Photographed by Cecile Bortoletti Styled by Guillaume Boulez

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Knitwear top, leather skirt, leather belt, necklace and Eternal cognac boots, LOUIS VUITTON

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Dress, leather belt, red doctor bag, sunglasses and Revival ankle boot, LOUIS VUITTON

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Cady dress with velvet and leather ribbons, LOUIS VUITTON

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Suede and contrasted fabric dress, leather belt and monogram boots, LOUIS VUITTON

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Knit top with leather detail, skirt and leather belt, LOUIS VUITTON

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Zipped tweed jacket, tweed skirt and Petit Malle necklace, LOUIS VUITTON

Model: Grace Simmons at Next Model Management Hair stylist: Nabil Harlow at B Agency Make-up artist: Olivier Baille Photographer’s assistant: Jean-Yves Giot Stylist’s assistant: Noemie Ferre Production: Louis Agency With special thanks to the Base De Loisir Des Boucles De Seine.

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City

Limits Photographed by Riccardo Vimercati Styled by Michela Buratti

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Burgundy flannel suit and white pumps with yellow rubber sole, DIOR

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Burgundy double-breasted flannel jacket and red quilted silk dress, DIOR

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Pink double-breasted cashmere coat, black quilted silk dress and Diorissimo flap bag, DIOR

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Bright yellow double-breasted sleeveless wool coat and black three-piece flannel suit, DIOR

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Embroidered black and red quilted silk dress with pink cashmere, DIOR

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Green double breasted laced cashmere coat, DIOR

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Bright blue wool coat, black three-piece flannel suit and Lady Dior bag in grey shiny crocodile, DIOR

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Model: Heidi Mount at One Management Producer: James Jolly Hair stylist: Enrico Mariotti at See Management Make-up artist: Junko Kioka at Joe Management Casting: Roger Inniss at Boom Production, Inc. Photographer’s assistants: Leonardo Ventura and Dario Castillo Production: Louis Agency

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Pale blue striped quilted cotton shirt dress and dark navy double breasted wool jacket, DIOR

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Photographed by Karina Twiss


Trends

Accessory

Hold On Tight Is it an oversized clutch or a strapless shopper? We’re still not sure but either way we’ve embraced the new way of carrying all our necessities. 1. BYBLOS | 2. ERMANNO SCERVINO | 3. FENDI | 4. MSGM

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Trends

Accessory

Geek Chic Socks and sandals have gone from faux-pas to ooh la la. Keep your toes warm and ontrend when you slip on your heels. 1. ALBERTA FERRETTI | 2. BORA AKSU | 3. ERMANNO SCERVINO | 4. DIANE VON FURSTENBERG

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Accessory 2

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Chain Reaction Fashion’s form of armour, wrap yourself in chains to toughen up even the most girly of outfits. 1. CHANEL | 2. LANVIN | 3. PRADA | 4. ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

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Trends

Accessory

Wrap It Up Bring back the 90s. Whether subtle or statement channel a choker with a big, bold and daring twist. 1. BALMAIN | 2. DSQUARED2 | 3. THOM BROWNE | 4. ALENA AKHMADULINA

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Trends

Accessory 2

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Snakes and Ladders Snakeskin has slithered its way back into our hearts. Work it on bags or shoes to stay in the game. 1. HUGO BOSS | 2. GUCCI | 3. SONIA RYKIEL | 4. DSQUARED2

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Trends

Accessory

Convenience Storers Keep your accessories close to home with a quick sweep of the supermarket or perhaps visit the drive-thru on your way back. 1. MOSCHINO | 2. 3.1 PHILLIP LIM | 3. CHANEL | 4. ANYA HINDMARCH

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Accessory 2

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Happy Feet Pedicures at the ready. Feet won’t be hidden over the cooler months as autumn sandals make their way down the runway. 1. MSGM | 2. MICHAEL KORS | 3. LANVIN | 4. CÉLINE

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Trends

Accessory

Climbing Frame Straps snaked their way up ankles so shoes could stay on. How high is up to you. 1. ANTONIO BERARDI | 2. PREEN | 3. MIU MIU | 4. CHLOĂˆ

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Accessory 2

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Ten-Gallon Head Raise the level when it comes to your headgear. What better way to stand tall? 1. CAROLINA HERRERA | 2. GARETH PUGH | 3. DSQUARED2 | 4. DAKS

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Desired

Most

DIONEA ORCINI Your Hand in My Hand

Conjured up by designer Dionea Orcini, the fine jewellery brand of the same name is inspired by mystical and ancient practices. Orcini, who is a seer and a dream-catcher, takes fine jewellery beyond the realm of decoration and into a journey of discovery across the world. Slip on her AmaneĂŠ Palmette bracelet, which follows the art of palmistry from Hindu scriptures, and you may learn the secrets to your future. Or let her handcrafted pieces soothe the soul, with Ayurveda acupressure points activated by healing magnets that are concealed

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below diamonds in the Jaipur collection - alternative medicine at its finest. As you travel across the ancient world, you may wish to pick up a gift for a friend, and what says it better than the Lasya collection. Combining the sacred Buddhist symbols of the lotus flower and the endless knot as a gift is said to form a bond of eternal love and friendship. Or mix an alchemy of MOJEH’s pick of pieces from the Arabesque collection to create a henna effect as they wrap around fingers and wrists. We may not be seers but we predict these pieces in your future.


Desired

Most

PAUL ANDREW Little Black Shoes

Winter weather leans towards a base of black, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that you have to blend in. Add interest with small twists on classic styles to see you through the season and into the next. After years of designing creations for the likes of Donna Karan, Calvin Klein, Narciso Rodriguez and Alexander McQueen, it was only a matter of time before Paul Andrew launched his own eponymous label. With an aesthetic that the designer describes as ‘sexy without severity’, Andrew has become a master of providing women with shoes, which work for the 9 to 5 grind, and beyond. ‘Fit and

comfort are a major priority’ says Andrew, ‘I’m able to ensure perfect balance so she feels grounded and comfortable, even in a 105mm stiletto.’ Whether you work a zebra stripe or turn up the heat in a strappy style, the base of black brings it back down to earth. Encompassing style and comfort as well as an element of fantasy, the shoes are undoubtedly made for the stylish workingwoman. With a penchant for incorporating snakeskin and feathers, Andrew’s shoes are sure to make your feet the talking point. Not even wallflowers will be able to resist.

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Desired

Most

M2MALLETIER Bags of Armour

Colombian duo Melissa Losada and Marcela Velez of M2Malletier have created a handmade collection of structural bags, which draw inspiration from the Minimalist and Surrealist movements. Conceptualised in Barcelona, a city engulfed in culture and stunning architecture, with artists constantly pushing boundaries and experimenting, the Northern Spanish region is sure to have rubbed off on the designers. The bags’ signature ‘needle’ handles provide an instantly recognisable trait, with medieval

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armour and tools being cited as an inspiration for the pair. The powerful pieces are perfect for adding an edge to an otherwise girly look – or why not channel a fierce look head-totoe, if you dare? The modern avant-garde design is offset with clean lines and classic colours that will ensure M2Malletier as a staple investment and not just a fashion fad. Already spotted on fashion favourites, such as Emma Watson, the brand won’t remain an in-the-know secret for very much longer. Guess the cat’s out of the bag then.


Strikes Couture

Special

Watch

When The Clock

In stunning fusions of grey, blue and pink steel, Dior VIII Montaigne watches are modern marvels, evoking the original vision of Mr Christian Dior. Here we tell their story.

Exceptional timepieces are a given when it comes to the House of Dior, encompassing each piece, from the La D De Dior to the Chiffre Rouge. But nothing evokes the spirit of couture and the house’s creator quite like the Dior VIII Montaigne. The most intricate of all Dior’s watches, created with innovation and individuality in mind, at the heart of the collection lays the original house codes set out by Christian Dior decades ago. Let’s begin with the name, VIII, said to be a number surrounded by magic in the eyes of the designer. On the 8th October 1946 he opened his couture house on Avenue Montaigne in Paris’s VIIIth arrondissement, and in turn awarded his first ever collection with the same title, En Huit. The timepiece might be available in various colour ways and metals – from the steel and diamond built Plisse Soleil with purple and yellow mother of pearl pyramid shaped detailing, to the rose gold version finished with a black alligator strap – but grey steel takes precedence, paying homage to Mr Dior’s love for the soft hue. ‘It is the most elegant neutral colour,’ he wrote in 1954. Set out as the house’s couture collection in timepieces, the watch knows how to accompany its wearer all evening, propelling her into new depths of beauty, in just the same way that any of Christian Dior’s couture dresses did. An incarnation of the house’s original codes, Dior VIII Montaigne possesses the soul of Mr Dior, his loves, his life and his designs.

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Special

Watch

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Silhouette no2 SS 2013 haute couture collection.

Athena dress, FW 1951 Christian Dior NY collection.

‘Pale blue is one of the prettiest colours’ – Christian Dior.

‘Dior this agile genius of our times whose magical name contains Dieu (God) and Or (Gold)’ – Jean Cocteau.

Dior VIII Montaigne timepiece, 36mm, stainless steel, diamonds and translucent blue lacquer.

Dior VIII Montaigne timepiece, 25mm, pink gold, diamonds and mother-of-pearl.

Timepiece by day, jewel by night. The diamonds set within and around the sheer and soft blue face come alive at nightfall, glistening with elegance and control. No detail is missed, even the case-back, built like the lining of a dress.

The slenderised horns, the pyramids with softened angles, the slimmed down case and bracelet, all discreetly renew the couture spirit of a designer who was held in the highest of accolades.


Special

Watch Grey flannel outfit, SS 1948.

Gourah dress FW 1952 collection.

‘Grey is the most elegant and neutral colour. Almost anything goes with grey’ – Christian Dior.

‘Pink is the colour of happiness and of femininity’ – Christian Dior.

Dior VIII Montaigne timepiece, stainless steel and mother-of-pearl.

Dior VIII Montaigne timepiece, stainless steel, diamonds and translucent pink lacquer.

Perhaps the most aesthetically simplest of all the colour ways, the stainless steel model is in fact the most complex in its affiliation to the designer. The legendary ‘Dior grey’ would drape across women’s bodies in his designs for years to come.

Here he recalls the colour he found to be ‘the sweetest of all the colours.’ The shade of his childhood home at Granville in Normandy and also the colour of the flowers he loved so much.

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Point

Talking

The Women’s

M vement

It’s time for change. Luxury watchmakers are throwing caution to the wind and turning towards women, in a big way. Gone are dainty diamond-laden wrist pieces, women mean business – but why now, is this what women want?

It became visibly apparent during Baselworld and Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie (SIHH) this year – arguably the biggest annual showcases for luxury watch brands – that it was women who were at the forefront. This once masculine dominated industry was trying to catch the attention of women the world over. Watches, all built with quality in-house movements and multiple complications, were for the lady who loves luxury – and its mechanics. Traditionally, the luxury watch industry has consistently catered for men. Being their main target audience, men’s watches have encompassed every mechanic, complication and engineering marvel in full view. In complete contrast, women’s wrist pieces have glossed over these aspects, covering them in diamonds and gemstones to sparkle with love. But last year at SIHH Vacheron Constantin chose to only present ladies’ watches. It was a pivotal moment for the watch industry. But, is it an emerging trend that will come and go, or is it here to stay? According to industry experts, women account for thirty-five percent of the high-end watch market. Brands are implementing higher sales targets and are aiming to move the figure to forty percent over the coming months. It’s a promising start, as brands are beginning to recognise the buying power women now have. Gone are the days when women looked to men to purchase such extravagant watches as gifts for them, women are now buying them by themselves, for themselves. With women now representing 12 percent of the global Ultra High Net Worth population, this comes as no surprise. Women are earning more and have a very acute eye when deciding where to spend their money. Is this change of direction, design and desire what women want? Women care about craftsmanship and quality is paramount – but they also want to see a piece of engineering. They want the best of both worlds: a diamond encrusted watch for the evening and a watch that means business for day-to-day. And, finally, the once neglected female market has gained momentous focus. It has taken time, but luxury watchmakers now know what women really want and the future is in our hands.

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Talking on er ch a V

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in nt sta

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affair

Accessory

Colour

Code

A diamond may be forever but coloured gems set the heart aflutter. Adorn your neck with amethysts or opt for orange sapphires on your fingers. The only jewels to deck yourself in come in an array of rich colours. Opt for anything from suitably subtle at Chanel or direct and to to-the-point bold at de Grisogono. As long as they make a statement. 1. BVLGARI | 2. CHANEL | 3. PIAGET | 4. POMELLATO | 5. VAN CLEEF & ARPELS | 6. DE GRISOGONO

GIAMBATTISTA VALLI

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affair

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under

The Sea Plunge below the waves with your jewellery box and let the Little Mermaid be your guide. Creatures from the depths deserve pride of place so let Shawish’s mermaid pendant make a splash on your neck, or tell the time with Tabbah’s underwater delight. There’s an ocean of inspiration out there.

1. TABBAH | 2. VHERNIER | 3. SHAWISH | 4. van cleef & arpel | 5. TIFFANY&CO | 6. LYDIA COURTEILLE

STELLA MCCARTNEY

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Body Brooch, photographed by Lionel Koretzky, MOJEH Issue 3

NOTE

Style


NOTE

Style

Feline Forever There’s something about cats. From leopards to cheetahs, fashion’s fancy with the feline has always been prevalent. As more brands launch cat-inspired collections, we look back at the power of the cat in high jewellery.

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oth predatory and elegant, the cat family is extensive. With lions from Africa, jaguars in America and tigers hailing from Asia, it is a worldwide love affair. And it is the big cats that we consistently have an unwavering admiration for. The cat in high jewellery has evolved through time and with each decade, it wasn’t until the Fifties that this process first occurred and it remains the same today. The ‘personality of the cat’ is at the forefront of the design process for many luxury jewellery brands. During the Fifties the cat could be seen with yellow eyes and evoked a ferocious look and it evolved in the Sixties to a less fierce persona and a more playful look. Its appearance is the sign of the times. In 1914, the first Cartier panther motif was created – consisting of onyx spots – and three years later the design evolved into a fully-fledged animal piece. Founder Louis Cartier famously put the panther on a vanity case designed for Jeanne Toussaint. From then on she became a close colleague, with her admiration for flowers and the animal kingdom, she developed the panther theme at Cartier. But it was the Duke of Windsor who commissioned the first Great Cats collection. Every catinspired piece is always made with the greatest craftsmanship, meaning that it is not uncommon for each piece to take more than 900 man-hours (over 6 months) to create. Cartier’s diamond-and-green

beryl bracelet is legendary for one jeweller having to spend over 500 hours placing the 784 sparkling diamonds and 91 onyx spots to complete the panther piece. The panther can be seen wrapping itself around a lady’s wrist, waiting patiently, in all its glory, to pounce. It was the Ancient Egyptians who considered cats to be sacred and semidivine. Maybe it was their mysterious nature or their hunting skills, or their beautiful feline features that have always had us enamoured. This lustful desire is not something new – but will our love affair with the cat ever fade? They symbolise freedom, femininity and the wild. Last year, Chanel offered one-off pieces from their Sous le Signe du Lion collection, which was inspired by Gabrielle Chanel herself, who loved the lion motif. It was during her trip to Venice in 1920 that she truly fell in love with the proliferation of lions. From door-knockers to public monuments to buildings, lions peered out. Last year’s collection presented The King of the Jungle motif cast in medallionstyle necklaces and brooches – each set with diamonds. The pieces were dramatic and majestic, like Coco herself. As luxury jewellery brands continue to be inspired by feline qualities and design new collections year after year, the cat will never fail to fascinate. They represent the woman. We love cats, now and forever. Hear us roar.

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Photographed by DorothĂŠe Murail Styled by Guillaume Boulez

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Yellow gold, tsavorite garnet, black lacquer, diamond and citrine necklace | Yellow gold, tsavorite garnet and black lacquer earrings, Panthère de Cartier collection, CARTIER

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White gold, emerald, onyx and diamond necklace | White gold, emerald, black lacquer and diamond earrings | White gold, emerald, onyx and diamond ring, Panthère de Cartier collection, CARTIER

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(Left hand) White gold, emerald, onyx and diamond ring | (Right hand) White gold, tsavorite garnet and onyx ring, Panthère de Cartier collection, CARTIER

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Yellow gold, tsavorite garnet, onyx, black lacquer and diamond necklace | (Left hand) Yellow gold, tsavorite garnet and onyx ring | (Right hand) Yellow gold, tsavorite garnet and onyx ring, Panthère de Cartier collection, CARTIER

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Yellow gold, tsavorite garnet and black lacquer earring | Pink gold, tsavorite garnet and black lacquer bracelet | Yellow gold, tsavorite garnet and black lacquer ring, Panthère de Cartier collection, CARTIER

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White gold, emerald, onyx and diamond bracelet | (Left hand) White gold, tsavorite garnet and onyx ring | (Right hand) White gold, emerald, onyx and diamond ring, Panthère de Cartier collection, CARTIER

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Model: Katiusha Feofanova at Marilyn Models Hair stylist: Stephanie Farouze at Jedroot Make-up artist: Megumi Zlatoff at Calliste Manicurist: Beatrice Eni Photographer’s assistant and retoucher: Charlotte Evrard Stylist’s assistant: Noemie Ferre Make-up artist’s assistant: Maki Ihara Production: Louis Agency

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Sugar High Photographed by Karina Twiss Styled by Guillaume Boulez

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Astrale collection earrings | High jewellery necklace, BVLGARI

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Catene collection watch | High jewellery and Serpenti rings, BVLGARI


High jewellery necklace, BVLGARI

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Musa collection necklace, BVLGARI

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Musa collection bracelet and earrings, BVLGARI

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Serpenti Tubogas bracelet in 18kt pink gold and steel | Diva collection earrings, BVLGARI

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Model: Nastassja Van Der Merwe at Marilyn Agency Hair stylist: Vinz at B Agency Make-up artist: Megumi Zlatoff at Calliste Agency Manicurist: Beatrice Eni Photographer’s assistants: Jack Wilson and Marco Rochas Stylist’s assistant: Noemie Ferre Make-up artist’s assistant: Maki Ihara Digital: Imag’in Productions Retouching: My Brother Bob Production: Louis Agency

All clothing by MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA

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Photographed by Pieter Henket


Trends

Hair and Beauty

Side

Sweep

1

Hair for fall is brushed across to the side in extremes. How far will you go?

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1. MAXIME SIMOENS | 2. ANTHONY VACCARELLO | 3. HERMĂˆS | 4. CHALAYAN

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Trends

Knotch

2

Hair and Beauty

Top

Twist your locks into a statement bun that works wonders whatever the weather.

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1. ISSEY MIYAKE | 2. CAROLINA HERRERA | 3. JASON WU | 4. CAROLINA HERRERA

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Trends

Hair and Beauty

1. ROCHAS | 2. GUCCI | 3. SAINT LAURENT | 4. PRADA

2

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Look

At Me The eyes are the windows to the soul, so make sure the shutters draw in admirers. The bigger the better when it comes to your lashes.

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Trends

Hair and Beauty

1. JOHN RICHMOND | 2. TOMMY HILFIGER | 3. KENZO | 4. AIGNER

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Great

Lengths Rapunzel ruled the runway so do whatever it takes to add length to those already luscious locks. Go on, let your hair down.

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Trends

Hair and Beauty

Midas

Touch

2

All that glitters is gold. Whether it’s on eyes, lips or nails, shimmer your way to the top. 1

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1. DONNA KARAN | 2. EMILIO PUCCI | 3. DESIGUAL | 4. RODARTE

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Trends

Faced

Hair and Beauty

Fresh

1

Barely there brings out your natural beauty and it also saves time in the morning so spring clean your make up bag. 2

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1. MARY KATRANTZOU | 2. BALMAIN | 3. MARIOS SCHWAB | 4. VIKTOR&ROLF

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Trends

Hair and Beauty

1. RICHARD NICOLL | 2. OLYMPIA LE TAN | 3. CÉLINE | 4. VALENTINO

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Pony

Tales Twist it, knot it. The standard pony won’t work here.

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Trends

2

Hair and Beauty

1. ANTONIO MARRAS | 2. ALEXANDER MCQUEEN | 3. MARC JACOBS | 4. DONNA KARAN

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Back To The

Future Sculptural hair or sci-fi make-up, this beauty trend is not for the faint of heart. Subtle flecks of silver hint that you’re out of this world.

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POINT

Talking

I Woke Up

Like This To see a photo of a model or celebrity working out has become commonplace. Whether it’s in the gym, at the beach or on a retreat, the models of the world are willingly sharing insights into their daily efforts to achieve their desired look. But why has this shift from elusive to intrusive occurred?

I

f you Google ‘I woke up like this’ you’ll be faced with 160 million results. From seeing it on T-shirts to hats, women all over the world have snapped up Beyonce’s latest feminist-fused hook. It’s about female empowerment: we (women) woke up looking natural, happy and healthy. This interest into ‘real’ beauty has taken hold across every aspect of society. Bygone are the days of believing supermodels didn’t have to lift a finger to look incredible. Now, we’re all in this together. The ‘realness’ being that hard work pays off for everyone – from supermodels to the girl next door. Model Jess Gold – who is newly signed with Women Management in Paris – has utilised her Instagram account to showcase her physique, beauty and work ethic. ‘I like to show that I work hard. I’m impressed by the results of what I have achieved by doing something that I love – being active, fit and healthy,’ she says. And it’s clear that the 21-year-old Australian understands the importance of showcasing her efforts. ‘You would only get to see the end result – not all of

‘The ‘realness’ being that hard work pays off for everyone – from supermodels to the girl next door.’

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1. @adrianalima | 2. @giseleofficial | 3. @giseleofficial | 4. @jessgoldxx | 5. @ jessgoldxx | 6. @adrianalima

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POINT

Talking

‘Times have changed, society is demanding reality, inspiration and insight.’

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All images courtesy of Instagram

7. @karliekloss | 8. @ediecampbell | 9. @giseleofficial | 10. @rosiehw | 11. @ iamnaomicampbell | 12. @karliekloss

the work that would go into producing the amazing pictures or shows. Now, everyone can have a little insight and understanding,’ she concludes. But it’s not just models who are starting out in the business that are presenting, posting and posing. The biggest names in the industry are in on it too. Rarely a day goes by when Brazilian beauty Adriana Lima doesn’t snap herself boxing up a storm in the gym to stay in shape. Or, without the highest earning model of the year, Gisele Bündchen, showing us herself practicing yoga, martial arts or balancing on a paddleboard in the middle of the ocean. Times have changed, society is demanding reality, inspiration and insight. Jess agrees, ‘Hilary Rhoda and Karlie Kloss always seem to be posting new and different methods of workouts for keeping in shape and maintaining a toned body. I also love that Karlie sells her own range of healthy cookies – I love baking!’ The focus is on health and fitness, not constantly counting calories. Founder of Skinny Bitch Collective and lead trainer Russell Bateman trains supermodels and athletes – having ‘gained a reputation for training the new wave of British fashion.’ His motto is ‘strong is the new skinny’ and his training sessions are all part of the ‘wellness project’. It’s a refreshing and healthy world away from, ‘Nothing tastes as good as skinny feels,’ a line famously stated by supermodel, Kate Moss. It brings only one question to the forefront: why has this shift occurred? Simply because, together, women want to see change. In Beyonce’s song ‘Flawless’ (where she repeats, ‘I woke up like this’) she conveys to women that they are beautiful without limitations. Sampled within the single is prize-winning Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, saying, ‘We teach girls to shrink themselves, to make themselves smaller.’ This insightful insert (which lasts a few minutes) tells us to forget what we have previously been taught, that we don’t need to pretend to be less than we are. And models don’t need to pretend to have been born beautiful. Unlike the supermodels of the Eighties – who carefully crafted the illusion of superstatuses worthy of Greek Goddesses – this decade is about truth and reality. Hence, Beyonce is saying that no matter what we do from the moment we wake up, we are flawless. So, in staying with truth and reality, models, celebrities, women will workout at the gym to improve themselves – not because society is dictating that they do so. The world is watching, literally, and we want it to.

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FOCUS

Beauty

1

Autumn’s Second Skin, photograp

hed by Riccardo Vimercati, MOJE

H Issue 17

Summer Lovin’

2

As the sun sets on European summers and we hit beach season in the Middle East, perfect your golden glow with an elixir of creams, oils and powders. Whether you choose to add a golden shimmer with Clarins or capture the season in a scent, there is a whole host of products that will keep your tan going strong. 1. LA MER, Face and Body Gradual Tan | 2. BY TERRY, Tea to Tan | 3. GUERLAIN, Terra Tropica | 4. CLARINS, Shimmer Oil | 5. YVES SAINT LAURENT, Or Rouge Crème | 6. KIEHLS, Body Scrub Soap | 7. CHANEL, Secret | 8. HERMÈS, Jour d’Hermès Absolu | 9. TOM FORD, Lip Shimmer Solar White | 10. CHANEL, Sublimage L’Essence | 11. LAURA MERCIER, Foundation Primer | 12. CHRISTIAN DIOR, Montaigne | 13. BOTTEGAVENETA, Shimmery Body Powder

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Guide

Hair

After Sun Luca Comella, photographed by Sarvenaz Hashtroudi

Once the long, hot summer holiday ends, our tresses are the ones to pay the price. With sun, sea and sand taking its toll, creative director of the Y-12 salon Luca Comella shares his secrets on nursing our manes back to lustre.

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Hair

Guide

• During this time of year in-salon treatments from Wella System Professional work wonders. These encourage the restoration of shiny and healthy looking and feeling hair. We’d suggest starting with an intense treatment based on the SP Luxe Oil, where the airy consistency makes the application simple and the microfine mousse infuses deeply into the hair. This helps to renew the health of the hair and scalp and provides a long-lasting effect without weighing it down. The mix is applied on freshly washed locks, section by section, followed by a gentle head massage to distribute the treatment and boost relaxation. After 30 minutes under the heat the hair is rinsed, conditioned and then blow-dried. • A haircut is always a good idea after a holiday, as it cleans up dry and dead ends. Better still, a restyle will add freshness to your look, and takes advantage of a good tan and a great positive energy after a summer away. • Hair can behave differently in the sun depending on whether or not it’s coloured. Dyed hair is more sensitive, dehydrated and may become dull in which case the above Wella SP Luxe Oil is the perfect solution along with a colour touch-up. On the other side, natural hair reacts better in the sun and may in fact be transformed into beautiful, naturally highlighted hair. In this case a Sebastian Professional Potion 9 leave in-salon treatment will work wonders at restoring lost moisture and enhancing that natural glow. • When styling hair at home, make sure you rinse out conditioner fully. They have the role of holding moisture in the hair and strengthening its structure and the oils and glosses are the main ingredients to help dry hair in becoming soft, pliable and shiny – but when not washed out thoroughly, those same ingredients weigh the hair down causing it to look limp and lifeless. • A burst of cool water is ideal when washing hair as it closes up the hair cuticles and locks in moisture. Try not to rub your wet hair with a towel as it roughens up the cuticles and encourages frizz. Your hair will also be more fragile during this time so avoid any aggressive combing or brushing, it may stretch and snap causing more split ends and fly away hairs. • It’s also important to use a good thermal protector which will create a screen between any hot tools and the hair, preventing loss of moisture. Together with Potion 9, the protector will prevent hair from becoming frizzed and static. Similarly, it’s very important to ensure your hot tool has a temperature control – any heat above 200ᵒC will cause the hair to lose moisture which will lead to more dehydration than it’s already suffered. Better still, during and after a holiday its good to refrain from using hot tools as much as possible as the hair is already being exposed to heat through the sun. • Do not pull your hair too severely when styling, if it’s tangled, start detangling from the ends and work your way up to the roots – this will prevent further breakage. • After a well deserved break, food is also very important for hair as exposure to the sun, sea and sand can lead to a loss of strengthening minerals such as copper and zinc. These can be replaced through dry fruits, nuts and seeds. Carrots and antioxidants in general will definitely assist the scalp in staying hydrated which the hair will in turn benefit from. • A smooth large round blow-dry with volume is always a winner when trying to create a glossy finish. The keratin in Wella’s Reflection Oil will also encourage this.

By Luca Comella

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Mojeh

HEALTH

superfoods:

Myth or Misunderstanding? They fight off disease, infection and illness. From blueberries to broccoli, over the past 20 years certain foods have been labelled with ‘super’ qualities – but are they dietary miracles or a marketer’s dream?

O

ver the past year alone bee pollen, buffalo berries, coffee fruit, yuzu juice and monk fruit have been added to the ever-ending list of superfoods – each one claiming to be rich in antioxidants and minerals. In recent years, we as consumers have questioned the nutritional value of farmed food, we’ve looked to superfoods in the hope of filling any much-needed nutritional gaps within our daily diets. It was in the Nineties when Michael van Straten and Barbara Grigg released bestselling book, Superfoods, that this culinary term was coined. Michael van Straten, an alternative medicine practitioner, informed us of the ‘four-star superfoods,’ which ‘supply the vital bricks that build your body’s vital resistance to stress, disease and infection.’ With a tagline as such, it’s not surprising it was (and still is) universally appealing to buy into such foodstuffs. As the list of superfoods continues to grow, we’re left pondering the differences between food and superfood. To begin with some scientists believe antioxidants fight off free radicals that are believed to contribute to ageing and illness. Independent dietician Ursula Arens, spokesperson for the British Dietetic Association (BDA), questions the heavily substantiated claims linked to superfoods. ‘The term superfood is used more by the food industry, or for food marketing, than by nutrition scientists. It has no ‘official’ definition, but has come to mean foods that are particularly rich in one or more nutrients,’ Arens says. ‘It implies potency of nutrient content so that instead of eating lots of ‘healthy foods’ you only need to eat a small amount of the superfood, to get the same nutrient intake.’ With a lot of superfoods now readily available to us – dramatically increasing the expense of our weekly shopping bill – we need to know if we’re really getting our money’s worth or if they’re just overpriced exotic foodstuffs. ‘Some super foods are, of course, healthy, and if you enjoy them then it is a good idea to consume them,’ Arens went on to explain, ‘However, beware of the belief that they are ‘magic bullets’ that can cure disease or keep you healthy, without the general day-by-day importance of healthy diet. This means: some protein foods, enough carbohydrate (preferably whole-grain) for energy, and lots of fruits and vegetables.’ In 2007 the European Union banned the use of the word superfood to help sell products without any credible scientific research. With the media’s constant input of grabbing headlines with new beneficial claims associated with superfoods the public’s confusion has continued to rise. In 2011 in the UK, the National Health Service actively tried to deter the public’s misunderstanding by publishing a document outlining truths and misconceptions. The document focused on 1,750 UK news stories that had been published as health science stories within 2007 and 2011, which the NHS ‘checked the reported claims

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against the research on which they were based.’ But has it helped to dispel the confusion surrounding the topic? ‘The confusions is due to the fact that there is no ‘official’ definition, and so the term is used to promote the sales of some foods – usually foods that are ‘exotic’ and unusual and needless to say, expensive,’ explains Arens. ‘Because the term is used in different ways to describe different nutrients and other properties in foods, there is confusion. There is no standard currency to the use of the term, and it is difficult to compare the superfoodness of ordinary and familiar foods, such as carrots or cabbage, with more exotic foods, such as monk fruit or bee pollen.’ Instead, Arens recommends that we gain advice from a nutrition expert (such as a dietitian) to achieve a healthy diet that’s individually suited. ‘However, food groups that are particularly concentrated in specific nutrients are fruits and vegetables, generally, and foods such as nuts and seeds, oily fish, small amounts of red meat, and lentils and beans,’ she concludes. With celebrities such as Victoria Beckham tweeting about her latest obsession with superfood bee pollen it is no wonder the world is clouded by confusion. As the miraculous list will undoubtedly increase over the coming months – all claiming antioxidants in abundance – it’s essential we buy with a sceptical eye. With the obesity on the rise, our daily diets are consistently criticised. So, what should our plates look like? ‘Dietary requirements vary depending on age, gender, activity levels and other particular situations such a pregnancy. It is important to consume enough energy (calories), but not too much, and to consume enough protein, essential fatty acids, vitamins and minerals, Arens explains. ‘Most people can manage this most of the time with a healthy balanced diet ie. one that contains a variety of foods that are rich in nutrients. Occasionally, the use of a vitamin supplement or the use of fortified foods is beneficial. The current issue of concern in diets, is that many people eat too much energy, by the overconsumption of foods that contain calories and a lot of salt or sugar, but that are generally low in other nutrients.’ As we’ve been told many times before: it’s about balance and moderation. Maybe the superfood label is the biggest and most successful marketing ploy of the century, but it might actually be benefiting us more than we realise. If it is pushing us to question our current diets, where foodstuffs are sourced and if they are actually helping us to maintain a healthy diet, then maybe we should try and test with caution. Furthermore, beauty brands are acknowledging the health benefits of these foods as an array of beauty products now honours these healthy food-based ingredients as a main component. They may just be the evernormal fruit and vegetables, but call them super if it helps you.


HEALTH

Mojeh

Its beauty is more than skin deep. The flowering plant red hibiscus contains the antioxidants flavonoids, polyhenols and anthocyanins. Some scientists believe these can help to lower your chance of heart disease. One Essential intense skin detoxifying booster serum, DIOR

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As a fruit of the vine, grapes are well known for their high levels of antioxidants (known as polyphenols), which some scientists believe help to reduce blood pressure and cholesterol. Vinoperfect Radiance Serum, CAUDALIE

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Oats are high in protein, a great source of fibre and they contain multiple essential fats. From zinc to calcium to vitamin C, they have an abundance of minerals too. Extra-Firming Tightening Lift Botanical Serum, CLARINS

The humble cranberry is a good source of vitamin C. With it’s apparent anti-fungal and anti-viral properties for fighting infections its qualities are a little more than commendable. Moroccan Rose Otto Ultra-Moisture Body Oil, REN SKINCARE @net-a-porter.com

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The tropical fruit Papaya is rich in both benefits and colour. By containing vitamins C and E, and antioxidants like beta-carotene and lycopene, it is a source of goodness. Papaya Gel, SANTA MARIA NOVELLA @neta-porter.com

For many years honey has been renowned for helping to provide a boost to the immune system. It increases antibodies; which help to fight infections and viruses. Abeille Royale Day Cream, GUERLAIN

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As a member of the algae family, seaweed contains a high level of antioxidants. It’s also rich in vitamins A and C, and has a healthy level of iodine.

Photographed by Sarvenaz Hashtroudi

The Concentrate, LA MER

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Photographed by Pieter Henket Styled by Sofia Odero

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Objects of Desire


Face (throughout), Le Blanc de CHANEL, Vitalumière Loose Powder Foundation N40, Poudre Universelle Compacte 40 Doré, Joues Contraste 160 Innocence | Eyes, Ombre Essentielle 104 Palpitation, Inimitable Waterproof 10 Noir | Lips, Lèvres Scintillantes 191 Songe | Nails, Le Vernis 631 Orage, CHANEL BEAUTY 283


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Eyes, Ombre Essentielle 112 Pulsion, Illusion D’Ombre 81 Fantasme, Ecriture De CHANEL 10 Noir, Inimitable Waterproof 10 Noir | Lips, Lèvres Scintillantes 191 Songe | Nails, Le Vernis 631 Orage, CHANEL BEAUTY

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Eyes, Ombre Essentielle 102 Sensation, Inimitable Waterproof 10 Noir | Lips, Lèvres Scintillantes 191 Songe, CHANEL BEAUTY 287


Eyes, Ombre Essentielle 102 Sensation, Inimitable Waterproof 10 Noir | Lips, Rouge Coco Shine Full Color 96 Aura, CHANEL BEAUTY

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Eyes, Ombre Essentielle 102 Sensation, Inimitable Waterproof 10 Noir | Lips, Lèvres Scintillantes 191 Songe, CHANEL BEAUTY 291


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Model: Ali Arboux at IMG, Brad Alphonso and Gui at Wilhelmina Hair stylist: Yoichi Tomizawa at Art Department Make-up artist: Stefanie Willman at See Management Manicurist: Holly Falcon at Kate Ryan Stylist’s assistant: Denticart Exil Casting: Roger Inniss at Boom Productions Inc. Production: Louis Agency All clothing by CHANEL Hair piece stylist’s own

Eyes, Ombre Essentielle 104 Palpitation, Inimitable Waterproof 10 Noir | Lips, Rouge Coco Shine Full Color 95 Viva | Nails, Le Vernis 625 Secret, CHANEL BEAUTY

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in Exhibition

Artist

Where Sound

Stands Still

In a special extract from his new book and exhibition entitled Sonic, Saint Laurent designer Hedi Slimane takes us inside his musical archive.

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onic. We’ve all experienced it, that definitive moment when sound takes over and frees the mind; it’s just you and the music. But how can entire decades and genres of densely emotive melodies be captured in a series of still images? When it’s Hedi Slimane behind the camera. In the world of high-end fashion, whether as creative director at Dior Homme or more recently Saint Laurent, Slimane is known for crafting clothing collections that speak volumes about the popular culture of that time. But for years the designer/photographer/ all-round creative has been using visual art to express his thoughts and evaluations on the immediate world around him, with music being a major driving force. From his 2004 book, Stage, on Generation 2.0’s rock revival, to the Hedi Slimane Diary – a photographic blog born in 2006 showcasing his work – and later 2011’s California Song exhibition exploring his days in the sunshine state, the Paris-born designer’s work has remained raw, of the moment and epic in its message. Influenced by the California Song exhibition, Sonic, published under Xavier Barral, takes a look at 15 years worth of Hedi Slimane’s musical archives, from London to New York, with particular focus on the California cycle, which begun in 2007. The book opens in San Francisco with an image of American cult hero, Christopher Owens, whose vulnerable and expressive nature invites us in to explore more. As the pages turn, we move from legends of rock and roll and underground heroes, to a new generation of musical pioneers. Not only are these images

Photographed by Hedi Slimane Courtesy of Almine Rech Gallery

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portraits of icons, they study the places in which these musical genres – country, punk, psych, surf rock – came to life and, in some cases, death. In the final portrait to be taken before his passing, an intense and pensive 71-year-old Lou Reed stares out from the page. His great eyes, although hidden behind aviators and the lines on his face, tell the story of a legend, who left an infinite mark of defiance and innovation on his industry. Then, like a parallel vision, we see a 20-year-old, Sky Ferreira, photographed in 2012 in Malibu, collapsed to the floor, seemingly broken-down, but beautiful. Here is a girl set to follow a path of musical greatness. Later we find Courtney Love at home in New York, the ‘enfant terrible’ of alternative music, photographed in just January of last year. In our special extract, chosen by Slimane himself, we explore just a few of these vastly expressive pictures. Each one, although completely silent and still, manages to evoke entire decades and movements for the spectator. They evoke a great sense of experience and elation, whether you were once watching, imitating or listening to these musicians. And each version of rock and roll, in both the book and exhibition, induce memories as you take in the unstoppable spirit and influence of sound – a sonic wave moving at light speed through time and space. When Slimane speaks, whether it’s through his clothing collections, art or in this case photography, but rarely through words, we stop and listen. For everything he touches – even when in black and white like the images across the following pages – is golden in its message.


in Exhibition

Artist Courtney At Home Courtney Love, New York, January 6th 2013.

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in Exhibition

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Sky Sky Ferreira, Malibu, CA, August 15th 2012.

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in Exhibition

Artist Lou Reed New York, June 5th 2013.

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Beck Hollywood/Los Angeles, March 2nd 2011.


in Exhibition

Artist Christopher at Hedi’s House Christopher Owens, Beverly Hills/Los Angeles, May 2011.

Hedi Slimane’s Sonic is released in September 2014, Xavier Barral Editions. Sonic the exhibition runs from 18th Sept 14 to 11th Jan 15, Fondation Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent, 5 Avenue Marceau, Paris 75116.

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in focus

Mojeh

The Mood Behind

With the release of her sensational new album – Ultraviolence – Lana Del Rey has no intention of glossing over her troubled psyche. From summer favourites such as Young and Beautiful to newer sensation West Coast, MOJEH gets an insight into the experiences that have led to her emotionally charged lyrics.

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Fred Allen/The Interview People

The Melancholy


There is so much nostalgia and sadness and world-weariness in your music, but here in person you seem pretty positive? I haven’t yet found that easy path towards happiness. It has been years since I’ve felt at peace. That’s been my theme in life: trudging the road to happiness. For me, there are moments of pure happiness, but you can’t achieve that over a sustained period of time, instead you try to make those moments as regular as possible. Happiness is not a static state, it’s an active state. That’s the ancient Greek definition – it’s not a state of rest, it’s a process.

You recently moved from New York to L.A., how are you finding the new lifestyle? For me being in L.A. has been an escape and I’ve been inspired by how casual everything is over here. I love to swim, I love going to the beach every day. And I spend hours and hours during the week driving up and down the coast listening to music. I love listening to the soundtracks of films like American Beauty, The Godfather, Scarface and I also love grunge – Mark Lanegan, especially Nirvana. And jazz: Chet Baker, Nina Simone, Billie Holiday. Not forgetting Bob Dylan and all the musicians of that period!

How are you trying to find that kind of happiness? By being a patient person, surrounding myself with those I love and by being generous and seeking serenity. In general, I have found that devoting your life to the people around you and caring for them is the true road to general happiness. You’ve spoken in the past about believing in alternative ways of being. What do you mean by that? My life has gone through various incarnations, mostly transitions. But I don’t consider myself to be someone very provocative or radical – I embrace a lot of traditional things. But I believe in in alternative lifestyles and in alternative relationships. I think we’ve lost the kind of cultural and personal liberation that we were exploring in the Sixties when people were talking about experiencing

Are you still very interested in philosophy? Yes. I also studied theology and was fascinated by the basic question as to ‘why do we exist?’ I enjoyed thinking and talking to other people about basic questions like why we are who we are and what kind of meaning can we find in life.

in focus

a new concept of freedom. That was a much more exciting notion than the freedom we talk about now.

Mojeh

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ith Lana, it is often hard to separate the real woman from her controversial David Lynch-ian ‘femme fatale’ public self – the stunningly beautiful singer with the pouty lips and a gloomy outlook on life. Yet she has parlayed her angst and gloriously melancholy music into a massive career. She first attracted worldwide attention with the 2011 release of Video Games and her subsequent 2012 Born to Die album that shot to the top of the charts in many major markets and has since sold 5 million Copies. Her video clips have been viewed over 100 million times and her fans treat her concert appearances with fanatical reverence. Not that she particularly enjoys performing live. ‘Getting on stage is the part I like least about my job,’ Del Rey says. ‘I love to write and produce music, but everything that comes after that is difficult for me....’ Whatever else she may be, the 29-year-old is certainly a survivor. Ultraviolence is already attracting enormous buzz and generally positive reviews. Her first single from the album, West Coast, and its accompanying video, has given strong indications that the new album is a strong and compelling follow-up to Born to Die. Coming off her narcoswing Young and Beautiful ballad from last year’s The Great Gatsby soundtrack, she was handpicked by Angelina Jolie to sing Once Upon a Dream in the trailer for Maleficent. Earlier this year she serenaded Kanye West and Kim Kardashian West at their wedding rehearsal dinner at the Palace of Versailles, a performance that was rumoured to have netted her around $3 million. But Del Rey has denied that, however, saying she would ‘never charge her friends.’ Despite the raging controversy over how contrived her sad persona may be, Lana Del Rey’s eerily nostalgic music has enthralled millions of fans around the world. Though fame and fortune have done little, if anything, to assuage her downbeat view of things, she has made her mark on the public imagination and Ultraviolence will doubtless silence many of her naysayers. But the bigger question is whether Lana herself will take any solace from her success?

Where did the title Ultraviolence come from for your new album? I found the title before I had written almost any of the songs. I love the idea of having a one-word title, it has a beautiful simplicity. I was thinking of flowers at the time and since I love flowers that are shades of blue and violet I had this idea of ultraviolet and that kind of vibration. That was the basis for the title and of course it became more suggestive. Ultra is a sweet sound and completely opposite to the sense of violence. It also summarises some of the contradictions I find in myself. How did this album come together? I started putting it together at Electric Lady Studios in New York. I met Dan Auerbach one evening, who listened to the record and really liked it but thought it had too much of a classic rock feel. When I explained that I had this idea for a west coast fusion with an underground jazz culture for the mood he said he felt that he could deliver that. So we went to Nashville and recorded everything there live and it had a really good feel to it. I’m in love with the record and I’m so happy to be able to feel that way about it. How would you describe your West Coast signature sound? When I met Dan, something that he really tapped into was that all of my choruses slipped into half-time beats and halftime swings – he called it ‘Narco Swing’ every time the West Coast chorus would kick in and that was a good description for it. It has a late-Seventies feel but there’s also a nod to the West Coast Nineties synth sound that comes in.

What’s your earliest musical memory? I remember when I was 15 or 16 years old and my parents sent me to Kent School, a private boarding school in Connecticut. I had a very young teacher, Gene Campbell, who introduced me to hip hop and that set things in motion for me and my music evolved over the course of the next few years, especially after I moved to New York which was a very troubled time but also a very creative one as well. When’s the best time for you to write? I’m a pretty nocturnal creature. I write at night, outdoors, and often with a lot of noise in the background. Either with the radio in my car playing or in my house and the TV turned on, usually drinking coffee... I drink tons of coffee!

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women

Mojeh

The Sisterhood of

the Travelling Bag Follow in the footsteps of Ferragamo, keeping it in the family has never been more fun. Salvatore Ferragamo is one Italian house where fashion really is a family business. ‘The concept and value of family have always been extremely important to all of us,’ women’s leather product director, James Ferragamo, told us. ‘Women are essential to the success of both our family and the company.’ The latest Fiamma bag - named after Fiamma Ferragamo, the leather accessories and shoe designer for almost 40 years draws inspiration from this legacy. ‘The different female generations of the Ferragamo family and their enduring influence on the house today is where the project took root’, Ferragamo notes. The house looked to a cast of international families and their female generations in order to bring the spirit of Fiamma to life. ‘We were looking for women whose talent, reputation and inherent styles are recognized worldwide,’ he went on to add. Chosen from across the globe, matriarchal powerhouses that embody the Ferragamo woman made up the Fiamma project. From well-known Brazilian media players to Italian nobility, each woman brings her own sense of self to the campaign.

Flora Zeta Cheong-Leen and Claudine Ying

Flora Zeta Cheong-Leen and Claudine Ying, in the heart of Paris, the iconic 7eme arrondissement. Flora Zeta Cheong-Leen may well be known for her entrepreneurial skills in her native Hong Kong. However, Cheong-Leen has always been immersed in the world of art and fashion, with beginnings at the Paris Opera studying costume design, dance, choreography and stage production. This start then lead to roles as a brand director at various fashion houses, earning her the title of style icon along the way. Her drive is a quality passed down to daughter, Claudine Ying, who as well as being actively involved in bettering China’s education system also writes as a contributor for Tatler in Hong Kong.

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Mojeh

women

Theresa Patricia and Mathilde Melusine Ruspoli, on the grounds of the 16th Century Roman Palazzo Ruspoli. Not many can lay claim to having their debut into society at the Crillon Ball in Paris, but then again not everyone can call herself a princess either. Mathilde Mèlusine Ruspoli’s upbringing is that of a story: Mathilde’s father is the late Alessandro Principe Ruspoli, 9th Prince of Cerveteri, who is said to have provided the inspiration behind Federico Fellini’s classic film, La Dolce Vita. It is no surprise that the 19-year-old has sparked international attention along with her mother, former model Theresa Patricia Genest.

Mathilda Mélusine Ruspoli

Theresa Paatricia and Mathilda Mélusine Ruspoli

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Hanayo and Tenko Nakajima

Hanayo and Tenko Nakajima, on the street-art lined avenues of Brooklyn. Artist Hanayo Nakajima’s foray into the fashion world began after training as a junior geisha in 1989, which four years later led to her modelling for a Jean Paul Gaultier campaign. Having published books, produced music and held solo exhibitions for her art around the world, Hanayo has her finger firmly on the pulse of art culture. Daughter Tenko Nakajima acts as a muse for Hanayo, while developing her own art at the same time, inspired by the life of her mother and her involvement in underground Japanese culture. The mother-daughter relationship is one of collaboration, with Tenko frequently one of Hanayo’s art subjects.

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Mojeh

Hollywood is a family business for Sydney and Anika Poitier. You may have heard the name before. Growing up surrounded by heavyweights like Roger Moore and Michael Caine was sure to impact the Poitier sisters. Now they are following in the footsteps of their Academy Award winning father, Sidney Poitier. With Sydney becoming an actress whilst Anika has gone behind the camera and turned her hand to directing, the sisters look to each other to keep their heads in fame, family and the attention the name brings.

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Sydney and Anika Poitier, at the Hollywood Hills home of Sydney Poitier.

Sydney and Anika Poitier

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Mojeh

Jacqueline Beaurang with Stella and Lola Montes Schnabel

Jacqueline Beaurang, Stella and Lola Montes Schnabel, in Jacqueline’s West Village Bohemian abode. Growing up around iconic figures such as Andy Warhol, you would be unable to escape the art scene. Stella and Lola Schnabel were no exception. Julian Schnabel is an artist and an award-winning director, with a Golden Globe under his belt. Meanwhile their mother, Jacqueline Beaurang, is responsible for opening an Azzedine Alaia boutique in Soho in the eighties whilst also designing her own label. Combining their father’s legacy in the film and art scene with their mother’s love of fashion has lead the pair to enter their own worlds: Stella is a poet and actress while Lola is a painter and filmmaker.

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Mojeh

women

Helena Bordon, Luciana and Marcella Tranchesi, in the home of Vogue Brazil’s style director and Helena Bordon’s mother, Donata Meirelles. Being raised by Vogue Brazil’s style director and the founders of Daslu, Sao Paulo’s premier fashion destination, is sure to have a profound effect on family friends Helena Bordon, Luciana and Marcella Tranchesi. The trio started high street brand 284 to cater to Brazil’s young fashion scene, in the process becoming style icons around the world as well as in their home country. The fashion world beckons as their empire grows. Watch this space.

Helena Bordon

Luciana and Marcella Transchesi with Helena Bordon

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Interview

Mojeh

A Subtle climb to the top Aside from his leading roles in Hollywood’s latest Oscar winning movies, Bradley Cooper is garnering interest the world over for his relationship with model-of-themoment Suki Waterhouse. We met the modern day icon to discuss career success, the freedom of Paris and his next big step in life, fatherhood.

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You seem like a man whose life has matched his ambitions? It’s been crazy. For a long time I thought I was never going to get the chance to do the kind of work I had been aiming for when I started out as an actor. I almost gave up on myself and then I was able to turn things around and suddenly I was working with my acting heroes, who I had grown up admiring. It still seems very surreal.

Are you inclined to move away from comedy and do more dramas like Serena and American Sniper, which Clint Eastwood is directing? Comedy still interests me. I mean, I don’t see them as separate things. As much of a drama as Silver Linings Playbook was, to me it was like there’s a lot of comedy in that movie. And we were very conscious about that while we were making it. And American Hustle has a lot of comedy in it too. In an ideal world, the best dramas have levity in them.

How do you compare your life today to what it was like ten years ago? It’s night and day. You go from a place where you feel frustrated and hopeless and then you see your dreams coming true and everything you worked so hard for is finally happening. I would wish that everyone could have a chance to experience that kind of feeling. Everything’s different now. Simply having financial security is one thing that makes your life so much easier because when you get into this business you know the odds are heavily weighted against you. There are a lot of talented actors who, for one reason or another, never get a chance to prove themselves and you’re constantly reminded how tough it can be to earn a living doing what you love.

Interview

Did you ever think you weren’t going to make it? There’s this crushing anxiety you feel when you’re not getting the parts you want and you wonder if that’s your destiny. I struggled for a long time and you never forget what you went through to finally make it. Even with the success I’ve had, I still fight for roles that I don’t wind up getting, so there’s still enough uncertainty to keep you hungry. But now I have the freedom to travel when I want to, enjoy everything about my life, and also have the ability to make smaller films that don’t pay very much but are very rewarding artistically.

Mojeh

I

n his first decade as an actor, he drifted from one unremarkable supporting role to another, but films like The Hangover and Limitless turned his career around, and an Oscar nomination for Silver Linings Playbook finally put him on Hollywood’s A-List. His recent performance in last year’s critically acclaimed film American Hustle merely confirmed his star power, not a bad achievement for an actor who at one point thought his career had reached a dead end. ‘It’s great to be able to feel that you’ve reached a place in life where you always wanted to be,’ Cooper says. ‘I’ve worked with [Robert] De Niro and David O. Russell twice and now I’m doing a film with Clint Eastwood. You almost think that you’re living out a dream and praying that you don’t wake up, that’s how good things have been going for me.’ Cooper’s new film, Serena, is a depression-era drama, set in 1929, that sees him star opposite Jennifer Lawrence as a newlywed couple trying to launch a timber empire in the hills of North Carolina. Directed by Susanne Bier - whose In a Better World won the Oscar for best foreign film in 2011 - the film reunites Cooper and Lawrence, having previously appeared together in David O. Russell’s Silver Linings Playbook and last year’s American Hustle. The story revolves around the emotional crisis that results when Lawrence’s title character discovers she is unable to bear children and takes her anger out on her husband’s illegitimate son. The 39-year-old grew up in Philadelphia, where his family lived next to a movie theatre, which allowed a young Bradley to develop an abiding passion for cinema and principally the foreign films that his father (who died in 2011) loved to introduce to his son. Following his much-publicised break-up with actress Zoe Saldana, Cooper has been dating model Suki Waterhouse since March 2013. He previously enjoyed a two-year relationship with Renée Zellweger and was married for four months to Jennifer Esposito in 2007. He is fluent in French, having studied the language in university, and has taken many trips to France in recent years he and Waterhouse, 22, spent a week in Paris together in April. A great lover of literature, Cooper wrote his English thesis on Vladimir Nabokov’s literary classic, Lolita. And he recently completed shooting American Sniper, co-starring Sienna Miller, directed by Clint Eastwood. For our interview, Bradley looks every bit the style icon he’s become known as, wearing a blue jacket, white linen shirt, blue jeans and Tod’s loafers.

With Serena, does it seem surreal to be working on your third film with Jennifer Lawrence? Jennifer is such a wonderful girl. We’ve had so much fun working together and I’m so proud of her success. She’s one of the most down-to-earth and unpretentious individuals you could ever meet, and it’s such a pleasure to spend time with her. Jennifer is incredibly talented and she’s one of those natural performers who are instinctively good at what they do. How did Serena come about? Serena was a fluke really. Jennifer was attached to it when we were doing Silver Linings and then I looked at it and I knew Susanne [Bier], so it was like, ‘Why don’t we just do this together?’ Was it interesting to do a period film? That was part of my fascination, although I was very anxious to work with Susanne who is one of the world’s outstanding filmmakers. I also wanted to learn to ride a horse, which I needed to do for the film. It sounds like an odd reason, but as an actor you’re constantly looking for different kinds of experiences like that. Have you and Jennifer Lawrence developed an acting shorthand together? It’s much easier when you have a natural rapport with another actor, and Jennifer and I both know each other so well that we don’t need to think too much about our scenes together. Susanne Bier is also an exceptional director and if you look at her films you can see how much sensitivity she brings to the characters. I learned a lot from working with her and I think Jennifer also appreciated being able to be part of this kind of a story.

Would you like to keep working with directors like David O. Russell or Susanne Bier? I plead guilty to the accusation of working, and wanting to keep working, with people again and again. That’s the goal, to create an artistic circle that works. If you look at any period of art that’s really exploding, it’s people collaborating again and again. You look at [Martin] Scorsese and De Niro - it’s always about pairing and the groups. I’m lucky that David O. Russell wanted to do a movie with me again. And what’s even more beautiful is that De Niro has become like a father to me. It’s hard to describe how much that means to me.

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Interview

Mojeh

Did De Niro offer you any acting advice? He’s taught me so much about acting, as much by talking to me as by my being able to spend time just watching him. He’s shown me that you shouldn’t try too hard - you should let a scene flow and allow yourself to be part of that process and not try to ‘act’ but to be present. I thought I was actually good at that, that being natural was my best asset as an actor, but then when I first worked with De Niro on Limitless I realised that I wasn’t as good as I thought! Have you found it hard to adjust to being a celebrity and seeing your private life splashed about in the media? I don’t talk about my private life very much and I don’t really care what gets written about me. Usually there’s no truth at all to what you read about me and my relationships. In Hollywood, all you have to do is be at the same party together or get photographed at some event and suddenly you’re the subject of the wildest gossip stories. It doesn’t affect my life at all and why should I let any of that spoil all the good things that have happened to me as an actor? Did your childhood influence your interest in movies at all? My father was a true cinephile and he invested a lot of time in showing me very serious and very avant-garde films when I was still pretty young - around 10 or 11. I was exposed to a lot of movies, which most parents would never want to show their children at that age, but I was hooked! Another huge factor was that we happened to live right across the road from a movie theatre in Philadelphia. All I had to do to go see a movie was go out the back door of our house, cross some train tracks, and in a minute or so I was inside the theatre. That’s how easy it was! Which films did you grow up admiring? My dad and I would watch French art house movies like Alain

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Resnais’ Hiroshima Mon Amour and [François] Truffaut’s Les 400 Coups. I also remember seeing great American films like The Deer Hunter and Apocalypse Now. But I knew I wanted to be an actor when I saw The Elephant Man, I was only 12 but from that moment until now acting has been my focus. I would constantly tell my friends, or anyone who would come to my parents’ house, that I was going to be an actor and even though people would usually laugh I was very serious. Why do you think movies had such an effect on you as a young boy? It was the way they transported me into this wonderful fantasy world. As soon as the movie was over, I felt like I was still part of the story and I would lie in bed trying to imagine myself in that world. I was also the kind of kid who wanted to grow up fast, so I would learn a lot about the adult world by watching movies and studying how the characters behaved. You speak fluent French and travel to Paris quite often. Do you feel at home there? Paris is one of my favourite places on earth. I love the culture, I love the city, and it’s interesting to be able to feel at home in a city that I was always fascinated by when I would watch French films. I feel very free there the way you do when you don’t have anything to do in a place and can just do exactly as you please without worrying about work or anything else. You turn 40 next year, any thoughts of starting a family? I would love to be a father one day and start building a family. I know my father would have been very happy to see me raising my own children because family was the most important thing in life to him. I’m sorry he won’t be around to see his grandchildren but he knows that fatherhood was something I was looking forward to. That’s my next big step in life.


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Explorer

Mojeh

Mount Fuji

My Tokyo

Designer Olivia von Halle shares with us her favourite city. See Tokyo through the eyes of this blonde beauty.

Olivia von Halle is available through net-a-porter.com

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Why Tokyo For me, Tokyo is the coolest city in the world. The first time I visited I was with my husband for the weekend, we were living in Shanghai and so it was only a couple of hours flight. We had an absolute blast and both fell in love with it | Favourite sunbathing spot Hayama’s Isshiki Beach – it’s where the Emperor spends his winter holidays | Bar to while away the evenings Blue Moon | Place to get lost in Tokyo Hands is 10 floors of heaven – a department store selling everything from electronics to stationary and kimono accessories, it’s an amazing way to spend a few hours | Secret shop Everyone has a store in Japan, which is perfectly suited to them – it’s just a matter of finding it. Mine is GR8, in La Foret, Harajuku | Favourite culinary delight Okonomiyaki at Gonpachi, Minato | How many days to see it all You need at least four days, but once you’re there you’ll wish it were longer | Suggested travel partner Tokyo is great no matter how many of you go. I’ve been with my husband, on my own and recently with 40 friends for a wedding | Adventure spot Climbing Mount Fuji | Best work-out Join in one of the yoga classes in Yoyogi Park | Best place to rest your head The Park Hyatt Tokyo – most famous for its role in Sophia Coppolla’s movie Lost in Translation | Best spa treatment Spirit of Peninsula body treatment at The Peninsula Tokyo hotel | Favourite memory Leaving the nightclub Womb and walking through Tokyo as the sun rose – the whole city was pink | Music to listen to while there The club’s play techno and house music and the atmosphere is always amazing | Chill out spot Shinjuku Gyoen – a stunning park in the heart of Tokyo. It’s the perfect place to lie on the grass and watch the world go by | Time of year In early April, it isn’t too hot and it’s cherry blossom season – when the streets and parks of Tokyo erupt into a sea of pink flowers | Final words It is very peaceful and everyone is so respectful. It would be my dream to live in Tokyo, because I feel completely at home there.


Mojeh

Explorer

The New York Bar, The Park Hyatt

Instagram @OLIVIAVONHALLE

Shinjuku Gyoen Greenhouse

Sunrise over Tokyo

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