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IMPRESSIONSISSUE 06: IMPRESSIONS

WHAT WILL YOU MAKE TODAY? B

WELCOME TO THE

MOHAWK MAKER QUARTERLY IMPRESSIONS

A

Whether tangible or abstract, your reality is formed by the impressions you make and take. Here’s to those leaving a lasting mark. The word ‘impression’ has several meanings. You might expect that a paper company would focus on the printingrelated definition: “a mark, indentation, figure, etc., C produced by pressure.” But with this issue of the Ma ker Quarterly, we’ve embraced every aspect of the word. Impression can mean a strong, lasting effect on the mind or the emotions— COVE R : like when beautiful artwork CALI aCO WALLPAPE R lingers in our minds long after we encounter it. It can refer to that first, immediate A . CO N we STRget U CTI N K I DS stimulus—like when we sensation to aOparticular PAU L judgment TA K E UCH I form a snap about a person when we first meet. It can also mean a vague notion or belief—like when we B . A Q U ESTI O N O F E AG LES have a general idea of what a product is like because we M E L IS S A TOL A R know the brand name. C.

people’s impressions can inf luence our own perceptions— a friend’s glowing review of a movie might prompt you to think, “Well, maybe it was a little better than I thought.” And over time, first impressionsDbecome part of our longterm memories about meaningful people or events. As makers, we strive to leave lasting impressions on our colleagues, friends, customers, inf luencers—even on the world around us. This issue celebrates creators and companies that act mindfully to produce positive, memorable impressions—and we hope it inspires you to create work that lasts. What impression do you want to make? —Thomas D. O’Connor, Jr.

SAR A BAR N E R

Impressions can be both physical and emotional; they can D. both CALI CO WALLPAPE be quickly formed andR enduring. They are informed DAW N L ACK Mthey A N bring life to communication by outside infBluences, and they shape perception. When we hold a well-worn E . TI RO TI RO book in we NS intuit T Eour R Ehands, S A ROBI ONthat it is much-loved and read by its owner. A well-crafted logo on a business card tells F. theFIcompany LSO N is competent and trustworthy. Other us E

F


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CONTENTS 3

Editor’s Letter

15

A Guide to Impressions with Studio On Fire

7

What is Ephemeral?

18

Stewards of Heritage

11

Impressions that Last a Lifetime

21

Timeless Library

24

The Movement

14

32

Making Memories

Paper Grades

Mohawk Live Augmented Reality App

Mohawk Live incorporates augmented reality, a new technology which allows access to content from web-based channels via scanned images on printed paper. The app was specifically designed to enhance materials printed on Mohawk fine paper, enhancing packaging, publications, point of sale displays, and other projects printed on Mohawk products. Mohawk Live seamlessly integrates print with dynamic, interactive content and transforms a one dimensional image to a multidimensional experience featuring 3-D images, videos, photos, infographics, text, websites and animations.

Mohawk Live is easy to download and use, following these steps: 1 2 3 4

Download the free app from the Apple App Store or Google Play. Point and hover a mobile device at the image that has the Mohawk Live icon. Wait for the enhanced content to load. WiFi connections are recommended for faster load times and enhanced quality. The app will launch enhanced content, seemingly bringing the printed piece to life.


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IMPRESSIONS

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D

COVE R : CALI CO WALLPAPE R CO N STR U CTI O N K I DS

PAU L TA K E UCH I

B .

A Q U ESTI O N O F E AG LES

C.

SAR A BAR N E R

D.

CALI CO WALLPAPE R

E .

TI RO TI RO

F.

FI LSO N

M E L IS S A TOL A R

DAW N B L ACK M A N

T E R E S A ROBI NS ON E

F


07 ISSUE 06:

09

IMPRESSIONS ISSUE 06: IMPRESSIONS

MADE TO LAST? Devices are the new gatekeepers of our personal information, and not as dependable as we think.

We take care to store the information that matters most to us on computers, on servers, on backup hard drives and in the Cloud. But our efforts may be less permanent than we think. Historically, humans etched, chiseled and wrote important information into and onto relatively permanent materials—stone, wood, paper—that require little more than the human eye to be read. But the 20th century has brought a wave of new archiving formats jockeying for dominance in our constantly changing cultural landscape. This f lood of formats, and the devices that read them, introduced an important new distinction: human-vs. machine-readable information. Humanreadable information simply requires a person to access.

WHAT IS EPHEMERAL?

Machine-readable information requires a device to interpret and display that information. This presents a new problem: While your format may survive, you may have no way to read the information stored on it. You may have noticed that many laptops come without a CD/ DVD drive nowadays, or that no one you know has a VHS player anymore. Now think further back: How easy do you think it is to get your hands on a UNIVAC SS90 to read that punch card you found in an antique shop? As we transfer our information from device to device, format to format, we have to ask ourselves: Are my storage formats worthy of the information I truly cherish?

D I D YO U K N OW?

As our computers 2–10 1–10 andYEfiles getAVEcorrupted, OF HARD DRIVEScrash FAIL ARS IS THE RAG E YE ARS IS THE AVE RAG E AF TE R FOU R YE ARS. LIFESPAN OF OPTICAL LIFESPAN OF A FL ASH DRIVE . DIA SUCH ASendures. DVDs, printedME matter BLU - RAY AND CDs.

22%

+150

BY

HUNDREDS OF YEARS IS HOW LONG ARCHIVAL PAPE R WILL L AST.

B RY N M O OTH

140 130 120 Think about all the photographs in your possession. Where 110 are they stored? And more importantly, how? Your answer likely depends on your demographic cohort. 100 If you’re a Baby Boomer, you probably have boxes in the attic full of dime-store 3-by-5 prints in their original 90 envelopes, strips of negatives in the little pocket in front. If you’re a GenXer, perhaps you have beautifully embellished 80 scrapbooks of snapshots from memorable family activities and milestones, plus every photo you’ve taken since you got your first iPhone stored (and ignored) on 70 your desktop computer. If you’re a Millennial, you probably have a whole Instagram feed of selfies and “what I ate for 60 dinner” food porn.

photos will always be there. But we’re not guaranteed of that. Good luck finding a player for the mixtape your 8thgrade crush made you. Technology’s only getting smaller, and while it will be possible to view your favorite pics on your smartwatch in the next few years, it won’t be a particularly enjoyable experience. Managing and preserving all this digital media presents tremendous challenges, not just for libraries and educational institutions seeking to archive their collections for future generations, but for those of us who want to store our personal photos, videos and .doc files. “All of us have content that’s vulnerable to destruction or loss, and we want to prevent that,” says Mary Molinaro, director of the Research Data Center at the University of Kentucky Library and a leading educator with the Library of Congress’s Digital Preservation Outreach and Education program. “Content is vulnerable whenever you change computers or update software,” she says. “When I present, I always ask people, how many of you have lost files? Everyone has.

It50 probably isn’t a coincidence that scrapbooking as a hobby for home crafters really took off just as digital cameras did in40 the early 2000s. Once all our vacation snapshots were invisible to us—stored inside our point-and-shoots or on tiny little storage cards—we felt like somehow we were 30 losing those memories. Inexpensive digital cameras made it easy for us to take lots of photos indiscriminately, but then “ People think digital media will always be there—but that’s not necessarily the case,” she continues. “I have boxes of we20opted to print and save the best ones in keepsake books. family photos from the 1800s. But when my daughter’s hard drive crashed, she lost all the baby pictures of her second It 10 also probably isn’t a coincidence that vinyl records are child. People don’t realize it until they lose things.” enjoying newfound popularity among audiophiles who want a more authentic listening experience than what In a 2010 article for Harvard Magazine, Jonathan Shaw they get from iTunes. writes, “For digital preservationists, a prime concern is that data might be kept perfectly secure and complete, And while digital book sales continue to grow, that growth but still be unreadable by machines in is slowing,PUNCH and 80% of all FLOPPY books purchased are VHSstill in FLASH FILM CD, DVD,and programs RECORD CASSETTE DISK TAPE DRIVE BLU-RAY the future.” Molinaro describes a recent move, when she paperback CARD or hardcover form. discovered a box full of old zip disks—not only did she no longer have a zip drive, but even if she had, it would be Even in this digital age, people still want the physical incompatible with her current-model computer. (The disks manifestations of those JPG, MP3 and PDF files. KEY M E D IA LI FES PAN T h e d ata a bo ve co n s i sts of th e ave ra ge *Medi a pl aye r a ccess h a s bee n est im ated thertrash.) ran ge of fo r m atwent lifesright pan s in . Info m at i o n ba sed o n hi sto r i ca l trends. Access my be E Dmay IA PL AY Ethem. R ACC ESS* As it turns out,Mwe need We take it onifaith that s inte n d ed fo r ge n e ra l co mpar i so n o n ly. shorter or longer depending on the victors format wars and Then there’s the issue of storingofallvarious this digital content. In the pace of our smartphones will always be able to display JPG images, technological progress. the guidebook “Perspectives on Personal Digital Archiving,” that the “cloud” in which we’ve stored all our music and

?? HARD DRIVE

THE CLOUD**

ARCHIVAL PAPER

** T h e cl o u d i s h ard to p in d o w n . In theory it could last indefinitely or only as long as you keep paying fo r th e se r v i ce , o r unt il th e se r v i ce i s di sco nt inu ed to m ak e way fo r so m ethin g n e w.


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“ We’re facing a forgotten generation or even a forgotten century.” “ If there are photos you really care about, print them out.” V I NT C E R F

G O O GL E ’ S CH I E F I N T E R N ET E VA NGE L I ST & V ICE PR E S I DE N T

Mike Ashenfelder from DPOE (Digital Preservation Outreach & Education) describes how he filled four 1-terrabyte hard drives with his family’s vacation videos, then needed four more drives to back up the originals. Further complicating matters: A study in 2013 by Backblaze, an online storage company, found that 22% of hard drives failed after four years, due to mechanical problems, random issues or overuse. In other words, we have to back up our backups. The irony is that digital media may be more ephemeral than print. While files that were “born” digital are particularly challenging to organize, catalog and archive, objects that originated in print form can endure (presuming that they’re archivally printed and stored). A cover of The New Yorker in 2009 illustrates the point: It showed a space alien sitting amid a pile of broken computer hardware and reading a book—the only thing that still “worked.” In an age when each of us has thousands of images, songs, e-books and documents, out of sight and out of mind on our desktops or in the cloud, we’re entirely disconnected from all of it. Our relationship with all this digital stuff is so temporary and distant—even if we don’t give that relationship much thought. But as creators and makers, we value things that make an impression, that are more permanent. We use technology as a means to produce our work, yet we prefer the physical product that results.

is a sustainable choice—both for the planet, thanks to its recycled content and FSC certification, and for the long term, thanks to its acid-free, archival qualities. And the Inxwell surface produces razor-sharp detail and deep ink density, while retaining the tactile feel of uncoated paper. Options with Inxwell makes for printed pieces that are beautiful, impactful and lasting. We’re in a time of transition—as we move from printed formats to digital media and back again, and use digital tools to create physical objects. Researchers and preservationists are in the same state of f lux, Molinari says. “In the library world, we digitize objects in our collection to make them more widely accessible, and we print them out for display. But the backup is still that printed object.” “ Think of printed books,” Molinaro says, in a nod to that New Yorker cover. “When you take a book off the shelf in 20 years, you can be pretty much guaranteed that the words will still be readable. In a presentation to the American Association for the Advancement of Science, internet pioneer and Google’s Chief Internet Evangelist, Vint Cerf, warned that this issue of digital data loss isn’t just a problem in the here and now, but rather has sweeping historical consequences. We can’t possibly know how valuable these materials will be decades or centuries from now: Family photos will be important to our descendants, and important research being done today will be vital to future scientists. We’re facing a “forgotten generation or even a forgotten century,” Cerf said.

And when we expect those products to make an impression and to last, we have to plan for that permanence. If digital content invariably succumbs to planned obsolescence, then “ We digitize things because we think we will preserve them, but what we don’t understand is that unless we printed content must be made durable if it’s to survive. So take other steps, those digital versions may not be any we have to make smart choices about form, production and better, and may even be worse, than the artifacts that we materials. Since 1995, designers have relied on Mohawk’s Options grade with the exclusive Inxwell surface treatment digitized,” Cerf said in a 2015 article for The Guardian. “ If there are photos you really care about, print them out.” to produce communication with staying power. Options


09 ISSUE 06:

IMPRESSIONS

MADE TO LAST? Devices are the new gatekeepers of our personal information, and not as dependable as we think.

We take care to store the information that matters most to us on computers, on servers, on backup hard drives and in the Cloud. But our efforts may be less permanent than we think. Historically, humans etched, chiseled and wrote important information into and onto relatively permanent materials—stone, wood, paper—that require little more than the human eye to be read. But the 20th century has brought a wave of new archiving formats jockeying for dominance in our constantly changing cultural landscape. This f lood of formats, and the devices that read them, introduced an important new distinction: human-vs. machine-readable information. Humanreadable information simply requires a person to access.

Machine-readable information requires a device to interpret and display that information. This presents a new problem: While your format may survive, you may have no way to read the information stored on it. You may have noticed that many laptops come without a CD/ DVD drive nowadays, or that no one you know has a VHS player anymore. Now think further back: How easy do you think it is to get your hands on a UNIVAC SS90 to read that punch card you found in an antique shop? As we transfer our information from device to device, format to format, we have to ask ourselves: Are my storage formats worthy of the information I truly cherish?

D I D YO U K N OW?

22%

OF HARD DRIVES FAIL AF TE R FOU R YE ARS.

2–10

YE ARS IS THE AVE RAG E LIFESPAN OF OPTICAL ME DIA SUCH AS DVDs, BLU - RAY AND CDs.

1–10

YE ARS IS THE AVE RAG E LIFESPAN OF A FL ASH DRIVE .

HUNDREDS OF YEARS IS HOW LONG ARCHIVAL PAPE R WILL L AST.

+150 140 130 120 110 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20

??

10

PUNCH CARD

KEY

FLOPPY DISK

M E D IA LI FES PAN M E D IA PL AY E R ACC ESS*

VHS TAPE

FLASH DRIVE

FILM

T h e d ata a bo ve co n s i sts of th e ave ra ge ran ge of fo r m at lifes pan s . Info r m at i o n i s inte n d ed fo r ge n e ra l co mpar i so n o n ly.

CD, DVD, BLU-RAY

RECORD

CASSETTE

*Medi a pl aye r a ccess h a s bee n est im ated ba sed o n hi sto r i ca l trends. Access my be shorter or longer depending on the victors of various format wars and the pace of technological progress.

HARD DRIVE

THE CLOUD**

ARCHIVAL PAPER

** T h e cl o u d i s h ard to p in d o w n . In theory it could last indefinitely or only as long as you keep paying fo r th e se r v i ce , o r unt il th e se r v i ce i s di sco nt inu ed to m ak e way fo r so m ethin g n e w.


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IMPRESSIONS

IMPRESSIONS THAT LAST A LIFETIME

From backyard farmer to backend developer, DIY.org helps kids learn to be whatever they can imagine with guidance, community and patches along the way. BY

SA R A H W H ITM A N

Kids are born makers. Just ask any parent about their daily battle to sort, store and display their children’s art projects and you’ll be hard-pressed to find one who isn’t overwhelmed. From watercolor paintings to Lego creations to Rainbow Loom jewelry, we’re swimming in a sea of kiddie masterpieces. But there’s a reason kids are such prolific makers: For them, the process is as valuable as the product. Long after their work is finished, kids carry the confidence gained by the act of creation. Vimeo co-founder Zach Klein believes strongly in this idea, and in 2011, he launched DIY.org, a community devoted to helping youngsters learn skills—and confidence—by completing projects and sharing them with their peers. As a child, Klein spent his free time designing web pages, but the adults in his life didn’t recognize that the talents he was developing could be the foundation of his livelihood. Conversely, through the traditional skills he was learning in Boy Scouts, Klein found both confidence and validation. With co-founders Daren Rabinovitch, Isaiah Saxon and Andrew Sliwinski, Klein created a mash-up of his childhood experiences: a co-ed, Scout-like environment where kids could explore both digital and hands-on skills, earn patches and connect with other kids in a safe place online. “ I wanted to make the community I wish I had when I was a kid,” Klein says. “My interests weren’t relevant at school because they weren’t understood to be important yet. …I realized that adults are poor predictors of which emerging skills will be valuable when our kids grow up.” That’s why most of the skills and challenges kids can tackle via DIY are suggested by kids themselves. And there are as many unconventional skills (beatmaker, circuit bender, entrepreneur) for the 400,000-plus members to choose from as there are classic skills (actor, athlete, chef). “I don’t

want to place bets on what will be important someday,” Klein says. “I just want kids to have the opportunity to practice whatever makes them passionate now and feel good about it.” DIY membership is free, although parents must supply credit card information to prove that an adult has OK’d the membership for kids to access the online tools. Kids can explore hundreds of skills, try challenges and get peer feedback. Some of the skills, like animation, involve using digital tools. Others, like clothing maker, are hands-on, and users must submit a digital record of their work to receive credit for completing the challenge. And with the new DIY Camps feature, kids can earn embroidered patches for completing challenges, receive personal feedback from DIY mentors, and collaborate with a small group and a counselor. DIY’s social components give members an opportunity to discuss skills in their own terms. “We believe the best person to teach a 10-year-old chemistry is an 11-year-old who just spent a year figuring it out,” Klein says. One unexpected offshoot of DIY is the 400 and counting grassroots clubs where members connect face-to-face to make stuff together. Naturally, the do-it-yourself philosophy is front and center there, too. DIY recently released a club handbook. The No. 1 rule? They must be kid-led. “Leadership is an important skill to practice, and you can’t get a chance to do that if parents are hogging all of the responsibilities,” Klein says. All this boils down to that one simple idea DIY hopes to instill in these creators and designers of tomorrow: confidence and the belief that you can do it yourself. “I don’t think it’s important that they use the skills they learn on DIY for the rest of their lives,” Klein says. “What’s important to me is they develop the muscle to be fearless learners, to never feel stuck with the skills they already have.”


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MAKING MEMORIES How senses and emotions help us store and recall memories. BY

B RY N M O OTH

There’s a family vacation photo on your desk—looking at it, you can recall details like the sun, the waves, the funny thing your son said just before the picture was taken. Objects are powerful triggers that prompt us to recall past experiences. Researchers continue to explore how the senses inf luence how we form impressions and store and recall memories. Not only is the science fascinating, but it can also shape how brands communicate and win fans. First, a quick primer on memory: Memory works as a filter that helps us process the staggering number of experiences and stimuli we encounter every day—without memory, our brains would essentially be in a constant state of overf low, unable to function. Scientists understand that the hippocampus gathers new memories; long-term memories are stored in bits all over the brain. To recall a specific person or event, we subconsciously sort through all those bits to assemble the memory. There are two primary types of memory: Explicit memories are those that you can deliberately recall and describe in words, like remembering your first date. Explicit memory is comprised of episodic memory (of people, experiences, objects, events) and semantic memory (facts we know about the world around us). Implicit memory is subconscious. The common example is that we know how to ride a bike from past learning and experience without thinking, “ I need to remember how to ride a bike.” Research has shown that emotion inf luences how memories are encoded in our brains. In an inf luential study in the 1970s, Roger Brown and James Kulik coined the term “f lashbulb memories” and proved that we’re more likely to remember events with significant emotional impact than mundane experiences. Flashbulb memory triggers “Where were you when” conversations: “Where were you on 9/11?” More recently, Karim Nader of McGill University, found that f lashbulb memories get reinforced—even changed— through these conversations. The more we talk about them, the more embedded these memories become. And hearing other people’s impressions of the events can alter the details we remember. We also know that emotions and senses inf luence recall. French novelist Marcel Proust documented this effect of sensory input on memory in “Remembrance of Things

I LLU STR ATI O N

M I K E A N DE R S EN

Past,” when the sensation of eating a madeleine prompted the protagonist to recall pleasant childhood mornings with his beloved aunt. Finally, we know that positive impressions or experiences can generate positive memories. Senses are key to creating those associations. In a recent study from Harvard University, researchers focused on how touch can provoke positive impressions—for example, subjects perceived that job candidates were more qualified when their resumes were presented on heavy clipboards.

“ In an article for the journal Science, the study’s authors wrote: “First impressions are liable to be inf luenced by the tactile environment, and control over this environment may be especially important for negotiators, pollsters, job seekers and others interested in interpersonal communication. The use of ‘tactile tactics’ may represent a new frontier in social inf luence and communication.”


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GUIDE TO IMPRESSIONS WITH STUDIO ON FIRE From engraving to embossing to edge painting, this best in class letterpress printer is making all the right impressions.


FOIL STAMPING Foil stamping uses heated copper plates to transfer thin plastic (foil) to paper. We have also started receiving lots of requests for blind heated impressions, when we use just the hot copper to burnish the artwork into the paper (sans foil). Use this technique when you want to create a sheet difference, achieve a bright/shiny metallic or apply an opaque color to a dark stock. A

ENGRAVING With this technique, we etch the artwork into the surface of a copper plate, coat the plate with ink, then wipe the excess ink away. Then we use extreme pressure to apply the inked plate to the paper, pulling the ink onto the surface of the stock. Engraving creates a slightly raised texture and is best for accentuating detailed typography and exquisite artwork or using opaque ink on dark stock.

B

C

H

D

I

E F G


J

LETTERPRESS

L K

Modern letterpress printing is a single-level deboss, meaning the image is pushed down into the stock from the front. Using house-made photopolymer plates, we lay down one ink color at a time. Letterpress inks, with the exception of metallics, are not opaque, a llowing for beautiful overprinting. Letterpress works best with thick, bulky papers, which inf luence how the ink lays down.

A . D ES I G N : C HAD M I C HAE L STU D I O

CL I EN T: CH A D M ICH A E L ST U DIO White, gold and gray engraving with gold and white foil. B . D ES I G N : O N E PLU S O N E

CL I EN T: T H E F I F T H B R I DE S M A I D C. D ES I G N : C HAD M I C HAE L STU D I O

CL I EN T: DAG GE R & CO. TATTOO Copper foi l a nd second i mpres sion . D. D ES I G N : STU D I O O N FI R E

CL I EN T: I NS PI R E D BY H E AT H E R E . D ES I G N : STO UT

CL I EN T: STOU T

F. D ES I G N : STU D I O O N FI R E

CL I EN T: ST U DIO ON F I R E

M

G . D ES I G N : CO LLE + M cVOY

CL I EN T: COL L E + McVOY H . D ES I G N : MAT TSO N C R E ATIVE

CL I EN T: ROGU E OCTOPUS P

I . D ES I G N : STU D I O O N FI R E

CL I EN T: ST U DIO ON F I R E J. D ES I G N : AI R B N B

CL I EN T: A I R BN B

K . D ES I G N : CO LLE + M cVOY

CL I EN T: COL L E + McVOY

L . D ES I G N : J OS É G U I Z AR

CL I EN T: JO S É GU I Z A R

M . D ES I G N : STU D I O O N FI R E

CL I EN T: ST U DIO ON F I R E

Q

N

EMBOSSING

EDGE PAINTING

Embossing pushes the image up above the surface of the paper. Debossing pushes the image down into the stock. Both techniques use a two-part die (one placed on the front of the stock and its counter form placed on the back) in order to achieve the sculptural result. These techniques are best for creating substantial sculptural effects and are often used in combination with foil stamping.

Edge painting is one of our favorite ways to add a splash of color to a project. The thicker the card, the larger the impact a colored edge makes. Meta llic and gradients have become popular choices over the past couple of years. An alternate technique is custom triplexing, which creates an Oreo cookie effect on the side of the card.

O

N . D ES I G N : STU D I O O N FI R E I LLU STR ATI O N : STO UT, MAT TSO N C R E ATIVE

CL I EN T: ST U DIO ON F I R E

O. D ES I G N : C HAD M I C HAE L STU D I O

CL I EN T: CH A D M ICH A E L ST U DIO G old foi l a nd embos s . P. D ES I G N : CARSO N C R E ATIVE

CL I EN T: ROBY N WAT E R S

Q . D ES I G N : STU D I O O N FI R E

CL I EN T: ST U DIO ON F I R E Spl it fou nt a i n let t er pres s a nd g ra d ient ed ge color.


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Filson is a heritage brand known for rugged and goodlooking outdoor gear. Everything about Filson—its identity, stories and products—makes a lasting impression. We asked creative director, Alex Carleton, why Filson is so enduring.

STEWARDS OF HERITAGE

Creating products —and customer relationships—that never go out of style. B RY N M O OTH I N T E RV I E W I NG A LE X CA R LE TO N OF F I L S ON

Filson’s promise is “unfailing goods”—the word ‘ unfailing’ has such power and distinction. How do you use design to convey that impression of durability, permanence, usefulness and quality? At Filson we always challenge ourselves to improve our products and assortment. We began as an outfitter in 1897 and continue to maintain that legacy of supplying our customers with enduring gear for the outdoors. We make the majority of our goods in the USA, mostly in the Pacific Northwest where we started, and we field-test each product. Customer testimonials and feedback guide us to constantly improve our products. At a time when so many products are built with short half-lives, what does it mean for a brand to stake its claim on products that are made to last? Filson built its legacy around ma king high-qua lity products with superior performance using timeless materials. Our uncompromising standards and lifetime guarantee are hallmarks of the brand. We’re proud to focus on lasting quality—not chasing trends, but providing products of real use to our customers. You instantly know from the color of the canvas and the feel of a leather strap that you’re holding a Filson bag. How do materials play into creating the impression of quality and ruggedness?

The materials we work with complement the classic design and structural integrity of our luggage and apparel. We develop and use materials that will wear well over time and that will build a rich patina or pliability with regular use. We’ve been using Mackinaw Wool and oil-finish cotton canvas for more than a century, so the material has an irrefutable, time-proven durability. While Filson never went away, it seems to be enjoying a broader audience and new popularity these days. What does it mean to be the steward of a heritage brand in today’s world? People from all over the world have been discovering Filson for more than 118 years, and it’s always great to meet new customers who find us. It’s a proud moment when we can outfit someone new, and that usually results in a life-long relationship between us and the individuals who use our products. While we like to stay aware of what’s going on, we don’t chase fads. Our drive is to innovate and build purposeful products that can withstand the demands of the field while enduring the test of time. Filson products feel like heirlooms. Why do you think customers long for heritage products—those that are hand-made, with enduring style, that feel oldfashioned in a way? Our products provide a tangible connection to the values of a previous generation. But beyond nostalgia, many of our customers have stories of inheriting their father’s Filson jacket, which he wore when they went hunting together every fall. It’s this sort of physical reminder of memories that make an emotional connection. Our products are companions on the journey.


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C

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A , C, D, E .

Your partnership with Shinola to produce Filsonbranded watches and bikes is a match made in heaven. What do these two brands—one more than 100 years old and the other less than a decade—have in common?

COPY R IGH T F I L S ON COM PA N Y B.

FOR E ST WOODWA R D

Shinola is the perfect partner to help us build Americanmade watches that deliver uncompromising quality. Together, we created a new standard of watches that are hand-built for a lifetime of performance in the worst conditions. What percentage of your customers are truly outdoor enthusiasts, and what percentage are people who don’t hunt or fish but aspire to outdoor living? How does the brand allow people to imagine a life that may not be within their reach? All of our customers are outdoor enthusiasts, in some way. They’re unified by their enjoyment of outdoor recreation, in whatever form that takes. Whether they’re town or country, our gear enables outdoor expeditions and reminds them to aspire to that goal. How do you use storytelling to create a world that envelops your customers? How are these stories timeless? We share real stories from the customers and Filson fans who inspire us. Finding long-time Filson supporters and sharing their experiences with our goods informs our product development in a way that is genuine, earnest and supportive.

E


21 ISSUE 06:

IMPRESSIONS

TIMELESS LIBRARY

Voracious collector and curator Dave Cuzner showcases design work created during—or inspired by—the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s. BY

SA R A H W H ITM A N

Dave Cuzner believes midcentury modern design is so appealing because it doesn’t try to be era-specific or regard shifting stylistic trends. It adapts to the current needs of the user. That’s why his popular website, Grainedit.com, not only features work created between 1950 and 1970, but also contemporary design inspired by the era. Classic design lovers will delight in the interviews, articles, designers’ libraries, rare design annuals, type specimens, ephemera, posters and vintage children’s books highlighted on the blog and sold on Graineditshop.com.

When evaluating items to showcase, Cuzner has guidelines for each discipline. Furniture has to first be comfortable, then effortless in its form. Graphic design must express a strong sense of composition and color to convey a message. Cuzner says modern design’s clarity and utility is relevant in any day and age: “I think the concept of functionality is attractive to many people—not just designers—who know that a well-designed product would not only serve its key purpose, but also projects simplicity and honesty in the materials and their methods.”

MARKEN SIGNETE

Drawing upon Constructivist art and the Bauhaus movement, Anton Stankowski’s work sheds excessive ornamentation in favor of a simplified yet formal approach. This book highlights many examples from Stankowski’s prolific body of design work.


22 MOHAWK

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JACQUELINE CASEY

Jacqueline Casey was a graphic designer who is best known for the posters she created during her lengthy tenure for the Design Services Department at MIT. Heavily inf luenced by the Swiss/International style, her work skillfully employed wordplay, repetition and bold typographic elements.

REYNOLDS METALS

Produced for Reynolds Metals Company, this booklet marks an early foray into the world of information design from a modernist prospective. Working with a limited color palette and a keen sense of composition, the designer forged a visually stunning and highly informative piece.


24 MOHAWK

THE

MAKER

QUARTERLY

MOVEMENT CHAMPIONS OF CRAFT

A Question of Eagles Heirloom-quality goods made by husband and wife Los Angeles, California AQ U ESTI O N O FE AG LES .CO M

“ Even if it doesn’t always translate directly into our designs, the freedom we find outdoors puts us in such an amazing headspace. Years ago, on a cross-country road trip through Northern Idaho, we stumbled upon a small lodge very early in the morning, literally in the middle of the forest. The fog was still thick, and the smell of coffee mixed with the pines was absolutely incredible—pancakes never tasted so good! It was such a memorable moment that we tend to go back there in our minds often, and that impression helps us remember to sometimes just slow down and enjoy the present.”

Imaginary Authors

Fragrances that follow storylines with intriguing twists Portland, OR I MAG I NARYAUTH O RS .CO M

“ Fragrance as a definition in our day and age doesn’t have a very good intrinsic connotation. From my perspective, the idea of mass-marketed perfume has given folks who have a desire for something unique and well-crafted a bad taste for what’s new, available, and even what’s possible with perfume and cologne and the sense of smell. It’s my hope that Imaginary Authors provides a door to exquisite, new olfactory experiences and adventures.”

Drawn Home

Hand-made quilts, throws and pillows Oakland, California D R AW N - H O M E .CO M

“ I greatly admire authenticity in others and hope that that is what people see in me. I want to be seen as someone who follows her own path, is not inf luenced by what should be done but is guided by her own voice. Color is a main focus of my designs. I love playing with color swatches and playing them off one another. Color is what tells the story and creates meaning.”


27 ISSUE 06:

IMPRESSIONS

PHOTOGR A PH E R S / I L LUST R ATOR S M E L IS S A TOL A R A S HOD SI MON I A N DR AW N HOM E

A. B. C.

D. E. F.

JACK I E YOU NG SA R A BA R NER L AU R EN COL EM A N & C Y L E SU E S Z

Canoe

Hand-crafted modern leather goods Austin, Texas CAN O EG O O DS .CO M

“ Leather is full of possibility! It can be stamped, carved, dyed, painted, burnt, molded and sewn. Every day I learn something new about it. It teaches me patience and to enjoy the process. Afternoons spent with my grandfather are some of my strongest memories. He was an artist, mechanic and jewelry maker. He taught me how to shine my shoes, work slowly and take care of the details. His love for our family was palpable in everything he did.”

Sara Barner

Minimalist bags and wallets with elegant proportions New York, NY SAR ABAR N E R .CO M

“ I love finding geometry in nature. The right proportions can elevate a simple shape into something very elegant. These shapes appeal to me aesthetically, but they also help express the quality of the material. I work with English Bridle leather, which is quite heavy and very stiff when it is new, so it naturally lends itself to holding these forms. As the leather is worn and broken in, it becomes much softer. The surface of the leather and the shape of the bag begin to transform. I love the relationship between the material and the shape—and how both change over time with use.”

Calico Wallpaper

Gilded, metallic, marbled wallpapers and bespoke wall murals Brooklyn, New York CALI COWALLPAPE R .CO M

“ When designing, we are quite mindful of creating an immersive environment with our work. Rather than sticking to standard rolls and repeating pattern, we like the engagement with architecture and client that non-repeating custom murals present. Although this offering can sometimes present a cha llenge, it is one that we embrace and feel affords us more f lexibility in creating a more dynamic installation. We feel this conceit creates a visceral experience for the viewer who becomes surrounded by our design.” C


24 MOHAWK

THE

MAKER

QUARTERLY

MOVEMENT CHAMPIONS OF CRAFT

A Question of Eagles Heirloom-quality goods made by husband and wife Los Angeles, California AQ U ESTI O N O FE AG LES .CO M

“ Even if it doesn’t always translate directly into our designs, the freedom we find outdoors puts us in such an amazing headspace. Years ago, on a cross-country road trip through Northern Idaho, we stumbled upon a small lodge very early in the morning, literally in the middle of the forest. The fog was still thick, and the smell of coffee mixed with the pines was absolutely incredible—pancakes never tasted so good! It was such a memorable moment that we tend to go back there in our minds often, and that impression helps us remember to sometimes just slow down and enjoy the present.”

Imaginary Authors

Fragrances that follow storylines with intriguing twists Portland, OR I MAG I NARYAUTH O RS .CO M

“ Fragrance as a definition in our day and age doesn’t have a very good intrinsic connotation. From my perspective, the idea of mass-marketed perfume has given folks who have a desire for something unique and well-crafted a bad taste for what’s new, available, and even what’s possible with perfume and cologne and the sense of smell. It’s my hope that Imaginary Authors provides a door to exquisite, new olfactory experiences and adventures.”

Drawn Home

Hand-made quilts, throws and pillows Oakland, California D R AW N - H O M E .CO M

“ I greatly admire authenticity in others and hope that that is what people see in me. I want to be seen as someone who follows her own path, is not inf luenced by what should be done but is guided by her own voice. Color is a main focus of my designs. I love playing with color swatches and playing them off one another. Color is what tells the story and creates meaning.”

F


27 ISSUE 06:

IMPRESSIONS

PHOTOGR A PH E R S / I L LUST R ATOR S M E L IS S A TOL A R A S HOD SI MON I A N DR AW N HOM E

A. B. C.

D. E. F.

JACK I E YOU NG SA R A BA R NER L AU R EN COL EM A N & C Y L E SU E S Z

Canoe

Hand-crafted modern leather goods Austin, Texas CAN O EG O O DS .CO M

“ Leather is full of possibility! It can be stamped, carved, dyed, painted, burnt, molded and sewn. Every day I learn something new about it. It teaches me patience and to enjoy the process. Afternoons spent with my grandfather are some of my strongest memories. He was an artist, mechanic and jewelry maker. He taught me how to shine my shoes, work slowly and take care of the details. His love for our family was palpable in everything he did.”

Sara Barner

Minimalist bags and wallets with elegant proportions New York, NY SAR ABAR N E R .CO M

“ I love finding geometry in nature. The right proportions can elevate a simple shape into something very elegant. These shapes appeal to me aesthetically, but they also help express the quality of the material. I work with English Bridle leather, which is quite heavy and very stiff when it is new, so it naturally lends itself to holding these forms. As the leather is worn and broken in, it becomes much softer. The surface of the leather and the shape of the bag begin to transform. I love the relationship between the material and the shape—and how both change over time with use.”

Calico Wallpaper

Gilded, metallic, marbled wallpapers and bespoke wall murals Brooklyn, New York CALI COWALLPAPE R .CO M

“ When designing, we are quite mindful of creating an immersive environment with our work. Rather than sticking to standard rolls and repeating pattern, we like the engagement with architecture and client that non-repeating custom murals present. Although this offering can sometimes present a cha llenge, it is one that we embrace and feel affords us more f lexibility in creating a more dynamic installation. We feel this conceit creates a visceral experience for the viewer who becomes surrounded by our design.”


28 MOHAWK

MAKER

QUARTERLY

PHOTOGR A PH E R S / I L LUST R ATOR S J I A M A & I K E A DA M A KOTO T E R E S A ROBI NS ON

A Two Pipe Problem

A. B.

C.

PAU L TA K E UCH I

Tiro Tiro

Type-centric letterpress prints, apparel and accessories Tokyo, Japan & London, UK

Enduring, covetable jewelry for everyday wear Portland, Oregon

AT WO PI PE PRO B LE M .CO M

TI ROTI RO.CO M

“ My early inspirations come from two very clear areas: American comics from the 1950s (Tales From The Crypt, Crime Does Not Pay) and a British magazine called The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News from 1897 that featured a small metal type that looked like tiny cut logs. I wish to leave behind the impression that I did things my own way and that I worked hard to maintain a strong sense of integrity. I hope my 6-year-old daughter will carry on after me.”

Construction Kids

Hands-on workshops where kids use real tools to build real things Brooklyn, New York CO N STR U CTI O N K I DS .CO M

“ The impression we are trying to make is that of self-reliance. Self-reliance is what binds everything we do. It engenders safety, it fosters creativity, it drives inquiry, and it empowers children to be generous and considerate. When children are given the opportunity to be self-reliant and are given the tools and knowledge to manage themselves safely, their innate expansiveness, generosity and creativity are unleashed.”

“ My most lasting impression is the first jewelry class that I took in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico almost 20 years ago. I went to study abroad as a young art student with a focus on painting. I took the jewelry class on a whim, thinking it would be fun to try something new. From the first little piece of silver that I melted into a ball, I was hooked. I spent the rest of my six months in Mexico neglecting my painting studies and spending all my money on silver and stones. I didn’t know it then, but that class ended up changing my life and determining my career.”


A


28 MOHAWK

MAKER

QUARTERLY

PHOTOGR A PH E R S / I L LUST R ATOR S J I A M A & I K E A DA M A KOTO T E R E S A ROBI NS ON

A Two Pipe Problem

A. B.

C.

PAU L TA K E UCH I

Tiro Tiro

Type-centric letterpress prints, apparel and accessories Tokyo, Japan & London, UK

Enduring, covetable jewelry for everyday wear Portland, Oregon

AT WO PI PE PRO B LE M .CO M

TI ROTI RO.CO M

“ My early inspirations come from two very clear areas: American comics from the 1950s (Tales From The Crypt, Crime Does Not Pay) and a British magazine called The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News from 1897 that featured a small metal type that looked like tiny cut logs. I wish to leave behind the impression that I did things my own way and that I worked hard to maintain a strong sense of integrity. I hope my 6-year-old daughter will carry on after me.”

Construction Kids

Hands-on workshops where kids use real tools to build real things Brooklyn, New York CO N STR U CTI O N K I DS .CO M

“ The impression we are trying to make is that of self-reliance. Self-reliance is what binds everything we do. It engenders safety, it fosters creativity, it drives inquiry, and it empowers children to be generous and considerate. When children are given the opportunity to be self-reliant and are given the tools and knowledge to manage themselves safely, their innate expansiveness, generosity and creativity are unleashed.”

“ My most lasting impression is the first jewelry class that I took in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico almost 20 years ago. I went to study abroad as a young art student with a focus on painting. I took the jewelry class on a whim, thinking it would be fun to try something new. From the first little piece of silver that I melted into a ball, I was hooked. I spent the rest of my six months in Mexico neglecting my painting studies and spending all my money on silver and stones. I didn’t know it then, but that class ended up changing my life and determining my career.”


32 MOHAWK

MAKER

QUARTERLY

PAPER GRADES

Superfine

Options +Navajo

Mohawk Superfine is the finest printing paper made today. No other paper has the same reputation for quality, consistency and uniformity. Superfine inspires great design with its superb formation, lush tactility, archival quality and timeless appeal.

Options features Mohawk’s exclusive Inxwell surface technology, combining the tactile feel of uncoated paper with the ink density and sharp detail of coated. Now including ultra-smooth Navajo, Options features six premium white shades to complement a range of styles.

THE ULTIMATE PAPER

THE INXWELL PAPERS

Via + Carnival

Loop

THE RESPONSIBLE PAPER

EXPRESSIVE COLOR & TEXTURE

Mohawk Loop is a complete collection of extremely high PCW recycled papers to support sustainable design. With a range of print surfaces and a fashionable palette of whites, pastels, jewel tones and earthy fibered shades, Loop enables environmental responsibility the Mohawk way.

Carnival + Via represents the most comprehensive and economical family of premium writing, text and cover papers in the market today. The combined portfolio offers a FSCÂŽ certified choice for virtually any design project with many shades of white, a palette of fresh colors, ten distinctive textures and an extensive offering for digital printing.

Strathmore

Brought to you by:

Digital

THE LUXE PAPER

THE IMAGING PAPERS

Setting the standard for design and innovation since 1892, the Strathmore Collection is a diverse assortment of writing, text and cover papers that honor tradition while striking new ground with contemporary colors and surface technologies. They add an image of luxury to all print communications.

Mohawk features a comprehensive collection of digital substrates, including a family of reliable and economical coated and uncoated papers specially made for digital presses, as well as a unique offering of specialty substrates for digital printing that help place you and your customers on the cutting edge.

We believe that partnership is essential to furthering the interests of craftspeople everywhere. Mohawk is proud to partner with craft printers to bring you the Mohawk Maker Quarterly. 465 Saratoga Street Cohoes, NY 12047 +1 (518) 237-1740 insidesales@mohawkpaper.com mohawkconnects.com

D ES I G N & CU R ATI O N

PAPE R

Hybrid Design Hybrid-design.com

Mohawk Options Navajo Smooth, Brilliant White 100 Text (148gsm), Pg. 1-2, 5-6, 9-10, 13-20, 23-24, 27-28, 31-32

T Y PE FAC ES

Chalet New York Nineteen Sixty, Sentinel PR I NTE R

Sandy Alexander Clifton, NJ Sandyinc.com I N KS

The names, symbols, logos, photographs and all other intellectual property of the companies, brands, and people appearing herein are the exclusive property of their respective owners and should not be interpreted as an endorsement of or by Mohawk; any legal and equitable rights in their intellectual property are exclusively reserved to those owners.

4cp, match neon orange, pink, green ITE M N U M B E R

76-702620015 March 2015

Mohawk Options 100% PC White, Vellum 80 Text (118gsm), Pg. 3-4, 7-8, 11-12, 21-22, 25-26, 29-30

Mohawk Maker Quarterly Issue #6: Impressions  
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