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REHABILITATION CENTER FOR STREET CHILDREN I RESEARCH Courtesy of ahmadhammoud photography


MSA UNIVERSITY FACULUTY OF ENGINEERING ARCHITECTURE DEPARTMENT FALL 2013 Prof. Omar Fawzy Prof. Sameh El Feki Prof. Suzette Michelle Prof. Tarek Abdelsalam

PREPARED BY Abdulrahman Mohamed Ahmad Hilal Danny Adib Eslam Ahmad Mohamed Gehad Mohamed Yasser Mostafa Salim Omar Elmelegy STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH


REHABILITATION CENTER FOR STREET CHILDREN I RESEARCH

STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH


Table of Contents

Chapter I Theories

1

-General background -Historical background -Problem definition -Problem magnitude

Chapter II Design Issues

6

-Image -Interaction -Circulation -Flexibility -Atmosphere -Legibility -Durability -Economy

Chapter III Case Studies

18

-GEAP Homeless Center -Street Children Home -Groot Klimmendaal Rehabilitation -Fawood Children Center -Addis Football Center For Hope -Pediatric Clinic -Um kalthoum Social Patronage Center -Door Al-Tarbeya Institution

Chapter IV Site Analysis

35

-Manshyet Nasser -Ain Alseera -Dokki

Chapter V Design Req.

56

Chapter VI Individual Tasks

70

Chapter VII References

132

Annex

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CHAPTER l GENERAL BACKGROUN D + THEORIES

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ABSTRACT There‘s no denial that every society is in need for all of it‘s members in order to prosper. However, nowadays, street children are considered a forgotten existence, with no tangible contribution to the community. ‗Street Children‘ are considered a phenomenon that has it‘s political, cultural, economical, psychological, urban and environmental roots. Egypt is known for it‘s high percentage of street children that need to be rehabilitated in order to become fruitful units in the society. Therefore, rehabilitation centres need to be available for those forgotten segment that are in serious need for help. Rehabilitation centres are categorized into different typologies that aim to provide help in various aspects and with different methods of therapy.

DEFINITION

A rehabilitation center is a facility that helps individuals recover from physical, mental or psychological disorders alongside other ailments. Rehabilitation centers may offer shelter as part of the therapy, which may be temporary or permanent depending on the patient's case. Rehabilitation centers are categorized into different categories with each specializing in curing a specific aspect.

Global Regiona l Local TYPOLOGIES Physical Rehabilitation Centre Drug Rehabilitation Centre Delinquency Rehabilitation Centre Psychiatric Rehabilitation Centre Vocational Rehabilitation Centre

BACKGROUND The phenomenon of street children started to become a problem in Egypt starting from the eighties of the last century. When Egypt overcame an economic recession. Which worsened the social situation of the country. This lead to an increase in the percentage of unemployment throughout the country. The domino effect of this situation increased family disintegration.

Reasons for being on streets

Direct Reasons

Indirect Reasons

-Child abuse. -Neglecting. -Peer pressure. -Sensation seeking.

Developin g Ethically Diverse Society

-Low Income. -Family breakdown. -Un planned rural migration.

Street Groups

Gangs

Child Participation in the Streets (Spatial Fluidity & Autonomy)

Stroller Bans with Territories & Internal Hierarchie s

Surrogate Families

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Unemployed

Children Disconnection Illiterate

Family Breakdown Creating Other Networks

Less Co-operative

Relative to the Street

High Level of Violence

The deteriorated condition of the streets became a fertile place for autonomy to prosper. Gatherings homeless people, street children and other forgotten sectors of society. From that point on, street children become exposed to deviation and foul manners. Building their own culture, laws and street customs that interfere with applicable law. Creating a new mass that forces it self socially on society and it's security. At this stage, a child starts to acquire values ​and behaviors, that reshape his vision of the surroundings of the family and society. Hence the occurrence of any defect pushes the child to a sense that his life became threatened by present and future. Hence the occurrence of any defect pushes the child to a sense that his life became threatened by present and future.

PROBLEM ILLUSTRATION

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KEY AUTHORS “These children are not criminals but victims who have been deprived of their rights – the right to education, health and social care, and especially the right to family care. The strategy is based on changing the way in which society views these children” Moushira Khattab, NCCM’s Secretary-General. Moushira Khattab holds a PhD from Cairo University on the rights of the child; she coordinated, in close association with civil society, the formulation of vital national policy documents comprising of national strategies for the protection, reintegration and rehabilitation of street children, combatting violence against children, and the eradication of Child Labor. Key action plans were conveyed including that on Girls‘ Education, an ―Egypt Fit for Children‖, Combatting Violence against Children, the National Survey on Street Children, and Rights Based Tracking of Public Budgeting for Children (for the first time ever in Egypt).

Figure 1.1: Moushira Khattab defending street children situation

“An image of a rebellious, disrespectful, drug abusing, adventure seeking runaway is often portrayed in film and fiction. In reality, few runaways leave home for uncharted territory or thrills based on such reasoning. Most teenagers flee what should be a comfort zone due to problems that become intolerable or even life threatening. These include sexual abuse, physical violence, emotional abuse, neglect, family dysfunction, parental or guardian mental issues and/or substance abuse, economic distress, and other negative issues.” “Typical issues runaway and homeless youth must deal with are trying to meet basic necessities in an atmosphere where there are no easy means to achieve such, poor nutrition, poor hygiene, promiscuity, teen pregnancy, survival sex, sexual assaults, substance abuse, gangs, and health crises including severe depression, sexually transmitted diseases, HIV infection, and sometimes a life cut short when all other options to get off the street come too late.” Flowers, R. Barri. Street Kids: The Lives of Runaway and Thrownaway Teens. R. Barri Flowers is one of the most versatile and prolific writers on the scene today, he‘s the author of more than forty novels and nonfiction books, along with a numerous amount of short stories and articles. In the book of ―Street Kids: The Lives of Runaway and Figure 1.2: R. Barri Flowers Thrownaway Teens‖ he examines the tireless and complex problem of street kids, children who have fled away or have been forced to leave their homes for reasons that comprise of child abuse and neglect, drug abuse, sexual abuse, behavioral problems and STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH mental health.

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“They are children who have not only fallen out of the formal education system but have been separated from their families (often spending all, or most, of their time on the street) and find themselves excluded by society at all levels. An educational program needs to be developed that is compatible with their specific learning needs and will ultimately enable their reintegration into society. The environment in which. these activities take place should be carefully considered and designed so as to complement the learning process as best as possible.” Barbara Brink, Street Children: Promising Practices and Approaches Barbara Brink (BSc Hons. Diploma Arch. MSc.) studied architecture at the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London, UK. She holds a Master‘s degree in ‗Building Design for Developing Countries. She spent 9 months working in INDIA for the People‘s Participation Program (NGO), on a housing project for low income groups in the suburbs of Bombay in a squatter settlement. She held positions in architectural practices in London and Paris and has been working in the Architecture for Education Sector, UNESCO Paris, as a consultant architect. Figure 1.3: Barbara Brink

“Street children are the causalities of economic woes, war, poverty, loss of traditional values, domestic violence and physical and psychological abuses. They seldom have a choice in becoming a straw in the wind – and going to school is always out of question. For kicks, these young souls turn to narcotics or to sniffing rubber solvent. Many street children gather money by begging, selling flowers, washing cars, shoeshining, working in small hotels, selling water and newspapers or other items or via prostitution, receiving only a small cut from the money that gets collected” Amir Ali Abro, The Problems Of Street Children: a Sociological Study Of Urban Sindh. Amir Ali Abro is the Deputy District Officer, Social Welfare Department in Larkana, Sindh Pakistan, worked for four years on the DDO (Human Resource Management & Establishment) project, as staff officer to District Coordination Officer, as to look after all matters related to Human Resource Management of district Government, as well as focal person for Disaster Management of District, and Worked as a part time Master Trainer; in Life Skills based education for MARAs & EVAs, Mehran Welfare Trust for developing life skills and capacity of children from 5-18 years. Most at risk Adolescent (MARAs) and expected vulnerable adolescents (EVAs) were the focus of these trainings. Assed and evaluated performance of children and documented the performance of. The project was supported by UNICEF Pakistan.

Figure 1.4: Amir Ali Abro

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28%

36%

RECENT FINDINGS 25%

Around 2 million children are believed to be on the streets of Egypt, most in Cairo and Alexandria. According to a 2011 study, that was conducted by Egypt‘s National Center for Social and Criminological Research (NSCR), finding that at least 20% of these children are victims of trafficking.

11%

Sexual Abuse Drugs Theft

Forms of Trafficking

30%

ORIGINS The study conducted NSCR involved interviews with more than 400 street children and found that only about 30% of them were born and raised in rural settings. Urban communities are not as closely connected as in rural areas, thus the high percentage that is 70%. In addition, children can seek employment due to the economic diversity of urban settings- which consequently renders them vulnerable to abuse and exploitation.

70%

Rural

Urban

Origins

AGE GROUPS The NSCR study found that most street children in Egypt (68%) are of ages ranging from six to eleven years old.

EDUCATION It was also noted that there‘s a strong correlation between education fulfillment and children‘s inclination to leave their homes. As illustrated in the graph, almost 40% of the interviewed street children did not attend formal education, while 60% acquired through minimum education whether it‘s primary and preparatory education.

INCOME GENERATING ACTIVITIES And finally, the study underlined the types of activities from where an income is generated undertaken by street children. About 73% were involved in street vending, followed by a 60% that were involved in begging.

No Schooling

Primary Education

Preparatory Education

Other

Education

Street Vending

Begging

Theft

Drug Distribution

Income Generating Activities STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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CONTEXTUAL ASPECTS Political aspect -Children are 45% of population, although there is no political social strategy for them. -All strategies target only city children, while no one look for countryside children. -Countryside children travel to city and starting act as criminals due to lack of caring and also due to hard life conditions. -Lack of strategies or solutions for children in all political parties programs in Egypt. Economic aspect -Due to Economic Openness and Free Economy of the country, wealthy people have increased in richness while poor families have increased in poverty, starting pushing their children to work with them in order to help. -This pressure on the children always push them to escape towards street.

Figure 1.5: Street Children

Social aspect -Rate of Egyptian immigrants in order to employed outside is increasing. This phenomena has a great effect on Egyptian child. -Father employed abroad, Mother employed locally, beside illiteracy in popular & rural areas, so there is no suitable environment to the child to grow well. Educational aspect -Although there is an increasing in the number of schools, but there is an educational problem due to the economic levels of families, high education costs. -All of these problems resulting in increasing of escaping rate from schools. Urban aspect Increasing of rural and informal areas, which are the source of the street children phenomena, as they (Informal areas) are the main target of the immigrants to the city.

Figure 1.6: Informality/Street Children Evolution STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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CHAPTER II DESIGN ISSUES

STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH


IMAGE Ordinary definition The preconceived idea held conceptually in defining a mental attitude. Architectural definition It is the main vision of any project at the early stages of its development providing an early message describing its identity and approach.

Identity / Symbolism -Intimacy and familiarity of space and zones -Shelter Symbolism for the street children Mission / Message -Blending and curing the crack softly -Diversity within integration between targets -Participation/Empowerment of the community Ordering / Hierarchy -Advice and awareness approach firstly -Prevention and early detection of extremes -Care / protection / Help when needed -Good treatment and understanding -Long term potential impact on children -Achieving children‘s dreams

Figure 2.1: Children’s dreams

Vision

Mission

A community in which children are

To protect children against all

enabled to achieve their full adult

forms of abuse and neglect

potential by growing in a secure and

through accessible, integrated

stable environment that ensures

and coordinated services

adequate nutrition, good health,

focusing on primary, secondary

physical and emotional security.

and tertiary prevention. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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CIRCULATION Ordinary definition The act of letting something through from a place / zone to another. Architectural definition It is the connection between the internal zones of a building and the external area as well as spaces through vertical/horizontal paths.

Pass by spaces

Figure 2.2: Inner outer integration

Pass through spaces

Terminate in a spaces

Radial

Spiral

Grid

Radial

Figure 2.3: Inner outer integration

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CIRCULATION Children’s Rehabilitation Centre fig 2.2 Large home within a small city Rotation of boxes delicately Freedom and outdoor/indoor interaction A lot of nodes with integrated centres Rowanda Pediatric Clinic fig 2.3 Multi node with non-concentric circulation Defined functional zoning at each court Flexible durable circulation

Figure 2.5: Loose method solid & void

Steambot Rehabilitation Centre fig 2.4 Centralized building Clarity of zones Minimal approach from the centre Materials Durable finishes Slip-resistant texture Colours to define routes

Figure 2.6: Loose method circulation

fig2.1 Loose Method

Figure 2.4: Non-concentric circulation

Figure 2.7: Centralized circulation

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TERRITORIALITY Ordinary definition It is an invisible boundaries in which a person or a group take over the control of it. Architectural definition An owned domain that enclose a sort of actions and doings by a group or individual. Design Considerations Ensure resources arability / Organize social interaction / Achieve level of privacy Satisfy emotional needs / Implicit presence

Figure 2.9: Creating a bond with the context in parallel to the defined territory

Territory Classifications Function/Privacy/Control/Group/Individual Context exposure/Interior organization

Figure 2.8: Creating a defined territory within the inbetween spaces of the masses

Figure 2.11: Well defined plan

Figure 2.10: Creating a defined territory even it wasn’t included in the building footprint

Figure 2.12: Moderately defined plan

Figure 2.13: Poorly defined plan

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LEGIBILTY Ordinary definition The clarity of thing to be read where can an individual can easily be perusal. Architectural definition Architectural legibility is the degree to which the designed features of the environment aid people in creating an effective mental image, or "cognitive map" of the spatial relationships within a building, and the subsequent ease of way finding within the environment.

Layering It‘s a sequence used in achieving a success of the project for being usable as rehabilitation centre. Fig 2.14

Each layer has it‘s period of time The layers are site, skin, structure, services, space and stuff. Plan Recognition It‘s a way of designing a building having a good typology & schemata. As designing plan according to function and sequences, with simple clear way of using. Orientation Sensory/Psychological Views Privacy Street activity Noise reduction. Local patterns Street direction Land use Accessibility requirements Figure 2.14: Layers STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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25%

Weak defined spaces Due to the distorted solid & void correspondence to outdoor/indoor

50%

Semi defined spaces Semi defined due to different units function & multi-nodes

75%

Defined spaces Defined due to zoning units function & the L-shaped circulation

100%

More-defined spaces Defined due to zoning units function & the concentration around nodes

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ATMOSPHERE Ordinary definition The surrounding influence or environment . Architectural definition An aesthetic quality or effect, especially a distinctive and pleasing one, associated with particular place. ―This singular density and mood, this feeling of presence, well-being, harmony, beauty...under whose spell I experience what I otherwise would not experience in precisely this way. ― - Peter Zumthor Setting the right atmosphere is needed for creating the right mental conditions that precedes the actual treatment. This can be achieved through: Factors affect comfort Light Materials Sound Objects Air

Temperature Room occupancy Color & material

Optimism, confidence, self-esteem, extraversion, emotional strength, friendliness, creativity. Intelligence, communication, trust, efficiency, serenity, duty, logic, coolness, reflection, calm. Physical comfort, food, warmth, security, sensuality, passion, abundance, fun. Physical courage, strength, warmth, energy, survival, stimulation, masculinity, excitement. Harmony, balance, refreshment, universal love, rest, restoration, awareness, equilibrium & peace. Physical tranquility, nurture, warmth, femininity, love. Figure 2.15: Colorful interior spaces

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FLEXIBILTY Ordinary definition It is the amount of adaption could be done in different occasions under diff. circumstances. Architectural definition The amount of legibility and clarity of any architectural product associated with amount of adaptable fixations having a durable operations responsive to different cases.

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INTERACTION Ordinary definition An action that occurs between two or more objects effecting each other. Architectural definition A set of behaviours a person or group represent based on planed zones. Social interaction Two or more people oriented in each other by Acts, actions, practices. Group interaction Doing activities under concern of learning, sharing knowledge & experience or training.

Figure 2.17: Interaction with the outer community through cultural activities and events

Library Garden Atrium Food court

Figure 2.18: Empowering people in design process to have a determined output

Figure 2.16: Interaction with the outer community through cultural activities and events

Figure 2.19: Empowering people in design process to have a determined output STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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DURABILITY Ordinary definition Assurance or probability that an equipment, machine, or material will have a relatively long continuous useful life, without requiring an inordinate degree of maintenance. Architectural definition Durability in Architecture represents the relationships between architecture and time depending on people than architecture.

Design considerations -Encouraging communication among the staff and students creating a visual access between all learning areas. -Visual connection between spaces reinforces the sense of a whole school working towards a common goal .

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RESOURCE MANGMENT Ordinary definition The Science responsible for analyzing the relation between cost, revenue and controlling in this relationship. Architectural definition Economic Developmental opulence is affected by project‘s financial needs outcome. Design Consideration -Levels of the Economic Environment the economics of the project development. -Region's economic development activities. -Local community level impact on community.

-Economic development Impact level on the country. -Economic Development Programs for designs. -Financial services activities. Non-financial supportive activities.

Figure 2.20: Exhibition paintings

Figure 2.21: Analytical section for efficient building STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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CHAPTER III CASE STUDIES

STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH


Case Study | International

Greenville Arts Expression Program Center For The Homeless [London - England]

Description A place that treats homeless people as artist. Where Homeless people can express themselves and their thoughts through art & music. The center acts as a bridge to prepare them to enter society. The Art produced is sold to provide for their living expenses sustainably. Structure -Main structure covered by curved steel girder. -It acts as a silhouette or shelter that covers the main masses. Fig 3.8 -Allows free open space for interaction between homeless and the community. -Provides natural ventilation for the movable faรงade on the ground level. -Optimize use of less energy through shading.

Figure 3.9: Curved steel structure

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Mechanical Room Storage Room

Recessed Shaded Entrance Auditorium

Main View

Entrance Lobby Art/Sculpture Studios

Open Park

Exhibition Space Entrance Lobby Admin Offices Dance Studio

Ground Floor Plan

Street View

Service/Laundry Housing Living Room Daycare

Garden View

Service/Kitchen Computer Lab

Garden View

Classrooms

Counseling/ Clinic First Floor Plan Street View STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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Orientation - The shaded areas is properly oriented - The Front garden blocks the prevailing wind. Meanwhile , The building is oriented towards the Khamaseen wind. - The orientation of the building throws shade on the garden and direct sunlight is directed on the playground leaving it unshaded , specially in the middle of the day.

-Main structure covered by curved steel girder. -Optimize use of less energy through shading -It acts as a silhouette or shelter that covers the main masses.

-Second floor as housing and a gallery

-Ground floor used as classes and offices -Provides natural ventilation for the movable faรงade on the ground level -Allows free open space for interaction between homeless and the community

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-Administrative Offices + Clinic -Arts Homeless Classrooms.

Gallery Space

Homeless Family Housing

Administrative Homeless Family Housing

Auditorium Art Lobby

Arts Homeless Classrooms.

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Case Study | International

Street Children Home [Caracas- Venezuela]

Description 1-Benefiting from an un utilized land underneath the Francisco Fajardo highway. 2- Lands underneath the highways in Carcas are abandoned and are mostly acquired by the ‗Buhoneros‘ (street vendors). 3- A facility that offers and orphanage that is surrounded by a workshop and a football court as well as a small garden. Figure 3.1: Carcas center zone within the context Entrance

Psychological Comfort The choice of the site, the location and the construction materials served in preserving the street look that street children are used to. Still, It segregates them with different activities that involve them in a process of therapy. Dormitory

N

Garden

Services Entrance Stair

Ground Floor Plan

Dormitory

Highway noise. Garden

Orientation of the dormitory is totally wrong, as it faces sun path all day.

Services

Garden orientation makes it‘s relation with the sun is very weak.

Playing court works as a buffer zone between dormitory and highway, it prevents dormitory from highway noise. Choosing basketball as a game in this project was unsuccessful, as the game‘s style needs many dribbling on the ground in which causes high destruction on dormitory. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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The noise from playing affects focus in the workshop.

Huge space for the court in a compacted project. Wrong choice of activity.

Workshop

Play court.

First Floor Plan This section shows the vertical relation between the two floors and the relation between the building and the highway bridge. Stairs (Vertical Circulation)

The zoning of the basketball court creates discomfort on the dorms from the continuous ball bouncing.

High way. Play court. Orphanage. (Dormitory)

The stair inside the garden is the only vertical connection between the Dormitory and the play court.

Safety The location of the project together with it High Way layering plays a role in preventing the children from being safe. The location of the dorms in Play court the bottom of the facility exposes the children to harassments and physical abuse. The Stairs location of the facility underneath the highway plays a role in threatening the children's safety Orphanage as well.. Additional Notes: 1- Wise using of lands that serve us on our idea. 2- Best place for rehabilitating street children is a place act like the street for them to make them feel like they are in their own place. 3- The materials used in constructing are preferred to be simple materials blend in with the street atmosphere. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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Case Study | International

Groot Klimmendaal Rehabilitation [Pierre aye – France]

Description 1- This rehabilitation centre in a Dutch forest is one of six projects to be shortlisted for this year's Mies van der Rohe Award. 2- The three floor building is clad in brown anodized aluminum and comprises a health facility , offices , sports facilities, a restaurant and theatre. 3- Both patients and local communities use the facilities. 4- All floors are connected by a shallow wooden staircase while the light wells visually connect spaces and allow the penetration of natural light.

- Concept Plan Analysis

Natural Lighting Passing through the glass

Figure 3.6: Front Elevation

Main View through curtain wall

Greenery

Inner – Outer relationship

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Theatre

Swimming Pool

Gymnasium

Main Entrance

Secondary Entrance Secondary Entrance

- Circulation / Accessibility Rmd house Circulation

Management layer

Special features Living long

Light well

- Vertical Layering of the program Main Entrance

Wooden staircase

Roof Garden

- Continuous Staircase enables visual relation from roof garden into valley Vertical Light well Light well with plants

Plantation

Vertical Circulation

- Light Well / Voids from roof to ground andSTREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH so terrain level

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Case Study | International

Fawood Children Center [London - England]

Description Total Space Created: 500 m2 Construction time : 5 days

Figure 3.7: Fawood center zone within the context

Fawood Children's Centre is a facility that provides a range of services for children aged from 0 to 5 and their families. Activities range from playing for kids to counseling for adults. Professionals such as health visitors and nutritionists work are involved. The center also provides learning opportunities for parents and careers covering topics such first aid, childcare and English for speakers of other languages. Large outdoor and indoor ground floor space as well as facilities for nursing mothers, parents with younger children and learning spaces for both children and adults.

Having the child in a preserved safe environment that mimics the outside. It Figure 3.8: Center colorful rotating windows has the benefits of Flexibility daylight and natural A part of the building is assembled by ventilation All the components exist in a safe environment that mimics the outside playgrounds Physical courage, strength, warmth, energy, basic survival, 'fight or flight', stimulation, masculinity, excitement.

Physical comfort, food, warmth, security, sensuality, passion, abundance, fun. Optimism, confidence, self-esteem, extraversion, emotional strength, friendliness, creativity.

reusing containers. The building was assembled in 5 days and can be reassembled or moved to other areas.

+ STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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Ground Floor

First Floor The perforated metal wall allows the children inside to see the exterior view therefore there is a blending going on between the interior and the exterior atmosphere, therefore, the children don‘t feel contained in a closed place

Proposed park area. Acts a s buffer zone from the surrounding two main streets. It also acts as a view for the people inside the building

The form of the building allows a wider view of the park as it‘s a parallelogram not a rectangle

Main Street

The building is close to the street therefore it causes noise to the children inside the building especially in the places with activities that need quiet environment

Structure - The main structure system of the building is steel columns and beams. - The use of mesh walls on the buildings exterior

The orientation of the building is Adding colors to the mesh wall to not towards the building, therefore, the curved mesh wall soften it and allows the air to enter the building give it a childfriendly look

The perforated metal wall doesn‘t block the view. So, it creates a fusion between the outside and the inside STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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Case Study | Regional

Addis Football Center For Hope [Addis Ketema, Addis Ababa- Ethiopia]

Description

Figure 3.10: Addis center zone within the context

Site The site is located in Addis Ababa which is a low income, high density area. The site is surrounded by mostly Urban area with business and residential properties. The residential and small domestic industry are in self made buildings using sheet metal, timber or local wall construction (mix of mud and chaff). Existing neighboring water tank

Green buffers (defining boundaries)

Youth center Rehabilitation center

Existing Dojo Existing Neighboring residential and commercial area

Secondary Entrance

Multi Main Existing Educational Football Grassed courtyard purpose Entrance zone Synthetic Pitch (buffering) center STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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Safety The site is at Jan Meda, stone walls run along it's north and east direction. Which separates it from the roads and traffic. There is a corrugated metal fence along the east and north sides, with the road to the addition, which needs to remove the corrugated metal fences at the south and west side according to the master plan of Jan Meda. Therefore, removing the walls next to the roads will eliminate the barrier between the children attending the center and the traffic. Although the children are used to presence of the traffic, it's is mandatory that the design deals with ways to segregate them from any danger that may be caused by the road. It has been requested also to upgrade the wood and corrugated metal facility which the guard inhabits to increase his comfort during nighttime.

Figure 3.11: Existing stone boundary wall to be removed after proposed road expansion

Figure 3.12: Existing guard station - Sport the Bridge have requested this be upgraded.

Orientation Noise zone caused by the football pitch

On foot Accessibility

Services

Inner court

Green Buffer around the educational zone Soccer Pitch Views from the front porch include viewing the soccer pitch

Educational zones and library

On foot Accessibility

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High level operable windows for ventilation and light Prevailing cool breeze

Prevailing cool breeze

Art Room

Library

Covered courtyard classroom

Mid morning sun

Mid morning sun

Cross Ventilation

Uncovered external courtyard

Uncovered external courtyard

Classroom

Clinic

Ambience Wall Openings - no glazing or window frames in classrooms and library. The openings on the wall are covered with an external hood which is operated manually. The inside of the centre is made from metal and painted in primary and secondary colours that has positive effects on the mood of the children.

Football Pitch

Harmony, balance, refreshment, universal love, rest, restoration, reassurance, environmental awareness, equilibrium, peace.

Physical tranquility, nurture, warmth, femininity, love, sexuality.

Optimism, confidence, self-esteem, extraversion, emotional strength, friendliness, creativity.

Intelligence, communication, Physical courage, strength, trust, efficiency, serenity, duty, warmth, energy, stimulation, logic, coolness, reflection, masculinity, excitement. calm.

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Boys wash & Girls wash and change rooms change rooms Porch

Mid morning sun Prevailing cool breeze

Uncovered external courtyard

Office

Mid morning sun Prevailing cool breeze

Uncovered external courtyard

Entry Hall

Porch

Football pitch

Interaction Dojo Rehab Zone ‗A‘ that engages Center education as a part of the rehabilitation. It benefits from the existing educational facility.

The ‗Fabric‘ wall is wall that has multi openings that provides daylight as well as natural ventilation for the required space which creates an interaction between external and internal spaces.

‗Fabric ‗ breeze wall

Zone ‗B‘ that engages sports as a part of the rehabilitation. It benefits from the existing football pitch and the existing youth center that‘s residing next to the project.

Figure 3.13: ‘Fabric’ arrangement pattern of open and closed brick courses

Figure 3.14: Pattern of light and dark

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Case Study | Regional

Pediatric Clinic [Rwanda]

Description A modular configuration that will expand or shrink in order to be more flexible in accommodating a number of people. It's a sustainable, culturally responsive, pediatric clinic model. It's considered as a ―spatial solution‖ that will help in connecting a major network of health care for street children. Masses & Structure The corrugated steel shell and I-beam structure is repeated and held at nodes positioned on the perimeters of the two concentric circles is capable of supporting increasing growth subject to a recursive geometric module.

Flexibility & Affordability The initial phase of beam and shell envelope of the units may be packed into a single container of dimension 4mx3mx2. The package can be delivered through land or air transportation. It includes corrugated steel sheets and an I-beam structure. Interaction between the building and the exterior is promoted. The design also finds ways of social interaction by planning for integration between spaces for education, recreation and living.

Zoning & Circulation -All facilities are facing the courtyard to allow maximum interaction. -free orientation. Provide a secured environment & privacy. -All courtyard's zones has its one functional elements surrounding it. -Non-Concentric zoning. -Defined open spaces around each facility. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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Center Point

Outdoor Family Area Residence area Center Relevant Expansion Direction Privacy Nonconcentric Zoning Main Axis Main Entrance Axis Educational Area

Main Axis Figure 3.15: Zoning and Circulation Analysis

Center point

Existing Center

Exiting Center point

Future Extension

Figure 3.16: Future Extension Plan

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Case Study | Local

Um kalthoum Social Patronage Center [Ain Shams – Cairo, Egypt] Layout of the facility

Figure 3.17: Um Kalthoum center zone within the context

Social Gathering Space

Playground

Workshops

Administration & Dorms

Description

A facility established as a juvenile facility and then transformed into a rehabilitation center for street children and orphans. The facility has a capacity of 60 children of ages 7 to 18. Orientation

- The shaded areas is not properly oriented

Restaurant

Carpentry Workshop Social Worker

Classroom Recreation Room - The buildings form together with it‘s orientation, blocks the prevailing wind. T.V Meanwhile, it‘s oriented Room towards the Khamaseen wind.

The orientation of the building maximized the surface area exposed to direct sun, specially in the middle of the day. This causes the building to have a huge thermal gain.

Storage Food Storage Administration

W.C

Storage

Dorms

Notes -Most young people living in the facility seek learning outside of the facility, as the facility only provides education in agriculture and carpentry fields, while it‘s located in a mostly industrial zone. -The facility is situated in an industrial zone which is low in population density making it harder for the children to find work once they are done with the rehabilitation process. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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ZONING AND SPACES

Building I

Building II

-Administration -Social WorkersClassrooms -Carpentry workshop -Restaurant -Recreation Rooms -Dorms -W.C

-Library -Furniture Workshop -Food Storage -Laundry -Lobby

The facility resides next to a number of social facilities which creates a network that serves in the process of treatment The location of the entrance on the main street makes it unsafe for children The location of the dorms next to the main street is uncomfortable to children

The position of building ‗B‘ allows a better view

Poor circulation from building ‗A‘ to building ‗B‘

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CIRCULATION

Additional Notes 1- The capacity of the dorms is set for 10 beds, while is actually has 20 beds (10 double beds). 2- The furniture used is not child friendly. For example, the children‘s beds doesn‘t have anything that prevents them from falling while sleeping. 3- The zoning of the workshop next to the dormitory creates loud noises that makes children and young people uncomfortable in their dorms. 4- Lack of recreational areas dedicated for leisure. Only recreational zone is the children‘s T.V room 5- The Facility lacks the following spaces (Religious area - Clinic – MPU – Place for psychological therapy – Sinks and W.Cs next to the restaurant) 6- Various workshops for different professions should be available so that the children/ young people don‘t have to leave the facility to get to learn those professions.

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Case Study | Local

DOR AL-TARBEYA INSTITUTION [Bulaq Dakroour– Giza, Egypt]

Layout

Figure 3.18: Dor Al-Tarbeya center zone within the context

Description Is an institution that contains all social defense services to receive and deposit and hospitalities for children ages 7-18 and with provisions or without provisions, the institution is a comprehensive unit and of large capacity as the design capacity is of up to more than 600 children and the master plan includes more than Living one building. Zone Distribution Area Admin.

Theate r

Dorms Manager Living Area

Care

Toilets Toilets

Restaura nt

Rest.

Dorms

Toilets

Rack

Theate r

Living Area

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Circulation Patterns

Circulation per Schedule for the Children: 1- Children wake up at 6:30 Am, and go on their to their cleaning chores. 2- Children then go to school or the workshop at 7:30am. 3- Children then return from school at 1:30 PM and have their lunch at 2:00pm 4- From 3:00-6:00 PM children have a rest and free activities, or their illiteracy program. 5- From 6:00-9:00, children spend their time studying, watching TV, and then have their dinner. 6- At 10:00, Children go to their dorms for sleeping.

Changed Function

Notes -There is a clear difference between the patterns in the original design uses and the actual uses both at the level of the master plan or at the level of the internal spaces of the ground floor of the deposit buildings.

No Specific Function After Change

- The ground floor premises of deposit buildings contains a lot of spaces without a specific use. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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Orientation - The depository buildings form shades it self in some parts, and as for the vocational training workshop, the building form is not well utilized, leaving large portions unshaded, and the playground as well is not shaded at all. - The buildings‘ semi-courtyards aren‘t utilizing the orientation fully in accepting the prevailing wind. Meanwhile, the master layout in whole is not protected by any greenery from the Khamaseen wind. - The orientation of the depository buildings maximizes the surface area exposed to direct sun, specially in the middle of the day. This causes the building to have a huge thermal gain in two sleeping wards for each floor. The existence of a bridge adjacent to the site is unhealthy, and puts the kids at risk of health hazards affected by air pollution, the noise can have a negative affect on the rehabilitation procedure. The location of the dorms next to greenery is comfortable for the children and can be considered a nice view. Poor circulation from dorms to school or workshop.

The position of site next to a residential area is good, and adds the sense of the home environment.

Sleeping area

Living area

Empt y spac e

Theate Empt Restaura Cour Empt y y r nt t spac spac e e

Sleepin g area

Breakfast restaurant

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CHAPTER IV SITE ANALYSIS

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LOCATION ANALYSIS Three locations are chosen for meeting the following criteria. The table below illustrates these points and the priority of each location.

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THE SCHIZOPHRENIC CITY : SOCIAL DEMOGRAPHICAL CHANGES Although Downtown the Egyptian capital has witnessed a lot off changes since modern Khedivian district was established, the population denseness throughout all these years didn't‘t change. However, there was a big shift in the social structure in Downtown after the „Officers‗ Revolution― in 1950s. The politics of nationalization, a new rental system, tendencies to decentralization lead to higher upper classes leaving Downtown and new inhabitants moving in, many of who where people from lower/middle classes or rural immigrants.

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MANSHYET NASSER Description located at the heart of Cairo, which was used to be a big spot of intellectuals, a crowded place with ministries, institutions, cafes, and museums space despite. Strengths -Historical -Diverse cultures and epochs -Integrated planned fabric -Street children existence -Multi-layers of ages -Economical aspect -High accessibility Weaknesses -Lack of governmental control -High density -Social structure shift -Stalk holders complicated chain -Social interference failure Opportunities -Old garden revival -Cultural exposure -Integrated planned fabrics -Street children existence -Multi-layers of ages -Economical aspect Threats -sustainability of the project -street children families -Street children existence -Multi-layers of ages -Economical aspect

Some of the used materials are Courtesy of ETH Studio Basel World’s Largest Recycling Hub 2010

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HISTORY

―An island is a segregated piece of land with only few connections to its surroundings. Mokattam settlement is an island from several points of view‖ Through the topographical cliffs of the Mokattam area, the settlement is separated from the surrounding area of Manshiyat Naser. The people who live there are a marginalized group of Coptic Christians taking the recycling of garbage as their main business. Garbage recycling system is managed through mono and micro economies all settled in Mokattam. Garbage is present in the urban structure and has a high influence on architecture. Mokattam is considered to be the main hub for the recycling business. The Zabaleen managed to develop their own management system to run this business which is bounded to the settlement of Mokattam.

The Mokattam area belongs to the administrative area of Manshiyat Naser. The settlement is located on Cairo city‗s Eastern edge at the bottom of the Mokattam mountain. Historically the area has been at the outskirt area of the city, while the capital was growing towards Mokattam mountain, the area has a central position in the capital today. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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HISTORICAL TIMELINE

Maps and the historical timeline are Courtesy of ETH Studio Basel World’s Largest Recycling Hub 2010

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NEIGHBOURHOOD The shown street section approve once more the fact, that in the Zabaleen area the space between two housing blocks is wider than in the neighbouring Manshiyat Naser. In detail the housing height and their appearance are not distinguish between the two areas. It is the use and employment of public and private space which is differing.

ARCHITECTURAL PATTERN

Source of the diagrams ETH Studio Basel + CLUSTER CAIRO World’s Largest Recycling Hub 2010 + Archiving the city in flux 2013

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ARCHITECTURAL DEVLOPMENT By the time, the plans were affected by political, social and economic changes of settlement and decisions made by the government. This overview shows the evolution of the floor plans, from 1972 very basic structure for living and working on the same level, until more separation between the working and the living area.

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ACCESSBAILITY Only two main shape the development of the area. First one is Mokattam mountain to the East, second is the traffic border of the 1960ies Autostrad to the West. Both of them prevent the settlement to grow horizontally and make the accessibility to the settlement very hard. The Autostrad was built in the 1960. It is an important connection between Helwan and Cairo International Airport, passing through Maadi and Nasr city. For Manshiyat Naser creates a border, difficult to cross. Upgrading programs in the 80th built passages to re-connect Manshyit Naser with The City Of Dead.

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EXISITING FACILITIES

RECYCLING BUSINESS

Maps and the historical timeline are Courtesy of ETH Studio Basel World’s Largest Recycling Hub 2010

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MOKATTAM CLIFFS/GEOLOGICAL HAZARDS The actual and potential hazards to human life and urban development in Manshiyat Naser were highlighted in 1994 when a severe cliff collapse resulted in the deaths of 40 people and the resultant of demolition of the development in the vicinity of the collapse. Further problems in nearby areas have led to the closure of schools close to cliffs. The stability of rock formations in the area are affected by three conditions, the form of the rock facades left after quarrying, the constitution of the rock formations and the impact of urban occupation.

Map of the geological hazards is Courtesy of ETH Studio Basel World’s Largest Recycling Hub 2010

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SOLID AND VOID

Solid Void

CONTEXTUAL ZONING

Collector Recycler Trader

BUILDING CONDITIONS

Bad Moderate Good


SITE AREA

Solid

20000 m2

Void

VEGETATION

Shallow Medium

60%

Dense

EXISITING BUILDINGS

4 5

1 Bad

75%

2 3 4 5

3

1 2

Moderate Bad Moderate Good STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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MANSHYET NASSER


Ain Al Seera Description A desert land facing some springs called Ein El-Sera. It is an area subsidiary to Masr Al-Adema city which have many districts like : Al-Fostat and Al-Manial.

Strengths Unique identity Lake which is considered as natural feature Surrounded by landmarks as Cairo land and Fustat park The site located on a main road which is Salah Salem Full of street children Weaknesses different layers and religions of people there. Different economical and social resources. No economical facilities to teach children any crafts there. Opportunities

Revival of the historical heritage. Integration between Cairo land theme park and the rehabilitation centre. Revitalization of Al-Fustat park Threats Site already involves street children, which makes the project integrated to their fabric. Tanneries workers may prevent children from going to the centre in order to help them in working as the children will not cost them too much

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HISTORICAL TIMELINE -Touristic Place. - Most successful craft is pottery. - Recollecting back the informal areas. - gated Coptic center

- strategic point - trade route by land - agriculture - military base - Contains the first built mosque in Africa - Fustat was the capital of Egypt - canal mouth is set to the north - huge increase of population - It had lots of trade routes by land or water

- Royal district called Al-Qahira - Christians were well treated by the rulers.

Maps and the historical timeline are Courtesy of ETH Studio Basel Where is Fustat ?

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“Fustat was the first capital in Egypt after the Arab conquest in 641 AD. Unfortunately today little reminds of its former grandeur.”

It was capital of the Muslim province of Egypt during the Umayyad and ʿAbbāsid caliphates and under succeeding dynasties, until captured by the Fāṭimid general Jawhar in 969. Founded in 641 by the Muslim conqueror of Egypt, ʿAmr ibn al-ʿĀṣ, on the east bank of the Nile River, south of modern Cairo, Al-Fusṭāṭ was the earliest Arab settlement in Egypt and site of the province‘s first mosque, Jāmiʿ ʿAmr. It grew into a permanent city out of an Arab camp set up for the siege of the Byzantine fortress of Babylon, but it developed rather chaotically. Around a core of permanent structures—mosques, palaces, and administrative offices—grew up a vast confusion of houses and huts, sited to no plan and periodically ravaged by fire and pestilence.

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LAYERING AND COMPINENETS

Tanneries Considered as a commercial space for children which can learn a future profession.

Al-Fustat Park Big park beside the site can be a great recreation outdoor space for children.

Cairo Land The nearest space for our site which has a great children activity can be used.

Museum of Egyptian civilization A great landmark for the site in which helps in accessing it, and it can be a helpful surrounding place for education/cultural treatment.

The Site

Lake One of the main elements of the site which can be greatly used in the project for children.

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Existing Facilities & Fabric Site

Lak e Sport s Rang Governmen e tal Range

Religious Range Old Cairo -Irregular Pattern -Narrow Fabric -Result of an Unplanned area

Hospitalit y Range

Educatio nal Range

Al-Fustat

Cairo Land The existing amusement park at the same land of our site will make a good interaction with our project, as the children will be the main users of the park. Also it will make the park restart working again as it is stopped working.

-Planned area -Grid Pattern

Lake This existing lake can has a good impact with our project not only environmentally but also architecturally as it can be an outdoor recreational place. Religions Complex An important landmark beside the location of the site, full of touristic visits which can also visit Al-Fustat park and this will be a great and new interaction treatment with our project. Al-Masry club A club in the same location of the site is important as it will make a great interaction with our project as a good recreational space for children. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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Vegetation Site

Site Impacts Private Buffers Public Private Gardens Water Features

Cairo Land The existing amusement park can be a great place for children but if this park is working. The park is not working, so our project will have a great impact on this park as it will make it restart working again and also can be greatly used as a recreational outdoor and entertainment space for children.

Al-Masry club The relation between the club and the site will be very strong as the center will use this club as an outdoor recreation area and will help in treating the children psychologically and physically.

Lake The site impact on the lake will be obvious when our project starts working there. Nowadays this lake is very neglected, dirty and useless, but after the presence of children center project will make a great difference in treating with this lake as it might be used as an outdoor recreational area.

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DOKKI Description located at downtown which has many nearby communities and segregated ones creating a strong relation between the formal and informal communities. Strengths -Easily accessible site through various main streets surrounding it, and by the nearby underground metro. -The site is located on main streets that are used by high density of the population with various social status targeting popular areas like (Cairo university, Al-Mohandseen and AlTahrir square). -Surrounded by different functional zones which are Educational, Commercial, Recreational, Governmental and Religious zones. Weaknesses -No architectural character. -Nearby railway acts as a visual separator between Bolaq Al-Daqror and the proposed site. -Railways can cause noise disturbance for the proposed project. Opportunities -Nearby workshops and commercial zones can serve as a working opportunity for the rehabilitated children. -The site located in a sensitive area between two different social and economical status. -The students of the nearby the Faculty of kindergarten can help out in the project as volunteers – while studying – or as employees. Threats -The site is located on main street in which there is a lack of safety. -The invasion of the informal settlements people from there places to the formal place (Al-Dokki) is uncontrolled.

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Shooting club Invasion

Rehabilitation Zone

University Zone

Orman Garden Agriculture farms University Hostel

Bulaq El Dakroor acts a source of street children due to its poverty , Informal Status and inhumanity.

Site Chosen Acting as a transitional part between the informal and formal areas In the line of segmentation.

Giza Zoo

Dokki is a high level community as it also has multiple universities , clubs ,Public , gardens and entertainment facilities.

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Ard Al Lewa

Bulaq El Dakroor

Al Muhandeseen

Dokki

Ben El sarayat Ezbet Abo Kanah

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Soudan st. is the main acces going to cairo university. Tahrir st. acts as the secondary main street from cairo university. National Research center in dokki which can benefit our project. Creating a bond between the police and the street children. Cairo university hostel consists of the students and professors.

Main Node connecting between Sudan street and tahrir street where transportation drop-off occurs.

Parking infront of the site used by the surroundings such as media masr and can be used by the project next to the admin. Railway tracks that cause noise and danger , also acts separation line between the two communities. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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Multiple Educational Facilities existing ( Ramsees language school , Facility of educational facility Youth sports center in between Bulaq el dakroor and Eldokki right before the start of feesal Bridge . El moroor Street which exists of multiple workshops , printing centers and many commercial centers

Existing Node where many street children accumulate as it acts as a point that spreads towards the surroundings.

Car Service center Residential Blocks

Bulaq El Dakroor acts a source of street children roaming in the streets of el dokki to integrate with higher classes.

Open area

Informal settlements

Research center

Mosque

Cairo University

Railway Noise and Danger

Church

Agriculture Department

Open parking Media masr commercial

El dokki is a high level district where multiple services exist such as educational and entertainment STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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DOKKI


MAQUETTE

DOKKI


R CHAPTER V DESIGN REQUIREMENT S STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH


Proposed Services / Activities For The Permanent Accommodation

Organization of center

Upkeep of center

Recreation & Social-cultural

General administration. Filling office work. Promoting public awareness. Holding meeting between staff members. Holding meetings with outside People. Parents. Members of local community. Government representatives. Police. Interviewing future staff. Monitoring project process.

   

A. Housekeeping Preparing meals  Cleaning center  Laundry 

B. Maintenance Painting  Repairing damages  Decorating 

  A. Celebration Birthday  Religious  National holidays  Festivals  B. Play Board games  Cards  Educational  Outings  Camping  Pool  Television  Team games 

Table 5.1: Design program

C. Sport Acrobatics  Ball games  Running  Swimming 


Residential

Educational

Vocational training

Special care

     

A. Personal  Hygiene  Nutrition  Health  First aid

Sleeping Resting Cooking Eating Washing Laundry

B. Self expression  Arts and crafts  Theatre  Music  Percussion  Dance

A  Fruit  Market gardening  Rearing live stock  Tree planting

C. Traditional  Literate  Reading  General studies  History  Geography  Language

      

Basic medical treatment Providing free medicines Dental care Eye care Counseling Vaccination Group/individual

B  Cooking  Courier service  Domestic help  Hotel boy training  Interior decorators  Launders  Message  Painting / decorating  Receptionist  Ruminative employment  Typing

C  Book binding  Cane work  Candle making  Carpet weaving  Ceramics and pottery  Door mat making  Leather work

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Functional requirements for the living of a child: It means to provide suitable places for child‘s living, such as Sleeping, living, studying, playing, recreation, food and other requirements and spatially appropriate requirements of the needs of the child (rate per child) of each of the former and it can be addressed as follows:

Sleeping Spaces Health Care

Studying Space

Library

General Activities‘ Space

Services

Administration

Sleeping Spaces The identification of sleeping spaces plane is considered an influential factor in determining the overall shape of the institution, also the determining of the appropriate number of children participating in the one space is due to economic and supervisory reasons where fewer children participating in the space, the more bedrooms are required and a larger number for the supervision of specialist, specialized studies meet on a specific point that is that the appropriate number of participating children in a single space for sleeping ranges from 4 children and up to 12 children and for children over the age of 12 years there must be a unit for clothing storage for each child separately next to his bed while younger children the clothing storage unit must be located in a room nearby at the disposal of the supervisor in charge and the sleeping space per child should be ( 3.7 - 4.6 m2). In the girls‘ institutions it is preferred that the space be divided by light partitions or curtains into an equal number of dormitories (cubicles) to achieve a capable amount of privacy for every girl and the cubicle should not be less than 5.5 m2. The sleeping space can be designed so that it can be divided into bed groups so that each group come into a private space with low thin partitions. Fig4.2

Figure 5.1: Dividing space into Cubicles.

Figure 5.2: Dividing space into Groups. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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One of the prime importance is flexibility, as with other necessities for street children. Beds being of the conventional norms isn‘t a necessity and could be specially designed, i.e. 90cm x 180cm, they can be designed to the average heights of the children accordingly. Savings in space can be achieved by reducing bed sizes significantly.

Figure 5.3: Circulation between beds

Figure 5.4: Separation between beds

Figure 5.5: Plan zones

Figure 5.6: 3D Plan shows the spaces

Figure 5.7: Argentina

Example

Figure 5.8: Nigeria

Area (M2)

Figure 5.9: Kenya

No. of Places

M2/Place

Argentina

115

14 or 22

8.25 or 5.25

Nigeria

90

20

4.5

Kenya

102

40

2.55

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Sleeping Spaces

Health Care Studying Space

Library

General Activities‘ Space

Services

Administration

Health Care Space Provisions of primary health care for street children should be catered to both their psychological and physical needs. Basic education and information on hygiene, nutrition and health wherever possible, should be given in association with medical treatment. Clinic • Separate noisy and quiet areas. • Suitable flow of patients to avoid other circulation movements. • The number of children that can be treated must be maximized by sharing facilities and spaces everywhere possible. • Privacy is required. • A relaxing atmosphere must be provided to make patients feel comfortable. • Health center -if part of a general center for receiving street children- must be linked visually with the general center, in order to make the children not feel isolated.

Figure 5.10: Zones STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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Sleeping Spaces

Health Care Studying Space

Library

General Activities‘ Space

Services

Administration

Standard classrooms, supplementary classrooms, extra-large classrooms, rooms for special courses, rooms for teaching languages and social studies, language labs, workshops and other ancillary rooms are all the components of the teaching area. • Space requirements: 2.00 m2/pupil are required for classroom for traditional teaching; 3.oo m2/pupil are for teaching in sets, 4.50 m2/pupil are required for open plan teaching place including ancillary areas needed for each Figure 5.11: space required per child for general subject. classroom activities is 1• Standard room space shape: 1.5m2/child (12x20, 12x16, 12x12, 12x10) this in the rectangular or square case; with a 7.20 m max. room depth, it is possible to have windows on one side only. • Floor areas are: 1.80-2.00 m2/pupil are required for traditional classrooms; 3.00-5.00 m2/pupil are required for open lab, The clear height should be 2.70-3.40 m.

Figure 5.12: 3D Plan shows the general activity area

Figure 5.13: 3D Plan shows the second general activity area STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH 60


The physical environment of the educational centre through modern educational concepts for the kindergarten. Physical Education Environment

Organizing Classes

Traditional Education Thoughts

Modern Education Thoughts

Class is the main component of a children Kindergarten.

Activity corner is the main unit of a Kindergarten, these corners are the components of the activity hall.

Monolith lines for children seats, facing the teacher (main focal point).

Small flexible groups seating's, helping children to make free activities, with no focal point.

Plans

Table 5.2: The impact of spatial form of child-care centers on supporting educational goals.

Workshop A good way of assisting the children in the process of rehabilitation is teaching them a skill or a trade. This doesn‘t only produce immediate, visible results, but also the objects made can generate revenue for the children and/or prepare them for work, consequently improving their confidence and self-esteem. Bench Area The work bench is one of the most vital pieces of furniture in any workshop. The bench area should be easily accessible from machine and storage areas and located in centre of workshop.

Figure 5.14: Plan zones STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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Teaching Area The teacher may need an area where he/she can address the entire group. Conditional on the size of the workshop and the nature of the program explanations, demonstration etc. may occur in the workshop or in an adjoining class room. However, much of the teaching will be casual. The teacher will require being available for help and small group or individual demonstrations. Therefore the teacher should have his/her own space from which he/she can easily supervise activities and where children can come to for help. Blackboards would be useful to have around the workshop so that ideas can be easily explained using drawings and/or writing. Examples Electrical equipment are prepared in this department which is responsible for repairing such items, such as air-conditioners, household equipment, typewriters and other office machines. It also plays a major part in building construction and has done much to make the workshop known as a place where original solutions are found for special problems.

Figure 5.15: Electricity

Figure 5.16: General Workshop

Figure 5.17: Electricity

• The horizontal and outer-directed design concepts are utilized in these layouts. Different site constraints or opportunities caused in making these two layouts shown have alternative entrance locations. The four major elements of the workshop are separated in these layouts. • The vertical and outer-directed design concepts are utilized in the layout. This layout may have to be used in order to meet the natural terrain of the land best. An exciting building visually is formed but must be made sure it work properly. • The horizontal and inner-directed design concepts are utilized by the layout. A central courtyard is the focus of work areas, which can also be used as an outdoor work area where weather dictates the need for shelter and protection. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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Sleeping Spaces

Health Care

Studying Space

Library

General Activities‘ Space

Services

Administration

Library Space Library consists of a conventional school library for students and teachers with books and magazines, reading, lending facilities and work places. The multi-media center is an extension of the library where the recording and playback facilities -for radio, film, TV- are located. Standard spaces overall requirements: • 0.35-0.55 m2/pupil for the library/media center. Broken down into: • Book issues and returns require 5m2 per workplace, and 20-40 m2 of catalogue space. • Information: librarian, media technician, media advisor, etc. 10-20 m2 per person.

Figure 5.18: Minimum distances

Figure 5.20: Plan shows library spaces Main spaces are: 1. Multi-purpose room 2. Audio books 3. Office 4. Central catalogue 5. Newspapers, magazines 6. Group area 7. Individual places 8. Typing booths 9. Information, lending desk 10. Lecture room 11. Audio/visual studio 12. Racks 13. Free access 14. Photocopier 15. Cloakroom, lockers

Figure 5.19: Standard bookshelf dimensions STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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Sleeping Spaces

Health Care

Studying Space

Library

General Activities’ Space

Services

Administration

Why Is Recreation Important?

Physical Development

Social Development

Emotional Development

   

Physical skills Stamina Co-ordination Elegance of body movement

By playing in groups children can learn to:  Respect and trust each other  Follow rules  Share  Cope with conflict situations

Through recreation (group and individual) children develop:  The ability to make decisions  The ability to control aggression  The ability to cope with personal challenges (self reward), thus improving their self esteem and confidence  Improved attention spans and perseverance

Recreation is vitally important when dealing with street children. It breaks down psychological barriers (i.e. mistrust, hostility etc.) to achieve initial contact with street children. It can also boost their social, physical, and emotional development.

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Quite Activities’ Spaces:  Reading.  Arts & Crafts.

 Spaces must include storage for tools and books.  Activities‘ spaces could be calculated at the rate of 0.92;1.85 M2 / bed.

Noisy Activities’ Spaces:  Team Sports.  Ping Pong,  TV watching.

 Different spaces for different uses rather than one big space.  Halls used for music, learning, gymnastics, athletic sports, all should be located on the ground floor.  A hall for official occasions.

These spaces are designed to be located on the ground floor or in the basement, and a minimum of one hall should be designated for official occasions, with a storage unit for movables attached to it.

Figure 4.21: Children watching television

Figure 5.22: Pool, billiards, snooker, etc.

Figure 5.23: Board Figure 5.24: Ping Pong can be inside or games, card games,STREET etc. CHILDREN outside REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH 65


Main Features Of An Activity Space

Outline of Space

 Different levels.  Furniture in limits.  Architectural elements (columns, walls, etc.)

Toys Storage

 Suitable storages.  Suitable places to use it.

Seating, Work Areas

 In groups.  Tables.  Chairs.

Unique

Location

 Remarkable signs.  Different colors & textures.  Different furniture.

Relation with:  Main circulation.  Staff location.  Other corners.

Art Work Tools and elements to work with and draw, whether furniture or on ground elements, also elements to pin up the children‘s drawings on. Library Quite and comfort spaces, tables, shelves and vocal devices to hear vocal stories. Dramatic Play Mirrors, different roles clothes, dinning tables, gathering spaces. Playing Area Seating‘s, tables, working surfaces, storage for toys, easy accessed by children. Different shapes for activity spaces Rectangle • Famous shape for activity corners. • Organized by furniture units. Rectangle • Narrow widths. • Wide, tall corridors helping children in running and in moving freely inside activity corner. Square • More time in movement between spaces, due to organizing corners and furniture around the center. L-Shape • Good, due to presence of many spaces for activities in the corners. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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Outdoor Recreation The designed play space can only be used for a few specific activities as it shouldn‘t be ‗over designed‘. The adaptable, with some imagination, and simple interventions, to a vast variety of activities and games, will be the unsurpassed design.

Figure 5.25: Ground flat shaping for active games like football Figure 5.28: Existing vegetation integrated into the designed recreational spaces .

Loose materials and construction Assembling objects out of scrap materials requires inventiveness, coordination, co-operation and patience. The potentials for creative play, both individual and group, are boundless. Figure 5.26: In a play area water which is always popular

Figure 5.27: Natural changes in ground terrain used for playing or seating, in addition to acting as wind screens and creating visual barriers.

Figure 5.29: Children playing with sand .

Sand Sand as well has endless prospects for creative play, both group and individual. Fig4.29

Swings and climbing structures

Figure 5.28: Sports field dimensions

Figure 5.30: Innovative use of tires for recreational purposes STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH 67 .


Sleeping Spaces

Health Care

Studying Space

Library

General Activities‘ Space

Services

Administration

Services Firstly: Kitchen Whether food preparation is being carried out by staff members or by street children themselves, the design ought to be practical and simple, to allow swift and efficient preparation of food in an easy to clean, comfortable, well ventilated environment. Fig4.31 Those that allow for flexibility in use will be the most successful of designs. In addition, the children should dine together in a family like environment. Storage Area Storerooms ought to be close to both delivery and food preparation areas. They should be organized according to their contents, i.e. shelf widths and depths should relate to size of the objects they will be holding, thus efficiently using space. Preparation Area Food preparation will be taking place inside the kitchen, even though some activities, i.e. chilies, drying onions, etc. or cleaning grains and pulses, can be completed outside. It should be close to cooking area.

Figure 5.31: 3D plan shows the kitchen space. .

Cooking Area Stove area is best located in the center of the kitchen. It ought to be close to preparation work tops. Path ways between stove and work tops should be wide enough to allow easy movement while cooks are working. Serving Area Serving area requires a counter (large enough for serving dishes, plates, etc.) which is adjacent to cupboards containing serving and eating utensils. It is preferred to have a separate room to serve food, in centers serving more than 400 meals. In smaller ones a serving area in the kitchen is perfectly acceptable. Shutters are recommended to close off the serving area if the adjoining dining area is used during the day for other activities.

Figure 5.32: Kitchen circulation.

Outdoor Area The outdoor area should be protected from direct sun light- particularly in hot climates- and rain, as it‘s traditionally where much of general food preparation takes place. Dining Area Dining hall size will depends on how many children are eating. In case there are a lot of children it is advisable to serve food in shifts so facilities can be

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Secondly: Dining Area The dining space is setup as for all the children could use it at the same time, and it‘s area is calculated as 1.4 m2 / child and this is in the case of using dining tables that fit 8 to 10 children, but in case of using smaller dining tables then a bigger area must be provided for every child.

Figure 5.33: Dinning tables standard dimensions

The examples cited are to be served as a guideline; so that the reader can have a general idea of how much is required of space to serve a set number of meals. Room sizes will differ depending on how many meals are to be prepared at any one time i.e. 150 meals prepared in several shifts over 24 hours will require less space than 150 meals prepared in one shift.

Figure 5.34: Serves 250

Figure 5.35: Serves 100

Thirdly: The Toilets locating depends on the institution‘s way of life, because institutions which are designed on the basis of the juxtaposition of sleeping, living and studding quarters together in one domain so that the children spend most of the day in this area it is imperative to provide enough toilets in this range, but as for the institutions that provide many spaces for general usage in the ground floor must provide enough toilets neighboring to it, and also there must also be toilets provided sufficiently near any place dedicated to kids gathering, and shall provide toilets especially for workers and separate from those for children, also taken into account the provision of toilets in open areas in the institution and those services must be provided for children at the following rates: - W.C. 2/10 children - Shower 1/10 children Figure 5.36: Collected toilets and - Sink 1/3 children - Urinal 1/20 children showers. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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Sleeping Spaces

Health Care

Studying Space

Library

General Activities‘ Space

Services

Administration

Administration The administrative requirements to run a street children centre will differ due to the scale and the organisation of the project. For larger scale projects, they may require spaces for gathering, holding meetings, organising fund-raising activities, and giving information out. For smaller scale ones, they may only require to have an office space where secretarial work can take place. Office(s) Basic administration and management of centre

Figure 5.37: Offices standard dimensions

Meeting room(s) Meeting place is for staff, members of the community, parents, government representatives, police, etc.

Figure 5.38: Tables standard shapes and dimensions

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CHAPTER VI INDIVIDUAL TASKS

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INDIVIDUAL TASK A.RAHMAN MOHAMED


INDIVIDUAL TASK | PERSONAL IDEOLOGY

Mission Inclusiveness and completed vision of the phenomenon of street children to the awareness that facing the problem is our national responsibility based on the collective effort organized and integrated a number of ministries, government institutions, non-governmental organizations, local and private sector, and citizens in general. Therefore, we must build and implement strategies of confrontation on the basis of the establishment of mechanisms to ensure the greatest possible coordination and effectiveness in between all the parties involved community. The strategy to protect and rehabilitate street children is based on the idea of ​" children's rights " as part of human rights , as it identified in the national laws on children, and in international rules approved by the Egyptian government and at the top of it the ―.

Objectives 1- Psychological Dimension - Establishment of a center to receive complaints of street children if they were exposed. - Specifying a Festival Day for street children to break the psychological barrier between children. - Doctors and psychologists have work program for psychiatric treatment for children. 2- Cultural Dimension - At the individual level apart of their time at day must be available for leisure and strengthening social ties to children practically nonexistent. - Families of children have to be aware of the activities carried out by children such as artistic activities from drawing boards or handicraft items. - Recreational activities must be also a dialogue activities, discussions and debates and competitions among children about vital topics pertaining to their community. 3- Social Dimension - Intensification of propaganda in the awareness of fundamental rights of the child and social risks of this phenomenon. - Increasing efforts of the media to reduce the spread of divorce and family disintegration. - Exchange of experiences with other countries on ways to cope with this phenomenon.

Conclusion All ministries and government institutions, foundations, and non-governmental which related to that transcends caring trend are inviting In this context, which controls most of the policies and programs currently , which would lead to devote develop targeted children and their families as a passive assistance recipients and services , and the direction to adopt developmental perspective based on the concept of " social rights " and to enable the target groups , and the consideration of these children as citizens have the right to get a safe childhood and healthy growth through access to all the opportunities and the economic and social rights available in the community.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT I Project: Street children rehabilitation centre. Location: Dokki, Giza. The street children rehabilitation centre‘s project strategy is providing the children with free and enjoyable circulation, the centre is designed as a single storey structure. The first phase is designed as an L-shape towards the front, features the administration, and Sleeping areas (Dorms) is designed as an reflected L-shape at the back of the plot, and leaving the courtyard inside the plot which is provide accessibility, and natural light.

Masses Diagram

The program states that required areas for rehabilitation process, it can be classified as the follows: sleeping area, educational area, healthcare area, recreational area, administration, and services. The spaces are organized around enclosed courtyard which provides an outdoor space, sheltered from sights and sounds of traffic, for therapy, and the occasionally celebrations. Circulation Diagram

Masses Functions Diagram STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY I

Cross section illustrates the process

The Interior after installation

3D Section STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT II Project: Street children rehabilitation centre. Location: Ain Al-Serra, Cairo. The street children rehabilitation centre‘s project strategy is providing the children with delightful atmosphere through playful elements, color, light and textures which support and activate the energy of children, inside and outside the centre. The rehabilitation centre is organized as a collection of rooms as varying shapes of small colored boxes around a central courtyard.

Masses Diagram

The attractive and joyful atmosphere of the centre will be applied by using bright colored walls, graphics, and colorful panels at the reception and the main waiting area, and the selected floor colors to revive the space and identify each sector destination on the corridors for the children. The atmosphere of the new centre is one of relaxation, stability, and protection elements essential to the comfort of children, which applied through good, natural daylight conditions and use of healthy indoor materials.

Circulation Diagram

Masses Functions Diagram STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY II SMART SKIN The system includes active shades, the building enclosure system and the internal mechanical system. The active shades are sloping on the external face of the curtain wall, all are forming a high efficient building wrapping. The internal conditioned ceiling panels reduce the amount of the required air outside, resulting an improved HVAC effectiveness.

Daylight absorption allows for reductions in electrical lighting and associated heat production. Over the year, the combined system provides an effective shading level of 78% and reduces top solar gains by 81%.

The three layers of the envelop

The exterior side of the facade

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT III Project: Street children rehabilitation centre. Location: Mansheyet Nasser, Cairo. The street children rehabilitation centre‘s project strategy is not to create a building as a part of its surroundings and the community which promotes the social and cultural activity in Mansheyet Nasser, not to create a centre with the appearance of a educational building . The children‘s centre will be designed as three masses that link each other with a central courtyard, which is imagined as the space that gather all the circulation paths through the different areas of the center. Geometrically, it can be defined as a circle due to the alignments of the lot.

Masses Diagram

Adding welcoming and open environment offers a natural residence for rehabilitation and allows perfect practice the other phases of the rehabilitation process. The centre will be an important element in process of development the district of Mansheyet Nasser. consequently, the building is designed to stand out with a unique image in the development process.

Circulation Diagram

Masses Functions Diagram STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY III BUILDING AUTOMATION SYSTEM Introduction Operate and control the building automation system from one central unit using prudence management station, it can easily record energy data and optimize it based on the operating theory. It can control blinds as they are adjusted optimally to allow the perfect use of natural light, to protect from the cold and the heat, and to minimize glare. It also controls the lighting level as it is automatically adjusted to match the time of the day. When needed, shading is provided to ensure use of natural light optimally without glare. Benefits •Lower energy costs with energy efficient applications. •Improved operating safety due to user specific displays. •Using graphical interfaces guarantee easy monitoring and operation. •Decision making and analysis based on detailed data. •Centralized alarm management for more improved safety. •Efficient operation via web based remote access. •Automated warnings for early intervention.

Room operator units

System components organization

System components chart STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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INDIVIDUAL TASK ESLAM AHMAD


INDIVIDUAL TASK | PERSONAL IDEOLOGY Mission The mission is to fix the wasted wealth which is street children with their massive number, weather to make them a great society weapon towards development or letting them as they are now which will make them a very dangerous weapon against our society. Since our project is under the umbrella of AWARENESS so we must state and spread that street children are not criminals as much as they are the biggest victim of many factors (Family, economical, social, political & urban).

Objectives 1- Psychological Dimension Psychological aspect is one of the main dimensions, where those children feel that they are neglected, hated and must be imprisoned, so that they must be psychological rehabilitated. 2- Cultural Dimension Cultural dimension is very dangerous as it is irreversible Trends and habits and it mostly effect street girls more than Boys and they usually face sexual harassment and abuse and violence 3- Social Dimension Social dimension can be one of the keys to solve this problem, this will happen when society change it‘s look to street children as they are only criminals and start to treat them as they can be victims of a low status country in all aspects.

Conclusion My conclusion is that street children as a phenomena is a society problem, every single citizen in Egypt is responsible for treating with this problem and treating As an architect I‘ll try to solve this problem by the same aspects causing it. For example the social aspect as it is one of the main causes of this phenomena existing, it should be one of the main solving factors by connecting different fields spaces and institutions (educational, recreational and vocational workshops) to work in one project, to make the children feel that they are living in their own new society.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT I Problem Causes Diagram

Problem Solving Diagram

Country

Administration

Family

Society

Urban

Adults

Recreational

Education

Work-shops

Facilities

NGO’s

Health Care

The first diagram ‗Problem Causes diagram‘ shows the main reasons of street children phenomena appearance in our society. So why we don‘t use the same diagram and transform it into solving one, then transform the new diagram into architectural spaces.

Al-Sudan street

Al-Tahrir Street

It also provides the children with an enclosed feeling within the center spaces, which will causes a good and easy psychological treatment.

Admin.

Educational

Recreational Workshops

Facilities Health Care

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY I ELECTROCHROMIC WINDOWS A new generation of technologies called switchable glazing or smart windows which

change the light transmittance, shading or transparency of windows in response to an environmental signal contains the Electro

A transparent conductor, an ionic conductor, an electro chromic coating, and a counter electrode between two glass plates are the main materials of Electro chromic windows which consist of up to seven layers of materials.

chromic windows. The counter electrode may also have electro chromic properties, which enhances the colour changes. The essential function of the device results from the transport of hydrogen or lithium ions from an ion storage layer and through an ion-conducting layer, injecting them into an electro chromic layer.

Sage Glass is invented into a dual pane or insulating glass unit (IGU) which is the most common structure for building windows today. It is formed as laminated safety glass for buildings and automobile windows where safety is necessary. Sage Glass IGUs are different from traditional IGUs by having two wires spreading from one edge; these wires are connected with the building's electrical system. As it installed, we can operate the window or skylight using a remote control, a dimmer switch, or central energy management system. In addition, EC windows will be used in applications with wireless powering Options. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT II The transformation from (A) to (B) is not only an age transformation, but also a developmental one. By days in the rehabilitation center street child must learn and treated by different aspects to become useful youth, so development goes parallel to age.

Case (A)

Case (B)

Al-Tahrir street

Translating this concept into architecture might be done in different spaces, to start with the entrance –Receiving area of the street child- as the case (A), moving by different types of treatment spaces ending with the preparing spaces as a last stage. Spaces can ordered by different criteria such as children needs priority or by area.

Al-Sudan street

Zone 3 Zone 2 Zone 1 Entran ce

Case (B)

Case (A)

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY II Biological Concrete for a Living, Breathing Facade Design future requires thinking in innovative

way about the construction techniques used nowadays functions so we may increase upon their efficiency. Sustainability now becomes a part of this design process. Increasing of vertical garden and vegetated facades is now obviously seen, so the biological concrete is apart from these other systems as it is an integral part of the structure. Biological concrete is composed of three layers on top of the structural elements which provide

ecological, thermal and aesthetic advantages for the building.

Waterproof membrane is the first layer which protects the structural elements from water penetration. The new biological layer of concrete is applied on top of this layer which absorbs rainwater, acting as a microstructure that retains and stores rainwater. Discontinuous coating is the final layer which permits the entry of rainwater and traps it between the coating and the waterproof membrane.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT III The concept is based on the relation between the project and the surroundings functions, creating a link between the project and the surrounding functions in order to transfer them from a static functions into a useful tools help our project and participate in developing the community.

Recreational

The main function‘s triangle (link) of the surroundings which are Recreational – Youth centre and clubEducational – Many schools in the same area- Workshops and factories. The main concept is making the main spaces of our project (Educational, Economical & Recreational) on the same axes of these functions at the surrounding.

Educational

Workshops

Educational area (Many schools as Ramsis Language school)

Recreational area (Al-Dokii youth center)

Al-Tahrir street

Al-Sudan street Sleeping area is not on the main street to avoid noisy impact on sleeping spaces, so it‘s located on a small path beside the project are, and also can has a view on the outdoor recreational area of the project.

Main Educati Hall Worksho onal Recreat ps Sleepin ional g

Workshops are (Some factories and workshops in Al-Moror street). STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY III Harmonia 57 The "Marthashof" residential estate is bang in Berlin's Mitte district and includes some 130 units across a total of 12,380 square meters. The buildings are U-shaped and arranged around a public park. What is striking is the special perforation of the elements used for the facades and sun-protections sections, designed by Berlin-based architects GrĂźntuch Ernst for Marthashof in the form of wisteria. This design was initially based on an idea of the building company Stofanel. RMIG, manufacturers of perforated sheet metal, made the personalized panels on behalf of Colt, which supplied the horizontal folding blinds. The combination of perforation and folding blinds enables residents to respond flexibly to changes in the weather, be it day by day or by season, and enjoy a pleasant room climate with minimal energy inputs.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY III

Sun and air are allowed to penetrate the flexible panel façade. It works as a mechanism for making the building breathe. It can be adjusted throughout the day to accommodate the sun‘s direction.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY IV Green Roofs Providing building with green roofs is rapidly becoming a design principle for buildings at

every scale. A decrease in heating and cooling costs, which in turn mitigates the urban heat island effect are some benefits of a green roof, other benefits include an increase in the life span of the roof, natural filter for rain water, a natural habitat for animals and plants and a reduction in dust and smog levels.

A common green roof build up consists of: • Roof resistant barrier • Protection layer • Drainage layer • Filter layer • Growing medium • Vegetation • Appropriate components i.e. outlet inspection chambers, 500mm vegetation barrier. The type, size, and design of each layer will depend on the proposed vegetation; as will the need for irrigation

Different types of Green Roof :

Extensive

Semi-extensive

Intensive

Roof Garden

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INDIVIDUAL TASK DANNY NASHAAT


INDIVIDUAL TASK | PERSONAL IDEOLOGY Mission The criteria of which I based upon my concept developing was based mainly on the children feeling right at home, and not to make them feel like they‘re in a prison, that they feel the interaction between them, the community, and the different social classes. With various consideration concerning the reasons why said children chose the streets as their home, and how to eliminate these reasons from the proposed project‘s concept.

Objectives The following dimensions are to be fulfilled in order to have a healthy user: • Psychological Dimension: Erecting a building where the child would feel like he/she is in a home-like environment, with the building form/façade not giving any sense of detaining or imprisonment. The setting of the color palate and how colors have an effect on the human behavior. • Physical Dimension: The implementation of gates, fencing and pathways that lead people in specific directions or prevent them from get into restricted areas. As well as windows that are installed at certain heights in the educational spaces to keep the children from being distracted by outside events. • Social Dimension: The respecting of the children‘s privacy, but not to let them roam as they‘d like, it should be controlled a bit by the social supervisor, and that would be by locating the staffs‘ private quarters near the kids sleeping areas, and having the staff in close proximity of the children at all time, in order for the children to feel comfortable towards the staff.

“All that we aspire for is for these children to live a decent life, be able to live their childhood, and be a part of the society - a contributing part, and not just be another brick in the wall. All this could be achieved through how the project is designed, the architecture has a huge impact on the children, and how they perceive their everyday life, and for that a project which respects the humanity of these children and consider their needs, will be the project with the most impact. A project that embraces them, that gives them a new meaning for life and rehabilitate them. A project that reintegrates them into the community, that helps them interact with different groups of people, whether it be social class or age. And a project that reaches out to them, creates a fighting chance for these children against there hardships, and setting them on the right tracks to success and a decent, honest life.”

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT I Rebirth Rehabilitation is like rebirth as the child goes into the institution –centre- and through its programs and interventions comes out a whole new person, and this can be translated to an architectural form in the shape of a person lying in the fetal position, which is . one of the most comfortable and familiar positions to humans. The person here is of old age –to some extent- and this is to press on the point that no matter how old you might be, you can still have hope of change to the better, and to become a new helpful member of the society. The fetal position form of the building will give the child a sense of embrace as it revolves around its center, that he/she will always be safe, away from harms way, and that the child will never be alone once again.

The process of the human being curling up into the position of a fetus.

As the building embraces the child more, the more the child feels safe.

A person lying in the fetal position.

The process of the building curling up imitating the human body.

A conceptual layout, and form arrangement.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY I The Reguflector The reguflector* concept uses photo controlled louvers within a skylight to maintain light levels within desired limits. This controls heat gain while allowing a skylight large enough to completely daylight a space during daylight hours - 4% daylight factor while electric lights are needed only at night. ESBL‘s initial product development has been in cooperation with CPI Day lighting, who provides engineering and manufacturing support. Since their collaboration began CPI has changed their designs to improve daylight control, reduce noise, improve the user interface of their controls and integrate electric lighting control into their system. "We were inspired by the Energy Studies in Buildings Laboratory to include new and improved day lighting systems in our product range." - Moshe

The reflector under the skylight redirects light to the sides of the room, thereby eliminating the bright spot directly under the skylight and reducing undesirable contrast

Konstantin, President, CPI Day lighting Inc. *The name "reguflector" is an amalgam of light "regulation" and light "reflector"; the concept was developed as part of Energy Studies In Buildings Laboratory ―High Performance Classroom project‖.

The classrooms at Mount Angel use triangular metal rods. The project achieved the equivalent of LEED Gold. The louvers and the custom reflector evenly distributes enough light throughout the day so that no electric lighting is needed 95% of the time the classroom is occupied.

Polycarbonate reflectors at Canby Middle School classrooms, and Da Vinci Middle School's net zero energy building, uses fabric in the reflector and achieved the first LEED Platinum school certification.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT II Cooperation As in the cooperation between the two -or three- different social classes, the age groups, and the community of said location of the project in general to solve the phenomena/problem of street children. The cooperation initiated by volunteers that will help out as social supervisors, the artisans of the project‘s community that will help out as trainers and teachers in the workshops to help the children develop a skill, and the cooperation of the children in helping out with their products in creating a revenue in order for the project to economically sustain itself. This cooperation maybe translated to an architectural form via the form of a set of gears of any machine, that all these gears can come to work together for that one goal, that in this case is the goal of solving the problem.

A set of gears

Conceptual Layout

Residential quarters with recreational spaces, both indoor, and outdoor using the courtyards. Educational spaces, and library, still utilizing the courtyards as a point of aesthetic attraction, and as natural illuminating courts. The workshops and galleries for the outside community to use and help in funding of the center.

Initial form‘s perspective

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY II The Windbelt The Windbelt is a wind power generator to see through the very modest electrical power needs of families in third-world countries. The device is ground-breaking for being nonrevolving — most wind power is produced by turbines that go around in a circle and turning on an axis to drive a generator. Windbelt, however, uses the fluctuation of a thin strip of material held in tension with a spring in order to vibrate a magnet that generates electrical power. The Windcell Panels are a new, non-turbine way of acquiring the wind on a large-scale. Much like a solar panel that is verticallymounted, but it captures the wind instead of the sun, the Windcell Panels are designed for safety, modularity, and very low cost. They are being developed to make fitting wind energy as easy as putting up a fence. Capable of being assembled into vast arrangements, with no spinning fans and very little mass moving the Windcell Panels can be mounted in all those locations that wind and solar have never been able to go.

A single Windcell Panel is made up of 20x1 meter long Windbelts, in a 1x1 meter frame.

The Windcell Panels‘ aim is to bring wind power to new micro-grids in the city.

Windbelt can preform as a part of the curtain wall.

Windbelt can be also used as a shading device.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT III Giving Out A Hand Giving out a hand in the sense of helping those children out in turning their lives around for a better tomorrow, as children are this country‘s future, they‘ll be our future doctors, engineers, teachers, and scientists. Giving out a hand to and leading them to the right path, setting them on the tracks to success. The children will be feeling safe again, as they get back –or might even be getting for the first time- a sense of security, away from the streets, away from the abuse, begging, theft, and the addiction. In order to articulate this concept into an architecture form it‘s going be in the form of two structures embracing each other.

A reaching hand to help out.

Conceptual layout.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY III Green Screen Green screen is a type of a metal structure that can be attached to existing structures or used to create freestanding growing walls. We harness the power of plants to absorb carbon from the atmosphere, through integrating more photosynthesizing plants and trees within the fabric of our existing cities. The surface area of buildings multiplies the ground footprint of the city, making the interesting and practical solution be vertical gardening and the integration of growing walls into our buildings. • Irrigation is pumped to green wall panels planted with low water need and native plants • Cisterns to hold approximately 2100 gal, or about 21 watering to assist in dry season. Backup portable water is expected to be used only 30 days of the year.

• • •

• The Biodiversity Green Wall will provide vertical habitat and increase building performance. • The Green Wall designed on a manual pulley system for ease in research and maintenance from the adjacent balcony. • A water harvesting system will capture, reuse and cleanse roof runoff to be used in the Green Wall irrigation.

Overflow directs excess water back to the • An Edible Green Screen will explore the storm drain. efficacy of vertical surfaces to support local Existing rain leader drains from 2195 M2 food production, roof. • The existing garden below will provide Rain leader extension diverts roof runoff seating for reflection and restoration to cisterns. opportunities with vertical nature.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK

MOHAMED GEHAD


INDIVIDUAL TASK | Personal Ideology A. Mission My criteria in developing the concepts is the level of reintegration of the children back into society, as contributing members, whether it is right away through functions and galleries, or on the long run as respectable members of society, and how harmonies is the project with its surrounding environment.

B. Objectives The following dimensions are a must that needs fulfilling: • Psychological Dimension: The controlling of how you use the surrounding environment and how the child perceives it is very important, as this can either make the child feel free and comfortable, or it could backfire and make him feel as if he/she is imprisoned. • Physical Dimension: We could simply control the movement of the centers users by simply applying a couple of fences, gates, and pathways that prevents them from passing into restricted areas, and lead them to their destination without deviation. • Physiological Dimension: Ventilation of the building has been taken into consideration, as well as the sun path and it‘s illumination. • Social Dimension: The child‘s privacy should be respected, so every child should have his own private personal space which he/she can modify to his/her liking to some extent, this would make the child feel the sense of ownership and be keen to preserve the cleanliness of the center.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT I

Integration -The first main concept is integration, its supposed to appear clearly in this project, as the street children already feel the segregation, so its about how the project will react with the society, the surrounding, or how to be integrated. -The Urban fabric of the chosen sites already appears to be unique, so if its well integrated, it will be more flexible which offer expansion and future extensions without having to tear up some blueprints. -The building should be well integrated to those fixtures appearing in the figure, the project will be well endorsed as it can work on these features, as well as it will achieve its maximum success for its function which is to make these children integrated again to their society, to feel that they have their facilities and buildings that can help them, that they can work for, just like the other part that they see, the rich people. -So integration is considered to be an important concept in my project, and again, its how to make children again related to their society that they used to leave away from them for a long time, integrated one society.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT II

Contrast -Contrast is one of the important concepts here in this project, how will the project attract the targeted people, it has to be unique, it has to appear very well, and to express itself. -This can be achieved by many ways, through colour, form, structure, a mark, even through its elevations, those components can act very well on the building -This photo expresses the contrast of the white building, as it appears very well through the whole buildings, that‘s because the colour gave it an appearing indication that its something different than the others, if the colour theory is applied it will be very helpful through this project

-This photo expresses the contrast in another different way, structure, as we see here the building also appears to be very unique compared to the surroundings as its structure differs, that gave it a strength point, which will be very helpful in our project, this will attract people to this place to try to see what is this, and then the function of the building takes place.

-What am trying to say here is that the building has to be very unique, this will appear very well through the contrast, to help out the building function to start. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT III

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY I

Compliant Shading Enclosure -This Technology helps in controlling the amount of sun, Shade and Shadow. This technology operates by the sun-light creating the maximum comfort level to be achieved at the space.

Open Section

Mid-open Section -These sketches shows the mechanism of this technology, it is very useful, as it consists of Bimetal, along with high and low expansion alloys. As the temperature differs, these alloys produces opposite force, causing the metal alloys to rotate. -As the parameters of the alloys are adjusted, it can suit any climate, it doesn't‘t need any future maintenance, and it also has no voice.

Closed Section

Model Digital Prototypes

- It Promotes diversity, its regulated with the solar exposure throughout the day, and even the whole year, it reduces the heat gain, glare and undesired reflections of sun-light.

Interior View for a Kitchen Model

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY II

Vegetation on cladding and Translucent Facades -Because Urban greening assures lower levels of CO2, as it also offers thermal response. These Technologies also offer for the building Hygienic Ventilation, sound insulation and solar protection. -It Consists of Sliding sash interior windows, with leaves surrounding it, and a chamber filled with the required vegetation. Only the vegetation layer that differs from a faรงade to another. Vegetated plants needs intensive caring, and should be reasonably chosen according to the climatic conditions of each area.

Translucent Faรงade Positions

-The shown sections provide more illustrations for the Mechanism of these facades, as the vegetation absorbs the CO2 emissions and the direct sunrays of the summer season on the building, and transfers the clear oxygen inside the building and also providing the needed shade, as it also controls the climate inside the building keeping it moderate, while during winter season, these facades absorbs the sun light and transfers the needed heat inside the building, to achieve the maximum comfort for the interior climate, Its more useful and economic, it sustains the building and helps achieving zero level energy building.

Figure (A) : Cladding, Figure(B) : Translucent Facades

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY III

Solar Chimney System -A solar chimney system in installed to enhance air ventilation in the interiors, using a series of linked downwards to the spaces. -The solar chimney is designed to preform well during the hot and humid climate conditions as well as cool days also. -The solar chimney System consists of four vertical ducts, each two of them are placed in the faรงade with rich amount of air, these ducts transfers the air to the different zones in the building, it also consists of a different number of inlets, the inlets are placed horizontally on the roof. Other heat exchanges are placed in other places nearby the building, to draw the air to achieve maximum passive cooling design to the building.

-During the exchange process of the heat, The heat escapes out of the building which makes it cooler, this process is called natural convection, its created by solar energy heating air inside the chimney. -Hot air escapes out of the building through the top of the chimney, and is replaced by cool air, imported from other vents or small inlets placed in the building, during winter, chimneys evacuating air can be closed, forcing hot air to enter the building, making it warmer.

Section showing principles of Solar Chimney STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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INDIVIDUAL TASK MOHAMED YASSER


INDIVIDUAL TASK | Personal Ideology

Street child

Brain storming

PEST Analysis

Childish Aggression

The Wealthy people

Street Identity

Mistrust to Autonomy

Loss of identity

Re-Integrating the society

Revival of heritage

An Early Adult

Psychology

Wastage of resources and illiteracy

Sustainable Solutions

The Seed to enlightenment

―Street children are daily active members of today‘s community and the future of tomorrow‘s being, Street children are a mix of the sensitive young child roaming freely for the need of care and the aggressiveness of a man in the cycle of searching for basic needs of life , How can this child be convinced to re-allocate himself amongst the community of ours by merging his lifesytle , street identity and be a productive member towards a desired future ―

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT I

The Seed to enlightenment ― The Recycilistic futurism ― Methodology

― Community enlightenment ―

Recycling

― Community Participation ―

Futurism

― Community development ―

Environ.

Social

Economical

Political

Innovation

Aesthesis

Technology

Identity

― Sustainable Development ―

Concept Awareness to communities through the unmined gold of recycling to the future which can be efficiently put to place in changing life patterns and identities of places. A whole city can be re-defined through community upgrading affecting the sustainable business process , Architectural style innovation , interventions through learning the value of the recycled uses and integrating it with the future. Futurism mainly focuses on the line of force radiating from the surrounding environment conflicting with each other creating a conception of reality , emotional and dynamic. Briefly taking recycling into another stage within our daily life and our futurism like lifestyle to the building components and daily uses.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY I Interactive Wall technology

Dynamic wall Facade

Contemporary air movement pattern facade

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY I

Schematic Diagrams

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT II

The Seed to enlightenment ― The Bridge of the two sides ― Methodology

― Community Integration ― Informal Community

Poverty

Hunger

Heritage

― Community Indulgence ― ― Community unity ―

Malnutrition

Innovation

Formal Community

Wealth

Aggression Identity

― Segregation ―

Concept The bridge acts as a transitional zone between people of the two sides with common activities to preventing psychological barriers. The Informal community suffers from poor health , poverty , Hunger and Malnutrition , psychological barriers within the informal community due to the large gap as they need opportunities especially jobs. Not most of the formal community have the mentality of treating with the other side in respectful way which is one of the main problems of sensitivity between the two sides. Briefly an open area with multi uses creating a transition between the informal community to the formal one and vice versa as a rehabilitation

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY II Pv Cells public Screen garden

Living Walls Bridge

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT III

The Seed to enlightenment ― Symbolism in Local Heritage―

Common Symbols Methodology

Mastaba

Minaret - Most commonly a symbol for the entrance or used as a landmark also.

- Most commonly a symbol for the strong social relationship between the people of a community.

Traditional

Courtyard - Most commonly used for the privacy and protection from the hot environments.

Souq - Represents the social and economical interaction in large open spaces.

Contemporary

Courtesy of rasem badran

Ibn Tuluun Minaret

Courtesy of Big architects STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDIES

Multi–Operational Modular Surface

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDIES Grade of resilience A deck surface covers the site as a strategy to occupy the ground, while preventing any contact with the contaminated soil condition of the site. With a rather conventional deck construction method, the surface is manipulated into a topographic and architectural expression and becomes both ground plane and roof. The deck lifts off the ground to envelop the building and then dips down to reach the harbor waters. Careful articulation of the deck‘s vertices allows the surface to perform multiple programmatic operations simultaneously. Within the context of a single day the deck serves as a roof, a ramp, a stair, a ground, a slide, a viewing platform, a playground, and about launch.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK MOSTAFA SALIM


PERSONAL IDEOLOGY | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY I

MISSION I have chosen this topic because as we all know that the problem of the street children here in Egypt needs a real solution as they are all suffering from different kind of problems, such as homelessness, drug dependence addiction, alcohol dependence, and compulsive behaviors. So they all needs to be rehabilitated as there is a limited number of rehabilitation centers in Egypt, in conclusion we have to provide there basic needs such as the self actualization, esteem, safety, & physiological needs as well as education for them in this rehabilitation center. OBJECTIVE Developing the problem of the street children by finding out a stable methodology throughout this problem, I believe that the best design always comes from a problem and you‘ve to solve it. As for this case here‘s the problem that we want to reduce among the streets of Egypt as well as educating these children and rehabilitate them in a different way not only with some games but also concentrating on the psychological part because it‘s an important one considering the rehabilitation process. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT I

PHYCOLOGY This diagram shows the relationship of the psychological functions or the personality to the Self and the will. The function of the self are awareness and will and it is through the interaction of will and the various functions that we interact in the world.

WILL

SELF

The different functions shows us how a person could be complicated or unique at the same time. We could changes the whole person by beginning in a process concentrating on any psychological function. We can transform this to the architectural perspective by creating spaces related to each function as well as taking care of each of the other functions will affect the children in an indirect way positively.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY I

LED INTERACTIVE WALL

―By walking through the corridor, you become the conductor of the piece"

The otherwise nondescript, hallway (corridor) might be twisted by the interactive accession of the LED panels into an unexpected adventure through marching there, complete slighting of gleaming animals grappled through the trees. The LED panels mingled behind graphic wallpaper that can be amplified on the two sides of the extended hallway (corridor). That might be constructed to divert the attention of the street children from what anticipates them. Motion sensors ascertain the existence of the children and guests, arousing the screens to spectacle silhouettes of rabbits, cats and running animals such as, scurrying hedgehogs horses and deer rambling thought the woodland. This approach is very beneficial and the advantages of taking it is such an affirmative experience for the street children and their feelings.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT II

BIOMORPHIC The building could be a materialistic representation of three words in one ; it could contains three biomes: desert, alpine, and subtropical encompasses. Each single biome is considered an environment of itself. Incisive in climate areas from other pieces of the world. The aptitudes includes an area that educate with exoteric plaza encircling the building. The rehabilitation center could supplies the street children with awareness into light, materials, air quality, water integration electrical demand, efficiently of arranged architectural distance and how the grass within biomes could be converted and reprocessed as biomes for fuel when their agedness runs out. Lamina

Primary Vein Secondary Vein Margin

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY I

SKETCH WALL WITH LED PENS

―Glow in the dark"

This high-tech demonstrates how to actualize an impressive "glow in the dark" wall that street children can draw and write with LED pens on the outside of affecting the wall. One of the favorite things of the children is to draw on the wall with pens and markers but it ends up by repainting the wall, however by implementing this type of technology to the street children rehabilitation center would be better for them than the normal wall in some spaces. They can express their feeling by drawing on these walls by the LED pens, moreover it could create a talent for some of them as the drawings will start fading out after 1 min which they can draw every day all the night round.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT III

Gradation The rehabilitation center could be guarded in an indirect way in order to carry-off the children's feeling of being locked in a place that they are obligated to be in or prisoned at. In addition to the things that they didn't used to have in their ordinary or daily life such as basic needs like granted food and shelter without asking them to do anything return or to let them work in order to have them. If the children were housed in such a healthful environment that they feel incarcerate in we'll have a community that is flourished with a great number of excited, educated, and creative several children ready to enter Egypt's work force. Consequently they not only need to feel that the center is more than just a place to sleep and taking care of them but also to feel that every space in the center is design for them as well as the technologies there, so they will feel Actualistior the evolution over Self there from each different age until they go Esteem Needs Belonging Needs Safety Needs

Physiological Needs STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | TECHNOLOGICAL STUDY I

POWERLEAP

―Energy from human activity"

It‘s one small step for man, one giant leap for power kind. Piezoelectricity, which harnesses the energy that resonates from the vibrations of human activity POWERleap utilizes the phenomena of piezoelectricity where electricity is generated from an applied stress. Instead of utilizing mechanical displacement like what is necessary with magnetic motors and microturbines, piezoelectric materials allow us to harvest vibrations thereby creating with no This kindaofproduct technology canmoving make the parts. street children release there power to generate electricity as it will be a new experience for them.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK OMAR ELMELIGY


INDIVIDUAL TASK | PERSONAL IDEOLOGY

Mission Seeking to help the society in one of the most traumatic social issues that we face today, that being the ‗Street Children‘ problem. The optimum way to do this is through offering a childfriendly environment through the design where therapy is mixed with education and recreation. And where street children can find a safe place for them to express themselves and become better beings. The rehabilitation center has been my choice because I‘d like to design architecture that contributes to society. And that offers individuals a place to have a second chance in life. Especially in the case of the aforementioned problem, where society seems to deprive them from that right.

Objectives The main objective of the rehabilitation center for street children is responding to the following dimensions: 1- Psychological Dimension The design will respond to this aspect by offering spaces for therapy and recreation in order for the rehabilitated ones to feel fresh and positive. As well as being treated psychologically at the same time. 2- Cultural Dimension Offering alternative culture than the acquired street culture. This helps in adjusting certain concepts land attitudes like autonomy. As well as preserving some of the society‘s traditions. 3- Social Dimension This being the most important dimension, the design will implement spaces and programs that will aid in stitching back the child to his family or community. Or offer a safe community that wiill embrace the child.

Conclusion

I want to create a place that is messy but organized at the same time. That shows sides from the street but maintains the deportment and solemnity of a rehabilitation facility. That also brings out the pure child in each one of them. I don’t want to substitute all that free realm that the street offers with a an entirely different place or environment where children are compelled to become something they might not want to become.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT I A PLACE FOR DREAMS One thing that a street child shares with all other ordinary children is dreaming. In dreams, all children are equal. Therefore, the first concept is based on the idea of creating a fantasy like world with extended realms and dreamy extents.

Children usually dream of having powers and authority in dreams. On the contrary with the real life. I also helps them develop a wider imagination. And so, having a dream–like place will enrich those traits in a child and help him in expressing himself more freely.

Conceptual sketch showing how children see themselves in dreams.

Conceptual image of the project and it’s impression.

A child‘s psyche can be easily influenced by an open realm that provides recreational spaces that work as recuperation factor. This way, the child will be under therapy without having to be under the psychological pressure of having to deal with therapy in a serious manner. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | T ECHNICAL STUDY I KINETIC MEMBRANE FACADE A dynamic shell for the exterior facade of the building or wall surface. It acts as a living skin as it allows the building to interact with different environmental situations. It turns the building exterior into a penetrable kinetic membrane as it tilts to accommodate the magnitude of solar rays. It's consisted of various tillable metal flakes continued by individual controllable pneumatic cylinders. It can also be controlled to form different kinds of animations.

Each stainless steel flake reflects the bright sky or sunlight when in vertical standby position. When the flake is tilted downwards by a computer controlled pneumatic piston.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT II AN ORGANIZED CHAOTIC WORLD The street is known to have a messy and chaotic life and lifestyle especially the case of Egypt. Even in character, the street doesn‘t seem to present a unique personality. Therefore, in my design I will implement that trait continuing the manner in which street should be implemented in the design. And also emphasize the fact that this facility is projected towards the street.

This ‗chaos‘ will be organized and monitored by the administration of the facility of course. And in the middle of this fabricated chaos will stand an element of the project, probably a clean mass, to which emphasis will be drawn.

A conceptual sketch done by me depicting chaos. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT II AN ORGANIZED CHAOTIC WORLD

Chaotic patterns found on the street.

The mass resembles a pure shape appearing between different chaotic shapes or masses. Therefore, it provokes curiosity and creates visual connection.

Conceptual image of the project and it’s impression. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | T ECHNICAL STUDY II VERTICAL VENTILATORS A mechanical system aimed at ventilating the building and gaining benefit from sunlight during certain times at day. It‘s shaped like a diamond and is placed o the roof of the building or desired covered zone.

The mechanism of the diamond ventilators enable the space to breath and act as a temporary courtyard for the building. It‘ can be shut off automatically in order to prevent any leaking caused by precipitation. The ventilators show flexibility as they can be installed into different structure systems.

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | CONCEPT III TRANSPARENCY Transparency is a trait that is always linked to children. It‘s also linked to honesty and positive attitude. Therefore, it‘s fit to be implemented in the design both as a conceptual idea and in functional technicality.

Conceptual sketches done by me illustrating a child in relation to a transparent space and a non-transparent space.. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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INDIVIDUAL TASK | T ECHNICAL STUDY III EXTERIOR ECO SYSTEM

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CHAPTER VII REFERENCES STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH


REFERENCES Zumthor, P. Atmospheres. (1st ed.). Abu, Al-Nasr, M. The Problem of Street Children in Cairo and Giza. A Paper presented to The Second Scientific Conference in Social Work, Helwan University, 1992 (In Arabic). Al-Amal Village Society. A Report on the Activities and Programs of Al-Amal Village Society, Cairo, 2000 (In Arabic). Mayhew, P. G. (2011, march 7). Human response to physical structure. Retrieved from http://www.otherpapers.com/Psychology/Human-Response-PhysicalStructure/6131.html Pineau, Claude. "The Psychological Meaning of Comfort." - Pineau. N.p., 22 Jan. 2008. Web. 28 Nov. 2013. „‟Cairo‟s informal areas between urban challenges and hidden potential‟‟ 2009. Available http://egypt-urban.net/ Stossel, Sage. “Introverts of the World, Unite!” The Atlantic. <http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2006/02/introverts-of-theworld-unite/4646/2/?single_page=true>. Quirk, Vanessa. “Forming Playscapes: What Schools Can Learn from Playgrounds.” ArchDaily. <http://www.archdaily.com/214274/forming-playscapes-what-schools-canlearn-from-playgrounds/>. Cain, Susan. “The Power of Introverts.” TED Talks. <http://www.ted.com/talks/susan_cain_the_power_of_introverts.html>. In Defence of Introverts, March 2012.. Available http://www.archdaily.com/215055/indefense-of-introverts/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter. Antes, E. (2009, april 22). [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://blog.ounodesign.com/2009/05/02/how-rooms-and-architecture-affect-moodand-creativity/ Kopila Kunj, „‟The Big Umbrella House‟‟, 2012. Available <http://www.childnepal.com/?page_id=1041>. Security Architecture and the ADM, March 2011. Available <http://pubs.opengroup.org/architecture/togaf9-doc/arch/chap21.html> Architectural privacy: a topological approach to relational design problems, May 2006.. Available <http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/2919/>. STREET CHILDREN REHABILITAN CENTER I RESEARCH

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REFERENCES Kurtz, P. et al. Problems of Homeless Youth: Empirical Findings and Human Service Issues. In “Social Work”, (36), 1991, pp.309-314. “School of One.” School of One, 2011 Brochure. <http://schoolofone.org/resources/so1_brochure.pdf> “Reimagining the Classroom: Opportunities to Link Recent Advances in Pedagogy to Physical Settings.” The McGraw Hill Research Foundation.<http://mcgrawhillresearchfoundation.org/wpcontent/uploads/2011/10/Reimagining_the_Classroom_DeGregoriFINAL.pdf> Linn, Charles. “School of One: A personalized instruction program‟s needs challenge the conventional classroom.” Schools of the 21st Century, a supplement of Architectural Record . The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. <http://archrecord.construction.com/schools/09_School_of_One.asp>. General Social Defense Department. The Programs of the Ministry of Social Affairs in Dealing with Children Exposed to Delinquency. Unpublished Report, 2000 (In Arabic). Hussein, N. The Phenomenon of street Children: A Field-research in Greater Cairo. Unpublished PhD Dissertation, Ain Shams University, 1998 (In Arabic). Koraim, A. The Dimensions of the Problem of Street Boys. Documents of the Conference “Children Caritas-Egypt. Dealing with the Problem of Street Children. A Paper presented to the ACCD Workshop on “Confronting the Problem of Street Children in the Arab World”, ACCD, Cairo, 1999 (In Arabic). Hussein, N. The Phenomenon of street Children: A Field -research in Greater Cairo. Unpublished PhD Dissertation, Ain Shams University, 1998 (In Arabic). The Subculture of Street Children. Documents of the Conference “Children in Difficult Social Circumstances”, Ahebaa El-Toufoula NGO, Cairo, 1998 (In Arabic). CRC Coalition. NGOs Report on the Rights of the Child in Egypt. Attala Publishing House, Alexandria, 2000.

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REFERENCES El-Kateb, E. Street Children. Documents of the Conference “Children in Difficult Circumstances”, Ahebaa El-Toufoula NGO, April 1998, pp.141-151 (In Arabic). General Social Defense Department. The Programs of the Ministry of Social Affairs in Dealing with Children Exposed to Delinquency. Unpublished Report, 2000 (In Arabic). ODCCP . Drug Abuse: Rapid Situation Assessment and Responses. ODCCP Studies on Drugs and Crimes. United Nations, 1999. Sedik, A. Experiences with the Problem of Street Children in Egypt. Center for Child Protection and Rights. Cairo, 1995 (In Arabic).

El-Gindy, A. Children in Difficult Social Circumstances. National Council for Motherhood And Childhood, Cairo, 1997 (In Arabic).

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CHAPTER VIII ANNEX


DOKKI


MANSHYET NASSER


INTERVIEWS WITH STREET CHILDREN


Research for Rehabilitation Center for Street Children in Cairo  

Graduation Project I

Research for Rehabilitation Center for Street Children in Cairo  

Graduation Project I

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