Greenwich Magazine, Sept 2020

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S EPTEMBER 2 02 0 | $5.95

TREAT YOURSELF

Fall Fashion Pick-Me-Ups

WHERE IS SHE? Deep inside the Jennifer Dulos investigation

THEY’VE GOT THIS This year’s Teens to Watch are working hard and leading the way

Arjun Dayal stepped up in the midst of COVID-19 and produced over 2,000 face shields for our healthcare workers.

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Top Dentists in Fairfield County Special A-List guide to Home-Design Pros Expert advice for Your Wedding Day


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GREENWICH

contents SEPTEMBER 2020 vol. 73 | issue 9

features

departments

72

16 EDITOR’S LETTER

HERE THEY COME!

24 FROM THE FOUNDERS Of Kids and Candor

This year’s Teens to Watch are a study in perseverance and excellence. They excel in academics, philanthropy, arts, science and sports. But perhaps more important, each has also shown true resilience, compassion and gratitude in these unprecedented times. With kids like this at the helm, we’re feeling pretty optimistic about our future.

29 STATUS REPORT BUZZ How affordable housing in Greenwich is getting a major upgrade SHOP Supporting Black business owners in Fairfield County

DO Greenwich native, Tim Corvino, on his new role as CEO of ONS EAT Townhouse in Greenwich welcomes guests with a new chic dining experience 46 G-MOM Resources to help you talk with your kids about recognizing and changing social injustice

b y ja m i e m a r shal l

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52 FINANCE FIX When family members ask for money, the conversation can get a little dicey. Here’s how to handle it.

FALL FASHION Take a peek at the trends you’ll want to shop for fall and check out our local guide to the stores that’ll be stocking the latest styles.

55 PEOPLE & PLACES Catherine Violet Hubbard Foundation; Senior Paw Project; Bruce Museum

61 VOWS Braunschweig–Arenz; Eberhart–McGirr

b y me g an g ag non

WHERE IS SHE? The tragedy of Jennifer Dulos has brought a renewed outrage and subsequent attention to the issue of domestic violence. It is the No. 1 violent crime in Fairfield County. The more we talk about it, the more likely it is that we can bring about change. We take an in-depth look at the ongoing case that is still garnering headlines around the world, as well as the facts, warning signs and solutions. b y t i mot h y d um as

65 SPECIAL WEDDINGS SECTION Experts weigh in on making your day perfect no matter how you’re celebrating.

29

139 CALENDAR

Angelica Arenas with her daughter Juliana, son John and Milo at their home in Adams Gardens

143 INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 144 POSTSCRIPT The resurgence of old-fashioned fun

plus! on the cover: our 2020 class of teens to watch cover photographs: dayal: classic kids photography; ferguson: highpoint pictures; burnett: contributed; shively: classic kids photography; intrieri: contributed; jones: lance sanchez; pisacreta: contributed; berman: marylin roos; winegardner: coffeepond photography; kim: chi chi ubina

TOP DENTISTS IN FAIRFIELD COUNTY PAGE 115

A-LIST GUIDE TO HOME-DESIGN PROS PAGE 126

GREENWICH MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2020, VOL. 73, NO. 9 GREENWICH MAGAZINE (USPS 961-500/ISSN 1072-2432) is published monthly by Moffly Media, Inc.205 Main St, Westport, CT 06880. Periodical postage paid at Westport, CT, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes (Form 3579) to GREENWICH MAGAZINE PO BOX 9309, Big Sandy, TX 75755-9607. greenwichmag.com

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VENERA ALEXANDROVA

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GREENWICHMAG.com CELEBRATING THE SCENE STEALERS OF OUR TOWN

WHAT’S ON OUR EDITORIAL DECK?

WE’VE GOT PLENTY OF GREAT THINGS IN STORE!

RESTAURANT ROUNDUP

A TIME TO REMINISCE TAKE A LOOK BACK AT THE GOOD OLD DAYS AND REMEMBER THAT WITH SO MANY GALAS AND FUNDRAISERS CANCELED, OUR NONPROFITS NEED OUR HELP NOW MORE THAN EVER.

Visit our galleries for all the fun

LIGHT A FIRE

Celebrating the men, women, businesses and nonprofits who went above and beyond during the COVID-19 crisis.

TOP DOCTORS

If there’s one thing that these past months have taught us, it’s that healthcare is of the utmost importance. Our annual Top Doctors issue is here to help.

FOLLOW US ON:

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EVENT PHOTOGRAPHS BY MOFFLY MEDIA’S BIG PICTURE/BOB CAPAZZO AND KYLE NORTON (RED CROSS); INSET 1 BY ©JOSHUA RESNICK - STOCK.ADOBE.COM; INSET 2 BY MELANI LUST PHOTOGRAPHY; INSET 3 BY ©BLUE PLANET STUDIO - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

We take a look at some of our favorite traditional fare, tried-and-true dishes and, of course, sweet treats.


Welcome to Next Gen Welcome to a company that doesn’t see every problem as a nail awaiting a hammer. At William Raveis, we’re at the forefront of proactivity and pre-emption, always innovating to keep our agents and clients ahead of the market in terms of the tools we provide to them. And, in today’s competitive market, now is no exception. From digital initiatives like data-oriented listing and marketing technology, to real world solutions such as home-staging and bridging finance, we’re building a suite of state-of-the-art services around the agent and our homeowner, the two principal audiences we are proud to serve. Welcome to William Raveis.

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Many divorce and post-divorce cases lend themselves to a non-adversarial approach that is time limited and less costly. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Courts remain closed for most in-person divorce related matters. A successful mediation will lead to a Divorce Agreement and neither party ever needs to appear in Court. Mediation can effectively be employed in cases with child custody and parenting related issues, high net worth cases with complex financial arrangements, or cases with more modest financial circumstances. Our directed divorce mediation approach can help you cut to the chase in an informed and constructive manner.

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We will hold your hand throughout, while maximizing the opportunity for a trustworthy, productive, and amicable process. We commit to a rapid response. When necessary, our firm will arrange and oversee collaterals such as real estate appraisers, business valuation experts, therapists, and accountants. We streamline the process so you can concentrate on yourself and your family during this transitional time. Finally, our firm does not disappear when your case is over; we remain available to assist with establishing support systems for your new post-divorce life.

• WHY BRODER & ORLAND LLC

What would a judge do? That is a question asked in most consultations and throughout the mediation process. As the largest Family Law firm in Connecticut, our eight highly credentialed lawyers have vast experience with a wide range of divorce and post-divorce cases throughout the state. We have the context to be able to inform you of the parameters of a likely outcome if your case were to go to trial and to guide you appropriately. That is what we refer to as directed divorce mediation. We have found this approach effectively makes the process as amicable, concise and economical as possible.

• DOES BRODER & ORLAND LLC LITIGATE DIVORCE MATTERS AS WELL?

Absolutely! Litigation is not a dirty word. Many cases are better served through the litigation process rather than through mediation. Our lawyers have successfully litigated some of the most notable cases in Connecticut. We are happy to discuss which approach is right for you.

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GREENWICH L I F E T O L I F E S T Y L E S I N C E 1 94 7 vol. 73 | no. 9 | september 2020 creative director

Amy Vischio–amy.vischio@moffly.com

editorial

Thinking of selling your home in Greenwich and buying in Naples, Florida?

editor

Cristin Marandino–cristin.marandino@moffly.com social editor

Alison Nichols Gray–ali.gray@moffly.com market editor

Knowing how you want to live is the first step in knowing where. There is something for everyone in Naples.

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GREENWICH L I F E T O L I F E S T Y L E S I N C E 1 94 7 vol. 73 | no. 9 | september 2020

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editor’s letter

SEPTEMBER 2020 / CRISTIN MARANDINO

ou know how parents love to say, “Back in my day (insert hardship here)”? Well, today’s kids are going to have some pretty great fodder for their offspring, thanks to the havoc wreaked by COVID. They lost the normalcy, structure and fun that comes with being a teen—school, sports, parties. And sadly, our seniors lost all those great rites of passage that graduation brings— the mischief of skip day, the excitement of senior prom, the pomp and circumstance of a traditional ceremony. But when writer Jamie Marshall asked our 2020 Teens to Watch how they coped with losing out on so much, their answers were beyond heartening. They acknowledged that they were angry, sad and frustrated … at first. But each, in their own way, went on to talk about gratitude— gratitude for having healthy families, gratitude for being in safe and comfortable environments, gratitude for being able to find new ways to center themselves and greenwichmag.com

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connect with friends. Each of these students was chosen because of their tremendous accomplishments and contributions, but it is their heart that makes them true standouts. For one of our teens, Arjun Dayal, COVID brought the opportunity to have a lifesaving impact. Seeing the countless stories of frontline healthcare workers being put at risk due to a lack of PPE, Arjun took action and got to work 3-D printing thousands of face shields for area hospitals. Today, more than ever, we need stories of hope. And we’re pretty certain that our teens, with their perseverance, innovation and leadership, deliver just that. As UCONN Storrs freshman Max Pisacreta says of the challenges brought on by this pandemic: “You can’t change it and can’t look back on it. You need to just look forward.” We couldn’t agree with you more, Max.

WILLIAM TAUFIC

THE ATTITUDE OF GRATITUDE Y


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tel . 203.622.7000

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founder’s letter

june 2020 / d onna moffly

OF KIDS AND CANDOR

“Dear God: Thank you for giving us the beautiful trees. It looks very nice.”

During a discussion about the celebration of Passover, Phoebe Huth raised her hand. “We celebrate Passover,” she announced. The teacher, who had known the family for years at Country Day, was taken by surprise. But Phoebe explained: “When Abby’s clothes get too small for her, she passes them over to me; and when they get too small for me, I pass them over to Brecky.”

PRESCHOOL

KINDERGARTEN

To Frederica McGannon at Bridges preschool: “Yesternight when I was going to bed…” and “Hey look, it’s winding outside.” Then from a three-year-old drinking juice boxes on a long drive: “I feel like tape. I’m sticky all over.” When a four-year-old boy walked into pre-K at Greenwich Country Day with a huge chunk of hair missing from his forehead, Liz Hart remarked, “Oh, Jamie, I see you went to the barber.” “No,” he admitted, “I tut [sic] it myself.” “So where did the hair go?”, she asked. His answer: “It went on the floor and the housekeeper picked it up.” From another kid: “These are my new blue pants, do you realize them?” And when Liz asked daughter Lolly how her first day of nursery school went at the First Congo in Old Greenwich, the little girl replied: “Well, nobody laughed and nobody cried.”

Cristin Marandino’s six-year-old nephew Ryan got into a scuffle with another boy over the swing set on the school playground. When the teacher sat him down to find out what happened, he walked her through the events very logically, then at the main point, stopped, looked at her and said: “Okay, here’s where it doesn’t look so good for me.”

greenwichmag.com

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ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Sister Carol Ann, director of Villa Maria School in Stamford, was elated when a young man in First Communion class asked her how to spell the word “penance.” But her bubble burst when she asked him to use it in a sentence and he replied: “The Red Sox won the pennants.” Eight–year-old Miles Patrick McDonald, who was brought into the world through modern technology, was taking religious

VENTURE PHOTOGRAPHY, GREENWICH, CT

I

t’s September and I get to write about kids again. But this time, in honor of our brave educators who have done such an amazing job in their virtual classrooms lately, I’m focusing on comments that our smallest fry have made to their teachers over the years. Some are new, some classics that bear repeating, but all should brighten your day. Kids do have a way with words.


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founder’s letter instruction in preparation for confirmation. For homework the kids were asked to write a prayer to God. So he wrote: “Dear God: I don’t know who my father is, but please let him go to Heaven, whoever he might be—except if he’s Donald Trump.” An English teacher at Country Day sent our twelve-year-old daughter, Audrey, home to show us a paper she’d done particularly well on. Assignment: define words, then use them in sentences. The word “vie” she’d defined as “to worry.” Used in a sentence? “Oy vie!”

SKI SCHOOL Sheila Mossman was teaching a “family private” at Vail last winter to a mom, dad and six-year-old—Asian Americans from Georgia and all first-time skiers. Mom gave up pretty quickly and Dad was happy to practice on his own, which left her on the beginner’s hill skiing backwards in front of Emerson, teaching him how to snowplow. When Ming, a Chinese

American ski instructor standing by, started speaking to the little boy in a foreign language, Sheila asked Emerson if he was speaking to him in Chinese. “How should I know?” the kid replied. “I’m American!”

SUNDAY SCHOOL A while back Bobbi Eggers asked the Sunday school children at Christ Church to write letters to God, and here are some excerpts: “Dear God, I think it would be a good idea to bring the dinosaurs back. Then there would be no need for ladders.” “God has invisible tools: monkey wrenches, screwdrivers, a hammer and an oil can. He fixes wings. He puts them on people. He has glasses. He can read. If he sees bad bugs, he shoots them with his thunder.” From Hunter: “God came down from Heaven and He saw my room and He said: ‘Hey. Nice room.’ ” From Brian: “Dear God: How do you think our choir is doing?” From Chase: “Dear God: Thank you for giving us the beautiful trees. It looks very

nice.” And from Blake: “Dear God: What does Heaven look like and I love you. I think you are old, maybe five or twenty-one.” Bobbi has always started the first session of Family Matters at Christ Church sharing with parents and grandparents a list of the “Top 10 Questions Kids Have About God.” Included this year were: “How did God know He was God?” “Why should I pray if God already knows what’s going to happen?” “How can He see everybody all at the same time?” “Why did God make mosquitos?” Hmmm. In The King and I, Anna sings a song called “Getting to Know You” to her little Siamese students. It begins: “It’s a very ancient saying/But a true and honest thought/That if you become a teacher/By your pupils you’ll be taught.” Turnabout being fair, we can learn a lot from looking at the world through these fresh young eyes—and have some laughs in the process. But while we’re at it, let’s remember to give an A+ to their teachers. G

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buzz by valerie foster

Angelica Arenas with her daughter, Juliana, son, John and their dog, Milo • Jeffrey Damberg • Simone Sherman with her daughter, Tatiana

VENERA ALEXANDROVA

NO A PLACE LIKE HOME

YES, GREENWICH IS KNOWN FOR ITS SPRAWLING HOUSES AND GATED ESTATES, BUT WE ALSO HAVE AFFORDABLE HOUSING

THAT IS UNDERGOING SOME AMAZING UPGRADES

ngelica Arenas speaks about her Greenwich neighborhood with pride, using phrases like “wonderful community…great family support system…a place where everyone knows everyone else’s kids and keeps an eye out for them— or anything that doesn’t look right.” She is talking about her home in Riverside where she is raising her two children, ages thirteen and fourteen, as a single mom. She’s talking about Adams Gardens, a family development, owned and operated by Greenwich Communities: Our Neighborhood Partnerships. Wondering what that is? It’s the rebranded name of the Town of Greenwich Housing Authority, which recently changed its name to reflect the safe communities it oversees. According to Anthony L. Johnson, its executive SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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director, they chose this kinder, gentler name because it is more reflective of what the department does—create neighborhoods where people of all ages are proud to live and thrive. To spearhead this rebranding, new name and logo, they turned to two well-known Greenwich residents and marketing professionals, Bobbi Eggers and Sue Moretti Bodson. “Unfortunately, housing authorities throughout the country have created the impression of terrible management and inferior properties,” Johnson says. “We wanted to get away from that representation, because it is not us.” Greenwich Communities owns and manages thirteen residential complexes of 837 apartments, as well as the Parsonage Cottage, a forty-bed facility for the aged. There are no vacancies; in fact, there is a waiting list, which


Newly renovated units at Armstrong Court

What many might not realize is the NEED IN GREENWICH FOR SUBSIDIZED HOUSING. Johnson attributes to the quality of Greenwich Communities’ properties and the town’s low crime rate, extraordinary public education system and the peace of mind that comes with tenants knowing their children are safe. Terry Mardula, deputy director and COO, adds that there is a preference for town residents and workers to fill the apartments, and says that because the rent is based on income, if residents lose jobs, they know their rent will be adjusted accordingly. “It gives people a protection they would never have if they rented from a landlord,” he says. The ages in these complexes range from infants to seniors, and the backgrounds and occupations are as varied as the ages. Consider Jeffrey Damberg, whose family bought a home on Milbank Avenue in 1952 for $18,000. Now

in his sixties, he and his wife Joanne once again call his old neighborhood home, this time at Agnes Morley Heights. Damberg, who is an artist, explains that when the 2008 crash hit, all his business dried up. “Moving here was a wonderful opportunity for us. We feel safe. We walk to town. Joanne walks to church. We can walk to the train. It is home and the value of the apartment is enormous, because as we all know, Greenwich is extremely expensive.” What many might not realize is the need in Greenwich for subsidized housing. Last school year, 19.8 percent or 1,794 of Greenwich Public School students qualified for free or reduced lunch benefits, a statistic Greenwich Communities understands well. “Our communities are very diverse, in terms of ethnicity, religion, age groups and mental

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and physical capabilities. Our residents come from all over—the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Hispanic countries and, of course, right here in Greenwich. We have a responsibility to our tenants that we continue to not only maintain our housing but also improve it,” Johnson says. Here’s a look at the major projects either ongoing or planned by Greenwich Communities. Wilbur Peck Court is a 110-unit complex of one-, two-, three- and four-bedroom homes built in 1951. It also includes a health center with a dental clinic, run by Family Centers and funded through Husky Health insurance. According to Johnson, this was the first federally funded health center in public housing. Simone Sherman recently moved here from Bridgeport with her five-year-old daughter, cutting her daily commute to her job with Greenwich Home Care by hours. She was also the first resident to move into a totally renovated two-bedroom apartment. Over the past few years, exterior improvements at Wilbur Peck have included upgrading the underground heating systems, installing new roofs and windows and replacing the HVAC system. Each bathroom in the complex was gutted and replaced, and each unit has new floors and paint. Currently, all the kitchens are being upgraded with stainless steel appliances, new cabinets and granite countertops. “This is a big change for us, but a good change,” Sherman says. “Everything is so convenient for me. Shopping, the train station, park, museums, my job, my daughter’s childcare—we are just so thankful. I feel so safe here, and I am just so lucky.” Armstrong Court is a 144-unit complex that includes a community garden and two day-care centers, run by Family Centers. Come this spring it will have 150 renovated units. Phase one recently opened with eighteen new townhouses next door to Bimbo Bakery. There are six two-bedroom and twelve threebedroom units, some with basements, and all with two bathrooms. Residents from the existing Armstrong Court were given preference.

BOB CAPAZZO

buzz


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The present emergency access points on each building will be enclosed to make them look like communal terraces but cannot be used for personal use. This space will become more square footage in each refurbished apartment.

The entire exterior will get a facelift, including changing the flat roof for a pitched roof and updating the look.

Twelve current one-bedroom apartments will be joined with two-bedroom units, creating twelve three-bedroom units with two bathrooms each.

Kitchen renovations will include stainless-steel appliances, new windows and bathrooms, fresh paint and upgraded insulation. Though the timeline has not been established, phases three and four will include the larger buildings.

Ribbon cutting at Armstrong Court

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This is a big change for us, but a good change. EVERYTHING IS SO CONVIENENT FOR ME. SHOPPING, THE TRAIN STATION, PARK, MUSEUMS, MY JOB, MY DAUGHTER’S CHILDCARE—WE ARE JUST SO THANKFUL. I

feel so safe here, and I am just so lucky.” — SIMONE SHERMAN

Armstrong Court senior housing is a new concept for Greenwich Communities and will feature what Johnson calls “around” market value rents. The exact monthly rent has not been determined but will be high enough to cover operating expenses and pay for itself. The project has been approved and will consist of fifty-one one- and possibly two-bedroom units for adults fifty-five and older. When asked why people of all ages want to call Greenwich home, Johnson is quick with an answer. “Diversity in town is one of the reasons that makes Greenwich a wonderful place to live,” he says. “Senior center programs, programs for youths, the libraries, the beach— there is just so much for residents to take advantage of here. But most important, Greenwich is safe, it has wonderful schools, and people feel protected. Low-income people want the same things for their kids as high-income people, and Greenwich provides it all.”

BOB CAPAZZO

THE SECOND PHASE OF ARMSTRONG COURT

McKinney Terrace currently includes twenty-one units of family townhouses and a fifty-one-unit senior housing building that was the former Byram School. Greenwich Communities has been approved to build a new fifty-one-unit building for seniors on the townowned property that has been leased to them for ninety-nine years. That will bring the number of senior residences in this complex to 102. Quarry Knoll is now a small development of fifty mostly studio units that houses disabled seniors aged sixty-two and older. Johnson calls it a “Smurf Village” that has outlived its viability. “There are many positives to Quarry Knoll, but the buildings are old, the apartments are small, and the need for more public housing is great,” he says. The plan is to demolish the buildings, move the residents to the new project at McKinney Terrace (with the option of moving back once complete), and develop the seven acres of land into between 175 and 225 mixed-income housing units, a combination of senior housing and family housing and for-sale homes that will pay for the project. Johnson stresses that although there will be homes for sale in the new project, they are not in the business of building market-rate homes, nor is this something they want to do. “To accomplish this project, it is something that we must do,” he says. “Now, if someone wants to write us a check to build low-income homes, we will gladly accept it and build more public housing.”


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shop by jill johnson

OPEN FOR BUSINESS

Kelvin Smith, owner of Hustle gym

T

he video footage of the brutal death of George Floyd elicited a collective gasp of horror from our country, ubiquitous protests and fervent dinnertable discussions. We know Black lives matter; we know white privilege has nudged many of us along the path to cushy homes in towns with top-ranking schools; but many of us don’t know how to further racial equality beyond turning our Instagram stories black. KELVIN SMITH, owner of the gym Hustle, offers some encouraging input. “Personally, I haven’t felt any racial bias in New Canaan,” he says. “The owners of the building where I lease the gym—all white men—have been amazing. I go in local stores and know people on a first-name basis. I’ve even been pulled over by police, and they’ve been nice and say, ‘Hey, you’re speeding a little. Just take it easy.’” Smith, who lives in Stamford, brought his fouryear-old daughter to New Canaan’s Black Lives Matter protest. But he emphasizes there’s more we can do: “Educate yourself on true Black history—not just Abraham Lincoln to Martin Luther King Jr. Educate your children. That’s the huge thing, so when they become leaders, they are exposed to other cultures and empathetic. With exposure and education, our society will be so much better. You can donate and march now, but it’s truly about the future.” greenwichmag.com

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KITT SHAPIRO BY JERRY GRAHAM; KELVIN SMITH BY ANNA PAULA PACHECO

Kitt Shapiro, owner of West boutique

SUPPORTING BLACK BUSINESS OWNERS in Fairfield County


south norwalk, connecticut | p. 203.563.0553 w w w. m i c h a e l s m i t h a r c h i t e c t s . c o m


shop Dr. Kim Nichols, owner of NicholsMD and SkinLab

businesses now so that they can survive, which in turn bolsters the community connection we are all craving. JERRI GRAHAM, a Black woman, photographer and Westport mom, offered two straightforward suggestions in Dan Woog’s 06880 blog: foster relationships with your Black neighbors and “put your money where your mouth is; support Black-owned greenwichmag.com

36

companies.” To help you do that, we have compiled a list of businesses in Fairfield County that have Black owners or partners. Please join us in growing this directory by sending us any listings we missed (email us at editor@greenwichmag.com) and we will add it to our list at greenwichmag .com/ blackownedbusinesses. Let’s keep the conversation going.

CONTRIBUTED

DR. KIM NICHOLS, who owns NicholsMD of Greenwich and SkinLab in Stamford, agrees. “As a mother, I believe having meaningful conversations with your children about racism and social injustices in our country is a great start,” she says. “As a business owner and Black woman, I encourage companies to hire from diverse technical programs, colleges and universities.” She adds, “Sometimes I am told—both explicitly and implicitly—that I wouldn’t have succeeded if not for special treatment due to affirmative action initiatives; in other words, that I can’t compete on merit alone. My answer is just to continue to work hard, be proud of who I am and to try to be a model for others.” CLAUDETTE ROTHMAN owns Claudette’s in Old Greenwich, an eclectic women’s clothing and accessories store “catering to women of every age, body type and economic status.” She is grateful for the support of “this fantastic community. I have lived in Greenwich for more than twenty-five years, and I’ve owned my store for over eight years. I see myself as a local businessperson who happens to be a woman and a person of color, and I hope that’s how my customers view me.” Unless they are aware famous singer Eartha Kitt is her mom, customers don’t realize the owner of the boutique West in Westport has an African American background. KITT SHAPIRO bought the boutique two years ago—perfectly encapsulated in the tagline: If Chanel and Jimi Hendrix had a daughter. Shapiro says, “I know people look at me— my mother was Black and my father White— and don’t realize it because of my skin tone. I grew up hearing stories of my mother’s life in the South. Those stories are still in existence in more places than we realize, and that’s clear from the news. It’s really important, as uncomfortable as it is, that we all talk about it. I walk into a store and don’t get prejudged because of my skin color. We need to realize we are not all treated the same, just based on how we look. We live in a bubble a lot of the time and don’t want to face the reality. We need to keep the conversation going.” Shapiro also emphasizes the urgency to support local


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elliman.com 88 FIELD POINT ROAD, GREENWICH, CT 06830 | 203.622.4900 © 2020 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL

PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


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PLACES SHOPS CLAUDETTE’S Women’s Clothing 177 Sound Beach Avenue Old Greenwich 203-990-0600 claudettestyles.com

OWNER: CLAUDETTE ROTHMAN

INSIDE THE ARMOIRE Fine Lingerie 45 East Putnam Avenue, Greenwich 203-422-2055

OWNER: PAULINE SIMPSON

LACE AFFAIRE

Lingerie, Swimwear, Gifts 23 Danbury Road, Wilton 203-529-3793 laceaffaire.com

OWNER: CARLINE DEAN

WEST

Women’s Clothing 117 Post Road East, Westport 203-557-4157 west2westport.com

YOU WILL O L VE TO

SHOP, VISIT, BOOK & EAT

HUSTLE 45 Grove Street, New Canaan 203-807-2300 hustlefitness andathletics.com

OWNER: KELVIN SMITH

PURE BARRE 280 Railroad Avenue, Greenwich 203-489-3500 purebarre.com/location/ greenwich-ct

OWNER: ASHLEY ALLEN

REVOLUTION TRAINING 579 Pacific Street, Stamford 203-355-2666 revolutiontrainingct .com

OWNER: AHMAD MICKENS

S E RV I C E S ALEXANDRE1983 PHOTOGRAPHY Stamford alxphotog.com

OWNER: ADRIAN ALEXANDRE ALLEN

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HER WELLNESS CENTER

Dermatologist, SkinLab

65 Old Ridgefield Road, Wilton 203-409-2539 herwellnesshealthcenter .com

OWNER: DR. KIKELOMO OTUYELU-GARRITANO

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MR. BEEZ WINDOWS & CLEANING, LLC 203-334-2067

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WINNING APPLICATIONS College Admissions Prep 73 Old Ridgefield Road, Wilton 203-762-6500 winning applications.com

PICTURE THAT Art Consultants 203-977-8203 picturethatart.com

OWNER: STEPHANIE KLEIN WASSINK

FOUNDING OWNER: VALERIE COOPER

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38

NO LEFTOVERS

Jamaican/Caribbean 182 Connecticut Avenue, Norwalk 203-318-6250 noleftovers restaurant .com

OWNER: LLOYD MELLAD

PEOPLE’S CHOICE JAMAICAN AMERICAN RESTAURANT

111 Main Street, Norwalk 203-956-5625

Jamaican 77 Wall Street, Norwalk 203-838-8272

OWNER: MARGARET CHERY

OWNER: DUDLEY FOSTER

HERB’S PLACE

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Hair Salon

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OWNER: DEMETRIUS GLOVER

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GATEWAY ART AND FRAMING

190 Main Street, Westport 203-293-4564 190mainwestport.com

SOLHAUS

MARC G. ANDRE ARCHITECTS

10 Bay Street, Westport 203-557-3040

190 MAIN Seafood and Tapas

OWNER: MELISSA GORMAN

ILLUMINATION SALON AND COLOR BAR

OWNER: KITT SHAPIRO

BODY PULSE FITNESS CENTER

50 Old Field Point Road, Greenwich, 203-8624000; 24 Harbor Point Road, Stamford, 203-862-4006 kimnicholsmd.com

R E STAU R A N T S/ C AT E R I NG

Food Truck 120 Water Street, Norwalk herbsplacenorwalk.net

OWNER: HERB EDMONDSON

JEFF’S BBQ & CATERING BBQ, Rubs and Sauces 203-852-0041 jeffsbbqandcatering.com

OWNER: JEFF ESAW

LA PERLE

AmericanCaribbean Cuisine 15 Bank Street, Stamford, 203-388-8600 laperlect.com

OWNERS: SMITH ST. JUSTE, PETER MEDOIT, HAROLD JEAN-FELIX

MISS BARBARA JEAN’S SOUL FOOD Soul Food

115 Main Street, Norwalk 203-939-9598 msbarbarajeans.com

OWNER: BARBARA JEAN

Soul Food 29 Main Street, Stamford 203-504-2625 soultastyct.com

OWNER: JEAN GABRIEL

TACO DADDY Contemporary Mexican 121 Towne Street, Stamford 203-541-5770 tacodaddy stamford.com

PARTNER: MO MAJOR

TEFF Ethiopian/Eritrean 113 West Main Street, Stamford 203-998-7474 teffstamford.com

OWNERS: MEKONENMENGESHA FAMILY

EMAIL US AT EDITOR@ GREENWICHMAG .COM IF THERE ARE OTHER LOCAL BUSINESSES WE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT.


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do HOMETOWN CEO NEW CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER OF ONS, TIM CORVINO, MD RETURNS TO HIS ROOTS

by eliz abeth hole

A

You joined ONS in February. Then the pandemic hit. What kind of challenges did you face? The biggest change when I first arrived at ONS was working through the COVID-19 crisis while staying focused on the future and growth opportunities for the next two to five years. Organizations need to continually evolve to remain vital and relevant. I knew it was important to be disciplined about looking ahead beyond the immediate circumstances. What’s the best part about being back in your hometown? So much. It feels like home; I love the community; and I’m so excited for my wife, Dina, and my two children, Emma and Liam, to experience living here. The beaches, the food, the Yankees... the list goes on and on. How did your background in emergency medicine prepare you for your new position? One of the unique attributes of emergency medicine is that you

Besides sports medicine, what are the other specialties there? ONS is fortunate to have twenty-six fellowship-trained physicians with expertise in the full spectrum of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries. Along with sports medicine, we provide minimally invasive orthopedic, spine and brain surgery, physical medicine and rehabilitation, outpatient and inpatient joint replacement, trauma and physical therapy.

work with physicians in every specialty in medicine and surgery, each of which has a unique set of challenges. Part of my role as CEO at ONS is to make sure our specialists are best equipped to deliver the highest level of care to patients today and in the future. With my understanding of the specific needs of ONS specialists, I am able to work closely with them to shape our future as a practice.

It sounds like healthcare is in your blood. How did that experience inspire you to become a physician? My mother and father were extremely important in shaping my career in healthcare. I learned a lot from my dad about the importance of serving the needs of the community and putting the patient first and foremost in the center of all decisions. While president of Greenwich Hospital, my dad worked with an incredible team of professionals. I learned so much from getting to know each of them. I also learned the importance of working as a team and the art of compromise. My mother’s influence was equally important. She served as the Director of Surgery at Montefiore Medical Center for twenty years.

ONS physicians serve as team doctors for several area schools. Are your doctors involved in other local organizations? Working with patients of all ages to keep them healthy and active is central to our mission. ONS physicians provide team support to more than a dozen youth sports organizations in our area, including Greenwich High School, Greenwich Academy, Iona Prep, New Canaan High School, Darien High School and White Plains High School. We also provide injury prevention programs for coaches, parents and student athletes to help our youth avoid injuries that can affect their play, and perhaps become a chronic problem later in life.

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I was a pharmacy intern at the later part of her career, where I was fortunate to witness so many memorable moments with her that still impact my approach to healthcare delivery today. I never contemplated a career outside of medicine because of them. What are some of your goals as CEO? The primary goal is to continue our mission of providing the highest standard of orthopedic and neurosurgical care through professional collaboration and compassion for our patients. With the emphasis on safety, we launched the telemedicine services and adapted our medical offices to meet CDC standards. We are also presenting patients in need of joint replacement with a same day, outpatient option, so they can recover in the comfort and safety of home. Looking ahead, my goal is to make it possible for ONS to stay ahead of the pack with cutting-edge innovation and patient-centered care and expand our unique brand of care through strategic partnerships with practices that share our high standards and values. With the support and commitment throughout the entire organization, I know we will accomplish great things. G

CONTRIBUTED

fter growing up in Greenwich and working in Stamford Hospital’s emergency room, Tim Corvino, MD continued his profession in the Midwest and Southeast. The son of parents in the medical field, he spent more than a decade at Emergency Medicine Physicians in Canton, Ohio, before heading to the Chicago area, where he was president of Integrated Acute Care. Most recently, he served as chief operating officer at Covenant Physician Partners in Nashville. As the newly appointed CEO of the Greenwich-based Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS), Dr. Corvino is thrilled with his new role—and the opportunity to raise his family in Fairfield County.


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A NEW NEIGHBOR TOWNHOUSE IS READY TO SERVE YOU DELICIOUS FARE WITH SPACIOUS AND CHIC INDOOR AND OUTDOOR SEATING OPTIONS

T

he keys to Townhouse open the doors to many rooms—as well as a sophisticated menu of New American seasonal coastal cuisine. The architectural details of the building (the former Gabriel’s) with its fireplaces and series of dining and drinking spaces have been brightened up. The former dark-wood walls are now a light gray and highlight the details of moldings, mullions and coffers. The contemporary design, in tones of gray, blue and light brown, is punctuated with slabs of black marble, streaked white. Tables are set with crisp white linens, and the food is served in artful dishes and bowls. Abstract expressionistic paintings splash contrasting hot colors on the walls, adding an art-gallery energy. As much as we admire Townhouse’s design and architecture, the menu is the true standout. Chef Stephen Lewandowski takes local and regional ingredients and with classic technique, global flavors and a deft hand, greenwichmag.com

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eat transforms them into creative, delicious dishes. With a background of the Harlan restaurants in Fairfield County and Tribeca Grill in New York City, Chef Lewandowski is a master at New American cuisine. Where better to start than the cocktails? The Townhouse is a blend of blanco tequila and ruby red grapefruit juice, lightened up with club soda and lemon. It’s sophisticated and refreshing. Homemade sodas—citrus cooler, pomegranate lemonade and açai berry tea— can be spiked with patron tequila, raspberry vodka or rum. The wine and beer lists are wellchosen and focused. On to the food. The Maine lobster salad, an appetizer at dinner and entrée at lunch, is a study in hues of pink, orange and red. Poached in blood orange and paired with beets and blood orange segments, the lobster is sweet and bright. Tuna tataki, an appetizer of seared sushi tuna sliced to reveal raw centers, is rich and satisfying. The tuna is enhanced by the slightly sweet umami sauce and is served with crisp garlic chips. Seared sea scallops are among the stars of Townhouse’s entrées, an artful dish in a palette of cream, green and brown. Big, gorgeous scallops, perfectly seared golden brown, rest on a soft pillow of cauliflower cream paired with morels, caramelized cauliflower florets, asparagus, lardons and truffle vinaigrette. This is the kind of dish you crave the next day. Vegetables play an important role in every dish on the menu. They’re integral, adding colors and textures, absorbing and marrying flavors. Yet meat is honored, too. The roasted rack of lamb, a double chop crusted in mustard bread crumbs, was rosy pink inside. It’s served over quinoa, with fall vegetables like Tuscan kale. A big smear of romesco sauce, the Spanish blend of charred tomato, garlic, red pepper and nuts, adds another bold flavor and creamy texture to the dish. The perfect salad to start this meal is the Bulgarian feta salad, creamier and less salty than the usual sheeps’ milk feta. With chickpeas, cucumbers, tomatoes and red onions in red wine vinaigrette, it’s a punchy mixture. It’s served with

from top to bottom: Seared sea scallops • Parisienne gnocchi • Roasted rack of lamb • Crullers

grilled homemade flatbread topped with za’atar, a blend of herbs, sumac and sesame seeds. Of the vegetarian pastas on Townhouse’s menu, Parisienne gnocchi, made with ricotta, are light and gluten-free. They are paired with a lovely herb-flecked corn pudding, so sweet and creamy that we dragged each gnocchi through it. The fall vegetables, tossed into the pan with the lightly seared gnocchi, show knife skills and attention to detail. A great fall dessert meant for sharing are the crullers—crunchy sugar outside and soft caramel sauce inside. They’re served with crème Anglais to drizzle or pour. Leftovers, if there are any, make a nice breakfast treat with a cup of coffee the next morning. (Order to go, anyone?) Outdoor dining continues into fall with heat lamps on the front porch. There is also seating in the charming atrium, with its cupola, clerestory windows, dramatic double stairway, marble floors, fireplace and a set of French doors that open to the fresh fall air. In the bar, a high-topped table sits before the working fireplace. A curved bank of windows, shaded by a curtain of small gold beads, gives a seductive view into the main dining area. In the spacious circular dining room, tables are spaced far apart and the most requested are the two cozy, curved banquettes, curtained by little golden beads. The wine room retains its mahogany paneling, wine collection and allure. And there is yet another space off the dining room that transforms into a private dining area. Townhouse is most certainly a place you will G want to call home.

TOWNHOUSE

HOURS

35 Church Street, Greenwich 203-622-4223; townhousegreenwich .com

Lunch: Tues.–Sat. 12 to 4 p.m. Dinner: Tues.–Sat. 4 to 9 p.m.

On-site self-serve parking lot.

greenwichmag.com

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g–m m by eileen bartels

ANTIRACISM W STARTS AT HOME “DO THE BEST YOU CAN UNTIL YOU KNOW BETTER. THEN WHEN YOU KNOW BETTER, DO BETTER.” – M AYA ANG E LOU

e all have to strive to know better, to ask difficult questions, learn and evolve. Even the youngest of our children are asking tough questions that don’t have easy answers. Kids want to know more about social justice and what they have seen on social media, the news, and at protests that occurred around the world and in our own town. Raising socially aware children to not just advocate for themselves but for the rights of others is the responsibility of every parent. We need to be antiracist, overtly striving to recognize areas of prejudice in our lives and actively working to make changes. Taking the time to learn more about the subject helps lay the foundation for more thoughtful conversations with your children. Here are some resources to help get those conversations started.

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THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD AND THE NICKEL BOYS Colson Whitehead’s

THE BLUEST EYE Toni Morrison’s books are all worth your time; but if you haven’t read The Bluest Eye, it’s an excellent entry point. Slim and life-changing.

11 THE HATE U GIVE Angie Thomas’s

protagonist bridges the dual worlds of her private prep school and her urban neighborhood until those worlds collide. This is a perfect read for teens.

2 ANTIRACIST BABY Ibram X. Kendi’s adult book is

now a picture book for young children with illustrations by Ashley Lukashevsky. It challenges parents and children to uproot racism in our world and in ourselves with bold art and thoughtful but playful words.

5 THE WATER DANCER Ta-Nehisi Coates’s highly-praised

fictional debut tells the story of an enslaved man who gets involved with the Underground Railroad. greenwichmag.com

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CONTRIBUTED

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FICTION

Pulitzer Prize-winning novels are must-reads. The Nickel Boys, tells the story of tormented reform school boys. The Underground Railroad is an alternate history novel that’s set to debut as a limited Amazon series.


Learn Who we are

Join What we do

New Member Open Houses September 22nd & 26th. For more information, visit www.jlgreenwich.org/join

The Junior League of Greenwich is an organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women and improving the community through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. We are committed to inclusive environments of diverse individuals, organizations and communities.


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DEN BROA R YOU IVE ECT PERSP s by 2 I’M STILL HERE: BLACK DIGNITY IN A WORLD MADE FOR WHITENESS Austin Channing Brown chronicles

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her life growing up Black, Christian and female in white middle-class America.

BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME Ta-Nehisi Coates’s

powerful book is an essay to his son about his life and race in America.

grow No one nding surrou with a elves thems ry that just enta comm es their own c o pick reinf r ns, so io t p e perc ks that up boo . ge you challen ellent An exc support e is to avenu k-owned Blac e Lit like th s e r o t books (thelitbar Bar the hich is the w , ) m .co re in ooksto only b We suggest . Bronx t its ing ou check g list, readin People.” White “Dear

5 SO YOU WANT TO TALK ABOUT RACE

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HOW TO BE AN ANTIRACIST

MAKE CHANGE

Ibram X. Kendi uses personal experiences, history and science to show how people can create an antiracist society. It is often sold out, so try the audiobook version read by the author.

Shaun King reflects on his life as a Black Lives Matter leader and lays out a plan of action for how you can join the fight to make a more equitable America.

Ijeoma Oluo demonstrates how to have useful conversations about race in America.

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ME AND WHITE SUPREMACY: COMBAT RACISM, CHANGE THE WORLD, AND BECOME A GOOD ANCESTOR

WHITE FRAGILITY: WHY IT’S SO HARD FOR WHITE PEOPLE TO TALK ABOUT RACISM Robin DiAngelo

Layla F. Saad’s

examines how white defensiveness can be a roadblock and how to engage in a meaningful, constructive dialogue.

book comes with worksheets and opportunities for reflection, for anyone who wants to make a change but isn’t sure where to start.

greenwichmag.com

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CONTRIBUTED

NONFICTION

g-mom


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RESOURCES

g-mom

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here to help LEAN ON LOCAL

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FROM THE START 1619 This New York Times podcast tells the story of the first ship of slaves to arrive in Virginia and takes listeners on a six-episode journey that leads to today.

The YWCA of Greenwich’s tag line is “eliminating racism, empowering women,” and it takes that mission seriously. Every April it sponsors a Stand Against Racism event at Greenwich Town Hall and gives out two Social Justice Scholarships. This past June the organization hosted a Zoom conversation with Jenna Arnold (author of Raising Our Hands: How White Women Can Stop Avoiding Hard Conversations, Start Accepting Responsibility, and Find Our Place On the New Frontlines) and Denise Hamilton (founder of WatchHerWork). Visit ywcagreenwich.org and check out Denise Hamilton’s website watchherwork .com for events like “Ask Me Anything: A Candid Conversation About Race.”

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MOVIES Hold a family movie night and select movies that inform and broaden your perspective. Commonsensemedia .org is an excellent resource for checking out plot specifics and age appropriateness.

FOR OLDER TEENS When They See Us and 13th help to open the door for family conversations on the topics of race, equity and mass incarceration.

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GO GLOBAL

WEB SERIES THE NEXT QUESTION: A WEB SERIES IMAGINING HOW EXPANSIVE RACIAL JUSTICE CAN BE This web series engages leading voices on critical topics of racial justice in America. Created by best-selling author Austin Channing Brown, Season 1 is now available and features Nikole Hannah Jones, Andre Henry, Brené Brown and more (tnqshow .com). Brown also hosts a podcast series, The Anti-Racist Pod Squad, and looks at how to practice social justice during a pandemic (austinchanning .substack.com). greenwichmag.com

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punishment and racial inequality. The website has award-winning videos, insightful reports and educational content.

BLACK LIVES MATTER blacklivesmatter.com

The site features a number of downloadable toolkits for families. The toolkits TalkAboutTrayvon and TrayvonTaughtMe are good places for parents to learn about Black Lives Matter and share the story of the young life that sparked a movement.

EQUAL JUSTICE INITIATIVE eji.org

The organization works to end mass incarceration, excessive

I SCREAM, WE ALL SCREAM FOR JUSTICE benjerry.com

Ben and Jerry’s Ice Cream is a strong proponent of social justice. Its website features content on systemic racism, mass incarceration and other topics, with videos, ideas of things you can do and opportunities to sign petitions and advocate for change. G


Inspiring confidence, curiosity, creativity and a sense of community in every child we teach

www.PIFS.net • 101 Indian Field Road, Greenwich Putnam Indian Field School is an independent, co-educational preschool for children 21 months to 5 years old.

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fınance fıx

MONEY / BY CAROL LEONETTI DANNHAUSER

INVESTING IN FAMILY WHAT DO YOU DO WHEN SOMEONE YOU LOVE ASKS YOU FOR MONEY?

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opefully, your physical, mental and financial health have survived the turmoil of 2020. Hopefully, you still have a job and food on the table and the ability to pay your bills. If nothing else, the recent ups and downs have reminded you why you have a financial plan in place. Others, maybe even your loved ones, haven’t been so fortunate. Perhaps your brother lost his job and can’t pay the mortgage. Maybe his bonus didn’t happen and the tuition bill is due. Maybe his family has mounting medical costs. Or maybe he shouldn’t have bought that boat after all. (You knew he couldn’t afford it!) Whatever the case, that’s him on the phone, asking you for money. What do you do? Many friends and relatives “are in a tough spot, asking for money,” says Andrew Shantz, senior vice-president of The Shantz Mantione Group at UBS private wealth management.

somebody’s lifestyle. You want it to be a helping hand, not be counterincentive.” The answer comes only with transparent, honest communication. “It’s common to think about finance in terms of dollars and cents, but when it comes down to it, it’s really very emotional.” If you think you can and should help, what is the best way to proceed: with a gift or a loan? Each can have tax consequences (see box). Here is where an adviser can help craft creative solutions, particularly for highnet-worth individuals with significant assets and complex estate plans. You can “hand out that money with warm hands rather than cold hands,” says Shantz. Perhaps you can invest in a business, buy out a mortgage, fund a 529 college plan or creatively tap a legacy fund. If you do opt to lend money, put the details of the arrangement in writing before handing over the money. Be sure to cover how much is owed, the interest rate, repayment term and consequences. Understand up front that you might not get your money back. Then what happens? Will you modify the terms, take their collateral or bring them to court? If the consequences are too scary to consider—and you can’t loan the money without resentment if you don’t get repaid—then don’t do it. G

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Gift or Loan? Uncle Sam needs to know Dealing with the Internal Revenue Service seems like the least of your worries when considering a loved one’s request for help, but don’t overlook the paperwork or you could both be in trouble. In general, the IRS allows taxpayers to gift up to $15,000 to another person tax-free each year. If you lend to a loved one, you must charge interest, says the IRS, which sets the minimum interest rate you can accept. Both parties must sign a promissory note that includes rates, terms and conditions, and you have to file tax forms each year reporting interest paid or received. Consult your tax adviser for specifics.

HEADSHOT BY TOM PICH PHOTOGRAPHY; OTHER PHOTO BY ©ALEXSKOPJE - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

Andrew Shantz, SVP

“When family members need financial assistance, it can be an opportunity to help. You can think of it as an investment—in the other person. At the same time, it’s a complex situation.” Sooner or later many loved ones might need a hand, whether that’s elderly parents with healthcare needs, or siblings going through a divorce, or kids who want to go to college or start a business or buy a house. The quandary boils down to three questions: Can you help? Should you help? How should you help? Assuming that you want to help, determine first how this will affect your financial situation. “You need to be careful that you’re not imperiling your own financial resources and goals to solve somebody else’s problem,” says Shantz, who works with high-net-worth clients. Examine your assets and the consequences of parting with them. Maintain enough cash in your “liquidity bucket” post-gift to cover from six months to two years of your cost of living without compromising your lifestyle. And be sure to have investments in place to generate 60 to 80 percent of your lifestyle cost down the road. Should you help? “Are you solving a problem or feeding the beast?” Shantz asks. Is the need a “short-term, finite issue” that will be solved with your help? “That’s different than subsidizing


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people&PLACES by alison nichols gr ay

PHOTOGRAPHS BY BILL GLASS 1

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CATHERINE VIOLET HUBBARD FOUNDATION / The Stanwich Club

To Honor & Celebrate

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n a touching tribute to the life and legacy of a first-grader lost in the Sandy Hook tragedy, the Catherine Violet Hubbard Foundation recently hosted its second annual golf invitational at the Stanwich Club. Presented by Tito’s Handmade Vodka, the afternoon welcomed golf foursomes while raising funds for the Catherine Violet Hubbard Animal Sanctuary in Newtown. Jenny Hubbard, executive director of the CVH Animal Sanctuary, was thrilled to be able to hold such a successful event this year. “Given the current pandemic, we were so thankful to even be able to hold this tournament. While we had to keep the number of golfers limited to ensure a safe environment, it only enhanced the spirit and comradery of the experience.” All proceeds support the creation of the Catherine Violet Hubbard Animal Sanctuary and its life-changing programs. cvhfoundation.org »

1 Brett Powell, Ben Mayer 2 Olivia Spraker, Laura King, CVH Animal Sanctuary President and Catherine’s mother, Jennifer Hubbard, Erica Spraker 3 Fritz Smith, Harry Bonomo, Christian Close, Ben Yorke 4 The view on the course 5 AJ Cappelli 6 Cocktails by Tito’s 7 Frank Polley, Frank LaTorra 8 AJ, Sarah and Phil Cappelli SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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BRUCE MUSEUM / Greenwich

COVID Creativity

L 1 Holding Hands Again by Chloe Yan 2 Coronavirus Helpers by Oliver Adams 3 Doctors are our Super Heroes by Jaden Royal 4 Lockdown by Whit Armstrong 5 Sadness by Alexa Kwasniewski 6 Do Not Touch by Leonardo Costanzo 7 Trapped in Darkness by Yana Thukral 8 Distance Learning by Emily Parker greenwichmag.com

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aunched in May to highlight the talents and concerns of the coming generation of young artists, the Bruce Museum Junior Art Competition 2020: Seeing and Feeling During the Pandemic​ invited children in kindergarten through eighth grade to use their creativity to share their unique experiences during this unprecedented health crisis. The artwork could be created in any medium and submitted electronically as one image per two-dimensional work or two images for threedimensional pieces. The museum received more than eighty submissions, each piece of art touching and heartfelt. Here are some of the award winners (they are all winners in our eyes). brucemuseum.org »


LIFE

Explored. Discovery is transformative! Our boys grow into young men as they’re encouraged and inspired to explore, to engage, and to share themselves. During their explorations, we plant and nurture seeds of discovery, of service, of optimism, and of lifelong intellectual and emotional growth.

RSVP FOR OUR

V IR T U A L OPEN HOUSE

bwick.org/virtualvisit


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SENIOR PAW PROJECT / Around Town in Greenwich

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1 Dr. Emily Andersen, Linda Townsend and her forever foster cat, Annie, at Valley Veterinary Hospital 2 Fenway 3 Pet food ready for delivery 4 Bella 5 CVH Executive Director Jenny Hubbard with volunteers 6 Rose and Midnight 7 Olivia Spraker 8 Wally 9 Richard Mulligan and his dog, Noopy 10 Einstein 11 Mini

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hen Donna Schenarts, a senior resident of Greenwich Communities (the former Greenwich Housing Authority), found out her dog needed emergency surgery, she faced a difficult situation. She was already struggling to pay for basic needs and finding the funds for veterinary support seemed impossible. That’s when the CVH Animal Sanctuary in Newtown stepped in with veterinary support and pet food through its Senior Paw Project. The CVH Animal Sanctuary created the project to address the critical and growing needs of an aging population unable to keep or care for their beloved dogs or cats. These animals often end up in shelters across the country, adding to the nearly 7 million animals relinquished every year. The Senior Paw Project works to keep these pets in the loving homes they deserve by providing medical support, including veterinary care, medicine and transportation assistance, pet food and so much more. The Project has distributed over 44,000 pet food meals to seniors and has stocked local food pantries, housing authorities and social services with 8,500 pounds of pet food. Over 4,000 pet food meals have been distributed to seniors in Greenwich alone. If you would like to help local seniors and their pets, please visit cvhfoundation.org. G greenwichmag.com

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THE BRUCE

Toasts

OUR 2020 GALA SUPPORTERS Although we were unable to gather together for what would have been the 33rd Annual Gala, the Bruce Museum extends its deepest gratitude to Co-Chairs Caitlin Davis, Asya Geller, and Layla Lisiewski for their inspiring leadership and dedication throughout the past year. Thank you to the entire 2020 Gala Committee, who gave deeply of time and treasure to this year’s Gala which provides support for the Museum’s exhibitions and education programs for the benefit of our community. We also appreciate the support of Greenwich Magazine/Moffly Media, the Gala's media sponsor. And we especially want to thank all of you, who donated so generously and gave critical support this year. VISIONARY Cricket and Jim Lockhart Susan E. Lynch PATRON Mr. and Mrs. Don H. Nelson Barbara Netter Gale and Bob Lawrence BENEFACTOR Amica Insurance Aundrea and Jim Amine Sue Moretti Bodson and Mike Bodson Mr. and Mrs. John D. Chadwick Katie Flaherty and Paul Landaiche Lucile and Richard Glasebrook Sachiko and Lawrence Goodman Kamie and Rich Lightburn Karen and Dennis Keegan Kathleen L. Metinko and Jan Rogers Kniffen Simone and J. Andrew McEntire Susan and Bill Mahoney Deanna and Stephen Mulligan Northern Trust Julia and Jamal Nusseibeh Betsey Ruprecht Judith and Steven Stein

Barbara and Robert Swanson Sue Ann Weinberg PROVIDER Mr. and Mrs. William Fitzgerald Rebecca A. Gillan Tracy and Mark Holton Pam and Bill Lawrence Jacqueline and Arthur Walker SUPPORTER Carolyn and Maurice Cunniffe Alexandra and Thomas DeBourcy Bill and Fran Deutsch Kathy Candel Epstein Ellen Flanagan and Joanne Flanagan Kathy and Bill Georgas Greenwich Magazine/Moffly Media Tanya and Michael Grunberg Alex and Cassaundra Karnal Alexandra and Cody Kittle Patricia Lunka and Gary Berkman Alice P. Melly Carolyn and Stephen Westerberg Muffin and Chuck Zoubek PARTNER Maryann Keller Chai and Jay Chai

Carol and George Crapple Mr. and Mrs. Marko Djuranovic Nancy and Ken Duffy Claudia Gerola Mirella and Hadi Hajjar Olivia and James Langston Romona and Jeff Norton Candace and Chris Procaccini Nicole Reynolds Heidi Brake Smith and Scott M. Smith FRIEND Shari Aser and Bill James Karin Crooks Caitlin and Mick Davis Lily deJongh Downing and David Yudain Robin Jaffee Frank and Robert Frank Asya and Mike Geller Katherine Goldberg Rob Irvine Felicity L. Kostakis and Timothy J. Yanoti Caity and Matt Lischick Layla and Gary Lisiewski Vince and Linda McMahon Juan and Virginia Meyer Linda Zwack Munger and Stephen Munger Craig and Debbie Stapleton


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vows by alison nichols gr ay

RHETT ANDREW BRAUNSCHWEIG & CAROLINE RICHEY ARENZ 1

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aroline and Rhett first met in June 2017 through mutual connections (Caroline’s sister worked for the same company as Rhett). Their first date was at a local pizza place where they were accompanied on the outdoor patio by Caroline’s miniature dachshund, Chili, who quickly became a third wheel on many dates. The pair dated for thirteen months before their engagement. Rhett proposed at home to ensure their (now) two miniature dachshunds were a part of the proposal. Rhett and Caroline spent the rest of the day doing some of their favorite things in Chicago, including brunch, a Cubs game and drinks at Will’s Northwoods, Rhett’s favorite watering hole for Badger fans. Reverend Vicky Curtiss officiated at the ceremony at Fourth Presbyterian Church in Chicago, and the reception followed at the Saddle and Cycle Club. With the father of the bride on guitar and the bride’s sister Elizabeth on vocals, the newlyweds danced to “Can’t Help Falling in Love with You.” The bride, daughter of Tom and Barbara Arenz of Greenwich, graduated from St. Paul’s School and Johns Hopkins University. Caroline is a graduate student at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. The groom, son of Ridge and Gail Braunschweig of Wisconsin, graduated from Homestead High School, University of Wisconsin and the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. Rhett is an investment banker for RW Baird & Co in Chicago. The Braunschweigs call Chicago home. »

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1 Doug, Carter and Kristin Singer, Caroline, Rhett, Gail and Kyle Braunschweig, Collins Singer, Ridge Braunschweig 2 The cutting of the cake 3 Lindy and Mark Camel 4 Caroline and Rhett with their wedding party 5 The newlyweds 6 Tom and Elizabeth Arenz 7 Marsha and Ken Mifflin 8 Elizabeth, Tom and Barbara Arenz, Caroline and Rhett Braunschweig, Kitty Arenz SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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1 Introducing the Eberharts 2 Delphine Eberhart and the late Frank Eberhart, Elizabeth and James, Maggie and David McGirr 3 Elizabeth and James made it official 4 Cocktails with a view at Belle Haven 5 Maggie McGirr, Julie Emo, Johanna Lawrence, Lucinda Day, Ann Miller greenwichmag.com

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY BRIAN DORSEY STUDIOS

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ames and Elizabeth met through the bride’s sister, Katherine, and brother-in-law, William Nix, who was a college friend of the groom’s. The couple started dating in 2015 while living and working in New York City. In 2018 on a summer trip to Maine, James proposed. Reverend Terence L. Elsberry officiated at the ceremony at Christ Church Greenwich, and the reception followed at the Belle Haven Club. The bride, daughter of David and Maggie McGirr of Greenwich, graduated from Greenwich Academy and the University of Virginia. Elizabeth is a senior trip designer for Indagare Travel in New York. The groom, son of Delphine Eberhart and the late Frank Eberhart of New York, graduated from Dartmouth College. James works in real estate at a private firm. The newlyweds honeymooned in Chile before returning home to Manhattan. G


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6 Cousins and siblings of the bride 7 And they are off … 8 The bride and groom with Lochiel Nix, Ruby McGirr and Joslin Nix 9 The wedding party 10 William McGirr, Phoebe Erdman, Anne Marcus, Ginger Jenks 11 Fun on the dance floor 12 That magic hour at Christ Church SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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DRESSES

Aisle Style YOUR DREAM DRESS I S W A I T I N G

Alison Luciano

Alison Luciano of THE PLUMED SERPENT knows how to get her brides to say yes to the dress. Her guidance (and gorgeous selection) are just what you need to navigate the latest in gowns, accessories and big day looks. 240 Post Road East Westport, CT 06880 plumedserpentbridal.com

What bridal trends are you seeing for right now? This is such an exciting time for bridal gowns and new trends. There are as many different styles and looks as there are women getting married; but I have been noticing a few trends that are popping up throughout the collections of many designers.

What are some of your favorite styles right now? That is like asking me to pick a favorite child! My favorites are always evolving and changing as I see brides come in to try them on and fall in love. This week my favorites are from two NYC-based designers, Lela Rose and Enaura. Rose’s gowns are the ultimate for refined preppy with a twist. They are equally suited for a NYC black tie wedding as well as a garden wedding in the backyard. The shapes and fabrics she chooses are always so creative

Bows // Bows are having a moment again. And what’s not to love about that? Designers are using them in creative and unexpected places— anywhere from a giant bow at the train to a super modern look where the bow is asymmetrically on the bodice. They are also showing up as delicate details on straps, belts and other unexpected

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and stylish. Enaura is on the other end of the spectrum of style and one of our new designers who is quickly becoming a favorite for me. They are all hand embroidered and beaded, and the beading is so elegant and quiet. Their gowns don’t sparkle, they twinkle.

industry, pictures solve the problem. They are so helpful in showing your consultant what you are looking for. And even if you don’t have an image of the perfect gown, that’s okay, too. Your pictures also help us see your vision and vibe for your special day.

What should a bride be thinking about before her first dress appointment? Brides are always nervous before they come in, because they feel that they need to know exactly what it is they want. But that is absolutely not the case.

Have an open mind. You might think that you know exactly what you want, but sometimes your consultant will throw you a curveball and show you something unexpected.

Bring only a few trusted friends and family with you. If you bring too many guests, your opinion might get lost among the opinions of others. Pictures are everything. Even though you might not know the terminology of the

How do you know when you’ve found the one? That’s easy! You know when you don’t want to take it off and you can’t help smiling. I always tell my brides, choosing your wedding gown is not an external decision; it’s an internal one. It isn’t about how you look in a gown; it’s how you feel in it.

top: Rows of gowns line Luciano's Westport boutique above: Two styles from Enaura prove why the new designer is already a favorite

STORE: MELANI LUST PHOTOGRAPHY; LUCIANO: JOANNA FISHER; ENAURA: COURTESY OF BRAND

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left: A blooming bar created with Design Collaborative right: An infinty altar makes for a modern moment below: An industrial bohemian setting dreamed up with Daylynn Designs

FLOWERS

Benjamin Newbold

What WINSTON FLOWERS is able to create with greenery and blooms is truly extraordinary. We spoke with Benjamin Newbold, creative director of floral and events, a visionary who shares his insight on palette, proportion and the best petals for each season. 382 Greenwich Avenue Greenwich, CT 06830 winstonflowers.com

M A K E A R R A N G E M E N T S T O P L U C K T H E S E FRESH FLORAL IDEAS

What floral trends are you seeing right now? For the past several years, muted tones have served as the color palette of choice at weddings—think blush tones or classic whites and greens— but this year we’ve seen couples go big with color. People want to be different and want their weddings to express who they are as a couple, so they are opting for bright, bold colors that make a dramatic impact. Another popular trend is heavy use of greenery and candlelight as opposed to an emphasis on florals. Traditionally, leafy greenery and foliage have taken a backseat to flowers, but we’re seeing couples reverse that trend by moving flowers into a supporting role. Centerpieces and décor that put greenery front

and center create an earthy, natural atmosphere that is very desirable right now. We’ve also seen a move toward pieces that are more designed and structural, versus the very flowy and whimsical looks that were common in the past few years. Couples want to see their décor push boundaries and defy expectations; it’s more flowers as art as opposed to just a simple centerpiece.

Which flowers or trends are always in style? Seasonal classics will never go out of style. In winter, anemones are at their peak and make a statement as part of your wedding décor. We love peonies in spring, garden roses in summer, and dahlias in the fall. You can’t ever go wrong with flowers that are blooming naturally during the season, since choosing those ensures that your blooms will be as fresh and lush as possible.

What advice would you give to a couple that doesn’t know where to start with flowers? Start with the season. When you consider season first, you’ll be working with flowers at the peak of their beauty. For example, peonies have a brief season and make a stunning addition to wedding décor. When they are at their peak, why not use them? Then, consider your favorite color. Your wedding should be a reflection of who you are as a person and as a couple, so be sure to choose a palette that you love—even if it’s out of the norm. The season of your wedding and the color palette will dictate what’s available, and then you can work with an expert to help you choose from the options available.

PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: MOLLY ANNE PHOTOGRAPHY; JOHN DOLAN PHOTOGRAPHY; MOVE MOUNTAINS CO.; COURTESY OF WINSTON

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café, walking your dog, riding bikes, or even photographing at the proposal location will give the images more meaning for the next generations than just having a pretty backdrop. I also recommend that the couple get a little dressed up and that the bride wear a dress; we always love “twirl factor” in the compositions. This is also a great time for a makeup trial. Have your makeup done just before the shoot, and then make sure to plan a fun night out afterwards.

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What advice would you give to a couple ahead of an engagement session shoot? “Engagement session” is a misleading term, I prefer “lifestyle couples session.” These images will reflect this time in your lives and have

an authenticity to them that will bring you, your children and grandchildren right back to when you were a young, fun and carefree couple in the early days of your love. The session gives you a chance to experience how I work and direct and helps

you feel comfortable in front of the camera, so that your guard can be down on the wedding day. I always recommend that the couple chooses a location and situation that has meaning, something as simple as cooking together, going to your favorite

What are some of your favorite locations to shoot couples in Fairfield County? There are so many fantastic locations, but I think that taking advantage of the shoreline is my favorite. The pastel colors in the sky as the sun sets are so soft and beautiful. I like to add a bit of light to my couple so that they are nicely exposed within the setting of the soft sky and the sea. G

Melani Lust

Melani Lust has photographed over 250 weddings since 2007. Although she shoots all over the world, the locations near her Westport home are some of her favorites. Wherever you’re celebrating, she’s here to help you get camera ready. melanilustphotography.com

top: A couple's sparkling exit from Westport's Birchwood Country Club above left: Newlyweds at Greenwich Country Club above right: A candid moment from a wedding in Madison greenwichmag.com

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LUST: KRISTEN JENSEN; ALL OTHER PHOTOGRAPHS BY MEANI LUST PHTOGRAPHY

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COVID-19 may be the first unprecedented global challenge these kids have lived through, but it won’t be the last—and from what we can tell, they are ready for anything

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AYLA SHIVELY BY DONNA BEEMAN; SAMANTHA BERMAN BY MARYLIN ROOS; CHARLIE BURNETT CONTRIBUTED; ELYSE KIM BY CHI CHI UBINA

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Through it all, they remained optimistic and even-keeled. Consider St. Luke’s graduate, Frank “Tank” Intrieri, who has committed to playing football at his dream school, Johns Hopkins University. “I’m just going trust it will all work out. Even if we don’t get to go on campus this year, I still get to play college football for three years at one of the greatest D3 schools in the country.” Or Brunswick graduate Nicky Winegardner, who is a freshman at University of Southern California. “At first it was heartbreaking. I’m a Brunswick lifer. I signed up for 14 years not 13.75. After watching the news and seeing and feeling the tremendous negative impact the virus had on so many, it made me realize there’s a bigger picture. I see how important it is not to waste time. This pandemic has shown me that the time is now to chase my dreams.” As for those still coping with the world of high school in the COVID era, Elyse Kim, a senior at St. Luke’s had this take: “It forced my friends and me to see that we take a lot for granted and that we are lucky to live where we do. We're living through an historic moment, so I asked myself, ‘What am I going to do with this moment?’ It was an existentialist realization, for sure.” For Arjun Dayal, a rising senior at Hackley School who spent the spring producing PPE for medical personnel, it was an opportunity to try something new. “The day my school let out, I actually went fishing with my friends. That was a first for me.” Global pandemic or not, we always feel a little more confident about the future after we’ve put this issue to bed. After you meet this year’s top teens, we trust you will feel the same. »

very September for the past twelve years, greenwich magazine has had the pleasure of showcasing ten of our town’s extraordinary teens. As always, this year’s group is an impressive lot. Six are now freshmen in college; the rest are still in high school. They represent a broad spectrum of interests—from astrophysics and the arts to social justice advocacy and biomedicine. They are smart, ambitious and dedicated to making a difference in their schools, our community and the world. None of them have taken their intellectual prowess or athletic abilities for granted. Each has proven to be resilient in the face of disappointment and adversity, turning setbacks into teachable moments. Certainly, these past five months have been a test of that resiliency as they were forced to navigate life in the face of a global pandemic. With the closure of schools, these teens lost out on many of the defining moments that frame a typical spring semester. For those heading off to college, that meant missing such rites of passage as senior prom, senior skip day and graduation. As of press time, some of them were still uncertain about whether or not they’d be attending classes on campus or online. As for the teens who are still in high school, they missed spring sports and other extracurricular activities. They all transitioned to online learning and made do with social media apps to get their friends fix. Summer internships, specialized academic programs, college visits? All curtailed by COVID-19.

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10 T E E N S TO WAT C H

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What would you tell your freshman self? “Enjoy it while you can. Try your hardest and do what you love. Take risks and never give up. Always put your best foot forward.”

01. AYLA SHIVELY Greens Farms Academy

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yla Shively was born with a song in her heart and a spring to her step. “My family likes to say I was dancing before I could walk,” she says. You name it, she’s danced it—everything from ballet to jazz, modern to lyrical. For Ayla, dancing helped cement her passion for performing. “When I’m on stage is when I know this is what I want to do for the rest of

Who has been your most impactful teacher? “Mrs. Pembroke, my English teacher. She always encouraged me to dig deeper and really find myself in my writing. She always had a positive attitude, and everyone really respects her.” my life,” she says. “Ironically, I have terrible stage fright and social anxiety, and I have to push myself. When I get into character, it all falls away and I don’t really worry about anything else.” Ayla was thrilled last fall when she was cast in the leading role of Audrey in the school production of Little Shop of Horrors. “I didn’t do the musical my freshman year, which I really regret, because I was way too scared.” That spurred her to push herself out of her comfort zone. Which is why she jumped at the chance to try out for the Stamford’s Troupers Light Opera’s production of The Gondoliers. Despite not having an opera background, Ayla was cast in the role of Fiametta—the youngest cast member by six years. “We rehearsed three times a week for three hours. It was a lot of work,” she says. The GFA junior brings the same level of discipline and drive to all areas of her life—from her honors-heavy course load, to her participation in school clubs,

including Quest, which raises awareness about the LGBTQ community. Last year, after a scary encounter with a stranger while riding the train to school, she worked with the school administration and her advisor to create a program designed to educate incoming freshmen about train safety. “The plan is to talk to new students and walk them through the process of how to say no to people and that it’s okay to walk away if someone makes you feel uncomfortable,” she says. “I realized a lot of women are taught to be submissive and just say yes and not ask questions and go along and not make anyone upset. And it’s important for the boys to know that they have to be involved, too.” As for the future, Ayla has her sights set on Broadway but first college. “Education is important to my family, so I’ll probably go to a school for performing arts,” she says. “I want to get in there and audition for everything.”

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What’s the toughest challenge you have faced? “Staying true to myself throughout high school and not giving into peer pressure, as well as finding myself in quarantine and learning how to adapt to be successful during this time.”

BLACK AND WHITE PORTRAIT BY CLASSIC KIDS PHOTOGRAPHY; STAGE PHOTO BY DONNA BEEMAN

How did you cope with lockdown? “Lots of exercise and meditation. I FaceTimed my friends to keep in touch. My family made sure to spend time together every night. Having a schedule also helped. I found that when I planned out my day, I got a lot accomplished.”


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FRANK “TANK” INTRIERI

How did you cope with lockdown and not having a traditional graduation? “Lots of lifting, playing Mario Kart with my sister and looking on the bright side.”

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ank Intrieri learned early on that when it comes to achieving life goals, perseverance and hard work pay off. He is a gifted athlete who discovered his passion for football when he joined the North Mianus Bulldogs in fifth grade. “I was awkward and big, and it took a while to figure it out,” he recalls. Eventually, his skills improved, and he started living up to his nickname, “Tank.” But it wasn’t until he transferred to St. Luke’s as a junior, that his football career took off like a rocket ship. After just one year, he was named cocaptain of the varsity squad. “That was the icing on the cake,” says Tank. As adept as he is on the field, Tank is equally at home in the classroom. He is a STEM standout who earned academic awards of distinction in every class he took last year. He received the school’s prestigious Pat Thomas award, which encompasses athletic excellence, academic proficiency and sportsmanship. He was also named to the All-Evergreen League, earned an All-New England Honorable Mention and was one of three high school players in Connecticut to earn a $1,000 scholarship from the National Football Foundation on top of being named a National Football Foundation Scholar Athlete. In between practices, games and schoolwork, Tank managed to find time to play percussion in the school band and volunteer for his local community, doing everything from checking in bikes at the CT Challenge to cleaning up after the Saint Leo’s Fair with his football team. Oh, and did we mention he also played varsity lacrosse and was on the Thirds basketball team? Tank says he gets his work ethic from his father, Frank Jr., a 1984

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What would you tell your freshman self? “It all works out in the end.” Who has been your most impactful teacher? “If I had to name just one, it would be Dr. Jason “Dubs” Warner, my eleventh grade physics teacher and advisor for my independent study. He is the smartest man I’ve ever met. He always connected with me, never fully answering my questions because he knew I could find the answers. After a year in honors physics, I didn’t hesitate to accept his proposal to work on a study together. I think we helped each other a lot, considering neither of us was very knowledgeable in the area of rocket physics; and it was a great experience to work with him again as a senior.” alum of Greenwich High, where he was a celebrated football player. “He was captain of the first 12 and 0 team in Greenwich High School history,” says Tank. “He was a really great football player. Ever since I was a kid, I wanted to be like him.” Now a freshman at Johns Hopkins University, where he was recruited to play football (another dream box checked), Tank is planning to major in mechanical engineering as a stepping stone toward becoming an astronaut. In fact, he is so intent on getting to Mars, last year he completed an independent study with his physics teacher, Dr. Warner. “I know NASA is eventually planning to send people to Mars in 2030,” he says, “and I wanted to find out how expensive or feasible it would be

to do today. I modeled a spaceship journey between Earth and Mars on an Excel spread sheet with 4,000 rows. I learned—surprise—the people at NASA know what they are talking about.” »

What’s the toughest challenge you have faced? “Moving to a new school and working to find my confidence alongside new teammates and peers.”


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hether she’s commanding a debate stage, raising awareness around climate change, peacefully protesting for Black Lives Matter or advocating for gender equality, Samantha Berman leads by example as she strives to make the world a better place. Last year alone, the rising senior worked in conjunction with the King Environmental Club to organize the school-wide King Climate Strike. As a cocaptain of the Debate Club, she led debate

SAMANTHA BERMAN King School

the entire school. “We are trying to educate the entire school on what it means to be a feminist,” she says. “If you believe in gender equality, then by definition you are a feminist.” When the Black Lives Matter movement came to Greenwich in May, Samantha was out there doing her part. “Just to go and be consciously participating in something that is a wider movement is important for me,” she says. “In addition to getting on social media and posting about all these issues, I think it’s important to leave your house and participate in the real world, if possible. It’s the idea of putting your money where your mouth is and getting your boots on the ground, so to speak.” She also brings this enthusiasm into her academic life, where she maxes out on honors and AP classes, volunteers at the middle school math help center and finds time to pursue a love of yoga and photography. She was one of two students to receive the school’s prestigious Tom Main Fellowship, offered for the first time last year. One partnership is given to two sophomores. Samantha and her partner researched the rise of nationalism in the EU through various case study countries. She conducted several interviews with journalists, professors and EU officials to investigate the issues of hyper-nationalism, xenophobia and migration, and possible solutions to the challenges they impose. Being an advocate for causes she believes in spurs Samantha to pursue solutions relentlessly. “I think it’s important if you see something in your own school or community that you know is wrong, don’t be quiet about it.” Although she’s still figuring out her next steps when it comes to a career path, Samantha is clear about one thing: “I definitely see myself not doing something very ordinary.”

practices and coordinated monthly attendance at the Connecticut Debate Association debates. As a cocaptain of the school’s Feminist Club, Samantha spearheaded the Glass Staircase project, a showcase of feminist and social justice–oriented art, photographs and quotations, which will be unveiled this fall. (It was meant to be finished last spring but was postponed due to COVID-19.) She also led the club’s participation in the Women’s March in New York City and then gave a King talk about the experience in front of

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How have you coped with lockdown? “I've been doing a ton of cooking and catching up on TV. I've been focusing on things that I find relaxing, like baking and painting.” What would you tell your freshman self? “Embrace creativity and messiness. I would get worked up over small things and try to make everything neat and perfect. Nothing is fun when you obsess over every detail. Trying to be perfect wasn't making me happy. I would say to myself, ‘Loosen up! Spend more time on what you enjoy: art, poetry, nature. Everything’s going to be OK!’” Who has been your most impactful teacher? “Mr. Lear-Nickum, my history teacher, and Mrs. Baker, my elementary school English teacher. Mr. Lear-Nickum compels his students to look at history and politics carefully and analytically. For the past two years, as a teacher and an advisor, he’s taught me how to think critically about the world and how to hold myself under pressure. When I was a kid, Mrs. Baker was the first teacher who taught me to value writing. She fostered a love of learning, and I credit her with so much of my dedication.” What’s the toughest challenge you have faced? “Learning how to plan and coordinate large scale projects has been a huge challenge. Planning the King Climate Strike, Women’s March trip, and working on the Tom Main Liberal Arts Fellowship have all been crazy experiences, and I’ve learned so much about communication and preparation. Also, balancing academics and my mental well-being. I’ve learned that it isn’t possible to function at your best if you don’t take care of yourself.”

PORTRAIT BY MARILYN ROOS; CONTRIBUTED

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hen your father is a TV producer and filmmaker, it stands to reason you might grow up being comfortable in front of a camera. Now a freshman at Duke, Charlie Burnett is not only comfortable there, he goes one step further: He shines. “My dad and I used to fool around a lot on weekends, making little videos,” he says. “He was always pushing me to perform.” Not that he needed much prodding. Charlie is a natural-born entertainer, whether playing guitar for his family or doing magic for his friends. During his time at Brunswick, he starred in a variety of roles from Angry Pa in

Oklahoma! to the mayor of River City, Iowa, in The Music Man. But it was his standout performance as the iconic Edna Turnblad in Hairspray that brought down the house. “Edna was my favorite role to play, because it’s so hilarious to imagine a sophomore guy playing her,” he says. “I had just started playing football, and I didn’t know the upperclassmen very well; and there I was standing up in front of the entire football team, and they were all just cracking up. It was a really great moment I’ve held with me. All those stereotypes of jocks thinking that musicals are stupid is really false.” A concussion his junior year took him out of the game, which was a blessing in disguise. “It was unfortunate, but it gave me a chance to focus more on my acting,” he says. A high honors student who carried a rigorous course load that included AP environmental science, English XII: creative writing, AP psychology, AP calculus AB, honors English seminar in literature and honors film production, Charlie managed to carve out time to help freshmen boys and girls transition to the Upper School through his role as a Peer Leader. He also mentored young ice hockey players as captain of the Thirds hockey team,

How have you coped with lockdown and not having a traditional graduation? “It's been a crazy time. I have taken the time to work out every day, eat healthy and do all things creative. I can’t help but feel incredibly lucky that I’m spending it with my family under one roof. Although it is sad not having a graduation ceremony, I know it isn’t the hardest thing I will face in life. Since I am lucky to not have to worry about losing my job and having enough money to pay rent, it seems to be my duty to follow the same guidelines as everyone else.” What would you tell your freshman self? “Keep your head high and pick yourself back up whenever things get hard and you get knocked down, because it will all be alright. Everything ends up working out in the end!”

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Who has been your most impactful teacher? “Mr. Lahey, my film teacher. I would constantly look forward to his class, and the days when it wasn’t on my schedule, I would go into his classroom to talk about film, school and life in general. Mr. Lahey never ceases to inspire me and my classmates. He is truly the best and most impactful teacher I’ve ever had.” What’s the toughest challenge you have faced? “I’ve been very lucky, so the challenges I have faced aren’t anywhere near those faced by others less lucky than I. But I would say one of the biggest was not being a sporty kid in a sporty world. I wrote my college essay on the challenge of being 6’3 and 270 pounds but not having the heart to rip the other teams' heads off in football. Coaches loved me for a couple of weeks, until they began to realize that perhaps I wasn’t the best athlete. But let me tell you, those first couple weeks were the best. Everyone loved me because I was big! I began to feel like a stranger within this group of guys that I had grown to love so much. Still, I stuck with it. Sadly, junior year, I got a concussion that took me out for the season. While it was sad not to play, it allowed me to do the GA fall musical. During that musical I made lasting connections with people who are now very important to me.”

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a role and a sport he loves. Although he dreams of a career in film and TV, he loves the process of producing and directing, too. For one senior project, he and his film class produced a “mindbending” music video to the Beatles song “Yellow Submarine.” “It was this very confusing and weird collapsing montage of different clips using multiple computer monitors,” he says. “We ended up showing it to the entire school, and they were like what? It was very gratifying.” »


“ We wondered, ‘What could we do to help Above & Beyond the community?’ We wanted to spread kindness in these unkind times.” - Arjan Kochar, 6th Grade

If you wonder whether young people can really be leaders, look no further than St. Luke’s Middle School students Arjan ‘26 and Nihaal ‘24 Kochar. The brothers wanted to alleviate some of the suffering caused by the Coronavirus crisis. They launched Zouchers.com—a website supporting small, family-run businesses. Watch the Kochars’ interview with Head of School Mark Davis at www.stlukesct.org/slsheroes

On campus and online... An Exceptional Education. Join a Welcome Webinar www.stlukesct.org/visit St. Luke’s is a secular (non-religious), college preparatory day school for grades 5-12 and a Best Private High School in CT - niche.com 203.801.4833 | 377 North Wilton Road, New Canaan, CT 06840


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When the COVID-19 pandemic struck, she signed up for a letterwriting project organized by the school’s Centers for Leadership. “Here we were at home and we didn’t miss a step,” she says. “It was easy for us to forget there were people in those nursing homes who couldn’t have the visitors that are really important to them, and that our notes could make an impact in a small but meaningful way.”

05. ELYSE KIM

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mbitious, curious, tenacious and compassionate—these are just a few of the traits that set Elyse Kim apart from the crowd. An academic powerhouse, she was one of nine students selected for St. Luke’s prestigious Global Senior Scholar program for 2020. A gifted writer, she was tapped to be editor of the Sentinel, the student-run newspaper, when she was just a junior, a role she will continue this year. A star athlete, she is the cocaptain of the girls’ volleyball team and was invited to the NEPSAC All-Star tournament in 2016, 2018 and 2019. She is also the founder of the Eye of the Storm video club, which chronicles school life in videos and podcasts, a member of the school’s Honor Council and has been an Admissions Ambassador for the past four years. Elyse says she gravitates to leadership roles, in part, as a result of her time at St. Luke’s. “It’s such a huge part of our mission, and the school does a great job of presenting leadership opportunities from the moment we join the community,” she says. “I was on the student council in middle school, and it was a fun way to learn to lead, which made it easier for me to find my own voice in the Upper School.”

If her drive and ambition is innate, Elyse says she gets her moral compass from her family. Her father is a West Point graduate who cofounded with Elyse’s mother the Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation, which provides college scholarships to military kids who lost a parent in the line of duty. “The Foundation has been a part of my life for as long as I can remember,” she says. “My favorite part is getting to know all the students it helps.” As a young girl, a trip to the Philippines taught her a valuable lesson about making the best of every situation life throws your way. “We visited a garbage

dump in Manila, where a severely underserved community was living, and they were happy and joyful. Coming back to where we lived, with all the opportunities placed in front of me, I realized how important it is to utilize them to the best of my ability.”

How did you cope with lockdown? “I stayed connected with friends via FaceTime and Zoom calls, whether talking for hours or just working together in silence. Those relationships are what I missed most about school, so it was important to keep our interactions alive.” What would you tell your freshman self? “Don’t waste time comparing yourself to others. Everyone has their own strengths. You have so much to look forward to, so ignore those insecurities and focus on your own path.” Who was your most impactful teacher? “Ms. Doran, my sophomore, junior and senior year English teacher. She has a way with words, and her love of literature is contagious. She emphasizes the idea that uncertainty is a catalyst for reflection, growth and artistic beauty. I often place pressure on myself, so I’ve tried to keep this idea in mind and embrace doubt and failure instead of dreading it.” What’s the toughest challenge you have faced? “When I was a freshman, my grandmother was placed in hospice care at our house. It was a traumatic and emotional time, but I was grateful to be with her during her last few weeks of life. It turned out to be a truly formative and meaningful experience.”

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gain a strong academic foundation and acquire critical skills, habits of mind, and confidence.

GCDS is a joyful environment where \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\ curiosity and/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/ creativity are valued, \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\ /\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/ resilience is cultivated, and the health \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\ /\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/ \/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\ and well-being of every student is essential.

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06.

NICKY WINEGARDNER Brunswick School

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How did you cope with lockdown and not having a traditional graduation? At first I was angry, sad and confused. As the weeks went by, I realized that the virus had a far more negative impact on others than on me. Although I looked forward to the senior traditions since I was five years old, my family and friends are healthy and safe, and that is much more important. What would you tell your freshman self? Enjoy the little things like the time in the locker room with your teammates, the conversations at the lunch table and the time backstage before the show. Celebrate the big moments, too. Savor the games when you storm the field with your team after a hard fought win, the final bow after a successful run of shows—you can’t get any of that back.

students at Brunswick as a peer leader and Big Brother. Even this past summer, while in lockdown, he ran football clinics for lower school kids in his backyard. He recalls an assembly he gave to middle school kids the afternoon before the big homecoming game last fall. In addition to performing for them, he talked about the importance of the arts and how to balance sports and

Who has been your most impactful teacher? Mr. Potter, my English/acting teacher and musical director. He pushed me to think in new ways and taught me how to see the complex layers of the characters I was tasked to play. I’m forever grateful for the insight and knowledge he imparted on me. What's the toughest challege you have faced? For a long time I believed I had to follow a specific path to fit in. After a few years, I realized that doing what made me happy was way more important. Looking back, it seems simple; but at the time, it was extremely difficult for me to understand.

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schoolwork and whatever activities you pursue. “I wanted to show the younger kids that it’s okay to take your own path,” he says. “I had a lot of difficulty transitioning from middle school to high school and accepting that I wasn’t going to be doing what everyone else did. It took a lot of years of working at it and figuring out what I really love, and it paid off big time.” »

FOOTBALL GAME BY WAYNE K LIN/BRUNSWICK SCHOOL; STAGE PHOTO BY GREG HOROWITZ

n the face of it, football and Broadway musicals may seem to have little in common. But for Nicky Winegardner, they’re a match made in heaven. The Greenwich native is that rare talent—a gifted athlete and a gifted thespian—who took advantage of every opportunity to shine on the field, and off, during his time at Brunswick. Like a lot of kids, Nicky first started tossing a football around with his dad. “I always enjoyed it, but once I started playing with the Greenwich Youth Football League in third grade, I really began to love the sport.” As the captain and quarterback of the varsity football squad his senior year, he led the Bruins to a postseason NEPSAC bowl game championship, running in the last touchdown of the game. “That was one of the best feelings of my life. It was the perfect way to cap off my football career.” Just as he was discovering his passion for football, Nicky was developing his skills as an actor. He remembers his first appearance on stage at a parents' event in second grade. He sang a Bob Marley song. “I told my parents that I didn’t want to leave the stage,” he says. In high school, he played five different lead roles, beginning in ninth grade as Archibald Craven in The Secret Garden and ending this past March as Harold Hill in The Music Man. “Archibald Craven truly ignited my flame and passion for acting,” he says. “Harold Hill gave me the chance to use the skills I had learned over the years in a more complete way.” Up until junior year, Nicky imagined he’d play football for an Ivy League school. But he realized his dream was to be an actor. So, like any nimble athlete, he pivoted. Now a freshman in the dramatic arts program at University of Southern California, Nicky says one of the things he’s proud of is the work he did mentoring younger


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HOLLAND FERGUSON Greenwich Academy

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s far back as she can remember, Holland Ferguson had an aptitude for science. As a kid she watched Animal Planet and Planet Blue with her family and played with dinosaur figurines instead of dolls and tiaras. “As nerdy as that sounds,” she says. But it wasn’t until she took a course at Cambridge University the summer before sophomore year that she discovered her real passion: aerospace engineering. The discovery was one of those weird meant-to-be moments. “Originally I wanted to take astrophysics,” she says. “But the course was full. So, I took a leap of faith and went for aerospace engineering. I absolutely loved it.” In hindsight, her affinity for engineering made sense. “I see it as a way of taking a problem and coming up with a tangible solution, which enables me as an individual to improve the lives of those around me.” Now a freshman at Stanford, she plans to study aerospace engineering and mechanical engineering, as well as immerse herself in the multitude of academic offerings available. While at GA, Holland launched the school’s first rocketry team to compete in The American Rocketry Challenge, the world’s largest student rocket contest, sponsored in part by NASA. They were on track to get a good enough score for the finals, but “the back of our rocket blew up,” she explains, chalking it up to a great learning experience. “No matter how many disappointments or

setbacks I’ve encountered, I will get up and be okay.” Case in point: Despite the fact that she was in high school, with no specific training, she managed to get hired for two internships at tech startups, both with ties to the aerospace industry. She also took a star turn on stage in every musical production from the time she was a freshman, and as a member of the Madrigals, the school’s elite honors choir. In recognition of her talent, Holland won a creative achievement award from the Greenwich Arts Council in 2019 based on the breadth of her theatrical and vocal work. As for her engineering skills, one of her best moments last year came about after the first meeting of an engineering club she organized for middle school students. “I remember after the first rocketry meeting, and one of the girl’s moms sent me an email that said, ‘I wanted to let you know my daughter came home and taught us basic aerodynamic principles at the dinner table.’ That was the best email I’ve ever received.”

How did you cope with lockdown and not having a traditional graduation? “I tried to focus on what’s really important. My family and I are so fortunate, and any sadness I felt toward missing something like a graduation ceremony is supplemented a hundred times over by my gratitude and joy that all of my loved ones are healthy and safe.” What would you tell your freshman self? “I’d tell her to put herself out there and try new things; you never know where they will lead.” Who has been your most impactful teacher? “This is a really hard decision, because GA and Brunswick have such amazing teachers, but the person who has been the most influential is my advisor Ms. Powers. She has always been so supportive of me, and I am so blessed to have had her as a mentor and friend for the past three years.” What’s the toughest challenge you have faced? “Probably my grandmother’s death. Despite her difficult upbringing and the many challenges she faced, she was one of the kindest, most generous and inspiring people I know. What was hardest, I think, was how suddenly we lost her and learning to deal with the sadness of losing a close family member for the first time.” STAGE PHOTO BY DAN BURNS; ALL OTHERS CONTRIBUTED

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08.

MAX PISACRETA Greenwich High School

during tryouts his junior year, with twenty-five kids returning, he bested them all, earning a spot on the varsity squad. Last year, as a senior, he received the ultimate affirmation of his skills when he was named captain. Under his leadership, the team reached the state finals for the first time in forty-one years. “No one expected us to do that,” he says. “It was pretty crazy. Even though we didn’t get the result we wanted, it was such an amazing experience and such an insane journey to get there.” When Max wasn’t playing for the High School, he competed in club soccer with FC Westchester (they

were New York State Champions in 2017) and internationally with Denali FC; during the summer of 2018 and 2019 he traveled to Sweden and Denmark to play in two of the largest youth soccer tournaments in the world. Now a freshman at UCONN Storrs, where he is a business major, the Greenwich native says he applied a lot of the skills that he developed in soccer to his academics. “Soccer has definitely made me a harder worker and a tougher person, too. I worked hard to play at the highest level and that carried over to my academics and schoolwork,” he says. He was a member of the National Honor Society and the Italian Honor Society, as well as percussionist in the Honors Band Program for the 2019 school year. Despite the many calls on his time, Max remained committed to giving back to the Boys and Girls Club, which played a huge role in his life from a young age. He worked his way up from being a club kid to eventually joining the Keystone Club. He also spent time as a counselor in training at Camp Simmons. These days Max devotes several hours a week to volunteering in the club’s learning center after school. “It’s nice to give back to the next generation of students,” he says, “especially since it’s where I would go when I was younger. It makes you feel like a better person, doing good for people around you.” »

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What would you tell your freshman self? “To keep working hard. To be more respectful to my teachers. I was always a good student and good kid. I’d always do things to make my peers laugh. My goal was to make my peers around me happier. But that could be a bad thing, because I would be disrespectful to my teachers who wanted the best for me.” Who has been your most impactful teacher? “My AP psychology teacher, Mr. Galatioto. We appreciated each other’s sense of humor. I looked forward to going to his class every day. I learned new aspects of psychology every single day. He understood me and my sense of humor, and we would coexist and work together to make a better environment.” What’s the biggest challenge you have faced? “The freshman soccer team. I knew I was better than a lot of the kids, but I wasn’t working hard in practice. I was one of the last kids off the bench that year. It was a hard time for me. I hated not playing but it inspired me to work even harder. I began training almost every day and would soon prove I was one of the best players in the program.”

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ax Pisacreta barely remembers a time when he wasn’t playing soccer—first as a toddler in the backyard with his dad, then with the town’s youth league, and finally with the town travel league, when in one of his first games he scored three goals. So, no one was more surprised than Max, when during his freshman year at GHS, he was one of the last players to come off the bench. “That was a bad experience for me,” he says. “It pushed me to work harder.” His efforts paid off. He made the JV team as a sophomore, and

How did you cope with lockdown and not having a traditional graduation? “I coped through communicating with friends through video games and family through FaceTime. I wish we’d had a [traditional] graduation. You can’t change it and can’t look back on it. You need to just look forward.”


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DANIELLA JONES Greenwich High School

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aniella Jones is both compassionate and driven; when she sees a problem or a challenge, she takes the initiative to fix it. She was just ten years old when she organized Carnival for a Cause in her backyard. The goal was to raise money for Abilis, which had provided much-needed support and resources to her family. “I have an older brother who is autistic and a younger brother who has cerebral palsy,” she explains. “As a kid, I always had a love of carnivals. That sparked my own idea of doing my own homemade carnival and raise money for something that’s close to our family’s heart.” Daniella raised $500 for Abilis that year. Since then, her efforts have increased tenfold. In 2019, Carnival for a Cause raised $20,000, bringing the grand total up to $50,000 over the past eight years. Daniella gives back to the community in a multitude of ways. As a freshman at Greenwich High School, she was invited to join the Abilis Youth Board; within two years she had been named president. “Our mission is to be really involved with the special needs community in each of the different towns we live in. And we try to get the special needs community involved with everyone.” She has volunteered for the Special Olympics golf

Live in each moment every day because that’s all there is. Moments. The good times and the bad will eventually all just be a memory, so choose what you want to remember.”

How did you cope with lockdown? Not having a traditional graduation? “The first month was tough trying to figure out a schedule for myself to follow every day. However, once I found it, there were no problems. Missing out on the best part of senior year was upsetting and made me angry at first, but after a while I realized there were thousands of seniors out there going through the same emotions I was and for that, each senior across the world has a connection. We were given a sense of a community, even when it felt like we’d lost everything. We had a social distance graduation, and although it only lasted five minutes, which is better than hours in the hot sun, I would’ve liked to see the people I’ve spent the last four years with graduate.”

Who has been your most impactful teacher? “My sophomore history teacher, Mr. Galatioto, because he was not just a teacher but someone I could talk to about anything. Even as the years went by, he was always a friendly face in the hallways. When I was having a rough day, he would take notice and pull me aside after class to see if I was okay, and he always gave me great advice. For that, I thank him very much.” What’s the toughest challenge you have faced? “I never really had a stable group of friends to lean on in high school. Nonetheless, it made me a stronger person and gave me time to find out what makes me happy instead of what makes others happy.”

What would you tell your freshman self? “High school seems like it lasts a lifetime; however, it is over before you are ready to say goodbye.

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program and the Arch Street Teen Center. Two years ago, Daniella organized a MistleTok meet and greet event featuring local TikTok stars Charli and Dixie D’Amelio and Mark Anastasio that raised more than $20,000 for the center. A member of the National Honor Society and two-time recipient of the Peter Bloomer Citizenship Award, Daniella also participated in Generation Impact an organization for girls to learn about charitable giving and philanthropy. Despite her busy schedule, the seventeen-year-old found time to channel her energy into athletics, where she was captain of the varsity softball team as well as a member of the Varsity Dance Team for three years in a row. “I’ve been dancing my entire life; as soon as I could walk there was a rhythm in my steps,” the Penn State University freshman says. “It’s how I express myself.” Still, Daniella was surprised when at the year-end sports banquet her sophomore year she received the Hip Hop MVP award. “I didn’t even know it was a thing,” she says. “I was just being myself and putting in the hard work.”

PORTRAIT BY LANCE SANCHEZ, CONTRIBUTED

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FOUNDED

1869 Not for Self, but for Service. - School motto

COLLEGE MATRICULATION The most popular matriculation choices for RCDS students 2016-2020 (number of students attending in parentheses):

Cornell University (34) University of Pennsylvania (27) Harvard University (19) New York University (17) Vanderbilt University (14) Brown University (13) Duke University (13) Georgetown University (13) University of Michigan (13) Washington Univ. in St. Louis (13) Northwestern University (12) University of Chicago (11)


10. ARJUN DAYAL

“Keep your love for STEM and pursue it with passion. Be creative and innovative to find solutions. Use your skills to enrich other people’s lives. Push yourself to learn about new cultures and understand different perspectives. There will be rough patches, but you will have to persevere and push through.”

Hackley School

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Who has been your most impactful teacher? “It’s very tough to choose one particular teacher because of all their impacts, but because of recent events, I would have to choose my advisor, Mr. Dioguardi. He took the initiative and reached out to me to see if he could help me in any way with manufacturing face shields. This selfless act he did has had a long lasting impact on me, and I hope I can be as selfless as him.”

producing face shields and masks at home; he donated his second batch, a large order, to White Plains Hospital in March (his first went to doctors at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan). In total, he has made and donated more than 2,100 face shields, with the remaining 250 to be sent to several hospitals in Connecticut, as well as to a Navajo reservation hospital in New Mexico. For as long as he can remember, Arjun has dreamed of becoming a doctor. In pursuit of that goal, while at Hackley he has already exhausted the STEM curriculum— taking every honors and AP class in math and science (except for one, AP physics, due to a scheduling conflict), as well as Spanish, a culture he admires. An avid Ping Pong player, app developer, and a varsity athlete in track and field and swimming, Arjun spent the past two summers conducting research at Columbia University’s Department of Bio-Medical Engineering. He

cites Elon Musk as a huge role model. “He was way before his time,” says Arjun. “His innovation pushed my motivation as well. When I grow up, I want to do robotic surgery. Bio or genetic engineering is the future. And I want to be at the forefront of that.”

How did you cope with lockdown? “I feel I coped pretty well. I kept myself busy with my PPE initiative and school, but I miss the face-to-face interactions with my friends and teachers. Not being able to interact on a daily basis with them left a void.” What would you tell your freshman self?

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What’s the toughest challenge you have faced? “I always push myself to do the best work I can, and I feel that only comes through taking the most difficult classes at school. In ninth grade and early tenth grade, I was surprised to not be achieving as high grades as I had hoped. I was convinced that I could do better without giving up the vigor in the classes I took. I did not want to be left behind by my peer group. So, I started spending many more hours outside of school, working on difficult problems, and then regularly meeting my teachers outside of class to get their guidance. This year, I took calculus AB/BC [the highest math course you can get into in eleventh grade], along with AP chemistry and cell bio, and saw the improvement. I learned that success can only come with preparation and taking the initiative outside of class.” G

PORTRAIT BY CLASSIC KIDS PHOTOGRAPHY

nventor, innovator, entrepreneur—at just seventeen, Arjun Dayal has already improved the lives of hundreds—if not thousands—of people in the U.S. and abroad, the majority of whom he’s never met. In ninth grade, he joined a private robotics club and learned to use a 3-D printer. Among the projects of which he is proud is a prosthetic arm he made and donated to a young girl he met at the Stamford Library. “When we finally gave it to her and I saw the joy on her face, it showed me that I can do what I enjoy and be rewarded for it at the same time,” he says. Sophomore year, a passion for teaching and STEM inspired him to launch KidsCode Corporation, through which he developed an intro to programming class that he brought to orphans and refugees at a school in Greece at the beginning of his junior year. Arjun started a similar program this summer with Union Settlement, a community service organization in Harlem. “I am excited to spread my love for STEM in my community,” the Hackley senior says. Arjun most recently used his scientific and engineering skills to help nurses and doctors at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. As he recalls, “I could see the problem, but I wasn’t sure as a student what I could do. I felt so helpless.” He read an article by a doctor at Mass General, urging people to use their 3-D printing skills to create PPE. For Arjun, that was a breakthrough moment. “Having the engineering skills is one thing, but being able to be creative, find a design, change it, test it and make sure healthcare professionals would be able to use it, that’s something else. That really pushed me.” Using his own 3-D printer, and with the help of his mother and his advisor at Hackley, Arjun launched Pegasus for COVID-19 and began


FOCUSED ON THE FUTURE Greenwich Academy is an independent college-preparatory day school for girls in pre-kindergarten through 12.

greenwichacademy.org/admission

Be Part Of The Solution. Help Close the Education Gap in Fairfield & New Haven Counties. A lot of us are wondering how we can really make a difference in education inequality. Shepherds empowers underserved local youth to build a foundation for success by providing a college-preparatory education at a non-public high school, academic and life skills, and the positive role model and support of a Shepherds Mentor. Be a part of the solution. Donate to Shepherds today.

CHANGING LIVES.... ONE STUDENT AT A TIME.

SHEPHERDSMENTORS.ORG/DONATE OR SCAN TO DONATE NOW! SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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2020

AL ASHION

by megan gagnon

FRESH-FROM-THE-RUNWAY IDEAS TO GUIDE US THROUGH A NEW SEASON

SEE BY CHLOÉ

Sheep key ring; $105. chloe.com

E

ven if you’re dressing up and staying in, we’ve gathered all the latest looks to get you out of your sweats and into something chic. (Don’t worry, luxe slippers are still in the mix.)


warm & fuzzy CURL UP WITH COZY SHEARLING FINDS

FRAME BLOOMINGDALE'S Shearling-trim leather gloves; $178. The SoNo Collection; bloomingdales .com

ISABEL MARANT

Radja shearling bucket bag; $1,190. isabelmarant.com

FASHION IMAGES COURTESY OF DESIGNERS/BRANDS

JOIE

Ambrosy coat; $448. Greenwich, Westport; joie.com

ROGER VIVIER

Hotel Vivier RV broche fur mule; $1,595. rogervivier.com

SAINT LAURENT LOEWE

Shearling oversized jacket; $4,700. loewe.com

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Double-breasted shearling trench coat; $6,890. ysl.com


JENNIFER BEHR

Bow-embellished velvet barrette; $150. jenniferbehr.com

GUCCI

Horsebit 1955 bucket bag; $1,790. gucci.com

HERMÈS

Women’s leather boot; $2,575. Greenwich; hermes.com

saddle up

ETRO

Gold-tone pegasus leather waist belt; $580. etro.com

RIDE INTO COOLER WEATHER WITH

EQUESTRIAN ELEMENTS

MICHAEL KORS SCHUTZ

Tennie pointed toe lace-up boot; $254.95. schutz-shoes.com

VICTORIA, VICTORIA BECKHAM

Ruffled poplin tie-neck top; $430. intermixonline.com

ALEXANDER WANG

Fitted shirt jacket with pointed collar; $750. shopbop.com greenwichmag.com

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LAPOINTE

BALENCIAGA

Mini city metal leather bag; $1,850. Neiman Marcus; neimanmarcus.com

ELIZABETH COLE

Gracelyn earrings; $98. elizabethcolejewelry.com

HOBBS

Haisley silk midi dress; $460. Greenwich; hobbs.com

true blue

WE'RE SEEING SOME CERULEAN IN YOUR FUTURE

VALENTINO GARAVANI

FASHION IMAGES COURTESY OF DESIGNERS/BRANDS

Vlogo signature leather belt; $525. valentino.com

MICHAEL KORS

ZARA

MK1075 Naples; $139. sunglasshut.com

Lapel blazer; $129. Greenwich; zara.com

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PARIS TEXAS

Croc-effect leather knee-high boots; $815. mytheresa.com


CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN

TS Croc flat; $1,595. us.christian louboutin.com

ALEXANDER McQUEEN

Croc-effect patent-leather ankle boots; $775. cettire.com

GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI

STUART WEITZMAN

The Allie bootie; $675. Greenwich; stuartweitzman.com

Nidir leather boot with metal buckle; $995. giuseppe zanotti.com

STELLA McCARTNEY

Emilie lug-sole Chelsea boots; $975. saks.com

JIMMY CHOO

Cruz 65 boot; $1,295. us.jimmychoo.com

ALLSAINTS

Donita combat boot; $397.95. Nordstrom, The SoNo Collection; nordstrom.com

heavy duty THESE BOOTS WERE MADE FOR ROCKING greenwichmag.com

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MONCLER

Hanya boot; $625. store.moncler.com


red alert

EUGENIA KIM

Harlowe wool hat; $295. eugeniakim.com

A.W.A.K.E. MODE

Asymmetric skirt with pleated detail; $651. awake-mode.com

CRIMSON HUES HAVE US STOPPING IN OUR TRACKS

REDVALENTINO

Wool-blend cape; $1,175. redvalentino.com

TOD'S

Burgundy leather timelessbag;Â $1,675. tods.com

L'AGENCE

Marsden red silk wrap blouse; $376. Mitchells, Westport; shop.mitchellstores.com

ADIDAS ORIGINALS

FASHION IMAGES COURTESY OF DESIGNERS/BRANDS

Gazelle sneakers; $95. luisaviaroma .com

THE ATTICO

Mafalda satin pumps; $630. net-a-porter.com

MONSE

Kidney bean wool cutout sweater; $890. monse.com

CAROLINA HERRERA

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shopping guide LOCAL

THINK FALL,

SHOP SMALL

N

ow that you’ve made a checklist of the must-have pieces to add to your closet, let us remind you of all the shopping opportunities right here in our towns—from family-owned department stores on the Post Road to boutiques that line our bustling main streets. Revisit the ones you love and discover the ones that are not on your radar (but should be). The only thing better than that freshoutfit feeling is knowing you’re supporting the businesses and people that make our communities great. greenwichmag.com

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WESTPORT & GREENWICH

MITCHELLS / RICHARDS GREENWICH DARIEN WESTPORT NEW CANAAN ROWAYTON FAIRFIELD

Westport’s first family of fashion has built their legacy and successful business model around unrivaled access to designer collections in an environment marked by exceptional service. Let one of their seasoned stylists help you navigate their sprawling spaces while trying not to get distracted by all the goodness beckoning from the jewelry cases and accessory walls.


WESTPORT

COTÉLAC With only seven U.S. locations, we're lucky to have a Cotélac nearby; giving us access to the layering pieces that say, “I just threw this together,” in a French accent, of course.

NEW CANAAN

TOGS It serves New Canaan’s stylish crowd for every occasion—from easy pieces for days when you’re running around town to complete looks for a night out at Elm.

WESTPORT

WEST Good vibes prevail at West, where Californiacool options sit among polished picks from designers like Smythe and Ulla Johnson.

GREENWICH

FAIRFIELD

PERFECT PROVENANCE

APRICOT LANE It’s not just for your college-aged daughter, although she might be stealing anything you bring home. It's a great spot to find the latest trends without emptying your bank account.

A rotating selection from harder-tofind European designers will have you feeling like you’ve stumbled on something truly special.

GREENWICH & WESTPORT

OLD GREENWICH & WESTPORT

FRED

PENFIELD BY ALEX TATYLOR; PERFECT PROVENANCE BY JULIE BIDWELL; IMAGES COURTESY OF STORES

GREAT STUFF

You could build your whole wardrobe here—and you'll want to—when you see the selection of dresses by Misa and LoveShackFancy, Rebecca Taylor tops and denim for every jean queen.

The name says it all. This old school boutique is stocked with the newest staples from designers like DVF and Nili Lotan.

WESTPORT

TINA DRAGONE Tina’s expert edit of clothing and accessories has made her a go-to since her start in 1983. With racks of L’Agence, Milly and Elie Tahari, it’s no wonder customers keep coming back.

FAIRFIELD

ROWAYTON

CHOU CHOU

PENFIELD COLLECTIVE

Katharine Sanford’s seaside spot is always worth checking out, whether you’re in the market for fabulous shoes, daytime dresses or customizable basics.

Vanessa Lewis is the perfect face for her sunny store. You’ll always be greeted with the smile—and plenty of style—in what we can only assume is a larger version of the owner’s own closet. G

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by timothy dumas

THE MAY 2019 DISAPPEARANCE OF NEW CANAAN MOM JENNIFER DULOS PAINTS A BROAD PICTURE OF WHAT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE—THE MOST HIGHLY REPORTED VIOLENT CRIME IN FAIRFIELD COUNTY—LOOKS LIKE RIGHT HERE IN OUR COMMUNITY greenwichmag.com

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CONTRIBUTED

#JUSTICEFORJENNIFER SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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I

n the fall of 2011 Jennifer Farber Dulos, a 43-year-old housewife with a masters degree in writing, started a blog about her life. We live in Connecticut, which is where I always wanted to live growing up. I am living my own personal dream for myself. Three boys, two girls, a loving husband whom I adore. It’s all here, right now. For 20 months Jennifer chronicled her perfect-seeming family: Fotis, her Greek husband, bright and athletic, the owner of a luxury home building business, and the beautiful children they’d had in quick succession: twin boys in 2006, a twin boy and girl in 2008, and another girl in 2010. Was there a worm

in the apple? Not that she mentions; just the mundane dissatisfactions of suburban living. My to-do list grew beyond anything—you should see it now, like some endless sock that someone keeps knitting and knitting and knitting. Between the chauffeuring and the meal-making and the interminable laundry, Jennifer laments that she has little time to enjoy her children. Or her husband. As the family moves to a brick mansion that Fotis built at 4 Jefferson Crossing in Farmington, she writes, I do wish for one moment though, in this new house, with Fotis—alone. After the kids have gone to bed, to pop some champagne, even if I don’t drink more than a thimble-full of anything nowadays, to toast to this new structure, to our family, to this fresh and lovely start. To commune with my husband, really. Jennifer titled her blog, with a hint of premonition, “And Five Makes Seven: A mother of five in Connecticut writes to her children as a way of capturing this moment in time.” In somber retrospect, we see that what Jennifer captured for her children were memories of life when life was good—days of family happiness before she fled the brick mansion for a rented house in New Canaan; before the ugly, drawn-out divorce proceedings; before she went missing and Fotis stood accused of her murder; and before Fotis took his own life, protesting his innocence to the bitter end.

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The story of Jennifer and Fotis also tells a broader story, one largely hidden from view, about the ways and workings of domestic violence in America. While the Dulos case offers an extraordinary view of the problem given its Shakespeare-in-the-suburbs texture, it appears to fit a depressingly classic pattern: that of the marriage gone bad escalating to emotional terrorism and all-out violence. We pick up Jennifer’s words in 2017, as she beseeches the court for full custody of the children: I am afraid of my husband. I know that filing for divorce, and filing this motion will enrage him. I know he will retaliate by trying to harm me in some way. Two years later, at age 50, she was gone. Investigators believe Fotis ambushed Jennifer at her New Canaan home on the morning of May 24, 2019 as she returned from dropping the kids off at New Canaan Country School. They found the garage floor, as well as the Range Rover parked in the middle bay, smeared and spattered with her blood. They found partial bloody shoe prints. And though there was an attempt to clean up the scene, they found a red smudge on the kitchen sink faucet, containing a mixture of Jennifer’s blood and Fotis’s DNA—a fact all the more troubling because Fotis was not permitted inside the large gabled house at 69 Welles Lane. An hour after the attack and cleanup, the kids’ nanny, Lauren Almeida, arrived at the house to discover a series of small but ominous clues. Jennifer’s Chevy Suburban was gone, but her handbag was still there, sitting on the floor—strange, because Almeida knew Jennifer had a morning appointment in the city. In the pantry someone had looted the supply of paper towels Almeida had stored there the night before—only two rolls of a twelve-pack remained. What kind of spill required ten rolls of paper towels? When Almeida tried in vain to reach Jennifer, “my stomach sank,” she told police. “In the almost seven years that I have worked for Jennifer I never, ever had a hard time reaching her.” And when she learned Jennifer had failed to show for her children’s orthodontist appointments

that afternoon, “my first thought was that Fotis did something.” Though Fotis enjoyed the presumption of innocence—legally if not popularly— one wonders how he’d have explained away the mountain of evidence gathered against him. Our brave new world of ubiquitous surveillance played a critical role in tracking his movements on the day of Jennifer’s killing. To begin with Fotis borrowed, without permission, a Toyota Tacoma pickup truck belonging to Pawel Gumienny, the project manager of Fotis’s building company, Fore Group Inc. Cameras at rest stops and on school buses show the red Tacoma making its way to New Canaan on the morning of May 24 and returning to Farmington in the afternoon. In between, various cameras spy the Tacoma parked on Lapham Road by Waveny Park, and a man believed to be Fotis, wearing a dark hoodie, riding a vintage ten-speed bicycle up Weed Street in the direction of Welles Lane. A home security camera, meanwhile, glimpses Jennifer cruising up Welles at 8:05 a.m., toward her imminent death; the same camera shows her Suburban leaving the house at 10:25, presumably with Fotis at the wheel and Jennifer’s body in the back. (That evening the Suburban was discovered abandoned on Lapham Road, with blood inside, near where the Tacoma was parked that morning.) The Tacoma is next seen as it passes the New Canaan rest stop on its way out of town, the camera catching a filigreed shape in the truck bed: the wheel of a bicycle. Those who would discount this evidence because Fotis is not definitively sighted in New Canaan must consider the following: That night, yet more surveillance cameras catch Fotis, with his girlfriend, Michelle Troconis, tossing garbage bags into receptacles along Albany Avenue in Hartford. When investigators recovered the bags, they found an assortment of items stained with Jennifer’s blood—her Vineyard Vines T-shirt, her bra, a bath towel, a sponge, a mop handle, gloves, paper towels, four zip-ties, and two clear rain ponchos. (State police were unable SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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which itself has that many), plus several more brutal assaults on intimate partners. Even peaceable New Canaan has its pre-Dulos horror stories. In 2010 John Michael Farren, deputy White House counsel in the George W. Bush administration, battered his wife with a flashlight, breaking bones in her cheek and jaw. (He’s serving fifteen years for attempted murder.) Last year in Fairfield, James Taylor killed his ex-wife with a .22 rifle shot to the head. (Like Fotis Dulos, he committed suicide while out on bail.) In 2013, at a mansion on Round Hill Road in Greenwich, Michael DeMaio bludgeoned his wife nearly to death with a baseball bat. (He’s serving eight years.) More diabolical yet is the 2009 case of Adam Dobrzanski, a live-in landscaper on a Greenwich estate who fatally slashed the throat of his 20-year-old daughter in order to spite his wife. Why? She was leaving him. Murder is only the grimmest metric of our domestic violence problem. Other statistics suggest an epidemic. According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, 20 people per minute are physically abused by an intimate partner in the United States, or 10 million people a year. More than 20,000 phone calls are placed to domestic violence hotlines every day. One in 4 women has been a victim of severe physical violence by an intimate partner in her lifetime, and 1 in 10 has been raped. While there’s a growing awareness that men, too, suffer domestic violence, they are overwhelmingly the perpetrators: 85 percent of offenders are male. Nearly half the women murdered in America are murdered by a current or former intimate partner, and for every such killing, nine more are nearly killed. Victims who endure the subtler forms of domestic abuse— mocking, belittling, intimidation, coercion— may go unrecorded in crime statistics, though these abuses can devastate the spirit. In ways large and small, the most dangerous place for a woman is in the home. Our fair towns do not inoculate us from domestic violence. In Greenwich, domestic violence crimes are the most frequently reported of all violent crimes, and this pattern

THE BIG PICTURE If Fotis murdered Jennifer as charged, then she must be counted among the 1,200 women (and 300 men) killed annually by an intimate partner in these United States. Such cases are not all that rare in Fairfield County. There are roughly two a year (not counting Bridgeport, greenwichmag.com

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to retrieve everything Fotis dumped along Albany Avenue. But according to the Hartford Courant, a homeless man found a bloodsoaked pillow and a knife in one trash can, and traded the knife to another homeless man for a $5 piece of crack.) Norman Pattis, Fotis’s defense attorney, professed to be unconcerned by the evidence. “If this is all the state’s got, we wonder why it bothered,” he said in January, after Fotis was charged with murder. Troconis and Kent Mawhinney, a lawyer and close friend of Fotis Dulos who lives in South Windsor, were also arrested, on charges of conspiring to commit murder. (Last year, separately, Mawhinney was accused of raping his estranged wife and violating a protective order; those cases are still pending.) Mawhinney’s arrest warrant raises the suspicion, based on cell phone records, that he had something to do with a grave-sized hole discovered at the Windsor Rod & Gun Club in East Granby on May 18, 2019, the week before Jennifer went missing. The hole was concealed with barbecue grates and leaves, and contained two unopened bags of lime. Lime is sometimes used in clandestine burials to reduce the odor of decomposition. Through the summer of 2019, Fotis peddled the odd notion that Jennifer was still alive somewhere—her body was never found. Norm Pattis went further, suggesting that she’d framed her husband for murder in the manner of the Gillian Flynn novel Gone Girl. (He also advanced the contradictory theory that she might have committed suicide as an act of revenge.) But Dr. James Gill, Connecticut’s chief medical examiner, noted that without immediate medical help, Jennifer could not have survived her grievous wounds.


holds for New Canaan, Darien, Westport, and indeed all of Fairfield County save the urban centers of Bridgeport and Stamford. But these crimes, ranging from threatening to hitting to rape, are also thought to be the most underreported ones. “We only see the tip of the iceberg here at the PD,” says Sgt. Brent Reeves of the Greenwich Police Department’s Special Victims Section. Even so, GPD works 250 to 300 cases a year. What Reeves calls “the services streams” see much more of the iceberg, because a victim can go to them confidentially, without setting the legal wheels in motion. “Once the judicial process gets rolling, it’s a steamroller, it doesn’t stop,” says Reeves. “I think that’s why people are a little afraid of the system.” The Greenwich YWCA’s Domestic Abuse Services provided counseling and other services to 833 victims last fiscal year, including 242 who simply walked in the door. The Domestic Violence Crisis Center, or DVCC, which covers Stamford, Norwalk, Westport, New Canaan, Darien, Wilton and Weston, served nearly 5,000 victims during the same period. And the Center for Family Justice, covering Fairfield, Bridgeport, Easton, Monroe, Stratford and Trumbull, served nearly 4,000. Together, these three entities fielded roughly 10,000 crisis calls, and their safe houses protected nearly 500 people. A good chunk of the iceberg is seen neither by police nor by advocates. Rachel Louise Snyder, author of No Visible Bruises: What We Don’t Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us—a widely praised book published last year—tells us the stigma of intimate partner violence is especially keen among the privileged, who set great store by privacy and tact. “And that means they kind of endure this alone, and their children endure it alone.” That brings to mind a story Brent Reeves told us. Once, he responded to a “DV” at an opulent backcountry home, but found the abused wife wanted nothing to do with him. Reeves asked why she declined help when her situation was obviously so dangerous. She replied, “Cost of doing business.” “The trouble is, we don’t talk about

“[THE CHILDREN] ARE PHYSICALLY AND EMOTIONALLY EXHAUSTED... WE ARE ALL TERRIFIED TO DISOBEY MY HUSBAND.” —jennifer dulos, in court filings

this,” Rachel Louise Snyder continues. “We talk openly about other social issues— homelessness, mass incarceration, gender inequality.” What surprised Snyder most during her decade of research was the way domestic violence intersected with those other social problems. “Eighty percent of incarcerated men were child victims or witnesses of domestic violence. For women, that number goes up to 92 percent when you include sexual abuse. It’s the leading cause of homelessness for women in this country. Over half the mass shootings in this country are domestic violence homicides, they’re just not framed that way. You want to address social issues en masse in this country? Start with domestic violence.”

RED FLAGS Jennifer Farber Dulos would have turned 52 in September; she was raised in Brooklyn Heights, the daughter of the late Hilliard Farber, a Wall Street banker and brokerage house founder, and Gloria Ortenberg Farber, a lifelong educator whose family cofounded Liz Claiborne Inc., the apparel giant. Though the Farbers were wealthy, they weren’t flashy: “They were understated, and tended to donate SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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to educational causes,” says Jennifer’s friend Carrie Luft. “They were not ‘social diary’ kinds of people.” Jennifer had luxuriant brown hair, high cheekbones and a broad, bright smile. “She was an incredibly sensitive and perceptive person,” says Luft, who met Jennifer in 1990, when both were aspiring writers in New York. “She was soft-spoken. She was gracious and kind. She was the most conscientious, responsible, thoughtful person I’ve ever known.” A Connecticut friend of Jennifer’s who wishes to go unnamed says, “She was quiet. And very sweet. She could be sassy, but kind of a sweet sassy.” This friend says that she too was a victim of domestic violence, and that she and Jennifer recognized their sad kinship without discussing it openly. “Women who are victims of domestic violence are afraid to speak. We have to be careful, because if we speak up, or attempt to protect our children, we will be harmed in some way.” Fotis Dulos, 52 when he died in January, was born in Istanbul and raised in Athens. A lifelong waterskiing buff, his Facebook page was replete with flattering photos of himself on the water, like a modern-day Narcissus. He was handsome, certainly, with square, neat features, watchful dark eyes, and a smallish, wellproportioned physique. In TV interviews he sat for after Jennifer went missing, he projected a charisma—“charm” is too warm a word—that might incline one to believe him if the evidence weren’t so damning. “We’re all very worried about Jennifer,” Fotis told WNBC’s Sarah Wallace last July. But his manner is so composed, so nearly detached, as to arouse suspicion. And sure enough he makes a narcissistic stumble: “Somebody has to look at who is the worst affected in this situation,” he says. “And you’re saying that’s you?” asks Wallace. “Yes,” Fotis replies. Both Jennifer and Fotis graduated from Brown University—he in 1989, she in 1990— and both went on to earn masters degrees—he in finance from Columbia Business School, she in dramatic writing from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. They were friendly


at Brown but traveled in different circles. Fotis married another Brown alumna first, in 2000, but in 2003 he encountered Jennifer by chance at an airport in Aspen. And serendipity cast its spell, she would write. We had a special chemistry together, always… One month after Fotis’s first marriage ended, in July 2004, he wed Jennifer in the living room of her parents’ home. (A large celebration followed at the Metropolitan Club, courtesy of Hilliard Farber.) Jennifer was then nearly 36 and eager to start a family; one can imagine her thinking that Fotis came along not a moment too soon. Jennifer’s friends were cautiously supportive. “It happened very, very fast and that seemed out of character for Jennifer,” says Carrie Luft. “Jennifer’s very measured. She’s not a rash, impulsive person. She’s pretty much anti-impulsive.” Fotis was perhaps even more zealous to marry, and here we’re reminded that rushed courtships (in combination with other behaviors) are a classic precursor of domestic abuse. Certainly, there were signs. Fotis had told Jennifer he was divorced when he was merely separated, hinting at the schemer in him. “Jennifer found out he’d lied, and that was concerning, but I think she felt she was too deeply committed,” Luft says. And he had a temper. Even before they married Fotis had a disturbing episode of rage, Jennifer told a friend whom we agreed not to name. “He ranted at her for about ten minutes without allowing her to get a word in edgewise. I can’t even remember what it was, it was so insignificant. Something very small. He just laid into her verbally, cutting down her character: ‘You’re a terrible person! How dare you do this!’ To me, there was a warning sign in that. That’s usually just the tip of the iceberg, right?” In Jennifer’s blog Fotis is a sketchy presence, slipping in and out of the scene. He is on the move. And I get his need for speed, movement, business, action. The two do not seem terribly compatible—the contemplative writer and the cocky sportsman. She mentions a video message Fotis has sent from Greece in which he blurts, “I love my Jennie!” Then he makes some bizarre faces and grunts. Not the most romantic, but I suppose it will have to do. At

“[FOTIS] ENJOYED SCARING PEOPLE... WE MADE A PACT THAT WE WOULD NEVER RIDE IN A CAR WITH THAT MAN AGAIN. ” —carrie luft, friend of jennifer dulos

another point, they go out to see a Quentin Tarantino movie. Ugh. I kept on leaving to get air, sanity, a break from the blood-letting. Fotis was in his own particular brand of heaven. But while spending a night away from the family, she writes, I want to be home, warm with my husband. My sleeping children. The cats and dog. If Jennifer makes one thing clear in her writing, it’s that she cherishes above all else the cozy cocoon of family. Fotis presents an alternative picture. “She’s up in her writer’s studio. She has absolutely nothing to do with the kids,” he said during the divorce proceedings, a lie calculated to hurt Jennifer, her friends say. After her disappearance Fotis told a Greek magazine, “My marriage has not been so happy since 2010. Jennifer gradually began to take me out of her life and became increasingly distant, a hermit. I tried hard to reach out and understand what was happening, but it never felt better. I’m sorry to say it, but Jennifer was suffering from serious psychological problems…” This too seems dishonest. It was Fotis who was always “on the move,” far from home, and Jennifer who longed for closeness. What’s more, Fotis traveled not for business, but for pleasure, to waterski in competitions at far-flung resorts. “He was frequently absent,” the longtime friend says. “I think she was often very lonely in the marriage. He’d post photos

of himself with attractive waterskiing women. But Jennifer was a mature, understanding person, and did not want to be unreasonably suspicious of a husband who was an athlete.” Jennifer did suffer from moderate depression—not “serious psychological problems”—for which she took prescribed medication. Fotis’s absenteeism was a likely contributor to her depression; so was his volatile demeanor, careening from flattering to dictatorial, and darkening into sheer, abusive anger. Jennifer would say in court papers that his anger extended to the children, whom he drove hard to excel at waterskiing. One day, she said, Fotis smashed a ski against a rock when a son refused to train. “They are physically and emotionally exhausted and have begged me to do something about it,” Jennifer said. “We are all terrified to disobey my husband.” Carrie Luft and her husband would come out from New York and socialize with the Duloses, but even in that relaxed setting they noticed red flags. “We experienced early on that Fotis drove like an absolute maniac,” Luft says. “He enjoyed scaring people. We were definitely not hothouse orchids, but we made a pact that we would never ride in a car with that man again. It was terrifying—wrong side of the road, crazy, breakneck speeds on winding Connecticut roads. Just unnecessarily show-offy and disturbing.” Carrie took note of Jennifer’s reaction. “She was in the passenger seat and could only laugh softly. Obviously, she was afraid to say anything to him. It spoke volumes that she couldn’t intervene and was embarrassed about it afterward.”

IT’S OVER Fotis built the Fore Group upon Farber largesse. Between 2004 and April 2016, he borrowed $10 million from Hilliard Farber, and at Fotis’s death he owed Hillard’s estate $2.5 million, a sum he contested by calling a “gift.” “I think Fotis truly had designs on their money from the get-go,” the longtime friend says. “He behaved like a complete parasite.” Despite his dependence on their fortune, Fotis did not always treat the


CONTRIBUTED

Farbers very well. “I think they ended up being held hostage, in a way. If they denied him money, they were afraid he would take it out on Jennifer.” To this friend’s knowledge, Fotis never physically assaulted Jennifer while they lived together, and Jennifer said as much in court. (Though nanny Lauren Almeida recounted an episode in which Fotis chased Jennifer through the house and banged forcefully on a bedroom door as Jennifer braced herself against it; he stopped only when he realized that Almeida and one of the children were present.) But domestic violence isn’t only about bruises and breaks. It’s also about degradation and toxic criticism; about threats; about destructive lies and isolation from family and friends; about harassment, coercion and manipulation; about financial and legal abuse. In other words, the “violence” can be soul-deep as well as bone-deep. “Emotional abuse can be far more effective” as a means of control, Rachel Louise Snyder observes, “because what it does is build a wall inside the victim’s own head. As it says in my book, they are ‘passive hostages.’” We don’t know when Fotis’s infidelity dawned on Jennifer, but she suspected it long before Michelle Troconis came along. “She was very frightened to confront Fotis about it, and did not know quite what she would do if it were affirmed,” says the longtime friend. “She had five children and very much wanted them to grow up in an intact family.” Her suspicion about Michelle ran deeper than prior hunches, perhaps because the Florida brunette who figured so prominently in Fotis’s social media had resettled in Connecticut. Fotis owned up to the affair in March of 2017. “Then, about a month later, Jennifer got confirmation of a whole bunch of other women,” her friend says. “People who’d been overseas with Fotis had seen him with other women on his arm.” For Jennifer the dam had crumbled; the marriage was over. Fotis did not dispute her assessment, but he resisted Jennifer’s pleas to have a peaceable break mediated. Instead he proposed—decreed, really—an arrangement that can only be seen as cruel: Michelle and her daughter would move into 4 Jefferson

Crossing, and Jennifer and the kids would live there, too, on weekends and in the summer, all under one roof. Jennifer’s friend says, “I think Fotis thought, because he believes he’s the only person who matters and other people are either there to serve him or get out of the way, ‘So you’re nothing; you don’t matter; you and the children can just live here and I’ll live here with Michelle, and I’ll just keep taking your family’s money.” (Hill Farber died in January 2017; one doubts Fotis would have proposed so brazen a plan if he were still alive.) “Essentially,” Jennifer said in court papers, “he expects to continue to exhibit complete control over me and the children.” During these tumultuous months—the spring of 2017—Jennifer began to sense something chilling in Fotis’s scheming. “She was frightened in terms of what would become of her,” says her longtime friend. “He obviously wanted to replace her. Then she found out that he had acquired a gun—even though they, as parents, had said they never wanted to have a firearm in the house. That frightened her even more.” Jennifer demanded that Fotis get rid of the gun, but he refused, citing a sudden desire for “protection.” (According to a study published in American Journal of Public Health, the presence of a firearm in an abusive relationship boosts the risk of homicide by 500 percent.) Events came to a head on May 30, 2017. Fotis handed Jennifer a custody schedule that would give him the children for almost the entire summer. When she balked, “he became enraged with me, that I wasn’t just agreeing to all this,” she testified in family court. She said Fotis then threatened to kidnap the children and abscond to Greece. “I knew in that moment when he made that threat, I knew I had to get us out of there,” Jennifer told the court. Her departure from 4 Jefferson Crossing, on June 19, 2017, was not a move, but an escape. An abused woman is in greatest peril around the time she tries to leave. “To understand intimate partner violence, we have to understand that it’s about power and it’s about control,” says Meredith Gold, director of abuse services at the Greenwich YWCA. “Any time SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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PRIVATE MATTERS In the dark ages of domestic violence, as recently as the 1980’s, incidents of abuse were deemed “private matters.” The issue was poorly understood. Domestic violence was also, in its peculiar way, embarrassing, since it signified to many people a personal failure—on the part of the abused person. The late feminist writer Andrea Dworkin said of her first, brutally abusive, marriage, “I had been told by everyone I asked for help the many times I tried to escape— strangers and friends—that he would not be hitting me if I didn’t like it or want it.” (Brent Reeves says victim-blaming is still very much with us. “Friends and family can turn on the victim and start to ask what we in the business call the ‘why’ questions: ‘Why did you have to call the police?’ ‘Why can’t you just leave?’”) The new century brought to light compelling research, and bit by bit that research filtered down to advocacy groups, counselors, police departments and lawmakers. No research was more important than that of Dr. Jacquelyn Campbell. A professor at The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing and a registered nurse herself, Campbell identified abusive behaviors that, in various combinations, put victims at risk of being killed or badly hurt by an intimate partner, and fashioned them into a list of questions called the Danger Assessment tool. Does he control most or all of your daily activities? Is he morbidly jealous? Does he own a gun? Does he spy on you? Has he ever forced you to have sex? Threatened to kill you? Tried to choke you? (There’s a potent literature around strangulation; choking should be seen as the gravest of warning signs.) Some risk signifiers are less obvious: Is the abuser unemployed? Are there children in the household who are not the abuser’s own? Victims then list incidents of abuse on a calendar, the better to gauge escalation. Often they don’t realize the abuser has escalated until they see it plotted on the calendar in black and white. A certified assessor can then determine a victim’s level of danger. Which is to say, domestic violence homicides are in some measure predictable. “That blew

CONTRIBUTED

a victim is trying to take back a little bit of control, there’s going to be an escalation. Most of the tragedies we hear about, the headlines about women who’ve been killed, the incident happened very soon after she filed for divorce, or moved out of the house, or filed for a restraining order.” Each case mentioned earlier fits just this pattern. J. Michael Farren’s wife, Mary, had served him divorce papers two days before he strangled her and pummeled her with a metal flashlight. James Taylor’s ex-wife, Catherine, had moved off his property on a Friday and was murdered that Sunday. Michael DeMaio’s wife, Diane, had served papers two weeks before he came at her with a baseball bat. Adam Dobrzanski’s wife, Renata, fed up with her husband’s emotional abuse, had filed for divorce two weeks before he killed their daughter. “I tell people all the time, if you’re in an abusive relationship to start with, and now you’re in the divorce process— and you’re living in the same household—that’s the hot zone,” Brent Reeves says. “Something is destined to happen.” It seems that Jennifer intuited exactly this. She believed Fotis would never allow her to leave on her own terms—at least once, he’d turned away her moving crew—and so she planned her escape carefully, in secret. “She was scared. She was absolutely scared,” Gina Bunch, co-owner of Daley Moving & Storage, told Fox 61 in Hartford. Jennifer instructed the Daley crew to show up in an unmarked truck and in regular clothes in case Fotis returned early from an out-of-town waterskiing competition. She and Lauren Almeida then piled the kids into her Range Rover and set off for Gloria Farber’s place in Manhattan. The following day, June 20, Jennifer filed for divorce and for an emergency custody order. In court papers, she describes Fotis as “irrational, unsafe, bullying, threatening and controlling”— an emotional abuser’s constellation of bad behaviors. “I am terrified for my family’s safety, especially since discovering the gun,” she said. “He is dangerous and ruthless when he believes that he has been wronged.” On June 21, Fotis was obliged to turn his un-permitted gun over to the Farmington police.


me away,” says Rachel Louise Snyder. “What’s that Tom Cruise movie where he predicts future crimes and stops them? Minority Report. I can’t even tell you how many people referenced that movie when I was working on this book.” Dr. Campbell’s startling findings are now used jointly by police and domestic abuse clinics as the “Lethality Assessment Program.” Five Connecticut towns, Greenwich among them, piloted LAP in 2012; now it’s state-wide, in every municipality. “LAP has really allowed us to work collaboratively with law-enforcement,” says Ann Rodwell-Lawton, director of programming and quality assurance for the Stamford-based DVCC. “Law-enforcement often would leave the scene feeling like they didn’t do enough. Now, with this program, if someone screens at high risk, police are required to connect that victim to an advocate in real-time, before they leave the scene.” The advocate then develops a safety plan with the victim, who could otherwise be imperiled all over again when her abuser makes bail. Family court is one realm where domestic violence is not given its vital due. Judges shunt aside claims of abuse in the interest of what they see as the primary goal—keeping both divorcing parents in children’s lives. In a landmark study on domestic abuse and custody battles, Joan S. Meier, a professor of clinical law at George Washington Law School in Washington, D.C., found that judges usually do not “credit” claims of intimate partner violence, and almost never credit claims of child sexual abuse. (This flies in the face of conventional thought, which holds that a mother need only cry abuse to “win.”) The upshot can be alarming: In judges’ desire for a co-parenting outcome, thousands of children each year are delivered into the unsupervised care of an abusive parent, usually the man. “Unfortunately, the moment someone raises domestic violence in the context of family court, the court views it as a mechanism for that person to try to get a leg-up,” says Karen Jarmoc, who heads the Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence, or CCADV. “It’s incredibly discouraging.” Equally discouraging is the fact that abusers

“SHE TOLD PEOPLE SHE WAS SCARED... THAT’S ALL WE NEED TO KNOW.” —rachel louise snyder, author

excel at being believed. Far from coming off as misfits or psychos, they’re usually solid citizens, articulate and even charming. Think of Rob Porter, the White House Staff Secretary forced to resign in 2018 after both of his ex-wives’ claims of abuse came to light. “The average abusive person, he’s two different people—the Jekyll and Hyde syndrome,” says Suzanne Adam, executive director of DVCC. “They could be a coach, a congressman, a mayor, a salesman.” Mary Lee A. Kiernan, president and chief executive of YWCA Greenwich, adds, “They can be perfectly pleasant and agreeable in the workplace and go home and be a monster.” Meredith Gold, director of domestic abuse services at YWCA Greenwich, asks us to picture the abuser and the abused at a parent-teacher conference. “The abuser is the one who is very much in control, who has got it together, who’s slick and cool,” she says. “And his wife might be acting flaky or flighty or inconsistent. We know that behavior is a direct result of trauma.” Judge Thomas Colin denied Jennifer’s bid for emergency custody. While the judge clearly grasped Fotis’s domineering nature, he was unconvinced that the children were at risk of physical or psychological harm. No doubt Jennifer’s admission that Fotis wasn’t a hitter factored in Colin’s ruling. “The court is hopeful that once things settle down and cooler heads prevail, these extremely well educated and accomplished parents will be able to reach an agreement,” he said. Alas, Colin did not credit Jennifer’s unambiguously stated terror. “She SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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told people she was scared,” says Rachel Louise Snyder. “That’s all we need to know.” From a judge’s point of view, though, the Dulos case may have looked like just another high-conflict Connecticut divorce in which the parties bleed each other dry. Karen Jarmoc stresses that family court judges should be better versed in detecting signs of abuse. “Domestic violence is not, on its face, always easy to view,” she says. “It’s important to understand how the offender uses a series of strategies to manipulate, harass, intimidate and threaten their partner.” Brent Reeves of the Greenwich Police Department illustrates what she means. “I’ve arrested people for sending a smiley face emoji,” he says, referring to a case in which the offender had a “no contact” protective order against him. “That smiley face is a felony—and it’s only an emoji. What I train the officers is, it’s not the action, it’s what the action represents. That action represents to the victim that the offender can reach out to her at any time, regardless of the police, regardless of the judge, regardless of the process. They don’t care. After years of abuse, think of the fear that that smiley face emoji instills in the victim when she gets it at two o’clock in the morning.” In Fotis’s case, the intimidation was not so subtle. Days after Jennifer was denied emergency custody, Lauren Almeida found her crying in the driveway of the first of her two New Canaan rental homes, on Chichester Lane. Fotis had just been there, she said; he’d driven up in his S.U.V. and accelerated at Jennifer, who leapt out of the way as the children watched. “You’re insane,” Fotis reportedly told her. “You should be locked away. Why don’t you pop another pill?” He reportedly added, “I can do whatever I want. You don’t have a restraining order.”

HE’S COME UNDONE As the divorce case progressed, things started going badly for Fotis. To begin with, the ravenous machinery of divorce—lawyers, psychologists, family therapists, guardians ad litem, custody monitors, forensic auditors— required Fotis to shell out hundreds of


thousands of dollars. Beyond that, however, he had only himself to blame. In flagrant violation of Judge Colin’s order that the children not be exposed to romantic partners, Fotis let them spend time with Michelle and her daughter, who were now ensconced at 4 Jefferson Crossing. Then he coached the children to lie about it to a court-appointed psychologist. Colin had returned to private practice, so it fell to Judge Donna Heller to throw the book at Fotis. On March 1, 2018, she suspended his visitation rights and awarded sole physical custody to Jennifer. Heller said Fotis “does not seem to appreciate in any respect the consequences of lying under oath and willfully violating a court order. His facility in testifying falsely to the court suggests that he is equally comfortable in encouraging the children to lie to achieve his desired outcome.” Though the file is publicly available, some of it remains under seal, so we may never know the reason why Heller added: “[T]here is an immediate and present risk of psychological harm to the children if they have unrestricted and unsupervised contact with the defendant, as well as a risk of physical danger.” Thus we find a man accustomed to total control reduced to helplessness by the court. Fotis proceeded to act as though he was the persecuted one. “He’s always the victim,” says Jennifer’s longtime friend. “He’s never at fault. He believes he’s great and has done everything right and everybody is just against him.” Sure enough, Fotis asserted that it was actually Jennifer who would say the disparaging, threatening things. She’s supposed to have told the children, “I can have the Mafia break your dad’s legs with a baseball bat.” But Heller said the evidence suggested that Fotis had invented the charge and pressured the children to repeat it. (Abusers are not always so readily caught out. In fact, Karen Jarmoc says, family court often constitutes a new arena for domestic abuse— “legal abuse”—accomplished with a storm of motions, “dragging someone back into court again and again.” Fotis, as it happens, out-filed Jennifer by about two to one.) Finding himself undone in Heller’s courtroom, Fotis slyly endeavored to get her disqualified from the case. At some point in

WE’VE COME A LONG WAY, BUT… Connecticut holds a historic place in the annals of domestic violence

then did the police arrest him. Tracey survived, and won a $2.3 million judgment against the Torrington Police Department. “From that moment on, Connecticut took domestic violence very seriously,” says Suzanne Adam, executive director of the Stamford-based Domestic Violence Crisis Center. Thurman’s case gave rise to the Family Violence Prevention and Response Act of 1986, also known as the Thurman Law, which requires police to make an arrest when confronted with domestic violence. Before that, police would ask a victim if she wanted to press charges—and she might well be too afraid to do so. Also, an arrested abuser must now be arraigned the next day, so that a judge can

O

quickly put into place an order

from her estranged husband,

both parties when each pointed

Charles “Buck” Thurman, as

a finger at the other. This had

the Torrington police officer

the effect of re-punishing the

she’d summoned waited in

abused person and dissuading

his car across the street. Buck

her from ever calling the police

slashed Tracey’s cheek with

again—and Connecticut had

a knife, stabbed her in the

the highest “dual arrest” rate

neck, then threw her down

in the country. (Dual arrests

and stabbed her twelve more

also took mothers away from

times. Finally the officer

their children, temporarily but

entered the yard and got Buck

traumatically.) In 2018 the state

to give him the knife. But he

passed its dominant aggressor

made no arrest. He stood by

law, requiring police to “figure

as Buck kicked Tracey in the

out who the bad guy is, and

head and broke her neck. As

only arrest the bad guy,” as Sgt.

paramedics loaded Tracey into

Brent Reeves of Greenwich

the ambulance, Buck made yet

Police Department’s Special

another run at her—and only

Victims Section puts it. The law,

n June 10, 1983, Tracey

greenwichmag.com

110

of protection. State law continues to evolve.

Thurman

After 1986, domestic violence

received one

arrests rose dramatically, but

last beating

police were obligated to arrest


applauded by police, advocates

domestic violence in all its

notes that Ireland voted to

send them anywhere,” Rachel

and victims alike, went into

shades, and the Connecticut

do so in 2018. Its Domestic

Louise Snyder tells us. “It’s just

effect on January 1, 2019.

Coalition Against Domestic

Violence Act 2018 criminalizes

a complete misread of what the

Violence has proposed

psychological and emotional

psychological underpinnings

violence are often linked, but

legislation to create one. If

abuse, or “coercive control,”

are. You can quote me on that

Connecticut’s family court

judges could confidently

recognizing “that the effect

twice.”)

system is ill-equipped to deal

determine the presence of

of non-violent control in an

with the two issues at once,

abuse, they could make better

intimate relationship can be as

reauthorization every five years.

critics charge. One easy fix:

decisions, says Karen Jarmoc,

harmful to victims as physical

Alas, we’re still waiting for the

make abusers suffer serious

CCADV’s chief executive. The

abuse,” said Charlie Flanagan,

2018 reauthorization—largely

consequences for breaking

Connecticut Judicial Branch

Ireland’s Minister of Justice and

because of certain senators’

restraining and protective

says it has a guidebook

Equality.

objection to a provision barring

orders (for now they don’t,

already, but Jarmoc believes

advocates say, though some

it’s inadequate: “It’s just

altered the complexion of

violence, including stalking, from

criminal defense lawyers

something they’ve developed

domestic violence in the United

possessing firearms. Current

would disagree). A harder

internally, without the expertise

States. The first was O.J.

and former spouses convicted

fix: identifying abuse in

of other disciplines” such as

Simpson’s arrest for the murder

of domestic violence crimes

the context of divorce and

psychologists, family lawyers

of his ex-wife Nicole Brown

already are prohibited from

custody battles. Family court

and researchers, she says.

Simpson and her friend Ron

keeping firearms; this provision

Divorce and domestic

Two national events greatly

VAWA requires Congressional

those convicted of “dating”

judges (nationwide, not just

Meanwhile, state Sen. Alex

Goldman in 1994. As Rachel

would close the so-called

here) usually reject claims of

Kasser, a Greenwich Democrat,

Louise Snyder wrote in her

boyfriend loophole. As the date

domestic violence, and worse,

has proposed the Child

groundbreaking book No Visible

for reauthorization came and

“The victim actually gets

Safety First bill, also known

Bruises, published last year, “Her

went, actress and activist Alyssa

punished for bringing up the

as Jennifer’s Law, in honor of

murder hurled into the forefront

Milano tweeted, “What kind

issue of abuse,” says Meredith

Jennifer Farber Dulos, which

a conversation that advocates

of country allows its Violence

Gold, director of abuse services

would bring big changes to

had been having for years—that

Against Women Act to expire?”

at YWCA Greenwich. For

family court. It would, for

it could happen anywhere, to

example: Where judges usually

instance, make domestic abuse

anyone.”

disbelieve, or at least shrug

a paramount consideration.

The second event was

person at the New Canaan

off, abuse claims, they usually

It would also put cases with

the passage of the Violence

Police Department, offers

believe the abuser’s typical

more than 100 filings—and thus

Against Women Act, or VAWA,

sunnier news. Intimate partner

counter-claim—that the victim

suggestive of “legal abuse”—on

introduced by Sen. Joe Biden

violence cases in his town

is fabricating the charge in an

a special track. And crucially,

in 1990 but only passed in the

dropped from a high of 96 in

attempt to alienate him from

it would broaden the definition

wake of Nicole’s murder in

2005 to 22 in 2018, the latest

his children. So not only is the

of domestic violence in family

1994. VAWA provides funding to

year for which there are stats.

victim granted no protections,

court beyond physical violence,

cities and towns for domestic

Why the remarkable decline?

but she risks her abuser gaining

threatening and stalking to

violence services such as

“A continuous education

some or even majority custody

include emotional abuse,

advocates, shelters, transitional

campaign for umpteen years,”

of the children as the judge

intimidation, isolation and

housing, legal training,

he says, noting the work of

attempts to “correct” the

financial abuse (this might

and abuser intervention

such groups as the Domestic

alienation. According to the

range from denying the victim

programs. (Regarding the

Violence Crisis Center, which

Center for Judicial Excellence,

access to bank accounts to

last: Connecticut courts often

covers New Canaan.

738 U.S. children have been

ruining her credit).

mandate anger management

Officer Michael O’Sullivan, the domestic violence point

Rachel Louise Snyder sums

classes for abusers, though

up our current domestic

president and chief executive

domestic violence is far less

violence picture like this:

of YWCA Greenwich, would like

about anger than about the

“People ask me all the time, ‘Are

expert-produced bench books

to see a similarly broadened

need to exert power and

things getting better or worse?’

to help judges recognize

definition in criminal law: she

control. “They might as well not

And my answer is ‘Yes.’”

killed by a divorcing or separating parent since 2008. Some states assemble

Mary Lee A. Kiernan,

SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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GETTING HELP

Fairfield County has a rich network of services to guide you, whether you need practical advice and counseling, legal help, economic help, immediate shelter, safety planning, or all of the above Domestic violence, often called intimate partner violence or private violence, can be confusing to navigate. You might share good times with your abuser between the bad, and think that leaving is not the answer. You might be afraid to leave. You might think that leaving is impossible: Where would you go? What about the kids?

STAMFORD, NORWALK, WESTPORT, NEW CANAAN, DARIEN, WILTON OR WESTON

GREENWICH YWCA Greenwich Abuse Services 24/7 hotline

Domestic Violence Crisis Center, or DVCC

203-622-0003

888-774-2900

FAIRFIELD, BRIDGEPORT, EASTON, MONROE, STRATFORD AND TRUMBULL

RIDGEFIELD, REDDING, BETHEL, NEWTOWN, DANBURY, OR NEW FAIRFIELD

Center for Family Justice’s domestic abuse hotline

Women’s Center of Greater Danbury’s hotline

203-384-9559

203-731-5206

CTSafeConnect

National Domestic Violence Hotline

888-774-2900

1-800-799-7233

Visit any of these organizations’ websites for more information. (You can also call the police, but know they are obligated to investigate once you do call them.)

ost people call for help after experiencing abuse for a while; a few call after a single M bewildering incident. “I’ve had calls where someone’s had a wonderful relationship for three years, they get married, something happens on the honeymoon, and they’re reaching out for help the next day,” says Suzanne Adam, executive director at DVCC. So what happens when you do call for help? Meredith Gold, YWCA Greenwich’s director of domestic abuse services, says, “You reach our staff directly, and we do an immediate needs assessment and risk assessment, to find out what’s happening right now. Are you safe? Do you need medical? Do you need the police? Once that’s established, we try to understand what’s going on, and why you’re reaching out for help.” The next step might be to meet with a counselor in person. (But bear in mind: While advocates keep your story confidential, they are mandated to report any child or elder abuse that you reveal.) Advocates understand that your life may well be resistant to easy solutions. “It’s very important to know that we just don’t tell victims to leave,” says Ann Rodwell-Lawton, director of programming and quality assurance for DVCC. “It’s much more complex.” Indeed, for some who leave, the leaving may be a long, slow process. Advocates also understand that abusers’ recidivism rates are high. So the best thing you can do is reach out to a domestic abuse service for help (even if you think your situation is not dire). “It’s the single strongest protective factor for intimate partner violence homicide, to be connected to a domestic violence provider,” says Meredith Gold. “Sadly, we know that only 4 percent of women who have been murdered by a current or former spouse have reached out.” By March the coronavirus pandemic had brought providers a wave of new problems: victims were trapped at home with their abusers, who sometimes threatened to kick them out if they got sick. But our domestic violence services, like our doctors and nurses, have struggled bravely on, taking care of the many in need.

2018, he called a bluechip New York divorce lawyer to ask about representation, explaining his intense dissatisfaction with his case out in Stamford. The lawyer said that hiring him would entail a $25,000 retainer, and there the matter ended. The lawyer’s name was Norman Heller— husband of Donna. On the basis of that one brief phone conversation, Fotis said, Judge Heller had “a reasonable appearance of impropriety” and should remove herself from the case. (Fotis made the dubious claim that he had no idea the two Hellers were related.) Jennifer’s attorney, the Greenwich-based Reuben Midler, noted that once again Fotis had deployed the “manipulative, coercive and scheming behaviors” he’d used throughout the case. But Fotis wasn’t done. He told Heller he’d written to the state’s Judicial Selection Commission, accusing her of bias. He offered that perhaps she didn’t like him because he was Greek. “Judge Heller has ruled against me over and over,” he wrote. “I am not an alcoholic; I am not a drug addict; I am not an abuser. I am a good father and my children adore me.” (Heller did not recuse herself, and the commission took no action.) In retrospect, it’s Dulos’s words from the March 2018 hearing that stick in the mind. “I really want to see my children,” the frustrated father said. “I’m not Charles Manson.”

QUESTIONS, UNANSWERED If Fotis killed his wife, why did he do it? What spurred him to action? In some ways his prospects had brightened. A psychological evaluation described him as “confident and gregarious,” and Judge Heller relaxed his visitation rights. On May 22, 2019, two days before Jennifer went missing, he picnicked with the children in her back yard in New Canaan (albeit in the presence of an official observer). Nothing went awry. One might expect some visible sign, some hint, of the looming fatality. Then again the court warfare, now 470 filings deep, was dragging on like the nightmarishly ceaseless case at the heart of Bleak House, and Fotis’s financial life was in ruins: was $4 million in debt and Gloria Farber


was suing him for those massive unrepaid loans. Speculation ran that his motive could have been pure, desperate greed: If he had sole custody of his five children, then he’d have access to their collective $10 million in trust funds. Yet doesn’t it strain the imagination to think of Fotis attacking “his Jennie,” the mother of his children, with such calculated, coldblooded, brutality? Isn’t there a disconnect here? He’d never raised a hand against her. Jacquelyn Campbell, though, wonders whether this is strictly true. “It would be highly unlikely for an abuser to go from controlling-insultingthreatening (except with a weapon) to murder,” she tells us by email. “The odds are that she was physically abused and didn’t tell anyone (as in forced into sex), and that she was threatened with a weapon, which is considered physical abuse.” The physical abuse seems unlikely, though friends say she was too private a woman to confide any sexual trespasses. But the threat with a weapon? It would signify an extreme mindset not too far from the actual deed. And sure enough, it happened. Fotis’s speeding at Jennifer with his S.U.V. absolutely qualifies, Dr. Campbell says. The weapon need not be anything so overt as a knife or a gun, only potentially lethal, “and a car definitely is.” Over the next two years, the frustrations of the divorce process, and of the financial freefall, would arguably heighten that violent mentality. After Jennifer disappeared, Fotis may have imagined he’d removed his afflicting thorn. As Lady Mcbeth tells her husband, “a little water clears us of this deed.” But Fotis made one critical error: On the night of May 24 he took his cell phone to Hartford. Investigators traced its activity to Albany Avenue, which led to the surveillance footage of Fotis’s Ford Raptor creeping down the street, stopping every so often so he could unload a bag containing items smeared with Jennifer’s blood. The footage led to recovery of the bags themselves, and following the chain backward, to the New Canaan surveillance footage. The first arrests, for tampering and hindering prosecution, came only a week after Jennifer went missing. Judge Heller promptly handed down an emergency

“WE HAVE TO BE CAREFUL, BECAUSE IF WE SPEAK UP, OR ATTEMPT TO PROTECT OUR CHILDREN, WE WILL BE HARMED IN SOME WAY.” —friend of jennifer dulos and victim of domestic violence

order forbidding Fotis from contacting his children. The unraveling had begun. Last January, after rigorous investigation finally produced murder and kidnapping charges, Fotis must have known he’d been cornered. And yet he managed to commit one last act of abuse against Jennifer. Grieving citizens had laid out a memorial for her, consisting of candles and flowers, on a large rock at the foot of Jefferson Crossing. Had Fotis truly been worried about Jennifer, he might have appreciated the little shrine. Instead he dismantled it. “What you did was stupid,” said Judge Gary White, threatening to double his $6 million bond. When Fotis got home from court that day, he found the memorial back in place, bigger and brighter than before. A week later he was dead, having locked himself in the garage and inhaled a fatal dose of carbon monoxide. In the car beside him lay a suicide note written neatly on lined paper. “If you are reading this I am no more. I refuse to spend even an hour more in jail for something I had NOTHING to do with,” he wrote. Would an innocent man surrender his life in quite this way? Fotis had spent only a droplet of time in jail, but a property foreclosure now called into question the soundness of the bond he’d SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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posted. This day, January 28, might well be his last as a free man. (Or so he thought: it turns out that a new bondsman was ready to step in.) “My attorney can explain what happened with the bags on Albany Avenue,” Fotis continued. “Everything else is a story fabricated by the law enforcement.” Norm Pattis made the big reveal at Stamford Superior Court on March 3. On the day Jennifer went missing, a person supposedly known to everyone in the case—but whom Pattis would not name—dumped the bags of bloody clothes on the back porch of 4 Jefferson Crossing. After finding this person standing near “a pile of debris in his yard,” Fotis panicked, loaded the bags into the Raptor, and set off for Hartford. That’s what Pattis said. It’s a vague and confusing story. Did Fotis say anything to this “third party”? Where did this person go? (He or she must have parked at Fotis’s house in order to unload the bags.) If the person’s goal was to kill Jennifer and frame Fotis, then why deliver the evidence to him? Or did this person mistakenly think he or she was doing Fotis a favor—is that where the Pattis defense was headed? A final question: Where is Jennifer’s body? From Pound Ridge to West Hartford, police scoured woods and parks, private lands and vacant houses; they probed lakes, streams, reservoirs, dump sites. Nothing. To think of Jennifer unceremoniously dropped into a pit or a pond only extends this appalling tragedy. If she’s nowhere, she’s also everywhere, in that heavy-weather way of unresolved stories. Perhaps we’ll learn more when the Troconis and Mawhinney cases—delayed by the pandemic— come to trial. Meanwhile, we the public have come to know Jennifer in a small way, and thus to see the beauty and intelligence and compassion that her friends describe. Those friends can still hear Jennifer’s voice when they close their eyes. What might she say, after all that has passed? She gave an answer long ago, in a blog post addressed to her children. I embrace you—all. I want to keep you safe and strong and wholly You… All five attentive faces that I watch and keep tabs on each and every day and night. You are the ghosts who continually and G wonderfully haunt me.


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It’s Time to Smile! WE FOUND 215 TOP DENTISTS

O

of new technologies. Respondents were also asked to put aside personal and political bias and use only their knowledge of a peer’s work when evaluating nominees. Final selections were made after careful examination of credentials and past records with state academies and dental boards. So, whether you’ve put off your regular cleaning, your child needs braces or you’ve been thinking about whitening, take a look. This list that follows is sure to include a specialist you can count on. »

ENDODONTICS BRIAN AMOROSO 259 Stillson Road, Fairfield 203-333-3636 amorosoendo.com ALBERT N. BONANNO Dental Care of Stamford 1500 Summer Street, Stamford (203) 884-0277 dentalcarestamford.com ALEXANDRA BYRNE 5 Eversley Avenue, Suite 102, Norwalk 203-803-1849 JOEL B. CHASEN Advanced Endodontics of Connecticut 95 Armory Road, Suite 2, Stratford 203-377-1331 advancedendo-ct.com

ANDREA GENTILE-FIORI Advanced Endodontics of Connecticut 95 Armory Road, Suite 2, Stratford 203-377-1331 advancedendo-ct.com ANJANETTE W. GJERTSEN 10 Berkeley Street, Suite 4, Norwalk 203-899-1636 microendoct.com AGNES HERCEG Advanced Endodontics & Microsurgery of Stamford 44 Strawberry Hill Avenue, Suite 5, Stamford 203-324-9239 stamfordendo.com

EVAN D. CHRISTENSEN Fairfield Shore Endodontics 61 Sherman Street, Suite E, Fairfield 203-255-3636 4 Dearfield Drive, Suite 104, Greenwich 203-470-5953 fairfieldrct.com

GERALD H. HYMAN Shore Endodontics Associates 40 East Putnam Avenue, Cos Cob 203-625-7686 westchesterrootcanal .com

JOSHUA L. DEMBSKY Advanced Endodontics of Connecticut 95 Armory Road, Suite 2, Stratford 203-377-1331 advancedendo-ct.com

PHILIP R. MASCIA The Greater Danbury Center for Endodontics 360 Federal Road, Brookfield 203-775-3344 danburyendo.com

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DAVID T. FONG The Stein Dental Group 1081 Hope Street, Stamford 203-329-8444 thesteindentalgroup.com

DENNIS L. PIPHER Endodontic Associates of Norwalk 120 East Avenue, Suite 3E, Norwalk (203) 635-6300 rootcanalnorwalk.com ALLEN J. ROSENTHAL Advanced Endodontics & Microsurgery of Stamford 44 Strawberry Hill Avenue, Suite 5, Stamford 203-324-9239 stamfordendo.com IRENE WONG Fairfield Endodontics 999 Summer Street, Suite 301, Stamford 203-325-3636 fairfieldendo.com JOSEPH A. ZERELLA Zerella Endodontics 21 Sherman Court, Fairfield 203-553-9700 zerellaendo.com

GENERAL DENTISTRY DOMINICK P. AGOSTIN 15 Old Ridgefield Road, Wilton 203-762-9907 agostindentalcare.com STEVEN ALTMAN Greenwich Dental Group 18 Fieldpoint Road, Greenwich 203-869-3984 greenwichdentalgroup.com

©5SECOND - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

ur smiles say a lot about us. So finding the right dental professional is very important. We’re here to help with our 2020 guide to leading dental practitioners in Fairfield County. We turned to Top Dentists, a leading dental data research firm, for its inventory of elite practitioners. Its process is simple: Top Dentists surveyors asked area specialists who are members of the American Dental Association to evaluate their peers. The criteria included experience, continuing education, patient care and use


It’s Time to Smile! W E FO U N D 2 1 5 TO P D E N T I S TS

JEFFREY W. ANDERSON Anderson Dental 351 Main Avenue, Norwalk 203-286-8668 andersondentalct.com THOMAS ANZALONE Integrity Dental of Greenwich 235 Glenville Road, Greenwich 203-408-2720 integritydentalgreenwich .com JEFFREY A. BABUSHKIN Cosmetic & Preventive Dentistry 888 White Plains Road, Suite 102, Trumbull 203-268-5881 cpdentistry.com CYNTHIA A. BARTOLONE 2150 Black Rock Turnpike, Suite 201, Fairfield 203-333-2060 JANETTE A. BLACK 69 Sherman Street, Fairfield 203-255-1545 drscullyandblack.com M. NICHOLAS BOCCAROSSA Dental Associates of Connecticut 32 Church Hill Road, Suite 201, Newtown 203-426-5891 dentalassociates.us JOSEPH R. BOLDT II 69 Fairfield Road, Greenwich 203-629-3735 FRANK R. BOTTINO Ridgefield Dental Arts 42 Danbury Road, Ridgefield 203-438-2236 paulharbottle.com JAMES T. BOWMAN 70 Strawberry Hill Avenue, Stamford 203-324-9506 jamestbowmandds.com KENNETH N. BRODER 144 Morgan Street, Suite 5, Stamford 203-327-1167 drkenbroder.com THOMAS J. CALNON 153 East Avenue, Suite 23, Norwalk 203-838-9997 ELKE W. CHEUNG Elke Cheung Dentistry 43 North Avenue, Norwalk 203-846-0400 drcheungsmiles.com CRAIG C. CLABAUGH Clabaugh & Trentalancia 1177 Summer Street, 2nd Floor, Stamford

203-327-2540 dentistofstamford.com

CHRISTOPHER C. COGGUILLO Cogguillo Family Dentistry 203 Cherry Street, Milford 203-874-0000 drcogg.info ALEJANDRA G. COSTANTINO The Stein Dental Group 1081 Hope Street, Stamford 203-329-8444 thesteindentalgroup.com CHARLES A. CRAPE Center for Family Dental Health 435 New Haven Avenue, Milford 203-877-4511 VINCENT B. DEFINA Devine Dental 4 Dearfield Drive, Suite 202, Greenwich 203-629-9009 dentistofgreenwich.com SANTO A. DELALLO 122 West Norwalk Road, Norwalk 203-855-8877 CARL F. DELUCIA 3100 Main Street, Bridgeport 203-374-0082 BARBARA J. DEVINE Devine Dental 4 Dearfield Drive, Suite 202, Greenwich 203-629-9009 dentistofgreenwich.com MARK S. DEWAELE 208 South Avenue, New Canaan 203-966-5944 newcanaanctdental.com BRIAN S. DUCHAN Westport Dental Associates 329 Riverside Avenue, Westport 203-227-3709 westportdental.com YOLANI P. EDIRISINGHE Family Dentistry of Milford 53 Cherry Street, Milford 203-878-1766 familydentistrymilford .com MARK L. EINZIG Ridgefield Cosmetic & Family Dentistry 90 Grove Street, Suite 208, Ridgefield 203-438-0120 markeinzigdds.com ELIOT S. ESSENFELD Vanlang & Essenfeld 53 Old Kings Highway North, Darien 203-655-8887 dariendentists.com

WILLIAM J. FESSLER 116 East Avenue, Norwalk 203-838-3939 wfesslerdds.com ANTHONY T. FESTA New Canaan Dental Care 116 South Avenue, New Canaan 203-966-9696 newcanaandentalcare.com SCOTT R. FISHER 4 Dearfield Drive, Suite 206, Greenwich 203-869-2929

DANIELLE D. GOODWIN Goodwin Dental 31 River Road, Suite 300, Cos Cob 203-869-2552 dgoodwindds.com KRISTY L. GRETZULA Hawley Lane Dental 475 Hawley Lane, Suite 9, Stratford 203-377-9300 hawleylanedental.com PAUL D. HARBOTTLE New Canaan Dentistry 162 East Avenue, New Canaan 203-972-0588 paulharbottle.com

CAMILLO L. FONTANA Fontana Family Dental Care 1100 Kings Highway East, Suite 3-A, Fairfield 203-333-4700 fontanafamilydentalcare .com

MATTHEW HERBSTMAN Dental Associates of Connecticut 36 Padanaram Road, Danbury 203-748-5717 dentalassociates.us

JOSEPHINE A. FRANZESE Ridgefield Perfect Smile Center 162 Danbury Road, Ridgefield 203-493-0556 danajonesdds.com

STEPHANIE J. HOTCHKISS Greenwich Dental Group 18 Fieldpoint Road, Greenwich 203-869-3984 dentalinformation.com

ADAM J. FREEMAN Westport Dental Associates 329 Riverside Avenue, Westport 203-227-3709 westportdental.com

MANDEEP HURA Community Health Center of Stamford 141 Franklin Street, Stamford 203-969-0802 chc1.com/Locations/ Stamford

ROBERT GALELLA Dental Associates of Connecticut 36 Padanaram Road, Danbury 203-748-5717 dentalassociates.us MARILYN GENI Imperial Dental Associates 15 Imperial Avenue, Westport 203-227-2520 imperialdentalassociates .com MICHAEL D. GENTILE 49 Lake Avenue, Suite 203, Greenwich 203-869-2090

MATTHEW J. IWINSKI 45 Pine Street, Suite 1-A, New Canaan 203-966-5606 matthewjiwinskidds.com DANA C. JONES Ridgefield Perfect Smile Center 162 Danbury Road, Ridgefield 203-493-0556 danajonesdds.com THOMAS J. KAHL Greater Danbury Community Health Center 70 Main Street, Danbury 203-743-0100 danburyhospital.org/finda-doctor/thomas-kahl

TAHA GHOMI Dental Associates of Connecticut 36 Padanaram Road, Danbury 203-748-5717 dentalassociates.us

BOZENA J. KIERSKI 44 Strawberry Hill Avenue, Suite 9, Stamford 203-348-5612 bkierskidds.com

PAMELA A. GIBSON Southport Family Dental 10 John Street, Southport 203-255-5142 southportfamilydental .com

MASHA KOGAN The Dental Center of Westport 175 Post Road, West, Westport 203-227-8700 dentalcenterwestport .com

ALAN GOLDBERG Goldberg & Marcus Dental Associates 1825 Barnum Avenue, Suite 303, Stratford 203-375-6090 goldbergmarcusdental .com

ALISON KUDISH Trumbull Dental Arts

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160 Hawley Lane, Suite 101, Trumbull 203-377-0638 trumbulldentist.com

MARYANN E. LEHMANN 5 Brook Street, Suite 1-B, Darien 203-655-0021 maldds.com MICHAEL LEVIN 1171 East Putnam Avenue, Suite 1-D, Riverside 203-637-5252 SUSAN K. LEVINE 52 Beach Road, Suite 203, Fairfield 203-259-7073 drsusanlevine.com ANDREW M. MARCUS Goldberg & Marcus Dental Associates 1825 Barnum Avenue, Suite 303, Stratford 203-375-6090 goldbergmarcusdental .com JACKQUELINE J. MCLEAN Mclean Smiles 23 Hoyt Street, Suite 2, Stamford 203-364-5081 (new patients); 203-327-6717 mcleansmiles.com WILLIAM J. MCPADDEN, JR. 135 Anton Street, Bridgeport 203-371-6586 JOSEPH D. MICELI Middlesex Dental Group 106 Noroton Avenue, Suite 5, Darien 203-529-4682 dentist-darien.com WAYNE A. MICHALKA Commerce Park Cosmetic Dentistry 4699 Main Street, Suite 200, Bridgeport 203-372-3726 commerceparkcosmetic dds.com DONALD W. MILLER Cosmetic & Reconstructive Dentistry 1275 Post Road, Suite 201, Fairfield 203-255-6878 fairfieldcosmeticdentistry .com ANDREW L. MOGELOF Mogelof Dental Group 2499 Main Street, Suite 5, Stratford 203-378-5588 drmogelof.com SCOTT A. MOGELOF Mogelof Dental Group 2499 Main Street, Suite 5, Stratford 203-378-5588 drmogelof.com

CARLA M. MONTEIRO Goldberg & Marcus Dental Associates 1825 Barnum Avenue, Suite 303, Stratford 203-375-6090 goldbergmarcusdental.com MICHAEL A. NOCERINO 1809 Black Rock Turnpike, Fairfield 203-335-4413 michaelnocerinodds.com THOMAS M. OHLSON Comprehensive Dental Group 999 Summer Street, Suite 400, Stamford 203-359-3296 pogosianohlsondental.com KARL W. OLSON Olson Family Dental 10 Mott Avenue, Suite 3-B, Norwalk 203-663-3316 olsonfamilydental.com COLIN M. PECH Darien Center for Dentistry 36 Old Kings Highway South, Suite 105, Darien 203-655-0667 dariendds.com DAVID A. PEREIRA Dental Arts of Darien 800 Post Road, Suite 301, Darien 203-656-8079 dentalartsofdarien.com MICHAEL J. PIZZO Ridgefield Cosmetic and General Dentistry 65 Danbury Road, Ridgefield 203-438-8866 ridgefielddentistry.com DONALD A. POGODA 8 West End Avenue, Old Greenwich 203-637-0554 DUSTIN F. RABINE Rabine Family Dentistry 865 River Road, Shelton 203-941-4912 (new patients); 203-375-1932 rabinefamilydentistry.com PETER J. RATHMAN 125 Strawberry Hill Avenue, Suite 204, Stamford 203-327-1470 peterrathmandmd.com PRASANNA L. RAVURI Merritt Dental Care 999 Summer Street, Suite 306, Stamford 203-356-9990 stamfordfamilydentist.com STEVEN M. REGENSTEIN Esthetic Dental Group of Westport 327 Riverside Avenue, 2nd Floor, Westport 203-227-3421 edgw.us


It’s Time to Smile! W E FO U N D 2 1 5 TOP DENTISTS

MICHAEL J. REYNOLDS 2600 Post Road, Suite L-1, Southport 203-256-8900 michaelreynoldsdds.com

MICHAEL B. STEIN The Stein Dental Group 1081 Hope Street, Stamford 203-329-8444 thesteindentalgroup.com

MARK S. ROISMAN 225 Main Street, Suite 304, Westport 203-227-6338 mywestportdentist.com

JOSEPH P. SUAREZ 153 East Avenue, Suite 23, Norwalk 203-838-9997 josephsuarezdds.com

JOSEPH M. ROMANELLI 1411 Black Rock Turnpike, Fairfield 203-384-6389

MARK R. SUTTON 391 East Putnam Avenue, Cos Cob 203-869-2066 greenwichdentistry.com

FRANK J. ROMANO 2240 Madison Avenue, Bridgeport 203-372-0881 romanodental.com JON C. ROSENBLITT 251 Long Ridge Road, Stamford 203-348-1632 rosenblittdentistry.com DAVID ROSH 1450 Washington Boulevard, Suite 105, Stamford 203-359-2244 roshdental.com

JEFFREY A. TAMUCCI 5 Eversley Avenue, Norwalk 203-853-0669 tamuccidds.com KENNETH B. TEMPLE 40 East Putman Avenue, Cos Cob 203-622-4243 DAVID J. THIBAULT 15 Commerce Road, Suite 2, Stamford 203-965-7795 davidthibaultdmd.com

ZACHARY M. ROTH Dental Care of Stamford 1500 Summer Street, Stamford 203-884-0277 dentalcarestamford.com

CHRISTINE L. TIERNEY Beautiful Dentistry of Greenwich 40 East Putnam Avenue, Cos Cob 203-869-5400 beautifuldentistryof greenwich.com

KEITH L. RUDOLPH 140 Sherman Street, Suite 3-A, Fairfield 203-254-9533 drkeithrudolph.com

ADRIANA TORENA Allure Dental Group 4699 Main Street, Suite 101, Bridgeport 203-368-9016 dentistryfairfield.com

JOHN J. SCHINTO III Schinto Dental 2001 West Main Street, Suite 110, Stamford 203-978-1184 schintodental.com

ROBERT N. TRAMPOSCH Greenwich Smiles 25 Valley Drive, Greenwich 203-862-9000 greenwichsmiles.com

CAROLINE A. SHENKER Perfect Smiles of Fairfield 60 Katona Drive, Suite 20, Fairfield 203-366-7655 perfectsmilesoffairfield .com

DOUGLAS M. TREPP The Town Practice 500 West Putnam Avenue, Suite 4, Greenwich 203-869-9252 treppandmiller.com

FRANCIS SHIN 25 Valley Drive, 2nd Floor, Greenwich 203-625-0301 valleygreenwichdental .com

GEORGE TSANGAROULIS Greenwich Cosmetic & Family Dentistry 4 Dearfield Drive, Suite G2, Greenwich 203-869-4755 greenwichfamilydental .com

JERRY M. SIMON Dental Care of Stamford 1500 Summer Street, Stamford 203-884-0277 dentalcarestamford.com DAVID R. STEBBINS 148 East Avenue, Suite 3-J, Norwalk 203-866-0415 davidstebbinsdmd.com

QUYNHCHI N. VANLANG Vanlang & Essenfeld Family Dentistry 53 Old Kings Highway North, Darien 203-655-8887 dariendentists.com

JEFFREY S. WARREN Family and Cosmetic Dentistry 1735 Post Road, Suite 8, Fairfield 203-259-1460 drjeffreywarren.com

ANTHONY J. CAMILLO Associated Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons 107 Newtown Road, Suite 1A, Danbury 203-797-0012 aomspc.com

ROBERT S. WARREN Brooklawn Dental Associates 990 Brooklawn Avenue, Bridgeport 203-335-6471 brooklawndental.com

DONALD J. CASE Stamford Oral and Maxillofacial Surgical Arts 27 Bridge Street, Stamford 203-325-2661 stamfordoms.com PAUL M. CIUCI Milford & Derby Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery One Golden Hill Street, Milford 203-874-1664 ctomfs.com

STEVE WECHSLER The Stein Dental Group 1081 Hope Street, Stamford 203-329-8444 thesteindentalgroup.com ERNEST J. WHITTLE III 284 Sound Beach Avenue, Old Greenwich 203-637-4660

CHRISTOPHER J. CUOMO Northeast Implant & Oral Surgery 27 Hospital Avenue, Suite 306, Danbury 203-797-0008 neimplantandoralsurgery .com

DAVID J. WOHL The Center for Aesthetic and Comprehensive Dentistry 111 Beach Road, Fairfield 203-255-4001 drdavidwohl.com

ROOLS L. DESSIEUX Dental Care of Stamford 1500 Summer Street, Stamford (203) 884-0277 dentalcarestamford.com

MASIS YETERIAN, JR. My Creative Dentist 211 East Putnam Avenue, Suite 2-6, Cos Cob 203-529-4217 (new patients), 203-869-2884 dentist-greenwich.com

NAUSHAD R. EDIBAM Stamford Oral and Maxillofacial Surgical Arts 27 Bridge Street, Stamford 203-325-2661 stamfordoms.com

DAVID A. ZADIK Greenwich Dental Group 18 Fieldpoint Road, Greenwich 203-869-3984 greenwichdentalgroup .com

SALVATORE J. FLORIO The Facial Surgery Center 115 Technology Drive, Suite B-101, Trumbull 203-261-7800 drflorio.com

MARK L. ZAMAT 1200 Linden Avenue, Stratford 203-378-0182

ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY

CHRISTINE L. HAMILTON-HALL Aesthetic & Maxillofacial Surgery Center of Darien 777 Post Road, Suite 100, Darien 203-656-4466

ABED ALKHATIB Oral Surgery Associates 1305 Post Road, Suite 201, Fairfield 203-259-2665 oralsurgeryassociatesct .com

VASILIKI KARLIS Maxillofacial Surgery of Greenwich 4 Dearfield Drive, Suite 205, Greenwich 203-717-1222 maxfacsgreenwich.com

MICHELE S. BERGEN Infinity Oral Surgery 49 Lake Avenue, Suite LL4, Greenwich 203-661-4231 infinityoralsurgery.com

CHRISTOPHER J. LANE The Stein Dental Group 1081 Hope Street, Stamford 203-329-8444 thesteindentalgroup.com KEVIN S. MCLAUGHLIN Norwalk Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery & Dental Implants 148 East Avenue, Suite 2F, Norwalk 203-866-0061 norwalkoms.com

TODD E. BLOOM Fairfield Oral Surgery 760 Kings Highway West, Building B, Southport 203-259-2227 fairfieldoralsurgery.com

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PHILIP F. PACELLI III New Canaan Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 166 Cherry Street, Suite A, New Canaan 203-972-1581 newcanaanoralsurgery .com ALAN R. RISSOLO Oral Surgeons Associates 10 Mott Avenue, Suite 4B, Norwalk 203-853-0500 norwalkdentalimplant .com MICHAEL F. TROFA Norwalk Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery & Dental Implants 148 East Avenue, Suite 2-F, Norwalk 203-866-0061 norwalkoms.com HOWARD B. TWERSKY Oral Surgery Associates 4747 Main Street, Bridgeport 203-371-5595 oralsurgeryassociatesct .com JOSEPH F. WALLACE III Greenwich Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 23 Maple Avenue, Greenwich 203-661-5858 greenwichoralsurgery .com THOMAS B. WILSON Greenwich Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 23 Maple Avenue, Greenwich 203-661-5858 greenwichoralsurgery .com ROBERT M. YUDELL Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Center of Stamford 90 Morgan Street, Sutie 207, Stamford 203-327-9966 oralsurgeryofstamford .com BRETT ZUCKMAN Greenwich Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 23 Maple Avenue, Greenwich 203-661-5858 greenwichoralsurgery .com

ORTHODONTICS FIGEN A. BAYDUR Baydur Orthodontics 1817 Black Rock Turnpike, Suite 104, Fairfield 203-333-0050 drbaydur.com PATRICIA A. BENDICK Fairfield Orthodontic Associates

111 Beach Road, Fairfield fairfieldorthodontic associates.com

JOHN S. BIBKO JB Orthodontics 346 Main Avenue, Suite D, Norwalk 203-866-7806 jborthodonticsct.com ORESTA L. BILOUS Bilous Orthodontics 52 Beach Road, Suite 206, Fairfield 203-255-2677 bilous-ortho.com CASS D. BURRELL First Impressions Orthodontics 1476 Post Road, Fairfield 203-307-0996 fairfieldorthodontist.com STEPHEN N. CAGLIOSTRO Westwalk Orthodontic Group 1460 Post Road East, Suite 9, Westport 203-226-9579 westwalkortho.com TIFFANY CHRISTENSEN Greenwich Braces 4 Dearfield Drive, Suite 204, Greenwich 203-869-2044 greenwichbraces.com DAVID H. COWIN Danbury Hospital 52 North Street, Danbury 203-792-7722 ALIKA L. CREW The Stein Dental Group 1081 Hope Street, Stamford 203-329-8444 thesteindentalgroup.com JEFFREY S. DRAYER Stamford Orthodontics 999 Summer Street, Suite 201, Stamford 203-325-3331 stamfordortho.com EMILY C. DRIESMAN Embrace Orthodontics 24 Imperial Avenue, Westport 203-227-6061 westportortho.com AUSTIN W. FEENEY 45 Pine Street, New Canaan 203-966-3042 feeneysmiles.com PETER FEIBISH Dental Care of Stamford 1500 Summer Street, Stamford (203) 884-0277 dentalcarestamford.com MARK P. FEINBERG 4 Corporate Drive, »


It’s Time to Smile! W E FO U N D 2 1 5 TO P D E N T I S TS

ROBERT J. GALLOIS Gallois Orthodontics 125 Strawberry Hill Avenue, Stamford 203-348-7571 galliosortho.com STEVE GIANNOUTSOS Georgetown Orthodontics 73 Redding Road, Georgetown 203-544-9338 georgetownorthodontics .com ROBERT B. GOLDMAN Goldman Orthodontic Arts 1200 High Ridge Road, Suite 5, Stamford 203-329-2712 goldmanorthodontics.com NIKA GRIGAITIS Blue Wave Orthodontics 777 Boston Post Road, Suite 300, Darien 203-202-7610 bluewaveorthodontics.com EROL GUND Dental Associates of Connecticut 36 Padanaram Road, Danbury 203-748-5717 dentalassociates.us SCOTT L. KESSELMAN Riverside Orthodontics 1171 East Putnam Avenue, Building 2, Riverside 203-698-0045 riversideortho.net BLAINE J. LANGBERG 17 Danbury Road, Suite 6, Ridgefield 203-431-4466 braceyourselves.com FERNANDA D. MARCHI Fairfield County Orthodontics 1275 Post Road, Suite 211, Fairfield 203-292-6644 bracesfairfield.com GREGORY A. MCKENNA McKenna Orthodontics 131 Deer Hill Avenue, Danbury 203-790-9155 mckennaortho.com GARY L. OPIN Opin Wide! Orthodontics 266 South Broad Street, Milford

203-877-3231 opinorthodontics.com

203-227-3709 westportdental.com

M. BINA PARK 42 Sherwood Place, Greenwich 203-900-1111 drbinapark.com

ALEXI M. DAMASCUS Ridgefield Pediatric Dentistry 22 Prospect Street, Ridgefield 203-403-3009 ridgefieldpd.com

ALLAN S. PHILLIPS Braces CT 8 Prospect Street, Ridgefield 203-438-6922 bracesct.com MARY E. RITTER Commerce Park Childrens Dentistry & Orthodontics 4702 Main Street, Bridgeport 203-371-8282 commerceparkdental.com ROSEMARY RYAN Greenwich Braces 4 Dearfield Drive, Suite 204, Greenwich 203-869-2044 greenwichbraces.com GREGORY W. SANFORD Sanford Orthodontics 44 Old Ridgefield Road, Suite 218, Wilton 203-762-2322 sanfordorthodontics.com UTTAMPAL SINGH Dental Care Orthodontics 1500 Summer Street, Stamford (203) 580-6330 dentalcareorthodontics .com MONICA A. TEREDESAI Smile Art Orthodontics 126 Old Ridgefield Road, Wilton 203-210-7375 smileartortho.com

JENNIFER D. EPSTEIN Kids First Pediatric Dentistry 1478 Post Road, Fairfield 203-307-1550 kidsfirstdentistry.com EMILY GABELERMANHEIMER Greenwich Pediatric Dental Group 4 Dearfield Drive, Greenwich 203-422-5437 greenwichkidsdentist .com

DURGESH A. KUDCHADKAR Dental Care Kids 1500 Summer Street, Stamford (203) 487-5705 dentalcarekids.com

SIMON ZMUIDZINAS Dental Care of Stamford 1500 Summer Street, Stamford (203) 884-0277 dentalcarestamford.com

MEENAKSHI MADHU Sensitive Care Dental 55 Old Gate Lane, Milford 203-951-5540 sensitivecare.net

PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY

GREGORY S. MOKOTOFF Kids First Pediatric Dentistry 1478 Post Road, Fairfield 203-307-1550 kidsfirstdentistry.com

HANNAH AHN Westport Dental Associates 329 Riverside Avenue, Westport

LAWRENCE A. DELIBERO Fairfield County Periodontics & Dental Implants 115 Technology Drive, Suite C-304, Trumbull (203) 459-1210 drdelibero.com

PERRY A. WASSERLAUF Fairfield Periodontics 71 Beach Road, Fairfield 203-255-7771 fairfieldperiodontics.com

GABRIELLE SYKOFF Dental Care Kids 1500 Summer Street, Stamford 203-487-5705 dentalcarekids.com

DAVID S. GOTTLIEB Periodontology Associates of Norwalk 10 Mott Avenue, Suite 1-C, Norwalk 203-853-1120

JOHN CORINO Norwalk Dental Arts 10 Mott Avenue, Suite 2C, Norwalk 203-854-9565 norwalkdentalarts.com

HIROSHI TSUYUKI Dentistry for Children 149 East Avenue, Suite 21, Norwalk 203-838-4191 dentistryforchildrenct .com

TERENCE S. JACKSON Periodontics & Implant Dentistry Center 47 Oak Street, Suite 6, Stamford 203-252-2252 stamfordperio.com

STACY ZARAKIOTIS Greenwich Pediatric Dental Group 4 Dearfield Drive, Greenwich 203-422-5437 greenwichkidsdentist .com

DAVID M. KNAUS 324 Elm Street, Suite 101-B, Monroe 203-261-1363

GARRICK F. WONG 453 East Putnam Avenue, Cos Cob 203-625-9888 drgarrickfwong.com

ANDREW SPADINGER Commerce Park Childrens Dentistry & Orthodontics 4702 Main Street, Bridgeport 203-371-8282 commerceparkdental .com

LILIAN R. VIERA Childrens Dental Care of Norwalk 10 Mott Avenue, Suite 4C, Norwalk 203-866-5020 childrensdentalcare ofnorwalkllc.com

JOHN IWASAKI Dental Associates of Connecticut 19 Padanaram Road, Danbury (203) 748-5717 dentalassociates.us

GORDON K. LEE Westport Pediatric Dentistry 305 Post Road East, Westport 203-226-5500 zerocavityzone.com

DISCLAIMER

Suite 195, Shelton 203-513-2014 feinsmiles.com

PERIODONTICS RICHARD F. AMATO Advanced Periodontics & Dental Implants 324 Elm Street, Suite 103A, Monroe 203-712-0917 (new patients), 203-268-2000 connecticutperiodontist .com ROBERT CHUNG Periodontal Associates 4 Dearfield Drive, Suite 201, Greenwich 203-661-3733 ctperio.com BRUCE K. DAVIDSON 273 Post Road West, Suite 1, Westport 203-226-7788 davidsonperio.com

SELMA KAPLAN Periodontics & Dental Implants 10 Mott Avenue, Suite 4A, Norwalk 203-635-4250 norwalkperio.com RUI “RAY” MA 1047 Old Post Road, Fairfield 203-254-2006 sonickdmd.com JENNY MATHEWS 15 Roseville Road, Westport 203-227-8990 jennymathews-perio.com BRETE D. MORAN 67 Cherry Street, Milford 203-876-0304 drbretemoran.com RANDALL H. NEICHIN Dental Care of Stamford 1500 Summer Street, Stamford (203) 884-0277 dentalcarestamford.com MICHAEL SONICK Fairfield County Implants and Periodontics 1047 Old Post Road, Fairfield 203-254-2006 sonickdmd.com E. J. TRAYNOR Traynor Periodontics & Implants 15 Valley Drive, Suite 302, Greenwich 203-661-5885 tpigreenwich.com

PROSTHODONTICS

JACK DEGRADO Stamford Dental Group 47 Oak Street, Suite 220, Stamford 203-883-6074 stamforddentalgroup.com MARIE E. FALCONE Dental Specialists of Darien 24 Old Kings Highway South, Suite 101, Darien 203-836-2744 dentalspecialistsofdarien .com KIMBERLY A. FARRELL Westport Dental Associates 329 Riverside Avenue, Westport 203-227-3709 westportdental.com STANLEY P. FREEMAN Westport Dental Associates 329 Riverside Avenue, Westport 203-227-3709 westportdental.com JEFFREY D. O’CONNELL Gold Coast Dental 1177 Post Road, Suite 2A, Fairfield 203-292-9292 goldcoastdentalpros.com STEVEN J. ROTHENBERG Dental Specialists of Darien 24 Old Kings Highway South, Suite 1, Darien 203-836-2744 dentalspecialistsofdarien .com MIN-SUNG YOON Evergreen Family Dental & Southbury Smiles 1300 Post Road, Suite 101, Fairfield 203-259-7870 evergreenfamilydental group.com G

This list is excerpted from 2020 the topDentists™ list, which includes listings for 215 dentists and specialists in the Fairfield County area. For more information, call 706-364-0853; write P.O. Box 970, Augusta, GA 30903; email info@usatopdentists.com or visit usatopdentists.com. TopDentists has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. Copyright 2010-2020 by topDentists, Augusta, GA. All rights reserved. This list, or parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without permission. No commercial use of the information in this list may be made without permission of topDentists. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of the information in this list without permission.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2020 Dental 2020

PROFILES Show Off Your Smile

©ALLA - STOCK.ADOBE.COM

Did you know that having healthy teeth, mouth and gums plays a vital role in your overall health? Your dentist can help decrease your risk of not only gum disease, tooth decay and halitosis, but also other issues such as stroke or heart attack. Finding the right dentist can be a challenge, so we’ve made it easier for you. The following pages introduce some of Fairfield County’s most prominent dental professionals who put your oral health at the forefront of their priorities. Choose a trusted individual to provide you and your family with the utmost care you deserve. A happy smile is a healthy one.


2020 | Dental PROFILES

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

E.J. Traynor, D.M.D., M.S. TRAYNOR PERIODONTICS & IMPLANTS NEW OFFICE LOCATION 15 Valley Drive, Suite 302, Greenwich, CT 06831 203.661.5885 tpigreenwich.com

Covid-19 Preparedness

My team and I are so happy to be back taking care of patients and keeping them healthy. As a surgical office, we have always maintained a sterile environment in the operatories so the biggest changes are the types we are all experiencing in other places of business, like wearing masks in all areas of the office, virtual waiting rooms and plastic barriers at the reception desk. Our returning patients are also seeing more equipment throughout the office, including in the reception area and the hallways, because we have invested in additional sterilization equipment to extend our cleaning practices to all areas of the office. For example, I have placed hospital-grade air purifiers, also known as “air-scrubbers”, throughout the office to filter and clean the air 6 times per hour. We have also started using a great sterilization method involving fogging to help us clean more areas efficiently. Overall, I must say I am most proud of how my whole team has adjusted to all of the changes.

Years in practice?

Twenty-two years in private practice here in Greenwich.

What is a Periodontist? A periodontist is a dental specialist in the diagnosis and treatment of periodontal disease, surgical placement of dental implants and cosmetic periodontal procedures. Because the periodontia refers to our gums, that is the long way of saying that I specialize in treatment of the gums, AKA, a gum doctor. Sometimes we overlook the importance of the gums but the number one reason we lose teeth is unhealthy gums. More importantly, gum disease will not go away without treatment because it typically involves an infection which needs to be treated by a periodontist, because infections become serious when left untreated. Lastly, periodontal disease, which affects at least 50% of the adult population has been scientifically linked to several other disorders such as cardiac disease, stroke, alzheimer’s disease and diabetes.

What is “Gum Disease”? Gum disease is the more commonly used

name for periodontal disease and it broadly refers to a category of infections under the gumline. There are a number of factors that contribute to gum disease, but the two most important are age and genetics. Because genetics plays such a large role, any patient with gum disease will want to maintain a regular schedule of periodontal maintenance. What are the signs of periodontal disease? I look for indications of bone loss, or erosion, in the area where the jawbone meets and supports the teeth around the roots. For the patient, the symptoms can include: Red, swollen or tender gums Bleeding while brushing, flossing or eating Gums that are receding or pulling away from the teeth to look longer than before Teeth becoming loose Shifting of the teeth resulting in new spaces between teeth

What are the most recent advancements in the treatment of periodontal disease? Laser therapy is a minimally-invasive alternative to traditional gum surgery. I use Periodontal Laser therapy to regenerate the bone and supporting structures destroyed by gum disease. The protocol is called LANAP (Laser Assisted New Attachment Procedure). This protocol is the only laser gum disease treatment scientifically greenwichmag.com

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proven to regenerate bone with FDA clearance.

Do you perform dental implants? Yes. We do what we can to save the natural tooth but if gum disease is left untreated and the tooth is lost, an implant is a great option.

In addition to preserving teeth, are there other reasons to make sure gum disease is treated properly? Your teeth affect your whole body. When they’re healthy, you’re healthier too. A missing tooth can affect your bite, speech and eating choices. As you rely more on your remaining teeth, you increase the chance they will wear out prematurely, or be damaged or lost. You may also experience headaches and/or jaw pain. Who would want their appearance and health to deteriorate? That’s the natural consequence of missing teeth – the jaw literally melts away. Generally, people will lose 25% of their supporting jawbone structure within the first year after tooth loss. Dental implants are more easily placed when teeth are first removed because bone replacement becomes more complex as time passes. The great news? Implants act just like your natural teeth. They safeguard and preserve your bone structure, oral health and appearance. Your dentist and periodontal surgeon work together to provide you with options so that you can make the most informed decision concerning tooth replacement.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

2020 | Dental PROFILES

Where did you go to school?

Joseph Wallace, D.D.S.: Georgetown University School of Dentistry; Washington Hospital Center—Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Thomas Wilson, D.D.S., M.D.: Columbia University School of Dentistry; Columbia University School of Physicians and Surgeons; NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital— Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency; NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital—General Surgery Internship Brett Zuckman, D.M.D.: Temple University School of Dentistry; Lincoln Medical Center/Weill Cornell Medical College—Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Garrick Alex, D.D.S., M.D.: M.D. from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons; D.D.S. from Columbia University College of Dental Medicine - Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency, New York Presbyterian Hospital

What distinguishes your practice?

Founded in 1984, Greenwich Oral Surgery treats each patient with the care and attention that has come to be our hallmark. Each of our doctors is Board Certified by the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and holds memberships in many dental and medical organizations. Our doctors, with appointments to the staffs of Greenwich Hospital, NewYorkPresbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, afford our patients the highest standard of care. Our patients have the advantage of the collaborative nature of our practice. Frequently, diagnostic consultations and surgical procedures can receive the attention of multiple members of our group. Our practice consists of three state-ofthe-art practices with a new location in Darien, CT. At least one of our doctors is available 24/7, 365 days per year. We are also proud to note that our doctors have been awarded Top Dentist status every year.

What procedures does your practice provide?

Some of the procedures offered are: dental implants, wisdom teeth extraction, bone grafting, pediatric procedures, TMJ treatments, reconstructive jaw surgery, facial trauma, oral pathology, and cosmetic procedures such as Botox® and fillers.

Joseph Wallace, D.D.S., Thomas Wilson, D.D.S., M.D., Brett Zuckman, D.M.D., Garrick Alex, D.D.S., M.D. GREENWICH ORAL SURGERY • DARIEN ORAL SURGERY

SPECIALTY: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dental Implant Surgery 23 Maple Avenue, Greenwich, CT | 203.661.5858 3010 Westchester Avenue, Suite 306, Purchase, NY | 914.253.9088 6 Thorndal Circle, Darien, CT 06820 | 475-328-8500 greenwichoralsurgery.com | darienoralsurgery.com 475-328-8500greenwichoralsurgery.com SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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Another year to be most thankful to be honored and for the ability to

serve our communities dental health needs. My staff and I are truly humbled to be a part of this community that fulfills us with a diverse and multiplicity of individuals that visit our office and become life long patients and friends.

Robert N. Tramposch, DDS Meenakshi Madhu, DDS Board Certified Pediatric Dentist

GREENWICH SMILES, PLLC SPECIALTY: Adult, Cosmetic and Pediatric Dentistry 25 Valley Drive Greenwich, CT 203.862.9000 greenwichsmiles.com

Will patients feel safe coming back to the dentist?

During these trying times, we are taking every precaution necessary to safe guard our patients and staff. Patients can be reassured that at Greenwich Smiles we surpass all CDC, OSHA and ADA quidelines. When patients arrive they must be wearing a mask. If a patient does not have a mask, one will What do you enjoy most about be provided. being a dental practitioner? All patients will then disinfect at Developing a relationship with each the hand sanitation station, have their patient and family. I take great pride that temperature taken and complete a my patients trust me with their dental screening process questionnaire. health and well being. We have staggered appointments so no one is in the waiting room. In between How is your office adjusting to appointments we have alotted 15 minutes Covid protocols? for disinfecting all rooms. After business Prior to Covid-19 we have always hours there is a complete disinfection prioritized on disinfection and sterilization. As of March, all staff and doctors wear N95 process including medical grade air purifiers. These are a few of the masks, full face shields and disposable measures we have taking to ensure gowns. our patients feel safe and comfortable Everyone has been great and fully accepting with our new Covid-19 protocols. in our office.

DrRobertTramposch_1_2_8.10_R5.indd 1

8/19/20 4:30 PM

Where did you go to school?

Rosemary Ryan, DDS Tiffany Christensen, DDS, MS GREENWICH BRACES, LLC SPECIALTY: Orthodontics 4 Dearfield Drive Greenwich, CT 203.869.2044 greenwichbraces.com

Dr. Ryan: DDS: Columbia University-College of Dental Medicine; General Practice Residency: Lenox Hill Hospital, NYC; Orthodontic Residency: Montefiore Medical Center Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr. Christensen: DDS: Columbia University-College of Dental Medicine; MS, Orthodontic Residency: Columbia University-College of Dental Medicine

Years of practice?

Dr. Ryan has been practicing for twenty-eight years. She graduated dental school in 1992 and completed her orthodontic training in 1995. Dr. Christensen has been practicing for thirteen years. She graduated dental school in 2007 and completed her

orthodontic training in 2010.

How do you change people’s lives?

What sets you apart from your competition?

We feel it is important to recognize a need for compassion beyond braces. We want our patients to feel beautiful and smile on the inside, as well as on the outside. Our motto is treat each patient as if they are our family member. We truly enjoy our patients and look forward to their visits. We strive to make our office the most safe and comfortable environment possible. Additionally, we feel blessed to live and work in such a great community. Dr. Ryan and Dr. Christensen believe in paying it forward. We support local charities to make our community a better place for everyone. Every month, we commit a portion of our proceeds to a charitable organization. Doing this makes our community and our world a better place.

At Greenwich Braces, two orthodontic minds, with years of extensive training and experience, go into formulating each orthodontic treatment plan. Dr. Ryan and Dr. Christensen combine the greatest aspects of their skills and experience to provide the best care possible to our patients. Over the past 22 years, we have treated more than 3,900 orthodontic patients with braces, InvisalignÂŽ and a variety of other treatment modalities. Some of our patients have even commuted from as far away as London, Qatar, Atlanta, Chicago, New York and New Jersey, to be treated in our office.

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2020 | Dental PROFILES

Dr. Bina Park DR. BINA PARK ORTHODONTICS 42 Sherwood Place Greenwich, CT 203.900.1111 drbinapark.com Dr. Bina Park Orthodontics welcomes you to her practice. We hope you and your family have been safe and healthy in these challenging and unprecedented times. As a small boutique practice, we have always placed the utmost importance on personal attention; treating one patient at a time, and maintaining a familycentered environment. We are particularly dedicated to creating customized and individualized treatment plans that reflect our patient’s needs. Our office provides orthodontic treatment for children and adults in a warm and caring environment with a commitment towards the best possible care and experience. Dr. Bina feels that orthodontic appointments should be enjoyable and pain-free. She makes an effort to give every patient the experience that makes orthodontics fun and appreciates getting to know her patients and their families during the process. Dr. Bina is committed to providing her

patients and staff members to a clean, safe and protected environment and will continue to re-enforce strict infection control measures. Our office follows the recommendations made by the American Dental Association (ADA), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). As we face more stringent concerns, we will be spacing our appointments to allow for extra time for meticulous sanitation of the treatment rooms and instruments before and after each patient. The new updates that we have planned include: Extra Hand sanitizers, Frequent cleaning of all surfaces with disinfectants, HEPA air filters and Medical Grade Air Purifiers, Extra High-speed suction, and Extra PPE as well as new protocols for each appointment. Dr. Bina finished her dental training at Baylor College of Dentistry and obtained her Master’s degree for Orthodontics at the University of Michigan. During her years

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at Baylor College, she received numerous research awards. She received national recognition when she won the Harry Sicher First Research Essay Award and presented her research at the annual session of the American Association of Orthodontics in 2002. She and her family reside in Riverside. Her family and staff are delighted to be a part of the wonderful community of Greenwich and appreciate the connections and relationships with family, friends and patients. She recently participated in the charity ballroom dance competition, Dancing Stars of Greenwich, and was the competition winner! She helped raise over $100,000 for the nonprofit organization, ABILIS. Our mission is to provide excellent orthodontic care in a safe and caring environment where the focus is on creating amazing, functional smiles. We are excited to meet you and be a part of your orthodontic journey to a beautiful smile.


2020 | Dental PROFILES

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

DR. KARLIS’ SPECIALTY FOCUS AREAS ARE:

CHILDREN’S CHILDREN’S DENTISTRY DENTISTRY AND AND ORTHODONTICS ORTHODONTICS OF OF GREENWICH GREENWICH

pediatric and young adult oral and maxillofacial surgery, which include extraction of primary and adult teeth, wisdom teeth removal, exposure of impacted canines, mesiodens removal, correction of tonguetied patients and orthognathic surgery. She is licensed in Connecticut to give outpatient general anesthesia/conscious sedation for patients that require additional sedation. Dr. Karlis works closely with local pediatricians, orthodontists and pediatric dentists to assure a comfortable surgical experience. As the program director at New York University Langone Medical Center, she dedicates much of her time to teaching oral and maxillofacial surgery residents. She is well recognized nationally and has authored many manuscripts on pediatric oral surgery and sedation.

1212 1212 East East Putnam Putnam Avenue Avenue Riverside, Riverside, CT CT 203.698.0794 203.698.0794 childrensdentistrychildrensdentistryandorthodontics.com andorthodontics.com

Silvestro Iommazzo, Iommazzo, DDS DDS & Silvestro & Victor Victor Pardi, Pardi, DDS DDS Why did did you you choose choose Why your specialty? specialty? your

As aa specialist specialist in in pediatric pediatric As dentistry, Dr. Dr. Iommazzo Iommazzo cares cares dentistry, for the oral health of children for the oral health of children from infancy infancy to to early early adult. adult. As As a a from specialist in orthodontics Dr. specialist in orthodontics Dr. Pardi supports supports patients patients by by Pardi improving their smiles and selfimproving their smiles and selfesteem, in addition to correcting esteem, in addition to correcting even the most complex bite even the most complex bite problems. We both have different problems. We both have different passions but strive to do all we passions but strive to do all we can for our patients. can for our patients.

Years in practice? Twenty-five years

What sets you apart from your competition?

Proudly, we are the choice for many pediatricians’ and dentists’ children.

What is your greatest achievement?

When past patients come back with their children for me to treat, it is the greatest compliment I can ever receive!!

What What sets sets you you apart apart from from your your competition? competition?

Our Our practice practice has has continued continued to to serve serve our our community community for for over over thirty thirty years. years. We We provide provide state-of-the-art state-of-the-art treatment treatment in in all all phases of pediatric dentistry phases of pediatric dentistry and and orthodontics, orthodontics, including including emergency emergency service service 24-7. 24-7. We We are constantly engaged in are constantly engaged in continuing education to stay continuing education to stay up-to-date with the latest up-to-date with the latest technologies to best serve our technologies to best serve our patients and families. patients and families.

Vasiliki Karlis, DMD, MD, FACS MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY OF GREENWICH

SPECIALTY: Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery 4 Dearfield Drive, #205 Greenwich, CT 203.717.1222 maxfacsgreenwich.com msgoms.com

Scott Kesselman D.D.S RIVERSIDE ORTHODONTICS

Our Mission

SPECIALTY: Invisalign® and Braces For All Ages

The mission of Breast Cancer Alliance is to improve survival rates and quality of life for those impacted by breast cancer through better prevention, early detection, treatment and cure. To promote these goals, we invest in innovative research, breast surgery fellowships, regional education, dignified support and screening for the underserved.

1171 East Putnam Avenue Riverside, CT 203.698.0045 riversideortho.net

If you would like to learn more about BCA, please visit breastcanceralliance.org

Why is it important for children to get screened by the age of 7?

Contact us!

The American Association of Orthodontics recommends an evaluation by an orthodontist by age seven because many times early developmental treatment guides permanent teeth into a more favorable position, lowers the risk of dental trauma and can correct skeletal discrepancies.

Breast Cancer Alliance, 48 Maple Avenue, Greenwich, CT 06830 P 203.861.0014 F 203.861.1940 Yonni Wattenmaker, Executive Director

www.facebook.com/ breastcanceralliance

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@BCAllianceCT

@breastcanceralliance


2020 | Dental PROFILES

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

If you add up all the years Dr. Goodwin has been in the Dental Field as a Hygienist and a Dentist,

you will see she has been taking care of teeth for over 20 years. “Time has flown by. I’ve had the opportunity to see so many changes in Dentistry.” Technological advances really help her days go by with less stress. At her family practice in Cos Cob, she uses the safest equipment and the most up-todate technology available.

Danielle Goodwin

GOODWIN DENTAL 31 River Road, Suite 300 Cos Cob, CT 203.869.2552 dgoodwindds.com

continue to follow all local and changing regulations on a daily basis. Our patients and staff are so happy to be coming back and we hope it can stay this way.

day, and make it to their events after school. It is most important to me not to miss my children growing up, and Dentistry allows me to do just that.

While there are many things I love about being a Dentist, treatment planning

Our practice has continued to serve our community for over 20 years. We provide

with the local specialists in town is very exciting for me. Being a solo Dentist at my office can get lonely sometimes, so it is great to work and collaborate with a group of talented dentists I also call my friends. I love watching kids I see at 3 or 4 years old grow up. Being a general dentist, I can appreciate different stages of growth and even watch them have their own children. But the best part about my job is the work-life balance it provides me as a mother of 2 active boys. I can get into work early, do teeth all

It has been a tough few month fighting this Covid virus, but Dentistry is

essential to our overall health and well-being. We have put into place guidelines to safely and effectively provide dental treatment to our patients, as well as keeping our families, friends and staff as safe as possible. We

Dentistry has always been at the forefront of infectious disease control measures, so at the Greenwich Dental Group, our dentists and staff members adjusted readily to the appearance of Covid-19. A full array of Personal Protective Equipment and thorough sanitation measures had always been critical to our mission of providing advanced dental care in a safe and warmly welcoming environment, and now we have taken additional stringent measures to enhance the quality of our patients’ experience.

Dr. David A. Zadik Dr. Steven Altman Dr. Stephanie Hotchkiss

GREENWICH DENTAL GROUP 18 Fieldpoint Rd. Greenwich, CT 06830 203-869-3984 greenwichdentalgroup.com

• A doubling in size so we could increase the distance between both patients and staff and rotate room usage in order to conduct intensified sanitation activity. • HEPA filters in each private treatment room to capture ultra-fine particles including viruses. • Carefully calibrated UVC lighting scientifically proven to kill viruses. • Strict protocols to take patients from their car to the freshly sanitized treatment room, with no waiting room time. • Daily symptom screening of all staff and patients as they enter.

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state-of-the-art treatment in all phases of dentistry, including after hour emergency care. We engage in continuing education to stay up to date with the latest technologies to best serve our patients and families. We get to know our patients very, very well. Our staff has been with our practice a LONG time. We love seeing our patients all over town. I love when kids run up to me to show me their wiggly teeth or when patients introduce me to their families. It’s a great feeling and the reason I love being a Local Dentist.

• Complete adherence to all ADA and CDC guidelines regarding the coronavirus. Although our practice has never closed down completely during the pandemic, we did reduce our activity so we could revamp and expand our offices to better address our changed world. And make no mistake—the enhanced patient safety and comfort flowing from these measures will continue to benefit you long after the Covid crisis has passed. Though the world may have changed, our commitment and tireless effort to provide comprehensive dental services of extraordinary quality and attentiveness for all age groups has only grown. As has our appreciation for the privilege of serving such a loyal patient base in both Fairfield and Westchester counties. And one more thing you can always count on: Our relentless “Dedication to the Health of Your Smile.” Please visit our website to learn much more about our services and staff! greenwichdentalgroup.com


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A-List Awards 2020

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We hope this year’s set of finalists, with their innovative and imaginative projects, is just the inspiration you have been looking for. Join us on September 16, 2020 for our virtual awards ceremony, where the winners for each category will be revealed. We wish our finalists much luck, and we thank all who entered, as well as our judges and our generous sponsors, who have made this celebration possible.

The following is a listing of the 2020 A-List Awards finalists by category. Please note that this listing includes the entrant’s name and contact information for each finalist. To view the full list of professionals credited for each project as well as a project photo, please visit athomealistawards.com to view our new digital A-List Awards program. Each finalist “page” can be shared on social media, and the link to each “page” can be included on a website or forwarded via email.

This year has been unlike any other. Due to the worldwide pandemic, our vision for 2020 has been altered—we have been sheltering at home, pivoting how and where we work, and adapting to an ever-changing reality. Despite these unprecedented challenges, our design community has created and embraced a new vision for 2020—they have shown, now more than ever, how essential good design is to making our spaces reflect who we are, how we live, and the way we want to feel. Against all odds, we received more entries than ever before in this year’s A-List competition, and our esteemed panel of judges had the unenviable task of determining the finalists from a truly impressive pool of submissions. We thank our judges for giving their time and expertise to this year’s competition.

Welcome to athome magazine’s eleventh annual A-List Awards.

Separate but together


Laura Kaehler Architects @laurakaehlerarchitects Laura Kaehler, Principal Matt Arnott, Project Architect Laura Kaehler Architects Greenwich; 203-629-4646 kaehlerarchitects.com

Hemingway Fine Homes @hemingwayconstruction Hemingway Fine Homes Greenwich; 203-625-0566 hemingwayconstruction.com

Clarity Home Interiors @clarityhome Amy Zolin Clarity Home Interiors Greenwich; 203-340-2468 clarityhomeinteriors.com

BATH DESIGN: Transitional/Modern

Steven Mueller Architects @steven_mueller_architects Steven Mueller Architects Greenwich; 203-869-3758 stevenmuellerarchitects.com

Sage Design @sage_design_ct Kathy Hodge Sage Design Fairfield; 203-553-9656 sagedesign.com

Pimlico Interiors @pimlicointeriors Melissa Lindsay Pimlico Interiors Westport; 203-972-8166 pimlicointeriors.com

Mark P. Finlay Architects @mpfarchitects Jay Valade Deborah Szabo Maureen Kokorda Mark P. Finlay Architects Southport; 203-254-2388 markfinlay.com

BATH DESIGN: Trad/Classic

Morgan Harrison Home @morganharrisonhome Morgan Harrison Home New Canaan; 203-554-0941 morganharrisonhome.com

Karen Bow Interiors @karenbowinteriors Karen Bow Interiors Darien; 914-953-1517 karenbow.com

DINING ROOM

Neil Hauck Architects @neil_hauck_architects Neil Hauck, Principal Brian O’Connor Robert Metzgar Neil Hauck Architects Darien; 203-655-9340 neilhauckarchitects.com

Laura Kaehler Architects @laurakaehlerarchitects Laura Kaehler, Lead Designer Richard Basic, Team Architect Victor Sheptovitsky, Team Architect Laura Kaehler Architects Greenwich; 203-629-4646 kaehlerarchitects.com

Cobble Court Interiors @cobblecourtinteriors Robert Rizzo Cobble Court Interiors New Canaan; 203-972-7878 cobblecourt.com

Jody Fierz Interior Design Ridgefield; 203-722-1447 jodyfierz.com

Jody Fierz Interior Design with Doyle Coffin Architecture @jodyfierzint @doylecoffin @doylecoffininteriors

Huestis Tucker Architects @huestistuckerarchitects Jennifer Huestis Huestis Tucker Architects Woodbridge; 203-248-1007 huestistucker.com

KITCHEN DESIGN: Trad/Classic

The Rath Project @therathproject Diane Rath The Rath Project Fairfield; 518-542-6268 therathproject.com

Pimlico Interiors @pimlicointeriors Melissa Lindsay Pimlico Interiors Westport; 203-972-8166 pimlicointeriors.com

Karen Bow Interiors @karenbowinteriors Karen Bow Interiors Darien; 914-953-1517 karenbow.com

ENTRYWAY

Robin Henry Studio @robinhenryid Robin Henry Studio Westport; 646-409-3099 robinhenrystudio.com

COMMERCIAL SPACE: Interior Design + Architecture Beinfield Architecture @beinfieldarchitecture Beinfield Architecture Norwalk; 203-838-5789 beinfield.com

Pimlico Interiors @pimlicointeriors Melissa Lindsay Pimlico Interiors Westport; 203-972-8166 pimlicointeriors.com

Studio KC @studiokcinteriors Katie Canfield Studio KC Stamford; 845-705-0684 studiokcinteriors.com

Robin Carroll (Interior Designer) KARP New Canaan; 203-972-3366 karpassociatesinc.com

KARP New Canaan; 203-972-3366 karpassociatesinc.com

KARP @karpassociatesinc

Deane, Inc. @kitchensbydeane Peter Deane Deane, Inc. Stamford; 203-327-7008 deaneinc.com

Alisberg Parker Architects @alisbergparker Susan Alisberg Alisberg Parker Architects Old Greenwich 203-637-8730 alisbergparker.com

KITCHEN DESIGN: Transitional/Modern

Sarah Blank Design Studio @sarahblankdesign Sarah Blank Design Studio Greenwich; 203-655-6900 sarahblankdesignstudio.com

Robert Dean Architects @robertdeanarchitects Robert Dean Architects New Canaan; 203-966-8333 robertdeanarchitects.com

Morgan Harrison Home @morganharrisonhome Morgan Harrison Home New Canaan; 203-594-7878 morganharrisonhome.com

Peter Coffin Doyle Coffin Architecture Ridgefield; 203-431-6001 doylecoffinarchitecture.com

JOIN OUR VIRTUAL EVENT / SEPTEMBER 16 / 5:30 PM

Roughan Interiors @roughaninteriors Roughan Interiors Weston and New York City 203-769-1150 roughaninteriors.com

Pimlico Interiors @pimlicointeriors Melissa Lindsay Pimlico Interiors Westport; 203-972-8166 pimlicointeriors.com

Karen Bow Interiors @karenbowinteriors Karen Bow Interiors Darien; 914-953-1517 karenbow.com

Charles Hilton Charles Hilton Architects Greenwich; 203-489-3800 hiltonarchitects.com

Ray Forehand Christina Lake Forehand + Lake Fairfield; 203-259-7636 forehandlake.com

Forehand + Lake with Charles Hilton Architects @forehand_lakedesign @charleshiltonarchitects

BEDROOM: Trad/Classic

Sage & Ginger @sageandgingerdesigns Emily Fuhrman Sage & Ginger New Canaan; 203-594-9862 sageandginger.com

Ryan Salvatore Design @ryansalvatorearchitecture Ryan Salvatore Design New York City; 212-475-0050 ryan-salvatore.com


ADDRESS:

Tischler und Sohn (USA) Ltd.

Tischler products are manufactured in our environmentally and Tischler und Sohn manufactures custom mahogany wood windows computer-controlled facility. These products consist of both European and doors in Germany. and domestic-style profiles and continue to be the benchmark in the products are manufactured our environmentally and industry,Tischler providing unsurpassed quality and in durability. computer-controlled facility. These products consist of both European To better serve our clients Tischler has added thermally broken, laserand domestic-style profiles and continue to be the benchmark in the cut stainless steel and hot-rolled steel, bronze and stainless steel industry, providing unsurpassed quality and durability. windows and doors. In addition, Tischler offers an aluminum sliding To system better serve ourofclients has added thermally broken, operating capable sizes Tischler up to thirty-nine feet by nine feet laser-cut stainless hot-rolled bronze and stainless steel ten inches and fixed units steel up toand twenty feet bysteel, ten feet six inches. windows and doors.a In addition, Tischler offers an aluminum sliding This product incorporates revolutionary patented pneumatic operating capable of sizes up to thirty-nine gasket system thatsystem can withstand extreme wind pressure. feet All by nine feet ten inches and with fixedspecifications units up to twenty feet by ten feet six inches. products are available that meet Florida Building This product incorporates a revolutionary patented pneumatic Code requirements for hurricane impact resistance, and air and gasket system thatproducts can withstand extremeready-to-install wind pressure.by All water infiltration. Tischler are delivered products aretechnicians. available with specifications that meet Florida Building our factory-trained Code requirements for hurricane impact resistance, and air and water infiltration. Tischler products are delivered ready-to-install by our factory-trained technicians.

Tischler und Sohn manufactures custom mahogany wood windows and doors in Germany.

tischlerwindows.com

WEBSITE:

203-674-0600

tischlerwindows.com PHONE:

WEBSITE:

203-674-0600 Six Suburban Avenue Stamford, CT 06901

PHONE:

Six Suburban Avenue Stamford, CT 06901

ADDRESS:

Tischler und Sohn (USA) Ltd.

PRESENTING SPONSOR

PRESENTING SPONSOR

129

A-LIST FINALISTS 2020 Alist.tischler.7.20.indd 1 SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

Tischler und Sohn (USA) Ltd. Six Suburban Avenue, Stamford, CT 06901 Telephone 203/674/0600 • Telefax 203/674/0601

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7/28/20 11:59 AM

TISCHLER WINDOWS AND DOORS. UNCOMMON. UNCOMPROMISING.

ARCHITECT: MARK P. FINLAY ARCHITECTS, AIA PHOTO BY WARREN JAGGER


Hobbs, Inc.

PRESENTING SPONSOR

Hobbs, Inc. is an award-winning builder of distinctive homes in Connecticut, New York and New Jersey. Brothers Scott and Ian Hobbs are proud to honor the legacy of integrity, quality and Hobbs,instilled Inc. is an builder of distinctive homes in client service by award-winning their grandfather and founder, Theodore Connecticut, New York and New Jersey. Brothers Scott and Ian deFreyne Hobbs, over six decades ago. Hobbs are proud to honor the legacy of integrity, quality and The company sustainsinstilled strong,by collaborative relationships with Theodore client service their grandfather and founder, the mostdeFreyne respected architects and designers in the construction Hobbs, over six decades ago. industry. They employ experienced, dedicated professionals and company relationships talentedThe craftsmen to sustains plan andstrong, executecollaborative every step of the “Hobbs with the most respected architects and designers in the construction Approach” for each project. Whether renovating an apartment in industry. They employ experienced, dedicated professionals New York City, constructing a waterfront home in the Hamptons or and to plan and execute every of the “Hobbs buildingtalented a family craftsmen retreat in Connecticut, each team is instep constant Approach” for each project. Whether apartment in communication to deliver a superior building renovating experience an from New York City, constructing a waterfront home in the Hamptons or concept to completion and beyond. Hobbs Care, a division of Hobbs, building a family retreat in Connecticut, each team is in constant Inc., is available to clients to provide comprehensive maintenance communication to deliver a superior building experience from programs, renovations and continual home improvement services. concept to completion and beyond. Hobbs Care, a division of Hobbs, The company’s success to is marked byprovide their transparency, synergy Inc., is available clients to comprehensive maintenance and determination to adhere to the values and client services thatservices. programs, renovations and continual home improvement make the company great. The company’s success is marked by their transparency, synergy and determination to adhere to the values and client services that make the company great.

hobbsinc.com; hobbs-care.com

WEBSITES:

203-966-0726

WEBSITES: PHONE:hobbs-care.com hobbsinc.com;

Hobbs Care: New Canaan, CT | Saddle River, NJ Hobbs, Inc: New Canaan, CT | New York, NY PHONE: Saddle River, NJ | Bridgehampton, NY 203-966-0726 Hobbs Care: New Canaan, CT | Saddle River, NJ

ADDRESS:

Hobbs, Inc: New Canaan, CT | New York, NY Saddle River, NJ | Bridgehampton, NY

ADDRESS:

Hobbs, Inc.

A-LIST SPONSOR

203.966.0726

www.hobbsinc.com

CONNECTICUT • NEW YORK • NEW JERSEY

DISTINCTIVE HOMES, ADDITIONS & RENOVATIONS

Jane Beiles Photography Interior Design by Lynn Morgan Brooks & Falotico Associates, Inc.

A-LIST FINALISTS 2020 JOIN OUR VIRTUAL EVENT / SEPTEMBER 16 / 5:30 PM


Fairview Hearthside Fairview Hearthside ADDRESS:

NY 12601

Hobbs A-List Program ad 2019 FINAL bleed.indd 1

131

A-LIST FINALISTS 2020 7/26/19 11:53 AM SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

Our team sales would team would be happy visitjob your or home Our sales be happy to visittoyour sitejob orsite home for for a free estimate for your dream project! Please give us a a free estimate for your dream project! Please give us a call at call at 452-8444 or email us at info@fairviewhearthside.com and CONNECTICUT • NEW YORK • NEWand JERSEY (845) (845) 452-8444 or email us at info@fairviewhearthside.com we will be happy to speak with you. 203.966.0726 www.hobbsinc.com we will be happy to speak with you.

Our pledge is to deliver an extraordinary service while Our pledge is to deliver an extraordinary service while maintaining a high level of professionalism, integrity, foresight, maintaining a high level of professionalism, integrity, foresight, and fairness. are committed to growing Fairview Hearthside and fairness. We areWe committed to growing Fairview Hearthside DISTINCTIVE HOMES,satisfaction. ADDITIONS & RENOVATIONS through complete customer through complete customer satisfaction.

Each project that Fairview Hearthside is involved in takes careful Each project that Fairview Hearthside is involved in takes careful thought and planning, and we pride ourselves on the ability to thought and planning and we pride ourselves on the ability to work with the customer in choosing the fireplace that best suits work with the customer in choosing the fireplace that best suits their style and needs. Fairview Hearthside offers many services their style and needs. Fairview Hearthside offers many services to complete your project, from designing the look that you want to complete your project, from designing the look that you want to achieve through the follow-up maintenance of your hearth to achieve through the follow up maintenance of your hearth product for years to come. We maintain a staff of experienced, product for years to come. We maintain a staff of experienced, Jane Beiles Photography well-traveled and fully ensured technicians, as well as specialists Interior Design by Lynn Morgan Brookswell-traveled & Falotico Associates, Inc. and fully ensured technicians, as well as specialists in our Sales/Design team, and we are confident that your project in our Sales/ Design team and we are confident that your project will be handled with professionalism, thoroughness, cleanliness, will be handled with professionalism, thoroughness, cleanliness, and with safety in mind. and with safety in mind.

For over 40 years, Fairview Hearthside is the Hudson Valley’s For over 40 years Fairview Hearthside is the Hudson Valley’s first name in hearth products. Having recently renovated our first name in hearth products. Having recently renovated our showroom at 68 Violet Avenue in Poughkeepsie, NY, we continue showroom at 68 Violet Avenue Poughkeepsie, NY, we continue to serve builders, architects, and designers with the very best of to serve builders, architects, and designers with the very best of the hearth industry, including gas and wood fireplaces, outdoor the hearth industry, including gas and wood fireplaces, outdoor kitchens, pizza ovens, grills, fire pits, and architectural stone. kitchens, pizza ovens, grills, fire pits, and architectural stone.

fairviewhearthside.com

fairviewhearthside.com WEBSITE:

845-452-8444 WEBSITE:

845-452-8444 PHONE:

PHONE: Poughkeepsie,

68 Violet Avenue ADDRESS: Poughkeepsie, 12601 68 VioletNY Avenue

A-LIST SPONSOR

PRESENTING SPONSOR

68 Violet Avenue | Poughkeepsie, NY 12601 Call for a free estimate: 845 452-8444 fairviewhearthside.com

The Leader in Sales and Installation of Fireplaces and Outdoor Kitchens Serving Fairfield and Westchester Counties

TOP DISTRIBUTOR OF


Kathleen Hay Designs @kathleenhaydesigns Kathleen Hay Designs Nantucket, MA; 508-228-1219 kathleenhaydesigns.com

Robin Carroll (Interior Designer) KARP New Canaan; 203-972-3366 karpassociatesinc.com

KARP New Canaan; 203-972-3366 karpassociatesinc.com

KARP @karpassociatesinc

Karen Bow Interiors @karenbowinteriors Karen Bow Interiors Darien; 914-953-1517 karenbow.com

Charles Hilton Charles Hilton Architects Greenwich; 203-489-3800 hiltonarchitects.com

Ray Forehand Christina Lake Forehand + Lake Fairfield; 203-259-7636 forehandlake.com

Forehand + Lake with Charles Hilton Architects @forehand_lakedesign @charleshiltonarchitects

BEDROOM: Transitional/Modern

Tanner White Architects @tannerwhitearchitects Tanner White Architects Westport; 203-283-4749 tannerwhitearchitects.com

Sellars Lathrop Architects @sellarslathroparchitects Sellars Lathrop Architects Westport; 203-222-0229 sellarslathrop.com

Robin Carroll (Interior Designer) KARP New Canaan; 203-972-3366 karpassociatesinc.com

KARP New Canaan; 203-972-3366 karpassociatesinc.com

KARP @karpassociatesinc

Douglas VanderHorn Architects @dvharchitects Douglas VanderHorn, Principal David Milliken, Project Manager Douglas VanderHorn Architects Greenwich; 203-622-7000 vanderhornarchitects.com

RENOVATION

Karen Bow Interiors @karenbowinteriors Karen Bow Interiors Darien; 914-953-1517 karenbow.com Roughan Interiors @roughaninteriors ROMO VA NGUA RD K EL LY WE A RS T L ER Roughan Interiors Weston and New York City 203-769-1150 roughaninteriors.com

Wesley Stout Associates @wesleystoutassociates Wesley Stout Associates New Canaan; 203-966-3100 wesleystout.com LANDSCAPE: Less Than 1 Acre

Devore Associates Devore Associates Fairfield; 203-256-8950 devoreassoc.com

CEN T URY CISCO McGUIRE M A DE GOODS

SCHWART ZDE SIGNSHOWROOM.COM

A N I N T E R I O R S C O L L E C T I V E , C U R AT E D F O R T H E T R A D E

SCHWARTZ DESIGN SHOWROOM

EL I T IS ERIC K US T ER

D2 Interieurs @d2interieurs Denise Davies D2 Interieurs Weston; 646-326-7048 d2interieurs.com

Ray Forehand Christina Lake Forehand + Lake Fairfield; 203-259-7636 forehandlake.com

Charles Hilton Charles Hilton Architects Greenwich; 203-489-3800 hiltonarchitects.com

Vicente-Burin Architects @vicenteburin Paulo Vicente, Principal in Charge Vicente-Burin Architects Fairfield; 203-319-9571 vbarchitect.com

Sellars Lathrop Architects @sellarslathroparchitects Sellars Lathrop Architects Westport; 203-222-0229 sellarslathrop.com

Charles Hilton Architects with Forehand + Lake @charleshiltonarchitects @forehand_lakedesign

LIVING SPACE

Prutting + Company Custom Builders @pruttingbuilder Prutting + Company Custom Builders Stamford; 203-972-1028 prutting.com

Nautilus Architects @nautilusarchitects2019 Christopher Arelt Nautilus Architects Lyme; 860-227-1169 nautilusarchitects.com

MODERN ARCHITECTURE

Rosalia Sanni Design @rosalia_sanni_design Rosalia Sanni Design Old Greenwich; 203-918-4619 rosaliasanni.com

Renée Byers Landscape Architect @reneebyers_landscape architect Renée Byers Landscape Architect Greenwich; 203-489-0800 reneebyers.com

Renée Byers Landscape Architect @reneebyers_landscape architect Renée Byers Landscape Architect Greenwich; 203-489-0800 reneebyers.com

James Doyle Design Associates @jamesdoyledesign associates James Doyle Design Associates Greenwich; 203-869-2900 jdda.com

Wesley Stout Elisa Miret-Pollino Cory Jorgensen Wesley Stout Associates New Canaan; 203-966-3100 wesleystout.com

Charles Haver Stewart Skolnick Haver & Skolnick Architects Roxbury; 860-354-1031 haverskolnickarchitects.com

Haver & Skolnick Architects with Wesley Stout Associates @haverskolnickarchitects @wesleystoutassociates

LANDSCAPE: Greater Than 1 Acre

JOIN OUR VIRTUAL EVENT / SEPTEMBER 16 / 5:30 PM


Schwartz Design Showroom (SD Showroom) is a 5,500-square-foot Schwartz Design (SD Showroom) is a 5,500-square-foot showroom exclusive toShowroom the trade, located in the Stamford Waterside exclusive to the trade, located in the Stamford Waterside Designshowroom District. The stunning showroom offers area interior Design Theastunning showroom offers area interior designers andDistrict. architects unique experience, one that infuses designers architects a unique experience, one that infuses seventy years ofand industry experience with the forward-thinking years of experienceexecutive, with the forward-thinking visionseventy and creativity ofindustry former marketing owner Alexis vision and creativity of former marketing executive, owner Varbero. Alexis Varbero. Exclusive to the trade, SD Showroom helps clients build their Exclusive the provides trade, SDend-to-end Showroomexpertise helps clients their businesses. Theto team and build support, businesses. The team provides end-to-end expertise and from research through delivery and follow-up customer service.support, from research through delivery and follow-up customer service. What began as a family-run furniture store seventy years ago Whatgrandfather, began as a has family-run storedestination seventy years by Alexis’ evolvedfurniture into a design for ago by Alexis’ grandfather, has evolved into a design destination innovators across the tri-state area. Throughout its rich history, SDfor innovators across tri-state area. Throughout its rich history, Showroom has been at the forefront of the interior design industry, has been at theservice forefront the interior design knownSD forShowroom its exceptional customer andofemphasis on the known for its exceptional customer service and emphasis designindustry, experience. on the design experience. Alexis also understands the complexities and needs of small Alexis As also the complexities and needs of small businesses. a understands result, SD Showroom offers ongoing opportunities businesses. As a result, SD Showroom ongoing opportunities to help foster designers’ professional growthoffers and development, with to help foster designers’events professional growth and a full calendar of networking and seminars. And development, there is also withprogram a full calendar networking events seminars. And there a loyalty offeringofspendable credits asand a way to further is also a loyalty program offering spendable credits as a way to build business for interior designers. further build business for interior designers.

@schwartzdesignshowroom INSTAGRAM: @schwartzdesignshowroom

schwartzdesignshowroom.com WEBSITE: schwartzdesignshowroom.com INSTAGRAM:

203-817-0433 PHONE: 203-817-0433 WEBSITE:

330 Fairfield Avenue ADDRESS: Stamford, 06901Avenue 330 CT Fairfield Stamford, CT 06901 PHONE:

Schwartz Design Showroom Schwartz Design Showroom ADDRESS:

PRESENTING SPONSOR PRESENTING SPONSOR

77 133

A-LIST FINALISTS 2020 athomefc.com SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

SCHWART ZDE SIGNSHOWROOM.COM

A N I N T E R I O R S C O L L E C T I V E , C U R AT E D F O R T H E T R A D E

SCHWARTZ DESIGN SHOWROOM

EL I T IS ERIC K US T ER ROMO VA NGUA RD K EL LY WE A RS T L ER CEN T URY CISCO McGUIRE M A DE GOODS


Ring’s End

PRESENTING SPONSOR

Ring’s End, a Connecticut-based lumber and building materials retailer, serves the CT shoreline, South County, RI, and Southern Westchester County, NY. Founded in 1902 in Darien, Ring’s End today End, alumberyards, Connecticut-based lumber and paint building materials has nineRing’s full-service ten free-standing centers, retailer, serves the CT shoreline, South County, RI, and Southern most with dedicated design and décor showrooms, a commercial Westchester County, NY. Founded in 1902 in Darien, Ring’s paint and lacquer facility, a custom millwork shop, a centralized End today has warehouse, nine full-service lumberyards, ten freestanding distribution and an education center. Ring’s Endpaint is thecenters, most with dedicated andand décor showrooms, a commercial largest retailer of both Marvindesign windows doors and Benjamin paint and lacquer facility, a custom millwork shop, a centralized Moore paint in the Northeast. This family-run company remains distribution warehouse, and an education center. Ring’s End is the true to its founding principles, catering to builders, remodelers and largest retailer of both Marvin windows and doors and Benjamin homeowners alike with an inventory of only the highest-quality Moore paint in the Northeast. This family-run company remains materials, a reputation for superior service, and a commitment to true to its founding principles, catering to builders, remodelers the local communities. Over the course of its 118-year history, Ring’s homeowners alike with an inventory of only the highest-quality End hasand increased their product offerings and embraced technology materials, a reputation for superior service, and a commitment to with the launch of an e-commerce website to supplement its brick the local communities. the course of its 118-year history, Ring’s and mortar stores, complementOver the modern shopping experience, End has increased their product offerings and embraced technology and cater to a diverse demographic. with the launch of an e-commerce website to supplement its brick and mortar stores, complement the modern shopping experience, and cater to a diverse demographic.

RingsEnd.com

WEBSITE:

800-390-1000

PHONE:

800-390-1000 ADDRESS: 181 West Avenue WEBSITE: Darien, CT 06820 RingsEnd.com

PHONE:

181 West Avenue Darien, CT 06820

ADDRESS:

Ring’s End

PRESENTING SPONSOR

MARVIN SIGNATURE™ COLLECTION

MODERN

JOIN OUR VIRTUAL EVENT / SEPTEMBER 16 / 5:30 PM

RingsEnd.com 800 • 390 • 1000


At Marvin, we’re driven by this purpose: to imagine and create better ways of living. As people spend more time indoors, we recognize that our work isn’t just about building better windows and doors—it’s about opening new possibilities for how people live, work, think and feel inside a Marvin space. Warm sunlight, fresh air and a connection to the natural world can instantly change the mood of a home or office. We design our products to make that connection feel seamless—even in the most challenging of spaces. We are committed to design that is as functional and intuitive as it is beautiful. Rather than meeting expectations, we push ourselves to elevate the standard for excellence. Whether we’re replicating historic millwork, engineering uninterrupted views or improving energy performance, we look for what we can do better—and then we design it. Since the day we opened our doors in 1912 as a family-owned and -operated cedar and lumber company, we’ve looked for ways to help people live better. We continue to evolve by raising the bar, building quality, beauty and simplicity into people’s everyday lives.

marvin.com

WEBSITE:

800-966-2784

PHONE:

2 Pearson Way Enfield, CT 06082

ADDRESS:

Marvin

PRESENTING SPONSOR

135

SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

pgarynproductions.com (203) 722-5401

Emmy Award winning Noah Finz is a veteran TV Sports reporter and anchor. He created and manages the Vantage Sports Network from Frontier highlighting CT sports. He spent 18 years as Sports Director for WTNH-TV, Connecticut’s ABC affiliate.

NOAH FINZ

Emmy Award winning Kendra Farn is a veteran TV news reporter and anchor. She spent 13 years at WCBS-TV, and WNBC-TV in New York City, the country’s largest television market.

KENDRA FARN

Your business needs a high quality video. Still photos just don’t cut it. Nothing can sell you or your company better than video. Moving pictures and sound are far more engaging to customers and clients. Business videos can be multipurposed: to enhance your website, use for presentations, for e-newsletters, for social networking sites, and so on. Video is the way of today and is so easily accessible to everyone.

Your video produced by real journalists.


Yvonne Ferris Interiors @yvonneferrisinteriors Yvonne Ferris Interiors Westport; 203-292-8614 yvonneferrisinteriors.com

Roughan Interiors @roughaninteriors Roughan Interiors Weston and New York City 203-769-1150 roughaninteriors.com

Karen Bow Interiors @karenbowinteriors Karen Bow Interiors Darien; 914-953-1517 karenbow.com

Charles Hilton Charles Hilton Architects Greenwich; 203-489-3800 hiltonarchitects.com

Last Detail Interior Design @lastdetailinteriordesign Carey Karlan Last Detail Interior Design Darien; 203-921-5151 careykarlan.com

Karen Bow Interiors @karenbowinteriors Karen Bow Interiors Darien; 914-953-1517 karenbow.com

PLAY SPACE: KID

InnerSpace Electronics @innerspaceelectronics InnerSpace Electronics Mt. Kisco, NY; 914-937-9700 ieiny.com

Christopher Pagliaro Architects Darien; 203-838-5517 christopherpagliaro architects.com

Hemingway Fine Homes Greenwich; 203-625-0566 hemingwayconstruction.com

Hemingway Fine Homes with Christopher Pagliaro Architects @hemingwayconstruction @c.pagliaro.architects

D2 Interieurs @d2interieurs Denise Davies D2 Interieurs Weston; 646-326-7048 d2interieurs.com

Alisberg Parker Architects @alisbergparker Susan Alisberg Alisberg Parker Architects Old Greenwich 203-637-8730 alisbergparker.com

Forehand + Lake with Charles Hilton Architects @forehand_lakedesign @charleshiltonarchitects

Ray Forehand Christina Lake Forehand + Lake Fairfield; 203-259-7636 forehandlake.com

PLAY SPACE: ADULT

OFFICE/LIBRARY

D2 Interieurs @d2interieurs Denise Davies D2 Interieurs Weston; 646-326-7048 d2interieurs.com

KID/TEEN BEDROOM

William D. Earls AIA Architect @williamd.earlsaia William D. Earls AIA Architect Wilton; 203-219-7838 williamearls.com

Nautilus Architects @nautilusarchitects2019 Christopher Arelt Nautilus Architects Lyme; 860-227-1169 nautilusarchitects.com

Haver & Skolnick Architects @haverskolnickarchitects Charles Haver Stewart Skolnick Haver & Skolnick Architects Roxbury; 860-354-1031 haverskolnickarchitects.com

DeMotte Architects @demottearchitects DeMotte Architects Ridgefield; 203-431-8890 demottearchitects.com

POOL HOUSE

William Lyon Designs @williamlyondesigns William Lyon Designs Stamford; 203-489-5624 williamlyondesigns.com

Smart D2 Playrooms @smartd2playrooms Karri Bowen-Poole Denise Davies Smart D2 Playrooms Weston; 914-260-3042 smartd2playrooms.com

Mark P. Finlay Architects @mpfarchitects Jay Valade Deborah Szabo Maureen Kokorda Mark P. Finlay Architects Southport; 203-254-2388 markfinlay.com

Ray Forehand Christina Lake Forehand + Lake Fairfield; 203-259-7636 forehandlake.com

Charles Hilton Charles Hilton Architects Greenwich; 203-489-3800 hiltonarchitects.com

Charles Hilton Architects with Forehand + Lake @charleshiltonarchitects @forehand_lakedesign

TRADITIONAL ARCHITECTURE: Greater Than 7,000 Square Feet

Ryan Salvatore Design @ryansalvatorearchitecture Ryan Salvatore Design New York City; 212-475-0050 ryan-salvatore.com

Karen Bow Interiors @karenbowinteriors Karen Bow Interiors Darien; 914-953-1517 karenbow.com

DB Design @dianabyrnedesign Diana Byrne DB Design Rye, NY; 646-246-2617 dbdesigninc.com

JOIN OUR VIRTUAL EVENT / SEPTEMBER 16 / 5:30 PM

Sellars Lathrop Architects @sellarslathroparchitects Sellars Lathrop Architects Westport; 203-222-0229 sellarslathrop.com

Robert A. Cardello Architects @cardelloarchitects Robert A. Cardello Architects Westport; 203-853-2524 cardelloarchitects.com

Kathleen Hay Designs @kathleenhaydesigns Kathleen Hay Designs Nantucket, MA 508-221-0159 kathleenhaydesigns.com

Huestis Tucker Architects @huestistuckerarchitects Jennifer Huestis Huestis Tucker Architects Woodbridge; 203-248-1007 huestistucker.com

Browning Residential Design Margaret Browning Kufferman Browning Residential Design Westport; 203-610-1478 browningdesignct.com

TRADITIONAL ARCHITECTURE: Less Than 7,000 Square Feet

Robert A. Cardello Architects @cardelloarchitects Robert A. Cardello Architects Westport; 203-853-2524 cardelloarchitects.com


PRESENTING SPONSORS

137

AWARD SPONSOR

GIFT BAG SPONSOR

Registration includes a suggested donation of $25, with 100% of the proceeds benefiting the Food Bank of Lower Fairfield County. In this time of health and economic crisis, many more families are seeking help for the first time. Resources are running low and demand is greater than ever. Please consider donating and make a difference in your community. So, sit back, pop the champagne and let’s celebrate together— you don’t want to miss this!

SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

Register for your full-access pass to design’s biggest night! Whether you’re a design pro or an aficionado, prepare to be inspired! Coming to you from Norwalk’s Wall Street Theater, we will reveal the 11th Annual A-List Awards winners at our virtual ceremony. Celebrate with us and your local design community! Go to athomealistawards.com to register and receive your access link to the show. Watching with a group? Each individual viewer must register to receive a $100 gift card to Serena & Lily.

Registered attendees will receive a $100 gift card to Serena & Lily

REGISTER NOW FOR FULL ACCESS: athomealistawards.com

September 16, 2020 / 5:30pm

Find out at our 11th Annual A-List Awards Virtual Ceremony

And the winner is...

the premier home design competition

awards


awards

JUDGES

the premier home design competition

BRIAN SAWYER Sawyer | Berson

MARA MILLER Carrier and Company

JESSE CARRIER Carrier and Company

BRITT ZUNINO Studio DB

DAMIAN ZUNINO Studio DB

KEITH WILLIAMS Nievera Williams

EDWARD SIEGEL Edward Siegel Architect

Need Home Design Inspo? Tune in Sept. 16 at 5:30pm to discover the winners of the 11th Annual A-List Awards in our Virtual Ceremony register for full access:

athomealistawards.com Registered attendees will receive a $100 gift card to Serena & Lily Coming to you from Norwalk’s Wall Street Theater, we will reveal the 2020 A-List Awards winners! Be inspired by the area’s best home design projects while celebrating our local design community. Go to athomealistawards.com to register and receive your access link to the show. Watching with a group? Each viewer must register to receive a $100 gift card to Serena & Lily.

PRESENTING SPONSORS

Registration includes a suggested donation of $25, with 100% of the proceeds benefiting the Food Bank of Lower Fairfield County. In this time of health and economic crisis, many more families are seeking help for the first time. Resources are running low and demand is greater than ever. Please consider donating and make a difference in your community.

AWARD SPONSOR

GIFT BAG SPONSOR


calendar ART & ANTIQUES ALDRICH MUSEUM, 
 258 Main St., Ridgefield, 438-0198. Tues.-Sun. noon-
5 p.m.; Fri. until 8 p.m. aldrichart.org AMY SIMON FINE ART, 1869 Post Rd. East, Westport, 259-1500. amysimonfineart.com BRUCE MUSEUM, 1 Museum Dr., 869-0376. brucemuseum.org CANFIN GALLERY, 39 Main St., Tarrytown, NY, 914-3324554. canfingallery.com CARAMOOR CENTER FOR MUSIC AND THE ARTS, Girdle Ridge Rd., Katonah, NY, 914-232-1252. Caramoor is a destination for exceptional music, captivating programs, spectacular gardens and grounds and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. caramoor.org CAVALIER GALLERIES, 405 Greenwich Ave., 8693664. cavaliergalleries.com CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY PRINTMAKING, 299 West Ave., Norwalk, 899-7999. contemprints.org

Moonlight on Sound by Elizabeth Higgins, 48"w x 60"h, oil on canvas

Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum

DISCOVERY MUSEUM AND PLANETARIUM, 4450 Park Ave., Bridgeport, 3723521. discoverymuseum.org

After temporarily closing in March, the Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum is pleased to announce that it is now open for business! A new exhibition, About Women, in collaboration with Silvermine Arts Center will mark the physical reopening of LMMM’s galleries and celebrate women’s artistic contributions as they are finding their voices and making an impact throughout the professional world. The show will run through Sunday, January 3, 2021. Admission to the exhibition will be included with the purchase of a tour ticket and be subject to museum tour schedules and rules. lockwoodmathewsmansion.com

( for more events visit greenwichmag.com )

CLAY ART CENTER, 40 Beech St., Port Chester, NY, 914-937-2047. clayartcenter.org

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FAIRFIELD MUSEUM AND HISTORY CENTER, 370 Beach Rd., Fairfield, 259-1598. fairfieldhistory.org FLINN GALLERY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 622-7947. flinngallery.com GERTRUDE G. WHITE GALLERY, YWCA, 259 E.

Putnam Ave., 869-6501. ywcagreenwich.org GREENWICH ARTS COUNCIL, 299 Greenwich Ave., 862-6750. greenwichartscouncil.org GREENWICH ART SOCIETY, 299 Greenwich Ave. 2nd flr, 629-1533. A studio school that offers a visual arts education program for kids and adults. Summer term runs through August. greenwichartsociety .org GREENWICH HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 39 Strickland Rd., 869-6899. Wed.-Sun. greenwichhistory.org KATONAH MUSEUM OF ART, Rte. 22 at Jay St., Katonah, NY, 914-232-9555. katonahmuseum.org KENISE BARNES FINE ART, 1947 Palmer Ave., Larchmont, NY, 
914-834-8077. kbfa.com LOCKWOOD-MATHEWS MANSION MUSEUM, 295 West Ave., Norwalk, 838-9799. lockwoodmathewsmansion.com LOFT ARTISTS ASSOCIATION, 575 Pacific Street., Stamford, 202-247-2027. loftartists.org MARITIME AQUARIUM, 10 N. Water St., S. Norwalk, 852-0700. maritimeaquarium.org NEUBERGER MUSEUM OF ART, Purchase College, 735 Anderson Hill Rd., Purchase, NY, 914-251-6100. neuberger.org PELHAM ART CENTER, 155 Fifth Ave., Pelham, NY, 914-738-2525 ext. 113. pelhamartcenter.org ROWAYTON ARTS CENTER, 145 Rowayton Ave., Rowayton, 866-2744. rowaytonarts.org


calendar SAMUEL OWEN GALLERY, 382 Greenwich Ave., 325-1924. samuelowen.org

Westport, 226-7070. westportartscenter.org

SILVERMINE GUILD ARTS CENTER, 1037 Silvermine Rd., New Canaan. silvermineart.org

YALE CENTER FOR BRITISH ART, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven, 432-2800. britishart .yale.edu

SM HOME GALLERY, 135 East Putnam Ave., 2nd flr., Greenwich, 629-8121. sandramorganinteriors.com

YALE UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY, 1111 Chapel St., New Haven, 432-0611. artgallery .yale.edu

STAMFORD ART ASSOCIATION, 39 Franklin St., Stamford. stamfordartassociation.org STAMFORD MUSEUM & NATURE CENTER, 39 Scofieldtown Rd., Stamford. stamfordmuseum.org UCONN STAMFORD ART GALLERY, One University Pl., Stamford, 251-8400. artgallery. stamford.uconn.edu WESTPORT ARTS CENTER, 51 Riverside Ave.,

CONCERTS, FILM & THEATER

DOWNTOWN CABARET THEATRE, 263 Golden Hill St., Bridgeport, 576-1636. dtcab.com FAIRFIELD THEATRE COMPANY, On StageOne, 70 Sanford St., Fairfield, 2591036. fairfieldtheatre.org GOODSPEED OPERA HOUSE, 6 Main St., East Haddam, 860-873-8668. goodspeed .org

ARENA AT HARBOR YARD, 600 Main St., Bridgeport, 345-2300. websterbankarena .com AVON THEATRE FILM CENTER, 272 Bedford St., Stamford, 661-0321. avontheatre.org

CURTAIN CALL, The 
Sterling Farms Theatre Complex, 1349 Newfield 
Ave., Stamford, 3298207. curtaincallinc.com

GREENWICH LIBRARY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 6227900. greenwichlibrary.org JACOB BURNS FILM CENTER, 364 Manville Rd., Pleasantville, NY, 914-7737663. burnsfilmcenter.org

Maritime Aquarium It’s time to explore again! The Maritime Aquarium in Norwalk is now open. For more information on hours and social distancing procedures, visit maritimeaquarium.org.

Your health and safety are our top priorities, so the Alzheimer s Association Wal to End Alzheimer s won t be a large in person gathering this year — instead, we invite you to wal in small teams of friends and family while others in your community do the same

Sunday, October 11 Fairfield County, CT

Registe today at

alz.org/wal 2020 NATIONAL PRESENTING SPONSORS

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A socially distanced benefit for Children's Learning Centers of Fairfield County

FOURTH ANNUAL

GOLF OUTING September 14, 2020

tamarack Country Club Greenwich, CT

Golf Outing Chairs: Tim Oberweger, Chris Peck & Robert Rahilly Shotgun Tee Time: 1:00 pm

Win a car ! Hole-in-One Prize Individual Golfer $675 Non-Golf, Cocktails & Dinner $275 Foursome $2,500 Corporate Foursome - $4,500 Dinner Sponsorship Sold Out!

Event Sponsor $15,000 Please register online before September 4, 2020 www.clcfc.org Questions? Email Corey Paris coreyparis@clcstamford.org

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calendar Flinn Gallery

LONG WHARF THEATRE, 222 Sargent Dr., New Haven, 787-4282. longwharf.com

Material World is the first exhibition of the 2020-21 season at the Flinn Art Gallery in Greenwich. The show features works by Leeah Joo, Stephanie Serpick and Jennifer Davies. All three artists bring the nuances and richness of materials, such as linens, fabrics, and paper to life through color, composition and texture. The show will run from Thursday, September 10 through Sunday, October 18 and is curated by Greenwich residents Katy Finnell and Nancy Heller. Check the Flinn Gallery website at flinngallery.com for information regarding the virtual exhibition opening, gallery hours and safety protocols. The Flinn Gallery is located on the second floor of the Greenwich Library, 101 West Putnam Avenue.

RIDGEFIELD PLAYHOUSE, 80 East Ridge, Ridgefield, 438-9269. ridgefieldplayhouse.org RIDGEFIELD THEATER BARN, 37 Halpin Ln., Ridgefield, 4319850. ridgefieldtheaterbarn.org SHUBERT THEATER, 247 College St., New Haven, 800-228-6622. shubert.com STAMFORD CENTER FOR THE ARTS, Palace Theatre, 61 Atlantic St., Stamford, 325-4466. stamfordcenterforthearts.org WESTPORT COUNTRY PLAYHOUSE, 25 Powers Ct., Westport, 227-4177. westportplayhouse.org

Pojagi Hope by Leeah Joo, 48’’ x 48’’, oil on canvas

LECTURES, TOURS & WORKSHOPS ALDRICH MUSEUM, 258 Main St.,Ridgefield, 438-0198. aldrichart.org AUDUBON GREENWICH, 613 Riversville Rd., 869-5272. greenwich.audubon.org

KIDS’ STUFF ALDRICH MUSEUM, 258 Main St., Ridgefield, 438-4519. Tues.-Sun. noon-5 p.m.; Fri. until 8 p.m. aldrichart.org AUDUBON GREENWICH, 613 Riversville Rd., 869-5272. greenwich.audubon.org AUX DÉLICES (cooking classes), 23 Acosta St., Stamford, 326-4540 ext. 108. auxdelicesfoods.com BEARDSLEY ZOO, 1875 Noble Ave., Bridgeport, 394-6565. beardsleyzoo.org

AUX DÉLICES, 231 Acosta St., Stamford, 326-4540, ext. 108. auxdelicesfoods.com

CLAY ART CENTER, 40 Beech St., Port Chester, NY, 914-937-2047. clayartcenter.org

BOWMAN OBSERVATORY PUBLIC NIGHT, NE of Milbank/ East Elm St. rotary on the grounds of Julian Curtiss School, 869-6786, ext. 338

CONNECTICUT CERAMICS STUDY CIRCLE, Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Dr. ctcsc.org

259-1598. fairfieldhistory.org GARDEN EDUCATION CENTER, 130 Bible St., 869-9242. gecgreenwich.org

KATONAH MUSEUM OF ART, 26 Bedford Rd., Chappaqua, NY, 914-232-9555. katonahmuseum.org STAMFORD MUSEUM & NATURE CENTER, 39 Scofieldtown Rd., Stamford, 977-6521. stamfordmuseum.org

FAIRFIELD MUSEUM AND HISTORY CENTER, 370 Beach Rd., Fairfield,

GREENWICH LIBRARY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 622-7900. greenwichlibrary.org

EARTHPLACE, 10 Woodside Lane, Westport, 227-7253. earthplace.org

MARITIME AQUARIUM, 10 N. Water St., S. Norwalk, 8520700. maritimeaquarium.org

39 Scofieldtown Rd., Stamford, 977-6521. stamfordmuseum.org

BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF GREENWICH, 4 Horseneck Lane, 869-3224. bgcg.org

GREENWICH HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 39 Strickland St., 869-6899. hstg.org

NEW CANAAN NATURE CENTER, 144 Oenoke Ridge, New Canaan, 966-9577. newcanaannature.org

BRUCE MUSEUM, 1 Museum Dr., 869-0376. brucemuseum.org

GREENWICH LIBRARY, 101 W. Putnam Ave., 6227900. greenwichlibrary.org

STEPPING STONES MUSEUM FOR CHILDREN, 303 West Ave., Mathews Park, Norwalk, 899-0606. steppingstonesmuseum.org

DISCOVERY MUSEUM AND PLANETARIUM, 4450 Park Ave., Bridgeport, 372-3521. discoverymuseum.org

IMAX THEATER AT MARITIME AQUARIUM, 10 N. Water St., S. Norwalk, 8520700. maritimeaquarium.org

DOWNTOWN CABARET THEATRE, 263 Golden Hill St., Bridgeport, 576-1636. dtcab.com

KATONAH MUSEUM OF ART, Rte. 22 at Jay St., Katonah, NY, 914-232-9555. katonahmuseum.org

BRUCE MUSEUM, 1 Museum Dr., 869-0376. brucemuseum.org

SEPTEMBER 2020

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RIDGEFIELD PLAYHOUSE, 80 East Ridge, Ridgefield, 438-5795. ridgefieldplayhouse.org STAMFORD CENTER FOR THE ARTS, Palace Theatre, 61 Atlantic St., Stamford, 325-4466. palacestamford.org STAMFORD MUSEUM & NATURE CENTER,

WESTPORT ARTS CENTER, 51 Riverside Ave., Westport, 222-7070. westportartscenter.org WESTPORT COUNTRY PLAYHOUSE, 25 Powers Ct., Westport, 227-4177. westportplayhouse.org G


advertisers index

BUILDING & HOME IMPROVEMENT Charles Hilton Architects...................................................................25 California Closets................................................................................ 11 Davis Feliz Salon.................................................................................45 Douglas VanderHorn Architects........................................................ 19 Fairview Hearthside Distributors......................................................131 Grand Entrance Gates Ltd..................................................................49 Hobbs Inc.......................................................................................... 130 Marvin............................................................................................... 135 Michael Smith Architects...................................................................35 Ring's End......................................................................................... 134 SBP Homes.........................................................................................39 Tischler und Sohn............................................................................ 129 Vicente Burin Architects, LLC............................................................53

FOOD, CATERING & LODGING Marcia Selden Catering......................................................................17 Table 104 Osteria Bar .......................................................................43 HEALTH & BEAUTY Nathaniel Witherell............................................................................... 22 Rye Vein Laser Center......................................................................... 114 Yale New Haven Health........................................................................ 23 Children's Dentistry and Orthodontics of Greenwich.......................124 Dr. Bina Park........................................................................................123 Dr. Robert Tramposch.........................................................................122 Goodwin Dental...................................................................................125 Greenwich Braces...............................................................................122 Greenwich Dental Group....................................................................125 Greenwich Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery........................................ 120 Maxillofacial Surgery of Greenwich....................................................124 Riverside Orthodontics.......................................................................124 Traynor Periodontics and Implants.................................................... 121 Hospital for Special Surgery................................................................31 Gray Matters.........................................................................................14 Nichols MD of Greenwich.....................................................................16 Yale New Haven Health/Smilow Cancer Center................................ 114

BUSINESS & FINANCE Broder & Orland LLC............................................................................ 8 Cummings & Lockwood - Greenwich................................................ 12 Greenwich Advisors............................................................................ 13 Greenwich Wealth Management.......................................................... 9 Legacies and Leadership.com........................................................... 15 Private Staff Group.............................................................................53 UBS Financial Services Inc./The Shantz Mantione Group............... 33 Vault Insurance...................................................................................26 Citibank............................................................................................... 21

JEWELRY Betteridge Jewelers..................................................................Cover 4 Henry C. Reid & Sons........................................................................71 Lux Bond & Green............................................................................ 67

DECORATING & HOME FURNISHINGS Sandra Morgan Interiors & Art Privé...................................................... 41 Schwartz Design Showroom............................................................ 133

LANDSCAPING, NURSERY & FLORISTS Sam Bridge Nursery.........................................................................60 Renee Byers Landscaping Architect PC...........................................51

EDUCATION & CHILDREN Berkshire School................................................................................85 Brunswick School...................................................................... 5, 57, 77 Children's School, The....................................................................... 10 Greens Farms Academy.....................................................................83 Greenwich Academy.......................................................................... 91 Greenwich Country Day School......................................................... 81 Independent Schools Admissions.....................................................53 King School......................................................................................... 87 Long Ridge School.............................................................................. 12 Masters School, The...........................................................................85 Putnam Indian Field School............................................................... 51 Rye Country Day School....................................................................89 Sacred Heart Greenwich....................................................................89 St Luke's School.................................................................................79 Whitby School..................................................................................... 87

NONPROFIT Alzheimer's Association................................................................. 140 Breast Cancer Alliance..............................................................54, 124 Bruce Museum - Sponsorship......................................................... 59 Children's Learning Center............................................................. 141 Junior League of Greenwich............................................................. 47 P Garyn Productions LLC................................................................135 Shepherds, Inc...................................................................................91 REAL ESTATE Berkshire Hathaway Home Services - Corporate........................... 20 Douglas Elliman Real Estate - Greenwich........................................ 37 Houlihan Lawrence - Corp................................................................ 27 Sotheby's International Realty......................................Cover 2, 1, 2, 3 William Raveis-Shelton...................................................................... 7 William Raveis-William Raveis/Debi Foss Heaviside & Dawn Stuttig........ 10

ENTERTAINMENT Stamford Tent & Event Services................................................60, 69 EVENTS A-list Awards..................................................................................... 126 The Open Door Shelter, Inc. Gala...................................................... 141 Walk To End Alzheimer's.................................................................. 140

REAL ESTATE/DESTINATION Ocean House.................................................................................... 64 MISCELLANEOUS Coxe & Graziano Funeral Home........................................................28 Westy Self Storage............................................................................49

FASHION Henry's Leather Company.......................................................Cover 3 Roundabout.......................................................................................51

SEPTEMBER 2020 GREENWICH

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postscript photog raph by melissa mc cann santangel o

SUMMER NOSTALGIA

I

f there’s one nice thing that’s resulted from the struggles of months of lockdown, it’s that we, even our little ones, seem to have a renewed appreciation for the simple pleasures. Over the summer, kids were less scheduled, allowing them to slow down and enjoy the timeless activities that used to keep us adults busy all summer— bike rides, beach walks and maybe a good old-fashioned frog hunt. Here, Teddy Santangelo proudly displays his new friend (who was soon released back into the wild). G

Have a photo that captures a moment in Greenwich? Send it to us at editor@greenwichmag.com for a chance to win $100. Please write photo submission in the subject line.

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Henry’s #7 Leather Sneaker Designed in Norwalk, Connecticut and meticulously hand-crafted in Portugal using only the finest French calfskin and Italian soles. Made to be comfortable from the first minute you put them on.

Henry’s Leather Goods • 5 Lewis Street, Greenwich, CT • henrysleather.com • 203-340-9273