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Editor Hannah Breshears Assistant Editor Scott Penman Contributor Sarah King Copyright Š 2013 modus studio All rights reserved. This book or any portion thereof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the express written permission of the publisher except for the use of brief quotations in a book review. Printed in the United States of America First Printing, 2013 ISBN 978-0-615-87014-4 modus studio 15 N. Church Ave. #102 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 www.modusstudio.com


contents foreword introduction timeline

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case study eco modern flats

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esther’s house orphanage clinic at esther’s house 1516 renovation

heber springs elementary deer multi-purpose facility ua razorback men’s basketball locker room sequoyah point project cleveland arts center of the ozarks sterling frisco

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reservoir house valley rim house

woolsey house viewpoint renovation crooked creek house hilltop house green forest middle school natural building solutions ua athletics master plan modus shop

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carroll county airport green forest athletic complex interactive subscape collier place cbs office cypress run ua west avenue annex caple residence

post winery fayetteville arts district wilbur d. mills pdc crawford hangar ua razorback retail demaree residence dunn residence ua razorback women’s locker room the cardinal at west center beersheba adult day care center doffin residence 560 vinson pat and willard walker student clinical education center ua leroy pond utility plant ua track + field walk of fame ua swimming + diving flippin elementary school 15 church

culture

community beast feast camping bowling

acknowledg ements biographies associates + collaborators photo credits


foreword I met Chris Baribeau in the spring of 2010, when we were in the early stages of envisioning the renovation of the dilapidated forty-year-old Glendale Apartments. Chris and I had an immediate connection. Both of us are sons of rural Arkansas, and we share the belief that our home state deserves well-designed spaces in every facet of life—not just single-family homes, but schools and public spaces as well. We both felt the same things were missing from our community: a lack of well-designed, well-managed apartments. modus was the natural choice for the Glendale project. The studio was instrumental to the early evaluation and conceptualization of that project, which evolved into Eco Modern Flats, winner of numerous local, national, and international honors, and arguably the most sustainable multifamily project in the country. The most special thing about Eco is not the project’s aesthetic appeal or environmental performance—it’s the way in which it fosters a true sense of community among the people who live there. This community-building effect is due in large part to the way that modus seized the potential to create meaningful outdoor gathering spaces where none existed before. Where some apartment doors opened to a steep, bare slope, modus saw a new curving retaining wall and a shady canopy of flowering vines, creating an inviting patio. Without altering the original structures, modus opened


up new vistas by adding balconies and rooftop terraces. What’s amazing about Eco is how modus transformed what are essentially 96 identical apartments. Within the strict parameters of a limited budget and limited space, creative solutions like the “transformer” media center and new outdoor spaces filled the once dismal spaces with new life. That’s a key element of modus projects—Chris, Josh Siebert, Jason Wright and their team not only consider the surroundings and the materials, they consider the way in which people interact within a space. In the Eco Modern Flats case study and throughout this book, we see thoughtful modern designs conveyed in a palette of simple materials. The varied body of work presented in this book speaks to modus’ talent, adaptability, and vision. Over the past three years, we have collaborated with modus studio on several designs for multifamily developments on urban infill sites. modus’s designs are modern while respecting the fabric of Fayetteville. These buildings integrate into the topography, the adjacent buildings, and the natural surroundings. They stand apart with distinctive modern design, but they are also good neighbors. What I most appreciate about modus studio is their practice of true collaboration. modus has the rare ability to balance the design intent with the partners’ goals and the economic reality of a project. In particular, the challenge of multifamily design is to fight the monotony of a mass of units. In modus’

designs, the thoughtful details that grace a single family home are not lost in the scale and uniformity of an apartment complex, and each space is treated as a canvas for living. As the studio has grown to include Jason Wright and modus shop, modus has gained the ability to fully bring their designs to life. Using simple materials and no small amount of cunning, Jason and his team fabricate unique pieces that are more beautiful and functional than massproduced alternatives. These handmade design details, such as the cedar and steel panels at Eco Modern Flats, bring warmth and unique personality to a building. Chris, Josh, and Jason often speak of modus studio as an idea. I congratulate the modus team for making the modus idea manifest—in a robust working environment, in your collaborations with clients and connections to our community, and in the thoughtful projects you have produced. The works in this book represent only the infancy of modus studio—I can only imagine what you’ll create in the next five years and beyond!

Jeremy Hudson, CEO


It was not in a fleeting moment that the decision to start an architecture firm was made. Though it feels like only moments ago, it was with great trust in each other and a shared passion for good design and hard work that Josh and Chris decided to bring modus studio to life in the summer of 2008. Our journey began with an idea - the idea that the patterns, perceptions, senses, and notions of daily life can inspire good design. Our goal was to admonish the preconceived notions of what an architecture firm should be and shed the all-too-often stuffy and pretentious stereotypes. We chose to leave our own names off the door and to foster a collaborative studio atmosphere. We chose to work hard and let the work speak for itself. We began this adventure in what was arguably a terrible economic climate, with a healthy dose of naivety,

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tenacity, and energy that allowed us to calm that risky tingle and persuaded us that we just needed to ride the wave up and out of the recession. Youth is a blessing. The past five years have been, for us, an incredible story, which has unfolded from humble beginnings: sitting back to back in Chris’ small 9’ by 11’ home studio (with an oversized plotter looming like a jealous third wheel in the corner) before quickly transitioning to a more urban context in our downtown studio on the fifth floor of the EJ Ball Building, where we could overlook our city and university. We spent many inspiring hours on rural state highways between Fayetteville and Green Forest, Arkansas, watching small armies of indigenous manmade structures return slowly to the earth. We allowed ourselves wide smiles with each new commission, even as we watched so many ideal projects be given


to those with more experience...All of these moments are certainly lessons in the process of pursuing good design and we are grateful for each one as they remind us of how we got here. We are bound by the belief that all living things deserve good-feeling space. This space is naturally sought by all sentient beings but is often an intangible, undefinable thing. Our ideal pursuit, using our creative talents and tenacious process, is to seek a balance between nature, man, and technology that delivers exactly this type of experience in our projects. As designers, we thrive in that vulnerable space between our known creative ability and the unknown challenges of new clients and projects. Our inaugural project, the design of a new educational facility for Green Forest

Public Schools, pushed us headfirst into that unknown. Unburdened by the prepackaged resolutions years of blind experience can bring, we learned to listen, to ask the right questions, and to first understand. We agreed that if children are going to spend eight hours per day, for nine months a year, for thirteen years of their life in school buildings, then those spaces should be bold and inspirational, not prison-like and cold. Our design philosophy was tested at the multifamily scale in Eco Modern Flats, where we again faced an unfamiliar project type. Working hand in hand with our brilliant clients, Specialized Real Estate Group, from the good bones of an existing apartment complex, we were

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able to deliver Fayetteville’s most modern and sustainable community. We saw firsthand in Eco Modern Flats the capacity of modern and sustainable design to positively affect the daily lives of people on a massive scale. We think this is a big deal. Jason joined our studio in the midst of this project as our new partner in crime and a key element in the formation of modus shop. The shop has bolstered our position as a fabrication and craft-based entity and allowed us to design, test, prove, and make our ideas as tangible and beautiful as possible. Much of this beauty comes from the iterative process of making that is integral to our mode of operation. In many of our endeavors we have been very fortunate to contribute to the remaking of our city in slow and somewhat economically tenuous times. We hold dear

the wide range of project types we have fashioned in this place and have chosen not to specialize in any certain area, but rather to remain as agile as designers and as nimble as, dare we say, businessmen. We find it a happy daily challenge to expand our portfolio and grow our firm in the blended rural-urban context of Northwest Arkansas. At the time of this writing we have 15(!) people in the studio. Unbelievable, really. We now occupy a new studio space at 15 N. Church Avenue in Fayetteville - one of our own design. We have put our money where our mouth is through our design and development partnership with Specialized Real Estate Group in the re-imagining of modern and sustainable spaces from the bones of some of the only remaining warehouse building stock in the city. For us, our new home represents the stark duality of


place and time and imagines in a perfectly personal palette the simplicity for which we strive. Furthermore, it gives us a space to expand the idea of architects as community builders. We can now open our doors and extend our resources to benefit the community on a more tangible scale...by exploring the educational and creative capacity of our studio through artistic outreach. As we continue to learn how to be bosses, fathers, students, leaders, and all around decent guys, we remain keenly aware of this thin sliver of space we occupy between the earth and the sky. And we build. Chris, Josh, and Jason August 2013


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reservoir house austin, kentucky

The Reservoir House commands a view of Barren River Reservoir in response to the characteristic rolling Kentucky hills. The barren hilltop, former farmland with only one towering elm remaining, provides a vast sloping surface on which the structure is sited. The challenge involved combining the proper angle of repose with the prominent 270-degree view. Careful control of orientation and proportions of space allows expansive glass to frame the view while maintaining privacy from neighbors.

LEFT view of north facade FACING PAGE site panorama floor plan 2008 | 21


The structure utilizes the space between the detached garage and the main house to create a poignant threshold. View is ever ything on a powerful site such as this. The lake is always present when approaching the house by car, and so the house acts as a device to appropriately hide and then reveal the view to re-engage the visitor with the power of the site. Unfortunately, the nearby homes have few windows, sheltered by a too-deep deck, feebly attempting to encompass the magnitude of the view to the lake beyond. The Reservoir House purposefully denies this standard approach and projects the primary living spaces with ample floor to ceiling glass to fully embrace the immediate and deep views of the lake beyond. RIGHT view of reservoir reveal FACING PAGE view of stair + skylight views of dining + living areas generative sketch 22 | 2008


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Transverse Section

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valley rim house altus, arkansas

Located near Arkansas’ wine country, the Valley Rim House is sited on a ridge overlooking the Arkansas River Valley. The expansiveness of the site is carefully controlled with an articulated loggia, simultaneously framing the courtyard and the view to the south. The planted terrace accommodates the section of the land and the owner’s desire for extensive gardens adjacent to the living areas of the home. The courtyard is an extension of the open, light-filled living room, blurring the lines between interior and exterior to carve out a unique place on a hillside once covered with vineyards.

LEFT preliminary sketches FACING PAGE transverse section through living area second floor detail sketches longitudinal section 2008 | 25


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LEFT rendering of approach rendering of pool + courtyard FACING PAGE floor plan 2008 | 27


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esther’s house orphanage malawi, africa

The Bigger than Life Christian Foundation of Nor thwest Arkansas par tnered with the local Church at Pinnacle Hills to embark on a faithbased ministry that would impact an entire region. Located in a context with over 40,000 orphans and a surrounding population of 350,000 people, the ministry has begun to make an impact in the lives of many. The facility is designed to initially house up to 100 orphans and care for 50 widows at Esther’s House. The needs of Malawi are great, and the solutions continue to evolve.

LEFT approach from street resident seated in courtyard FACING PAGE view from courtyard 2009 | 31


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ABOVE site axonometric diagram FACING PAGE interior view of chapel local worker laying bricks water tower installation on-site coordination and planning 2009 | 33


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clinic at esther’s house malawi, africa

The next phase of the project includes the development of a medical clinic to help aid and sustain the orphanage and provide developmental training for years to come. The continued support of t h e Nor thwest Arkansas community is needed in order to stabilize the goals of the project and assuage the great need of the Malawians. The medical clinic will be a place for health, education, and community support for the people of the region. The clinic will utilize a solar chimney for natural ventilation and cooling. Additionally, the design incorporates a small private courtyard for solitude and healing.

LEFT exterior renderings FACING PAGE learning center array classroom modules 2009 | 35


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1516 renovation

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The 1516 Renovation is a revealing modification to a 1940s house that uses an experimental island to embrace the kitchen as the modern hub for family and social interaction. The material logic and spatial relationships, both interior and exterior, are strengthened and articulated with simple, durable, and naturally beautiful materials.

LEFT plan evolution FACING PAGE view of kitchen exploded axonometric diagram view of dining room 2009 | 37


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woolsey house

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The expansion of the home’s small 1940s era footprint into a modern dwelling is achieved by melding clean traditional lines with warm modern elements. This re-emphasizes the interior and exterior relationships with the small site and existing large trees while simultaneously defining privacy and porosity. The reimagined home and newly articulated native landscape merge to define a sleek home in the most popular neighborhood in town. The project is realized by merging traditional materials of cedar, cement fiberboard, stone, and glass in a sensual and comfortable design.

LEFT plan evolution FACING PAGE view of interior stair view of porch with cedar rainscreen view from street 2010 | 41


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LEFT, ABOVE view of kitchen + dining area view of living area FACING PAGE exploded axonometric diagram 2010 | 43


viewpoint renovation fayetteville, arkansas

The Viewpoint Renovation design transforms a simple ranch style home into a modern edifice atop the northern rim of Mt. Sequoyah in Fayetteville, Arkansas. The addition refaces the street presence and adds a secondstory master bedroom to gain elevated views to the west and provide a new roof deck for stargazing. A calculated balance between light, color, and material references the artistic Asian pieces that adorn the interior walls of the home. Striking red elements are juxtaposed against the muted black cladding of the reskinned house. The reimagined home subtly engages the context of the neighborhood while clearly defining a fresh and modern face. RIGHT conceptual sketches site model rendering from street 44 | 2010


crooked creek house harrison, arkansas

The Crooked Creek House interprets the found conditions of the site through material logic. The “stick and stone� form of the project sits regally on a gently sloping hill above a fork of Crooked Creek. Intimately layered views of the Ozark Mountains reveal themselves on the rural journey to the site through a dense wood of mature oak, maple, and cedar. The solid base armature, the stone, proudly carries the variegated cedar-clad cantilevered box, the stick. These forms serve to spatially separate the programmatic elements, for the open living and kitchen areas occupy the joint carved between the two dominant elements.

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hilltop house

fayetteville, arkansas The Hilltop House was conceptualized as a modern insertion into the skin of a historic barn situated on one of the last remaining undeveloped lots on the east side of Mt. Sequoyah in Fayetteville, Arkansas. The home’s design privileges the relic-like nature of the existing barn and utilizes sustainable design systems, both passive and active, to minimize operating costs in a very natural setting. A fifty-foot tall silo-inspired tower and small open air pavilion were also designed to accommodate the owner’s desire for additional entertainment space on the large site. LEFT elevation + perspective sketches rendering of southeast corner FACING PAGE facade studies preliminary sketches rendering of guest suite silo sketches 2010 | 47


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green forest, arkansas client: green forest public schools total area: 29,014 SF

green forest middle school


This new two-story middle school is located in the small agricultural community of Green Forest, Arkansas, in a wide valley among the Ozark Mountains. During the initial evaluation of the proposed site, we recognized the importance of the existing central green space as a common area for the campus. Used throughout the day as a gathering place for middle school and high school students, it is a transitional space consistently traversed by all manner of students and members of the community. The space provides access to the campus football field and acts as a plaza for the old CWA gymnasium, as well as the art, music, cafeteria, and agricultural buildings on the campus. PREVIOUS PAGE view of front facade RIGHT preliminary sketch building model FACING PAGE views of front facade conceptual sketch 50 | 2010


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In the early master planning stages, the school’s desire to fill in the entire greenspace with a one-story classroom building (which would have eliminated the central outdoor space of the campus) was reinterpreted by proposing a modern two-story building capable of preserving much of the available exterior space as a student commons and community plaza. The design is resolved through the use of economical and intelligent materials combined to enrich the existing campus through the interaction of people, space, form, and color.

RIGHT view of front plaza FACING PAGE rendered window detail building section 52 | 2010


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Inside, a spacious atrium with a floating stair and a large skylight creates a pivotal moment of light and movement and acts as the primary hub of circulation. The vertical wall of the elevator, painted the school’s trademark red, is a catalyst for activity. The exposed bones of the building create an innately educational diagram and accentuate the volume of the entry, reception areas, and corridors that connect the classrooms. The library and circulation spaces on the second level open to the entry below. Conceived as a transparent platform, the library floats above the entry with a projected window box that frames the view to the west.

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elevator landing floating stair library entrance children’s library

FACING PAGE first floor plan 2010 | 55


cedar rain screen new membrane roof renovated showroom and offices cedar sun shade new entry

new concrete sidewalks new asphalt drive new planters new concrete patio grass pavers

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natural building solutions little rock, arkansas

Natural Building Solutions (NBS) is a retailer of sustainable building products with locations in Little Rock and Rogers, Arkansas. This building was purchased by the owner of NBS with the intention of rehabilitating the existing structure using green materials, ultimately providing a tenant space for an ecoconscious business to occupy. The client approached modus shortly after the purchase of the building, previously both a gas supply house and a flooring supplier, to re i m a g i n e t h e s t r u c t u re as a LEED Gold facility.

LEFT rendering of approach from street FACING PAGE conceptual sketches axonometric diagram 2010 | 57


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fayetteville, arkansas client: university of arkansas athletics design team: modus studio + populous

university of arkansas athletics master plan


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modus studio teamed up with Populous, a sports architecture firm located in Kansas City, in order to deliver an extensive fifteenyear Athletics Master Plan for the University of Arkansas Athletic Facilities. The intense study of existing facilities, programming for future needs, design investigations for the proposed future uses, and cost estimation were aimed at maintaining a competitive edge in the Southeastern Conference and took into consideration the entire Athletic Valley.

PREVIOUS PAGE master plan aerial rendering LEFT massing diagram, baum stadium conceptual sketch, hog pen club conceptual sketch, hog walk FACING PAGE planning studies 2010 | 61


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modus shop

fayetteville, arkansas We understand that a disconnect exists between the classic architectural process and hands-on fabrication. A designer sitting at a desk can model something in three dimensions, but he or she doesn’t have the benefit of gleaning information directly from the making of the part. Though we still sketch and make models, modus shop gives us the ability to feed off the prototyping process and to fabricate things we really believe in. Through iterative design, we are constantly improving, and that’s something that is deeply important to our office.

LEFT hog wall prototype fabrication team on site heber art wall installation FACING PAGE 15 church idea wall installation post wine rack frame shaping post wine rack assembly 2010 | 63


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berryville, arkansas client: carroll county airport commission effective area: 2,450 SF

carroll county airport


The Carroll County Airport Terminal is an architectural machine that is inspired by the spirit of flight and yet stands as a proud artifact, eager to engage a growing population of pilots and visitors at this rural Arkansas airport. Conceptually derived from the memory of a World War II F4U Corsair airplane, the terminal building is a lens that captures and projects pilots to the landing area of the runway. The building seeks to take flight while sheltering exterior spaces under its provocative winglike forms.

PREVIOUS PAGE aerial view view of covered terrace RIGHT corsair wing diagram plan generation FACING PAGE floor plan 68 | 2011


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folded metal shell

Simple materials of metal panel, glass, and cement fiberboard are carefully articulated as lightweight skins to capture form and flood the space with natural light. The wedge form provides compression at the public entry to the north and release towards the runway to the south, welcoming planes as they land. From the sky, the building is a beacon, a parked artifact, and a form familiar to visiting pilots. The observation deck, or vulture’s row, is a unique loft that provides prime views to the approach end of the runway, a vantage from which pilots critique the skills of others as they make their landing on the windy hilltop.

window box

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FACING PAGE view from runway view of bar + gallery view of lounge area view of observation deck 2011 | 71


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green forest, arkansas client: green forest public schools thermal area: 2,978 SF stands + circulation: 6,540 SF | 1,000 seats

green forest athletic complex


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The Green Forest Athletic Complex reshapes the vision of this small public school district’s athletic program with a sleek language of color and form. Located directly to the south of the previously designed middle school, the new stands and press box continue the proportions and color coding which are now very identifiable sources of community pride within the Green Forest Public Schools Campus. By establishing a clear processional entry with striking color and form, the pulse of the athletic program is captured in a manner justifiable with the fervor that sporting events demand of small public school realms in the South. PREVIOUS PAGE view from field LEFT view of pressbox detail night view of stands view of approach from football field rear view of pressbox FACING PAGE roof ribbon diagram master plan 2011 | 75


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new york, new york [competition] Art Gallery

High Line Park Capture

Art Gallery

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Though pedestrian-oriented, the New York City High Line Park fails to connect visually and experientially with the everyday realm of the city street. To remedy this, our design offers a playful interaction between the activities of the High Line and the void below via live and recorded projections of the energy bounding from the walkway above. Under this portion of the High Line, one can see and hear the formerlydisconnected vivacity while enjoying a soft and playful respite from the monotony of planar concrete floors and stationary walls.

LEFT sight + sound diagrams rendering of subscape FACING PAGE second life installations 2011 | 77


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collier place

fayetteville, arkansas A relevant merger of materials and style seeks to blend a new building with the long time community anchor, Collier Drugstore. Rising above the dilapidated residential context, the new design embraces the existing site section and efficiently places parking, commercial space, apartments and amenities to meet the public and private demands of the prominent site. The modern units incorporate open and flexible living areas that take advantage of interior views of the site as well as scenic views of the University of Arkansas and the surrounding Boston Mountains. This footprint embodies a sustainable design and provides walkable urban living in the heart of the city. LEFT exterior rendering conceptual sketches FACING PAGE site massing diagrams dusk rendering 2011 | 79


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cbs office

bentonville, arkansas In the summer of 2011, Corporate Business Solutions (CBS) came to modus with the desire to bring the culture of their work to Northwest Arkansas. CBS specializes in printing services and needed a place to simultaneously display the machines they sell, house their diverse staff, and work with clients one on one. We engaged a design exercise that brought the Corporate identity to life through very clean forms and bold logos that floated above the salesmen’s bullpen. The design focuses on efficiency and clear, direct product display. The use of CBS’s red allows the potential client to fluidly interact with both the products and the CBS staff. LEFT views of entry lobby + conference room FACING PAGE floor plan axonometric diagrams 2011 | 81


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cypress run

forrest city, arkansas Cypress Run is an exclusive duck hunting collective in the marshy wetlands of eastern Arkansas. The linear, exaggerated forms of the lodge are derived from the nature of a duck in flight coupled with rich walls of stone and cypress that represent the material nature of the site. Orientation and site lines reinforce the migration patterns of the duck as muse, directing attention towards the wetland views from the grand interior and exterior spaces that are suited for accommodating the fellowship and function of the hunting club. LEFT first floor plan view of loft area view of first floor lounge FACING PAGE view of front approach view of entryway web column generate view of rear entry with web column 2011 | 83


level 03 7,950 SF (net) 8.456 SF (gross)

level 02 7,950 SF (net) 8.456 SF (gross)

level 01 7,950 SF (net) 8.456 SF (gross)

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ua west avenue annex fayetteville, arkansas

modus conducted a feasibility study for the University of Arkansas’ West Avenue Annex, located just east of campus in downtown Fayetteville. West Avenue is an important street for the growth and expansion of the Dickson Street Entertainment District. The annex site is transitional in nature with commercial retail, entertainment, and multifamily residential nearby to the north, west, and south. The potential for the redevelopment and improvement of this street and the existing adjacent structures is a logical step in the growth of downtown Fayetteville.

LEFT existing structure rendering of exterior from west avenue FACING PAGE floor plans + existing room use natural light diagram 2011 | 85


The existing building is underutilized in regards to space planning and occupancy efficiency. However, it is an ideal structure for various departments due to the location, which offers ideal walkability to Dickson Street, available free parking, and the private and secure nature of the building. It would not be unfair to say that the West Avenue Annex is one of the best kept secrets in the university’s building stock. The redesign of the exterior envelope and the renovation of the interior spaces carefully considers materiality, utilization of natural light, and appropriate space-making with modern amenities in order to establish this building as a premier university facility.

RIGHT rendering of classroom space rendering of conference area FACING PAGE amenities + greenway axonometric diagram 86 | 2011


uawaax civic buildings religious buildings transit stops entertainment 2011 | 87


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caple residence rogers, arkansas

Sitting prominently on axis with the main neighborhood entry and overlooking the 17th green of the Pinnacle Country Club golf course, the Caple Residence design seeks to strike a balance between the norms of the context and a more modern approach. The steep, irregularly-shaped site demands interjection between form and facade in order to balance the public and private realm. The stark white stucco exteriors are akin to a golf ball sitting proudly in the fairway, primarily an object in the natural setting yet rooting itself as an accepted part of this cultural environment.

LEFT exterior rendering FACING PAGE interior axonometric diagram conceptual sketches 2011 | 89


eco modern flats eco modern flats is a gut rehab of four similar apartment buildings built between 1968 and 1972. Our client’s goals for the renovation were to deliver a product not currently available in the local market— modern, urban, green multifamily rentals—and to save operations costs through energy and water-saving u p d a t e s . T h e re n o v a t e d buildings were each certified LEED Platinum.

fayetteville, arkansas owner: specialized real estate group, bob dant t h e r m a l a r e a : 6 2 , 4 0 0 S F bedrooms/units: 96 total utility cost: 50% of pre-renovation cost water saved annually: 2,221,825 gallons recyclables collected in first 18 months: 6 tons 90 | case study

A success by many measures, eco is a fully leased property, with a waiting list for new residents. Our client cut utility costs by half, and the project has been honored with local, national, and international recognition. A less quantifiable, but tangible result has been the true sense of community fostered by the new design.


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We saw an opportunity to reimagine healthy interior space, creating open and light-filled studios. Spatially efficient, sustainable strategies are expressed playfully; each tenant chooses a modern, no-VOC paint color for his or her kitchen, and a central multipurpose wall provides built-in storage that contains a rotating TV module to be viewed from the kitchen, living, and bedroom spaces— or to disappear behind a bookshelf. Enlarged windows and new sliding glass doors add circulation and much needed natural light to each space.

PREVIOUS PAGE night view from courtyard transformation diagram LEFT view of kitchen + dining area view of living area FACING PAGE exploded transformer diagram view of entry from kitchen view of transformer in action case study | 93


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Outdoors, the landscape design creates new spaces for outdoor living in a symbiotic relationship with the buildings, tenants, and nature. Serpentine retaining walls address erosion on the sloping site and carve out new patio areas for ground level units. Steel and cedar armatures create public and private rooftop terraces and balconies. The former laundry facility was transformed into a leasing office, restrooms, and pool cabana surrounded by prairie plantings. Lowtech sustainable solutions including a vegetated steel-cable trellis system and freestanding cisterns fashioned from steel culverts add high function and visual appeal at low cost.

LEFT view of courtyard from stair FACING PAGE aerial view view of rooftop deck + lounge view of stair to rooftop conceptual sketch case study | 95


96 | case study


Our comprehensive design services for this project included the design and development of the logo, branding, and marketing materials. To illustrate the sustainable features of the p ro p e r t y, w e d e v e l o p e d graphics including a sustainable elements diagram and a sixteen-page booklet. Educational groups and community organizations often make field trips to the project to demonstrate best practices in low-impact development, stormwater management, and native landscaping. To benefit a local children’s charity, we also designed and built a playhouse, called eco.fort, in the style of eco modern flats. LEFT eco logos marketing brochure eco fort rendering eco fort on site FACING PAGE sustainable elements diagram FOLLOWING PAGE vine covered walkway rain garden + cistern case study | 97


selected awards Urban Land Institute

Global Awards for Excellence 2013 Finalist

US Green Building Council LEED for Homes Award Outstanding Multifamily Project

National Apartment Association

Paragon Award for Green Housing Paragon Award for Best New Community under 150 Units

Student Housing Business Magazine

Innovator Award for Best Use of Green and Sustainable Design

Green Builder Magazine Green Home of the Year Award for Best Community Project

American Institute of Architects Arkansas Chapter 2011 Merit Award

US Green Building Council - Arkansas Most Outstanding Residential Project

Illinois River Watershed Partnership Golden Paddle Award for Construction

Fayetteville Construction and Developers Sustainability Award

Fayetteville Urban Forestry Advisory Board Landscape Award

Fay Jones School of Architecture Alumni Design Award 2013 Honor Award 98 | case study


case study | 99


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102 | 2012


deer multipurpose facility deer, arkansas

Designed for the students of the Deer/Mt. Judea School District, this facility not only takes into consideration the spatial needs of the school district but also functions as a refuge facility capable of housing the entire student body in the event of a natural disaster. Equipped with a regulation 94’ x 50’ basketball court, locker rooms for both senior and junior high students, concessions area and retractable bleachers for flexible staging of events, a music room, two classrooms, and restrooms, the facility provides much needed educational space for the small school district. LEFT exterior rendering looking southeast generative diagrams FACING PAGE conceptual sketches rendering of basketball court rendering of concessions lobby 2012 | 103


104 | 2012


heber springs elementary heber springs, arkansas

The Heber Springs Classroom Building is an addition to the dense public school campus in the heart of Heber Springs, Arkansas. Through initial master planning efforts, the site for the new building was identified as phase one of the infill on the campus. The construction of the building provides improved elementary security, increased building economy, and permanent healthy structures for learning. The simple form, articulated by the use of smart and economical building materials, sets the standard for the future expansion of this growing campus.

LEFT exterior view of art wall FACING PAGE exterior view of classrooms exploded axonometric diagram view of entry hall view of classroom 2012 | 105


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fayetteville, arkansas owner: university of arkansas athletics thermal area: 2,600 SF

university of arkansas men’s basketball locker room


108 | 2012


court wall

court floor

themed path

concept

The University of Arkansas came to us with a desire to strengthen the identity of the men’s basketball program through locker room renovations. Though the team has a strong history, the university leadership wanted a more holistic design to inspire and focus their players—a space in which they could take pride and feel ownership. The facility in this sense became an extension of the court that included several auxiliary spaces alongside the main locker room. Individual spaces are connected by a potent flow of energy expressed by the red ceiling plane and court floor material, which unifies the team’s pre- and post-game activities in the spirit of the game itself. PREVIOUS PAGE view of court wall + logo detail LEFT view of players’ lounge exploded axonometric diagram view of kitchen area FACING PAGE view of locker room 2012 | 109


white textured wood wall steel wrap with window box slate finish trellis and green roof tiled walls wood flooring CNC milled wood topography

section

elevation

gravel garden water overflowing reflective box within steel box house number illuminated from behind white powdercoated steel viewing box wood slat screen

110 | 2012


sequoyah point

fayetteville, arkansas Sequoyah Point is a renovation to an existing ranch style house situated atop Mt. Sequoyah. The project consists of remodeling the interior kitchen area, opening up the living space, and making a connection to the pool deck below. The two-story house is poised for entertaining, with some of the area’s finest views of the valley to the east. The redesigned layout of the house is flexible enough to accommodate the client’s modern lifestyle.

LEFT exterior rendering from pool area FACING PAGE exploded axonometric diagram pattern studies 2012 | 111


low impact design diagram.

112 | 2012


2012 | 113

fayetteville, arkansas client: specialized real estate group thermal area: 260,000 SF (approximate) site area: 118,048 SF

project cleveland


Project Cleveland is a design for a multifamily/student housing development on a 2.6 acre site just north of the University of Arkansas campus in Fayetteville. The design incorporates modern and efficient apartments ranging in size from studio units to fourbedroom units. Balconies, roof gardens, a rooftop club, and a pool courtyard are key elements adding to the quality of livable space. A parking garage serving the tenants is concealed on three sides by the building. The stepped back design helps to ease the transition between the university campus and surrounding residential neighborhood.

PREVIOUS PAGE low impact design diagram exterior rendering looking southwest RIGHT rendered elevations FACING PAGE conceptual sketches 114 | 2012


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116 | 2012


2012 | 117

springdale, arkansas client: arts center of the ozarks scope: exterior facade renovation building area: 4,500 SF

arts center of the ozarks


The Arts Center of the Ozarks asked modus to reimagine their existing facilities, improve their presence in the community, and provide new areas for cultural engagement on the grounds. This institution, which has been producing plays and art exhibitions for the last three decades, was in desperate need of rebranding to bring new life to its downtown location. We proposed a playful screen facade that gives the Arts Center of the Ozarks a distinct and inviting entry. Exterior gardens entice the public to become part of the streetside performance by stepping through the new screen into a curated melding of art, nature, and people. PREVIOUS PAGE rendering of southeast corner RIGHT phasing axonometric diagram rendering of entryway FACING PAGE courtyard axonometric sketches entrance sketch 118 | 2012

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fayetteville, arkansas [LEED registered: under construction] client: specialized real estate group thermal area: 302,095 SF

sterling frisco


122 | 2012


This significant site is the bridge between the University of Arkansas and Fayetteville’s entertainment district, where commerce, arts, and residential areas merge. The western edge of the site is obscured by the Frisco Trail and Arkansas-Missouri railroad, disengaged by topography and vegetation along these transportation spines. This buffer provides natural relief from the small residential character between the site proper and the university’s Old Main Lawn. With two bridges spanning the railroad ravine, like arms reaching to the university beyond, the site is conceptually a bridge within the fabric of the city.

PREVIOUS PAGE rendering of club entry exterior rendering LEFT rendering from street FACING PAGE site plan 2012 | 123


124 | 2012


The scale of this building begins to converge with the contextual built environment, a mix of commercial, residential, and institutional structures. Infrastructure and parking lots are currently low-slung, space-vacant neighbors to the east. This vacant context reinforces the need to reduce mass and volume along Lafayette Street, West Avenue, and Maple Street by using tower forms for depth, along with horizontal and vertical material transitions to modify the perception of scale. The mixed-use organization along the ground level balances the connection to the greater commercial context and provides an appropriate horizontal base that moves and reconfigures with the site section.

LEFT rendered elevations FACING PAGE view from maple bridge 2012 | 125


ABOVE unit axonometric diagrams RIGHT renderings of club lounge rendering of living area FACING PAGE rendering of courtyard + pool 126 | 2012


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altus, arkansas client: post winery scope: master plan + retail renovation total area: 22 acres

post winery renovation


Located in Altus, Arkansas, the Post Familie Winery carries on a rich tradition of wine making in the unique River Valley region of the Ozarks. The project involved the development of a master plan that expands upon operational efficiencies and heightens the visitor experience. Sitting on seventeen acres in the heart of Altus, the winery has a strong presence in the local community with over 100 years of production. The site has become a destination for wine, art, and events. The renovation to the retail and dining areas will renew the lasting energy of the place.

PREVIOUS PAGE view of exterior approach RIGHT site plan FACING PAGE phasing diagram plan generation 132 | 2013


existing

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2013 | 133


134 | 2013


The trellis is an essential element in grapevine cultivation and has always b e e n p a r t o f t h e re t a i l facility. The design reacts to conceptually rotate and extend the trellis to a massive horizontal configuration accepting vendors into the new western entry. This new light and airy entry invites visitors to enjoy the full scope of the wine tasting experience.

LEFT rendering of courtyard FACING PAGE view of retail entry view of exterior screen detail view of custom wine racks view of wine tasting bar 2013 | 135


136 | 2013


fayetteville arts district fayetteville, arkansas ingredients for a successful arts district.

PEOPLE

E N T E R TA I N M E N T

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PLACE

people + art + entertainment + place.

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The Fayetteville Arts District (FAD) is a nonprofit organization seeking to revitalize, support, and expand the prominent role that downtown Fayetteville plays in local commerce, art, and entertainment. FAD is focused on a spirited downtown region full of various retail, dining, art, culture, and entertainment options. The potential for a unified district will strengthen the existing community and encourage infill and revitalization within the district by attracting new businesses. The Fayetteville Arts District will promote and expand the ever-growing cultural impact of downtown by creating a single marketable district.

LEFT logo formulation diagram FACING PAGE downtown arts district 2013 | 137


138 | 2013


wilbur d. mills cooperative building beebe, arkansas

This project is a new professional development center for the Wilbur D. Mills Cooperative. The co-op has multiple outdated buildings that were retrofitted to serve a purpose not condusive to the buildings’ original designs. The professional development center will help consolidate the co-op’s program and offer a single point of meeting for those who use the co-op’s facilities. The new professional development center will be a collection of office and meeting rooms with collapsible partitions to allow for more flexible arrangements. The facility is also equipped with a workroom and serving kitchen in order to host larger workshops. LEFT rendered aerial view FACING PAGE rendering of entry lobby rendering from street 2013 | 139


cr crawford hangar

springdale, arkansas

In the fall of 2012, modus was approached by a local business owner who wanted to update his recently purchased airport hangar, located at the end of the Springdale Municipal Airport. The design concept incorporated showcasing the owner’s business and providing a nice, simple space for business meetings, all while housing the corporate plane. The hangar’s main feature is the use of different colors of metal and solar shades on the main facade. The desire to have more natural light while controlling the use of morning light was paramount to the way the east elevation was conceived. The hangar has multiple private offices, a pilot’s lounge, and a full kitchen. RIGHT rendering from street facade sketches 140 | 2013


ua razorback retail fayetteville, arkansas

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LEFT rendering of approach to shop axonometric diagram of interior axonometric diagrams of cash wrap DESCRIPTION

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UofA Razorback Store

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Located at a primary intersection in the Northwest Arkansas Mall, the modern feel of the UA Bookstore’s satellite storefront engages the viewer with bold color and form. Simple and modern, the new UA Razorback Shop is perfectly suited to the fastpaced shopping experience desired by Razorback game day visitors. Inspired by the Arkansas Razorback mascot, a red form jogs through the interior of the store and wraps the storefront. In the same manner, the display shelves, cash wrap, and ceiling cloud attempt to convey this sense of movement through misalignment, angles, and changing heights.

CONTENTS.

AXON‐OP 2

DESIGN.

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142 | 2013


demaree residence bentonville, arkansas

The Demaree residence is split into four levels by function to accommodate the shifting nature of the site and the location of existing trees. The master suite occupies the highest level with living areas and the children’s quarter below. The lowest level is devoted to entertainment alongside the garden and swimming pool. Expressed in stucco, cedar siding, and glass, the materials of the facade are allowed to move freely through the design, playfully merging the exterior and interior spaces of the home.

LEFT rendering of approach FACING PAGE rendering of master bedroom conceptual sketches rendering of living room 2013 | 143


144 | 2013


dunn residence little rock, arkansas

The Dunn family came to modus with a desire to renovate their 1945 home by boldly merging traditional architecture with modern design. This project reinterprets the existing stone walls as the support to the new “wooden box.� The entirely rebuilt second level sits as a pure element, contrasting the richly textured stonework below. The new design has renovated bedrooms and balconies on the second level and an open floor plan on the first level that extends to the outside and connects to the backyard, new deck, and carport.

LEFT rendering of entry view of existing approach FACING PAGE view of existing homeww rendering of northwest corner site model 2013 | 145


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2013 | 147

fayetteville, arkansas client: university of arkansas athletics thermal area: 1,885 SF

university of arkansas women’s basketball locker room


Un-renovated for nearly a decade, the existing UA Women’s Locker Room lacked the inspirational atmosphere found in the university’s other prominent facilities. The new design brings fresh life to the team’s locker room, lounge, and group study area with bold graphics and modern furnishings. Brushed steel hog logos, stainless steel lettering, and a ribbon colored the university’s trademark red help to unify and energize the interior spaces of the locker room. Additionally, a replica of the Bud Walton cour t floor displayed in the lounge area emphasizes the team’s winning philosophy on and off the court.

PREVIOUS PAGE rendering of court wall rendering of locker room RIGHT renderings of players’ lounge FACING PAGE locker room floor plan locker room axonometric diagram players’ lounge axonometric diagram 148 | 2013


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150 | 2013


2013 | 151

fayetteville, arkansas client: specialized real estate group units: 150 | 223 beds/acre site area: 2.11 acres total area: 346,175 SF

the cardinal at west center


The Cardinal at West Center is a multifamily project located on a two acre site adjacent to the University of Arkansas. This location is the northern edge of a populated and thriving multifamily neighborhood. The Cardinal has the opportunity to be a unique catalyst in the Fayetteville core. Within a sustainable culture resides a new and distinctive demographic - a generation seeking something better than status quo and an aesthetic beyond traditional norms. This project seeks to embrace the fresh tendencies of modern sustainability that permeate the exceedingly knowledgeable, diverse, and cultured people that will ultimately inhabit the project. PREVIOUS PAGE aerial rendering from southeast rendering of northeast corner RIGHT rendered elevations FACING PAGE renderings of courtyard + pool rendered sample unit plan 152 | 2013


2013 | 153


EXIT

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beer sheba adult day care center

beer sheba, israel [competition] This design utilizes the inherent characteristics of the site to transform a theoretical day care center into an urban amenity for the city of Beer Sheba, heightening the experience for residents and visitors. Conceptually, all aspects of the architecture can be seen as integral to, and generated from, the dramatically sloping site. Ascending and descending paths through the site create a dynamic, engaging, and open quality for the facility and its outlying areas. Natural light filters throughout the interior spaces of the facility from skylight wells. Warm hues wash the walls leading into and through the Mother Groups and give a unique character to each of these semi-private spaces. LEFT exterior rendering lego modeling FACING PAGE massing diagrams section through mother groups 2013 | 155


156 | 2013


560 vinson

fayetteville, arkansas When the owners came to modus with a desire to transform their modest ranch style home atop Mt. Sequoyah into a modern piece of art, connections to the natural beauty of the Boston Mountains instantly surfaced as paramount to any potential design. The existing house was segregated by small, cramped spaces with few windows to allow natural light in or views out. By opening the living areas and integrating layers of transparency into the design, the spatial boundaries of the home are purposely blurred, and at times, completely obliterated.

LEFT entrance sketch view from street FACING PAGE view of entry from patio 2013 | 157


A large oak tree in the front yard stimulated the angular expansion of the master bedroom that entirely changed the simple rectilinear plan of the existing home. This formal shift not only creates a cradle-like entry space for visitors but also allows the resident to experience the interior and exterior of the home simultaneously through planes of glass and cedar. Floor to ceiling windows flood the interior with natural light and visually extend the primary living areas out onto the front porch. From a position near the front door, a connection is made to the central oak through the sitting area of the master bedroom, further blurring the boundaries of public and private space in the home. RIGHT conceptual sketches generative plan sketch FACING PAGE view of rainscreen window detail view of dining area view of living room 158 | 2013


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doffin residence

bentonville, arkansas The Doffin Residence is a renovation to a twostory 1940s home located in downtown Bentonville, Arkansas. The traditional home is reimagined with a modern, open floorplan that creates strong connections to new exterior decks and terraces. A new pullthrough carport further defines the backyard and new outdoor living spaces, making the home more desirable for entertaining.

LEFT view of back facade FACING PAGE interior window detail view of back porch view of bathroom view of office space elevation + plan sketches generative plan sketch 2013 | 161


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fayetteville, arkansas client: university of arkansas for medical sciences northwest scope: interior renovation area: 12,287 SF

pat and willard walker student clinical education center


The renovation of just over 12,000 SF of what was previously surgical procedure space was designed to enable students and professionals to practice in a collaborative environment. It melds three uses into one space: a specialty clinic of private practitioners, a clinical skills area for the teaching of students, and a continuity clinic where student doctors work with practicing professionals to address the needs of real patients. The new clinic encompasses exam and procedure rooms, conference and consultation rooms, a break area, and the support spaces necessary for the high tech education of today’s medical students. PREVIOUS PAGE rendering of corridor looking west RIGHT floor plan axonometric axonometric unit detail FACING PAGE rendering of clinic student entry rendering of waiting area + play space 164 | 2013


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fayetteville, arkansas client: university of arkansas facilities management thermal area: 8,900 SF (approximate)

university of arkansas leroy pond central utility


168 | 2013


16'-0"

to its East and Bud Walton Arena to its West. By stepping back, both scales are responsibly negotiated while giving preference to the western walkway.

Pairing the height of the chiller towers with the height of Pomfret

The potential for noise between two brick structures is then an issue. The mechanical equipment may disturb the residents of Pomfret Hall, visitors to Bud Walton Arena as well as the opportunities for leisure in the nearby grassy areas and sidewalks.

A perforated metal screen surrounds the rooftop chillers and means of sound attenuation.

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STADIUM DRIVE

POMFRET HALL

BUD WALTON ARENA

APPROXIMATE PROJECT BOUNDARY

In order to preserve the pedestrian way to the west of the utility plant, the scale of the building responds to both Pomfret Hall to its east and Bud Walton Arena to its west. The structural bays reference the existing bays of Pomfret Hall in order to create a beautiful cadence along the southern facade. A perforated metal screen surrounds the rooftop chillers above to offer an attractive means of sound attenuation and visual obstruction. The perforation of the copper screen facade responds to the air flow, formal aesthetics, and acoustical needs of the building while being sensitive to the views from the dormitory to the east.

LEFT sound + scale diagrams site plan FACING PAGE modeled view of approach courtyard detail W CLINT ON DR IVE modeled view of towers conceptual sketch

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light with frosted glass housing

olympic ring emblem

name plates with athletes’ signature and information

metal pillar with polished finish

grass pave system

170 | 2013


ua track + field walk of fame

fayetteville, arkansas The incredible number of records, championships, and triple crowns this team holds is outstanding, yet there is no comprehensive display of these achievements to be found on campus. modus was given the opportunity to create a “walk of fame� for the track and field teams a display that would finally exhibit their astonishing achievements to the public. The new design follows a strict radial geometry, paying homage to the lanes of the track by continuing their form into the public realm, thereby creating a direct connection between the competitors and their fans. LEFT layout sketches FACING PAGE rendering of entry looking northeast monument diagram rendering from garage at night 2013 | 171


fritted glass

textured plaster wall

bronze metal panel

translucent glass

172 | 2013


ua swimming + diving locker rooms fayetteville, arkansas

The swimming and diving team at the University of Arkansas were relegated to a small corner of the existing HPER facility, which had been roughly outfitted for their lockers and lounge. The entry was not well considered, the locker area was no longer large enough for the expanding team, and the space generally lacked the energy, inspiration, and presence that a university athletic team deserves. The new design of this facility formalizes the entry to create a public face for the team and emulates the form of a narrow reflective swimming lane with a proud translucent glass approach. LEFT rendering of entry from southeast conceptual sketches rendering of entry from southwest FACING PAGE material diagram 2013 | 173


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flippin, arkansas client: flippin public schools thermal area: 40,544 SF

flippin elementary school


F l i p p i n P u b l i c S c h o o l ’s existing elementary buildings have reached the end of their usable life. High repair and utility costs, a disconnected layout, and the lack of a secure perimeter have resulted in a campus that is no longer efficient to operate. In addition to maximizing natural light and using sustainable materials, the new building provides multiple levels of security for the school. A welcoming, administrative “front door� orients guests and ensures that all visitors have to check in at the office before entering campus. Additionally, the centrally-located PE facility can serve as a safe room in the event of a natural disaster. PREVIOUS PAGE floor plan rendering of entrance + north facade RIGHT master planning diagrams entrance sketch FACING PAGE aerial rendering of entrance 176 | 2013


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fayetteville, arkansas client: 15 church partners thermal area: 6,240 SF

15 church avenue


The building at 15 Church was originally an electrical company warehouse built in 1955. The structure has solid bones of concrete block, brick, and steel bar joists. The building served as a functional warehouse space, haphazard television studio, and mediocre office space in downtown Fayetteville until recently purchased by 15 Church Partners, LLC. This project will transform the building into modern and sustainable offices with a new second level apartment. 15 Church is the first building we have designed for ourselves, with space for our collaborators at Specialized Real Estate as well as a small tech firm and barbershop next door. PREVIOUS PAGE construction time-lapse

RIGHT first + second floor plans conceptual sketches FACING PAGE shou-sugi-ban (burnt cedar) mobros on site shadow texture study rendering of entrance 180 | 2013

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These office spaces bring new life to what was a dilapidated site within the downtown core. By targeting LEED Platinum certification for major renovation, this project seeks to be a beacon for sustainability with an outwardly modern and crisp aesthetic that will educate citizens on the potential of eco-friendly design. Once complete, this project will result in urban, walkable, and energy-efficient working and living environments in downtown Fayetteville.

LEFT view of modus office view of specialized real estate office view of crown barbershop FACING PAGE axonometric diagrams of conference room modus conference room, in progress hand painted signage from joe alexander view of loft apartment 2013 | 183


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modus + community As a design studio, we draw constant inspiration from Fayetteville’s creative culture and have made a renewed commitment to engage the public in our craft through a series of community outreach events. By opening our shop and studio to the public on a quarterly basis for educational lectures, hands-on workshops, and professional collaborations, we hope to position ourselves as a generator of artistic expression in our own studio and the community at large.

special guest artists: studio leilani + students matt miller studio culture | 187


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beast feast When the leaves start to turn and the wind blows just right, we start craving the culinary excellence only the grill can provide… Or perhaps it’s just time to clear the deep freeze for this year’s bounty of wild game. We like to call this semispontaneous event the Beast Feast. We gather together an assortment of beverages, savage meats, barbecues, and deep fryers to commence in the wonderful merriment of cooking and eating with great friends and family. Typically we do this in the steel shop and will often get lost in nerdy architect/craftspeople debate. There may also be an occasional foot race, just to keep things interesting.

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camping As a (mostly) native group of Arkansans, we must get out and enjoy the wild air from time to time. Once a year we load up the cars and trucks with the latest camping accoutrements and head to “the farm� for hiking, skeet shooting, four-wheelers, and campfires. Roaming the wilderness helps us stay fresh and reminds us how important friends are to our sanity and success.

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modus + aia bowling We’re a competitive bunch. We play sports, cards, board games, and the occasional game of bowling in honor of his dudeliness, the Big Lebowski. Each year the AIA Arkansas puts together a bowling tournament for architects and consultants in Northwest Arkansas to battle it out. We may not have fancy uniforms or big league players, but we definitely hold our own. With consecutive wins in shades of bronze and silver, we’re confident that next year’s gold is ours for the taking!

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p a r tn ers

c h ris m. baribea u, AIA

jos h a. s ieber t , as s oc . A I A

jason h. wright, assoc. AIA

Chris Baribeau, AIA, is the principal architect and co-founder of the Fayetteville, Arkansas-based firm, modus studio. After graduating from the Fay Jones School of Architecture, Chris continued to build on his undergraduate design successes in a position with former professor, mentor, and friend, Marlon Blackwell Architect. The time spent at Blackwell’s firm allowed Chris to continue his architectural education while actively participating in the daily functions of a thriving design studio. In the middle of the economic downturn, Chris partnered with fellow designer Josh Siebert in 2008 to form modus studio, a firm built on the idea that relevant and inspiring architecture can be sourced from simple, everyday experiences. Chris’ work is rooted in northwest Arkansas, far from the nation’s fashionable centers of culture and art, where even decaying places have interminable meaning. He believes that through observation the world reveals itself as an inspirational primer for design and an unwritten instruction manual for living. In a region where the terms rural and urban are almost interchangeable, Chris champions architecture as a means of navigating the threshold between the natural and manmade world. He has chosen to focus on education, higher education, and multifamily housing projects in his own practice and embraces simple, low-tech design solutions to improve the lives of his clients.

Josh Siebert, associate AIA, is a designer and cofounder of architecture + prototyping firm modus studio in Fayetteville, Arkansas. After graduating from the Fay Jones School of Architecture in 2002 with a degree in architecture and a minor in art, Josh moved to Kansas City with his wife to work for HOK Sport +Venue +Event, a firm that allowed him to blend his passion for sports with design on projects like the New York Yankees Stadium and the Washington Nationals Baseball Stadium. After three and a half years with HOK, Josh returned to Arkansas to pursue projects smaller in scale. In late 2005 he accepted a position in the Rogers, Arkansas office of the San Diego-based firm, Tucker Sadler Architects. This position allowed Josh to expand his skills in the development market before joining Chris in 2008 to co-found modus studio. modus has worked diligently to improve Arkansas’s rural and institutional education facilities in recent years, with Josh leading the charge in the design of Green Forest Middle School and Athletic Complex, Heber Springs Master Plan and Elementary School, and several prominent University of Arkansas facilities. Through inventive design, careful attention to detail, and a clear understanding of use, Josh strives to create projects that stretch beyond individual building footprints to enhance the lives of their clients and communities.

Jason Wright, associate AIA, is the head of modus shop and project manager for modus studio in Fayetteville, Arkanas. He has been exposed to many different project types, and he believes that architecture is not unlike a crossroads, an intersection where the human experience and the built environment coalesce. Shortly after graduating from the Fay Jones School of Architecture in 2004, Jason moved to Estes Park, Colorado to build small local projects. During this time he experimented with metal fabrication and eventually moved to Kansas City, Missouri to take a job at el dorado, inc. At eldo Jason was taught, “if you design it, you build it, and you install it, then good will come.” This intense level of involvement instilled a high degree of accountability and work ethic in him, as well as a level of quality control that can be measured by eldo’s numerous awards and publications. After the three years at eldo, Jason transitioned to another award winning Kansas City, Missouri-based architecture firm, sfs architecture, inc. At sfs, he gained experience managing projects of different scales. Chris, Josh, and Jason kept in contact during his time away from Fayetteville and continued to toss around the idea of joining forces, anxiously waiting for the right time. Eventually their schedules were such that a move was justified and they took advantage of the opportunity.

200 | associates


associates [ 2 0 0 8 - 2 0 1 3 ]

Chris Lankford

David McElyea

Suzana Annable

Aaron Speaks

Joshua Jewett

Graham Patterson

Hannah Breshears

Scott Penman

Jody Verser

E. Milton Vaught

Kevin Brown

Lance Mallette

Cesar Chacon

Jose Garduno

not pictured:

Austin Chatelain Leanne Baribeau

Laura Chioldi Allison Vandever

Mark Wise Julie Chambers

Joey Gamblin Rachel Lords Smith

Erica Blansit Eric Hobbs

Paden Chambers

c o l l a b o ra t o rs [ 2 0 0 8 - 2 0 1 3 ] HP Engineering, Inc. Tatum-Smith Engineers, Inc. Engineering Consultants, Inc. DCI Engineers TME, Inc. Community by Design, LLC Bates & Associates, Inc. Jorgensen & Associates MESA Landry & Bogan McCutchen Engineering

CDI Contractors, LLC Crawford Construction Company Milestone Construction Company, LLC Crossland Construction Company, Inc. Flintco, LLC James H Cone, Inc. Birdsong Builders, Inc. Nabholz Construction Services Thompson Thrift Construction, Inc. Humphries & Partners Architects, L.P. L & L Metal Fabrication

Razorback Ironworks, LLC Blessings Construction, Inc. Specialized Real Estate Group Populous Phillip Lancaster Fairchild Construction Tom Usher SPI Interiors Malmstrom White Company H.E. Williams, Inc. Kimbel Mechanical Systems, Inc.

Harness Roofing, Inc. Ozark Electric Cooperative McClelland Consulting Engineers, Inc. Tim Cooper Tim Hursley Rett Peek 3GD, Inc Town Builders, Inc GB Group Construction Stuart Fulbright associates | 201


p h o t o c re d i t s All photos © modus studio, unless otherwise noted. esther’s house orphanage Bigger Than Life Christian Foundation: 30-32 woolsey house Rett Peek: 40, 43 green forest middle school Tim Hursely: 48-49, 51-52, 55 carroll county airport Rett Peek: 66-67, 70-71 green forest athletic complex Tim Hursely: 72-73, 75 eco modern flats Tim Hursely: 90, 94-95, 98-99 Rett Peek: 92-93 heber springs elementary Rett Peek: 102-103 ua razorback men’s basketball locker room Tim Hursely: 106-109 community Leilani Law: 186, top left Sarah King: 187, top right

202 | credits


credits | 203

modus studio works: 2008 - 2013  

an architectural monograph by modus studio

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