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Developing Sustainable Forests and Communities


photo © Gene Belanger

Developing Sustainable Forests and Communities

Contents OUR FOREST SECTOR IS IN CRISIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Building New Forest-Based Opportunities in Rural Canada. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Northeast Superior Blueberries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Ontario East Wood Centre. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Non-Timber Forest Products in Lac-Saint-Jean. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 FACILITATING CAPACITY BUILDING AND ENGAGING COMMUNITIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Bioenergy: Solutions for Community Sustainability. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Winnipeg River Learning Centre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Saskatchewan Aboriginal Junior Forest Ranger Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Jobs in Natural Resources: The Atikamekw Take Charge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 DEVELOPING INTEGRATED, MULTI-SECTORAL APPROACHES TO FOREST MANAGEMENT. . . . 16 Small Scale Biomass Feasibility Study. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Facilitating FSC Certification for the Ottawa Valley Forest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Corner Brook Pulp and Paper - CSA Certification Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Diversification of Local Economy: Value Added Housing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 INTERNATIONAL – SHARING SUCCESSES WITH FOREST COMMUNITIES AROUND THE WORLD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Building Economic Development Capacity of Indigenous Communities in Costa Rica . . . . 22 Exploring the Feasibility of a Model Forest in Cambodia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 FINDING VALUE IN THE NETWORK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Weberville Community Model Forest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 TELLING THE NETWORK’S STORY THROUGH NUMBERS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Canadian Model Forest Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

cover photos © Hamilton Greenwood


OUR FOREST SECTOR IS IN CRISIS Over the past decade the forest sector in Canada has undergone an economic crisis that has had disastrous effects for rural Canada. The impacts of mountain pine beetle, the Softwood Lumber dispute, the high value of the Canadian dollar, and the economic collapse of the American housing market have all played key roles in the nationwide crisis. The combination of these factors has forced Canadians to take notice of the forest sector like never before, and caused them to ask the government how they are going to help.

MOBILIZING THE COUNTRY At the community level there are fifteen organizations, either Model Forests or Forest Communities that have taken a lead role in redeveloping our economies as the forest sector crisis has progressed. These sites have joined in mandate and in cause through the Canadian Model Forest Network (CMFN) to reach out to their community partners. Some of the principal objectives of the network are to build new forest-based opportunities in rural Canada, facilitate capacity building To date, the network has and engage local communities, develop leveraged Natural Resources integrated, multi-sectoral approaches to forest Canada’s $12.6 million investment management, and share successes with forest through the Forest Communities communities around the world. Linking First Program to $60.3 million Nations, municipalities, industries, residents, nationally. and researchers for a common purpose has created an atmosphere of hope in many forest based communities, and tough economic times have encouraged the widening of partnerships to include neighbouring communities. These connections and relationships create the solid foundation which supports our national network. Together, our sites represent nearly 1 million Canadians living in more than 270 First Nation and non-First Nation communities. These communities have faced nearly 80 mill closures and approximately 12,150 residents have lost their jobs. This means that nearly 1.5% of the population in CMFN partner sites have been unemployed as a direct result of the forest sector crisis. When we consider forest sector indirect

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photo © Gene Belanger

job losses, nearly 18,200 additional citizens have faced unemployment as a result of the past decade of instability. Combining these numbers creates a total impact of the forest downturn in our partner communities of nearly 30,300, or over 3%. The harsh reality is that approximately 1 in 32 people in our regions have been unemployed as a result of this forest crisis

REPORTING ON ACCOMPLISHMENTS These numbers are merely a glimpse into what our communities have faced, and will continue to face until the crisis fades, and our organizations have taken this challenge seriously. As an example, our partners have seen an annual investment from Natural Resources Canada of $3,575,000 be leveraged across the country into over $20,000,000 annually. This is a leverage rate of 6 to 1, meaning every dollar of federal funding received by our sites is being turned into six dollars through partnerships, through hard work, and through reporting results. Although funding is critical to our success, the CMFN partner sites have highlighted our success in more ways than dollars and cents. What makes us unique is a diverse variety of

stakeholders and partners across the country who are willing to roll up their sleeves and participate in the redevelopment of their economies. In-kind contributions represent people and industries that are willing to donate their equipment, their time, and their expertise for the achievement of a common goal. The value of these contributions network-wide is over 5 million dollars, and this amount is reflective of the commitment to the program and to the goals of forest sector redevelopment nationally.

TELLING OUR STORY – PARTNER PERSPECTIVE Our organizations have a tremendous network of on-site support – with more than 220 funding partners nationally, and over 400 in-kind support organizations. We have learned to be creative in developing projects and opportunities for our regions. It is this groundswell of support that shows the true success of our national network. Through the upcoming stories you will see how the partners of the CMFN have come together to impact real change and show true results in communities across this country. In three short years we have made some tremendous impact – and the stories speak for themselves.

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photo © Hamilton Greenwood

Building New Forest-Based Opportunities in Rural Canada The development of new economic opportunities is a key pillar of our partner sites. We represent a diversity of regions with differences in our physical environments, economies and our labour forces – yet we are all challenged with finding new opportunities that make use of our forest assets. We are all working at achieving these goals in different ways – each of which is driven by adapting to our environment and developing creative solutions to the current economic crisis. Most importantly, we are finding success.

Success Story:

Northeast Superior Blueberries The Blueberry project in Northeast Superior Forest Community (NSFC) is a flagship example of building new opportunities and encouraging entrepreneurship. The NSFC region is rich in sandy acidic soils. It is an area that has a tradition rich in berry production, making the transition from recreational to commercial blueberry production a natural progression, while building on existing regional assets. Despite the influx of cultivated, high bush blueberries on the world market, the NSFC and its partners are positioning themselves for the fresh, wild blueberry market in southern Ontario. The NSFC has developed a project designed in a hub and spoke model – where communities are connected through the development of wild blueberry plantations. The project goal is the establishment of a network of plantations across municipal and First Nation communities, and creating a new economic driver in the regional economy. Spreading the plantations within the wider region spreads the benefit and spreads the risk – both of which ensure this program is poised for success. The first of six regional plantations is currently under site development by NSFC partner and private business, Level Plains Enterprises. The first location in Wawa, Ontario consists of close to 400 acres of private land that is expecting its first harvest in late summer 2011.

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Trevor Laing Owner, Level Plains Enterprises “The Level Plains, 400 acre blueberry plantation in Wawa Ontario has been an interest of mine for many years, and working with the Northeast Superior Forest Community (NSFC) has been a catalyst for spurring this development forward. Already, in the first few years of working together, we have generated employment in our region and see a bright future ahead for our regional plantation network. It is refreshing to have Natural Resources Canada, through its Forest Communities Program, provide businesses like mine with the assistance we need to make great things happen. I look forward to continuing this partnership in the coming years.�

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Success Story:

Ontario East Wood Centre The Eastern Ontario Model Forest (EOMF) has made significant progress on its most ambitious project to date: facilitating the establishment of the Ontario East Wood Centre (OEWC) and EcoIndustrial Park in the Township of Edwardsburgh-Cardinal. The OEWC is envisioned as a thriving best practices centre of excellence that brings technology, science and entrepreneurship together in support of the rural economy of Ontario, sustainable forests and sustainable communities. The main goals of the OEWC are as follows: • the encouragement of a forest and biomass based and innovationinspired cluster of industrial, business and demonstration projects in an ecologically sound environment; • facilitation of a platform for scientific collaboration, business development, demonstration, piloting, commercialization, exporting and marketing of a wide array of innovative value-added wood and biomass products, including:

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Larry Dishaw Mayor, Township of Edwardsburgh-Cardinal “Having just returned from China I am more convinced than ever that a new direction for our own Great Lakes-St Lawrence forestry sector is important and the way of the future. I have witnessed, in a new way, the potential for value-added wood product export. Our Township’s partnership with the Eastern Ontario Model Forest and the resulting creation of the Ontario East Wood Centre & Eco-Industrial Park as an incorporated body position us well for the future. “I believe strongly in working together and our partnership has proven this again and again.”

Bliss Baker Former Vice-President of Corporate Affairs, GreenField Ethanol “We have a particular interest in the research, development and demonstration aspect. This Centre is ideally positioned to bridge the gap between scientific and technological discoveries and subsequent commercialization of the innovative utilization of forest and agricultural feedstocks and associated products.”

– solid wood building components, – biochemicals, and – bioenergy A huge amount of work has been done building interest in the concept on the part of a large number of organizations. Working closely with the Township of Edwardsburgh/Cardinal, Natural Resources Canada, the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, the University of Toronto (Faculty of Forestry), Queen’s University and others, the EOMF continues to champion the cause that this type of facility would add significant value to the forest sector in Eastern Ontario and the Ottawa Valley. Greenfield Ethanol has self-identified as the first major anchor in the Eco-Industrial Park and most recently, the Wood Centre received its Canadian letters patent and is now officially incorporated.

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Success Story:

Non-Timber Forest Products in Lac-Saint-Jean From blueberries, to birch syrup and wild mushrooms, the Lac-SaintJean region of Quebec is fast becoming a national leader in production of economic opportunity from their forest resources. Birch syrup is a product which had been overlooked in the SaguenayLac-Saint-Jean region. The Lac-Saint-Jean Model Forest began a project with the objective of verifying the possibilities of a harvest, the potential volume of birch sap and the processing options. The project was carried out in three phases. The results of this project led to the successful production of birch syrup and the promotion of the product. Today, the Lac-Saint-Jean Model Forest test results serve as a reference for entrepreneurs, often maple syrup producers, who are conducting similar experiments on the use of birch groves with a view to developing this sector. Of the better known ones, the tests done by the ‘La Chouape’ microbrewery in St-Félicien have resulted in the making of a premier birch syrup beer in Quebec. Wild mushrooms are another focus area of this Model Forest’s efforts in the development of new economic opportunities. The project entitled ‘’Development of processed products from wild mushrooms’’ will enable the development of wild mushroom products in order to diversify what the new collective enterprise on wild mushroom marketing has to offer.

Marie-Claude Gauthier General Manager, Lac-Saint-Jean Model Forest

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“Lac-Saint-Jean Model Forest is proud of its accomplishments within the Non-Timber Forest Product (NTFP) sector, and is excited to continue researching and implementing NTFP opportunities in the region. The research and accomplishments in this sector have been made possible in part through funding from Natural Resource Canada’s Forest Communities Program, and as well with the financial and in-kind contributions of communities. Through the efforts displayed by several local organizations involved in the Lac-Saint-Jean Model Forest, the NTFP research-action projects have created entrepreneurial interest in birch syrup production and wild mushroom harvesting, as sustainable economic activities which can be successfully developed in the Lac-Saint-Jean region. Progressively, the Lac-Saint-Jean Model Forest is advancing forest livelihood alternatives, and contributing to improve the communities’ resilience in the shifting forest sector. Opportunities in the NTFP sector are abundant across Canada; there is no end to the possibilities for success.”


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FACILITATING CAPACITY BUILDING AND ENGAGING COMMUNITIES Building capacity in communities can take a number of forms and it is a critical step in helping communities take advantage of forest based opportunities in their regions. Whether it means facilitating the coming together of experts and communities through workshops in order to explore opportunities, or creating new education and training opportunities, all methods contribute to involving communities in diversifying their local economies. In many ways our partners, through their work in the forest sector, have been strongly committed to being a part of economic renewal and community growth. Capacity building is a key priority that links our regions across the nation. We are all working to help communities adapt and prosper in this new economic reality, and are using our national connections to share knowledge and help our communities through this transition period.

Success Story:

Bioenergy: Solutions for Community Sustainability The mountain pine beetle has gradually invaded British Columbia. British Columbia’s Mountain Pine Beetle Action Plan 2006-2011 states that the invasion is a “catastrophic natural disaster and is causing widespread death of lodgepole pine, the Interior’s most abundant commercial tree species, and ponderosa pine, a less abundant species. The epidemic puts forest values at risk and threatens the stability and long-term economic well-being of many communities.” The Action Plan also states that the Ministry of Forests and Range predicts that 80 per cent of the merchantable pine in the province’s central and southern Interior could be wiped out by 2013. Witnessing the devastation the epidemic has caused for communities in central British Columbia, the Resources North Association (RNA) saw there was an opportunity to promote the use of salvaged pine for bioenergy, an emerging sector in BC. Supplemental funding support was secured from Western Economic Diversification Canada to deliver a workshop in March 2010 on establishing biomass energy systems as economic diversification options for the affected communities. Through this project, RNA was able to develop numerous partnerships and organize and deliver a successful workshop that addressed current issues, community needs, as well as relevant information and technologies.

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Stephanie Killam Mayor, District of Mackenzie, BC “In March 2010 I attended the workshop hosted by Resources North and their partners entitled “Bioenergy: Solutions for Community Sustainability,” which I found to be extremely worthwhile. As the Mayor of the community of Mackenzie BC, I have witnessed first hand the devastating effects of the downturn in the forestry sector, compounded by impacts of the mountain pine beetle infestation. Over the past three years we have experienced closures of all four sawmills, a paper mill and a pulp mill, leaving over 1500 members of the Mackenzie workforce out of work, not to mention the spin-off job losses. From a population of 4700, this has had a severe impact on our community. New economic development

opportunities in the biomass energy sector have the potential to open new doors for Mackenzie. The Bioenergy Solutions workshop presented a great deal of information and expertise on how communities would go about establishing biomass energy systems. The presenters addressed highly relevant topics such as accessing fibre, community engagement, First Nations perspectives, access to funding, economics, challenges and opportunities. Of equal value was the networking with experts and practitioners. As a result of the workshop, I plan to continue working to attract bioenergy business to our community and explore district heating as an option.”

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photo Š Hamilton Greenwood

Success Story:

Winnipeg River Learning Centre The Winnipeg River Learning Centre is a new post-secondary educational institution that was created in the Manitoba Model Forest area in 2008. Local Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities saw the need for a regional training facility that could provide local training programs that are locally relevant as part of a long term vision to diversify the local economy and to supply a highly skilled labour force in the area. First Nations in particular stressed the importance of a training facility located in close proximity to their communities, so that their students and trainees could remain at home while attending classes, thereby maintaining family and community support systems.

photo Š Hamilton Greenwood

With the involvement of many partners, including the Manitoba Model Forest, First Nation communities, other towns and rural municipalities, Sunrise School Division, Red River Community College, the Province of Manitoba, and others, the Winnipeg River Learning Centre opened its doors in 2008. A range of short and long-term accredited and non-accredited courses including accounting, small business management, human resource management, para-educator, health

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photo © Hamilton Greenwood

care aide, non-timber forest products, electrical, introduction to personal computers and software, photography, security guard training and more have been offered. To date, more than 300 full-time and part-time students have completed courses at the learning centre, with a large portion of these being First Nation and Métis. The Winnipeg River Learning Centre has now been incorporated as a not-for-profit entity in Manitoba and has a Board of Directors to oversee its operations. The Winnipeg River Learning Centre is in the final stages of purchasing the former Pine Falls school from Sunrise School Division, and the building is undergoing a $3.2 million energy efficiency and renovations project, with funding from the federal government’s Community Adjustment Fund. This is helping to further secure the long-term sustainability of the Learning Centre. The learning centre is providing needed training programs in the region and preparing students for participation in a more diversified workforce.

Beverly Dubé Chairperson, Winnipeg River Learning Centre “On behalf of the Board of Directors and the community at large I would like to express our sincere thanks to the Manitoba Model Forest and its partners for the ongoing support of the Learning Centre. We have grown by leaps and bounds in the last two years due largely to the contributions of the Model Forest. “In light of recent developments in our one-industry town and the closure of the paper mill, the work being done at the Learning Centre is crucial in assisting individuals and small business to diversify and adapt to such changes. “The future is bright here at the Learning Centre as we continue to focus on the needs of our larger region and look forward to continue working with the Manitoba Model Forest as we move forward to achieve our goals!“

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photo © Hamilton Greenwood

Success Story:

Saskatchewan Aboriginal Junior Forest Ranger Program Since it began in 2006, the Saskatchewan Junior Forest Ranger (JFR) program has grown from one camp to now involve First Nations and Métis communities from across central and northern Saskatchewan. The Prince Albert Model Forest (PAMF) coordinates the Saskatchewan Junior Forest Ranger program, working with its partner organizations to plan and organize a six-week schedule of events for the youth. Last year, eight communities hosted the six-week summer program which celebrated a total of 88 graduates, ranging in age from 16 to 22. Through the program, youth gained certification in CPR, First Aid, Workplace Hazardous Materials Information Systems (WHIMIS), Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG), Pleasure Craft Operators Card, Restricted Radio Operators Card, Canadian Firearm Safety Certificate, All Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Certificate, and a Type III Fire Fighting Certificate. More importantly, youth involved in the program mature over the course of the summer, learning how to work together as a team. They become confident as individuals and as leaders. They learn the benefits of staying in school and the opportunities that open up to them for future careers, and see the potential that exists for them in their own communities. They gain a greater awareness and appreciation for their own cultures and traditions. The Saskatchewan Junior Forest Ranger program is a summer work experience unlike any other.

Alfred Gamble Beardy’s and Okemasis First Nation “A needs assessment was carried out in the community identifying social issues facing the Youth. The Beardy’s and Okemasis First Nation incorporated the Junior Forest Rangers into the community and modified it to address the needs assessment. “Over the past three years, we have seen 60 students graduate. A majority of these students have continued with their education. I’m very proud of what they have achieved, from University to College, Olympic Torch bearer, Canadian Forces, community leadership, employment, etc. “Just weeks after the program, a JFR graduate successfully performed CPR on an elderly gentleman who suffered a heart attack. He saved the man’s life, thanks to the training he received as a Ranger. “

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Success Story:

Jobs in Natural Resources: The Atikamekw Take Charge Since 2006, the forestry sector in the Laurentians has been seriously shaken by an unprecedented worldwide financial crisis. The consequences in terms of employment in the natural resources sector are many: setting up retraining committees, regional exodus, early retirements, etc. At the beginning of a much anticipated economic recovery, access to an available and qualified workforce presents an important challenge. Greatly concerned by this situation, Table Forêt Laurentides (Laurentian Forest Table) decided to develop a partnership with the Manawan Atikamekw Council, though a collaborative agreement with the objective of putting into place in Manawan a Atikamekw body responsible for human resources in the natural resources sector.

Greatly encouraged by the completion of previous collaboration agreements between the ‘Le Bourdon Project’ and the Atikamekw Council in Manawan, the context was wellsuited to its deployment. Very interested in – and inspired by – taking charge of their own economic development as well as human resources, the Manawan community comprises a population of 2,500 people, of whom 60% are younger than 25 years old. Over and above the traditional forest trades, professional opportunities linked to non-timber forest products as well as wildlife resources will offer increasing opportunities over the next few years.

M. Benoit Bisaillon

Table Forêt Laurentides

M. Raoul Flamand

Directeur du développement économique, Conseil des Atikamekw de Manawan “The start-up phase and the implementation of the project are expected to get underway in April 2010. The Atikamekw responsibility project for human resources linked to the natural resources sector is expected to last for a minimum of one year. “It appears that the Le Bourdon Project has contributed greatly to promote the development of collaboration agreements between different partners under the 64-51 Management Unit and even over a much broader territory. The atmosphere of trust and respect felt throughout the aforementioned process enables us to easily foresee other kinds of partnerships over time. Nevertheless, the one-step-at-atime strategy should be respected in order to ensure the best results.”

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photo Š Hamilton Greenwood

DEVELOPING INTEGRATED, MULTI-SECTORAL APPROACHES TO FOREST MANAGEMENT The shift towards the new forest bio-economy has caused a need for the forest to be considered and managed as a complete resource. In order to fully realize the potential wealth of the forest, our 15 partner sites are actively bridging the gap between all those that have a stake in the forest. By facilitating the partnership between these groups, we are creating a new reality for our forest industries that is open to new opportunities and supportive of our traditional ones.

Success Story:

Small Scale Biomass Feasibility Study Partners in the New Brunswick timber industry have felt firsthand the significant reduction of revenue from traditional markets. With timber harvested from private woodlots accounting for up to 30% of wood utilized by New Brunswick mills in the past, and with revenue from recent years reduced by 70%, a new approach was critical to the survival of private woodlots. As a proactive measure to help create market opportunities, the New Brunswick Federation of Woodlot Owners which represents over 40,000 woodlot owners, requested a meeting with New Brunswick Minister of Energy. Their purpose was to explore the potential for constructing small-scale biomass facilities (up to 5 MW) to produce heat and electricity from wood harvested from private woodlots. During the ensuing discussions, the Minister challenged the group to build a business case for the concept. To address the challenge, a Steering Committee was formed and Fundy Model Forest (FMF) was approached to participate in and help coordinate the new partnerships activities. The FMF acted as the secretary for the committee and shepherded the development of the Terms of Reference for the eventual project. This initiative has led to the development of a 2-year strategy to pilot a small scale biomass project, with the goal of demonstrating the potential for wood heating to reduce long term energy costs for public and other buildings and to create a market opportunity for private woodlots.

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Ken Hardie General Manager, New Brunswick Federation of Woodlot Owners

photo © Hamilton Greenwood

“We have produced a world class study, by a world class engineering firm, and established a very good relationship with a government department (Energy) that is very interested in – not just accepting the study – but in coming up with a plan to carry it forward. In my experience that is rather unique. We have done an incredible amount of work that will be of great benefit to woodlots and the communities that depend on those woodlots. We need

Fundy Model Forest. It is the catalyst to accomplishing this work. We (the Federation) no longer have the financial resources or the human resources to get this done anymore. We can partner but we can’t do it alone. The strength of Fundy has always been the partnership. Imagine what we can do if we continue this partnership. This is an excellent forum for some of the challenges we face.”

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Success Story:

Facilitating FSC Certification for the Ottawa Valley Forest The Eastern Ontario Model Forest (EOMF) has been successfully managing, overseeing and ‘growing’ a forest certification program for over 10 years. It has built a reputation as a world leader in the realm of forest certification on private, community and Crown lands. The EOMF often provides a mentorship role for other organizations and takes great pride in sharing its certification expertise. The Ottawa Valley Forest (OVF) Sustainable Forest Licence (SFL) is a cooperative venture between six local sawmills, two logging contractors, and one group of independent loggers located in or adjacent to Renfrew County, as well as a paper mill in Trenton, Ontario. The OVF SFL covers an area of 806,766 hectares, of which 240,000 hectares are managed Crown land. The rest is comprised of private land, parks, conservation reserves, federal land, and a First Nations community. The boundaries of the Ottawa Valley Forest coincide with the municipal boundaries of Renfrew County. The Eastern Ontario Model Forest in partnership with the Ottawa Valley Forest and the Renfrew County Community Futures Development Corporation were able to access funds and provide the technical guidance to assist the OVF in achieving Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification. Forest certification involves rigorous audits that include reviewing a forest company’s performance. Performance is judged in terms of environmental sustainability, social responsibility and economic stability. Forest certification is an important way for consumers to ensure that the wood products that they purchase originate from a well managed forest, and contribute to the well being of local businesses.

Alf Van Dyke General Manager, Ottawa Valley Forest “Through the technical guidance of the Eastern Ontario Model Forest and its ability to access funds on our behalf through our regional community development corporation, the Ottawa Valley Forest will be able to market and sell all forest products from our unit as FSC certified. This will provide our shareholders with continued market access and may provide additional opportunities. This would not have been possible without the EOMF and its indispensable presence here in eastern Ontario.”

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Success Story:

Corner Brook Pulp and Paper CSA Certification Process CBPP Woodlands has been an active partner in many research and communications projects with the Model Forest of Newfoundland & Labrador (MFNL), from leading the process and testing the models developed in our Biodiversity Assessment Project, to taking teachers on tours of harvest areas during the Summer Institute in Environmental Education. Partnership with the Model Forest provided CBPP with an alternate venue to share the company’s message about the forest industry, and to accomplish work it might not have been able to tackle on its own. MFNL helps achieve this by facilitating and coordinating important research needed to assist in sometimes complex decision making, and maintaining open-minded communication between CBPP and many other stakeholders. MFNL has played an integral role in the company’s planning process, and its obtaining Canadian Standards Association (CSA) certification. Currently, the two are working together to assist CBPP in obtaining FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) certification.

Patrick Tompkins Manager, Woodlands “I think we’ve worked through issues over the past phases that we would have hit the wall on otherwise. We worked through a number of items of how the plan was structured and laid out, because prior to that, we had a lot of trouble working with the public stakeholders to develop that plan. But when the Model Forest facilitated it for us, it went much more smoothly. A goal of the Model Forest Program, is to tie the social and ecological values of forest-dependent communities into economic benefits, and that’s where the community can really gain, if they’re prepared to let that happen. The Model Forest Program can help them in their struggle to diversify and move away from total dependency on a single, traditional industry, in which they evolved and revolved around. It’s beneficial in that it helps them see other opportunities that the forest provides for them.”

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Diversification of Local Economy: Value Added Housing The Five Nuu-chah-nulth Central Region First Nations on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, are all, in some form or another, trying to figure out the connection between small value-added mills and their housing requirements. This is based on the Forestry Vision at Boat Basin in 2008: to support the “circle of wealth” between forest harvesting; value-added production; skills and training; housing; and community development – particularly in the First Nation communities. The Clayoquot Forest Communities Program (CFCP) is helping local communities to realize this vision.

Harvey Robinson Ahousaht Nation Councilor and CFCP Ahousaht Nation Representative for Nuu-chah-nulth Central Region Chiefs “Ecotrust Canada has stuck with us for years in Clayoquot Sound. They have been here through thick and thin, and helped us prove we can own a forest business, reserve more of our ecosystems, and still turn a profit.”

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INTERNATIONAL – SHARING SUCCESSES WITH FOREST COMMUNITIES AROUND THE WORLD Forest dependant communities and regions across this country who partner at the National level have invested a significant amount of resources in the transfer of knowledge. Canada is a lead partner in the International Model Forest Network, and is heavily committed at both a national and a site level to foster an environment that is conducive to sharing knowledge and best practices. We have all gained from the knowledge of others, and we have had tremendous success in fostering innovation and commitment to sustainable forest management and community economic development in several international arenas. These successes show the foundation of the Canadian Network – the willingness to be both teacher and student as we look across the globe, from boreal ecosystems to the tropics, for opportunities to build partnerships.

Success Story:

Building Economic Development Capacity of Indigenous Communities in Costa Rica In 2007, Brokenhead Ojibway Nation (BON) and the Manitoba Model Forest initiated a project with the Reventazon Model Forest, the IberoAmerican Regional Model Forest Network and Centro Agrinomico Tropical de Investigacion y Ensenanza (CATIE) on ethno-cultural tourism in Costa Rica. This partnership resulted in a project with the Cabécares indigenous communities of the Nairi Awari peoples of Costa Rica, BON and the MBMF. The project includes eco-tourism development in the Cabécares communities, the development of a comprehensive eco-tourism management plan and the establishment of capacity, infrastructure and technology to assist the communities in developing an ecotourism business. Training and education of Cabécar youth and women is included in order to provide future project leadership. The partnerships between BON and the Cabécares communities is facilitating learning from each other, technology transfer and indigenous youth exchanges.

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The MBMF and BON partnered with the CabÊcar community of Jameikari to assist in the establishment of an eco-tourism/ethnotourism enterprise which would allow the community to provide tourism opportunities that highlight the natural tropical environment of their reserve and the community’s traditions and culture. The Jameikari community is located along the Pacuare River, one of the most acclaimed white water rafting rivers in the world. The project will allow the community to offer white water rafting adventure-seekers the opportunity to experience traditional community living as part of their tour package, while providing the basic comforts and safety that tourists expect. BON and the MBMF have worked with Jameikari community members in constructing a river-side structure for accommodations

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Victor Hermandez A. President, Asociacion Turismo Cabecar Jameikari

Mildred Jiménez General Manager, Reventazon Model Forest (Costa Rica) “We would like to jointly express the importance of being able to continue with the support and partnership with the Manitoba Model Forest, to the Reventazon Model Forest, Costa Rica and specifically in support to the indigenous cultural tourism project in Nairi-Awari, in charge of the Association of Cabecar Tourism of Jameikari. The support we have received has been key to strengthening community capacity for tourism and also allowed us a stronger community cohesion to achieve our objectives. “We have achieved all of our objectives, including facilitating community members to stay in their communities by offering job opportunities in tourism. We have also achieved greater awareness towards the conservation of nature and, among other important aspects, the opportunity given to us to establish collaborative partnerships with institutions, NGOs and companies to strengthen our mission and the tourism project. “We believe that we are reaching the goal that will lead to a better development of our communities, for which we expect to continue relying on the Manitoba Model Forest as a partner.”

and cooking, tent platforms, installing a new septic system and toilet/ shower facility, creating walking paths along the river and creating a new hiking trail connecting the river-side site to the Jameikari community. Additional infrastructure work will see the construction of a cultural centre, scenic look out platforms, additional upgrades to hiking trails, solar power, drinking water purification and internet. Ecotourism training programs for the Cabécares community members are being conducted in tourism/hospitality, first aid, nature guiding, small business administration, gender equity, handicraft production, and basic English. A cultural exchange was also conducted to allow Cabécar youth and youth from BON to visit their respective areas and learn about each other’s indigenous culture and aspirations, and to discuss opportunities for eco-tourism.

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Success Story:

Exploring the Feasibility of a Model Forest in Cambodia From 2008-2010, the Nova Forest Alliance (NFA) funded a small group at the University of Battambang, Cambodia, who wanted to explore the feasibility of establishing a Model Forest in Cambodia, that could become a candidate for membership in the International Model Forest Network. In the first year, a candidate location was identified within Samlaut National Park in Cambodia, which is a protected area conserved by the Maddox Jolie-Pitt Foundation (MJP). In 2009-2010, another possibility was presented when University of Battambang Forest, with a total area of 200 ha, was donated by Rukhakiri Forestry Community (RFC). RFC, covering a total area of 10804 ha was officially established in 2003 in Rukhakiri District in Battambang Province. The University of Battambang recently completed a paper that explores partnership between University of Battambang and Rukhakiri Forest Community. It was found that the partnership can offer advantages for both sides, because the expectations and the objectives of the partners are similar. In such a partnership, the community is committed to turning over a piece of land (200ha) to the University to be used as campus and conserving the forests and its resources. The University would, in turn, have to use its own foundation money to plan, fund, and offer training programs, to provide agricultural inputs, and to build a new recreation centre for the community to generate income for community members, so that exploitation of forests can be minimized. The University, on the other hand, could formally expand its jurisdiction and link the two campuses where it would operate as a “fortress� of knowledge and pure research, thus becoming a conduit through which research reflects community needs. The partnership could be a win-win scenario for a public university and a private community. It is proposed that partnerships between universities and forestry communities could play an important role in sustainable forest management. Successful partnerships, however, will need to develop innovative structures and techniques for forest management in order to respond to the goals of the partners.

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Touch Visalsok, Ph.D. President, University of Battambang, Cambodia “University of Battambang has recently received funds from the Nova Forest Alliance to work on Cambodia Model Forest Initiative. The funds, although being small, are of great help to us in conducting feasibility studies to understand the current status of forests, forest model, and forest communities in Cambodia, and to give us useful ideas of how the university could build partnership with forest communities, to improve the livelihoods of the community members while also conserving forest resources.

“Also, I have praise for the quick reaction time, patience, understanding and service that I have received from the staff of NFA, especially David V. Sutherland and Terry Stanislow. “I hope that Cambodia could become a member in the International Model Forest Network in the future.”

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FINDING VALUE IN THE NETWORK The development of the CMFN as a national organization has been of value to all of its members. Through the strengthening of our relationships and speaking with a common voice on the issues we face as partners, we have the ability to become a collective. This country is diverse in landscape, culture, and in economy, but by looking closely enough, we can see the similarities that make us all uniquely Canadian.

Success Story:

Weberville Community Model Forest The Weberville Community Model Forest (WCMF) evolved from a pilot project whose focus was on landscape-level private land forest management. Initiated jointly by FPInnovations and the Agro-forestry Woodlot Extension Society in 2008, the project quickly drew attention and interest from various stakeholders in industry, government and Non-Government Organizations for its grass-roots, collaborative approach to private woodlot management. In 2009 the communityrun board which governed the project became incorporated as a non-profit society under the name of the Weberville Community Forest Association (WCFA). Through a variety of successful extension activities, the project has gained national and international exposure, particularly following its acceptance into the Canadian Model Forest Network.

28

The vision of the WCMF is to encompass the goals of multiple woodlot owners and in doing so, provide a “big picture� view of private forest management which offers greater opportunities by virtue of its increased total land area. This approach not only addresses economic benefits through landowner collaboration, but also environmental and social aspects. By working together, the landowners effectively combine their lands in order to take advantage of opportunities such as tree planting, which last year saw over 40,000 trees planted, and the development of a recreational trail system, linking over ten miles of trails in the area.


Lisa Ladd General Manager, Weberville Community Model Forest “By becoming members of the Canadian Model Forest Network, our grass-roots initiative was given a leg up in terms of national and international profile. When you’re working at the ground-level you see the differences that you make at a local level and you want to be able to share it on a larger scale with your neighbours. Joining the CMFN gives us that opportunity to not only share what we have learned but to learn from our neighbours as well. It is amazing to see where the similarities exist across such a large and diverse country. As the newest member of the CMFN family, we are looking forward to promoting the many positive aspects of developing strong and focused forest-based communities.�

To date the WCMF has conducted three years of woodlot inventory work covering 42 quarter sections of private land which grew into a Landscape Level Forest Management Plan for the community. In addition, over 20 individual woodlot plans were created for landowners to assist them in making informed forest management decisions on their land. By working together, the WCMF has fostered a strong sense of community for the benefit of not only the landowners themselves but for the forests which will be managed responsibly and sustainably as a result.

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photo © Hamilton Greenwood

TELLING THE NETWORK’S STORY THROUGH Communities

First Nation Communities

Partnerships (all types)

Model Forest of Newfoundland & Labrador

4

2

28

Nova Forest Alliance

13

21

90

Fundy Model Forest

46

3

73

Le Bourdon Project

10

1

38

Lac-Saint-Jean Model Forest

9

1

39

Cree Research and Development Institute

5

5

Eastern Ontario Model Forest

8

2

268

Lake Abitibi Model Forest

9

5

60

Northeast Superior Forest Community

6

8

75

Manitoba Model Forest

9

4

37

Foothills Research Institute

12

3

162

Prince Albert Model Forest

12

12

84

Clayoquot Forest Communities

5

6

68

Resources North Association

25

25

80

Network Total

173

98

1102

Model Forest Site

* Indirect job loss calculated by multiplying direct job loss by a value of 1.5 Please note that numbers reflected are approximates, were compiled by Canadian Model Forest Network sites, and are not official government statistics

30


NUMBERS Population (2006)

First Nation Population (2006)

Unemployment Rate (%) (2006)

Direct and Indirect* Jobs Lost

FCP Site Contribution (since 2007)

Total Program Cash Value

82,499

3,715

25.2

500

1,150,000

4,840,170

66,235

14,670

10.2

1,150,000

2,988,578

196,005

200

9.7

400

1,150,000

2,337,161

28,535

2,300

23.1

4,000

1,150,000

2,840,533

62,950

4,662

14.7

6,250

1,150,000

3,812,522

7,482

18.0

145,198

13,992

6.4

1,750

1,150,000

7,303,464

82,129

68,915

7.7

1,500

10,681

3,250

8.0

2,863

1,150,000

3,087,280

15,015

7,911

11.6

1,463

1,150,000

8,010,748

129,947

12,760

4.1

11,447,303

49,014

35,000

9.4

3,915

1,150,000

7,170,687

3,877

2,400

6.3

150

1,150,000

3,470,375

103,081

13,300

7.3

7,500

1,150,000

2,983,821

975,166

190,557

11.55

30,291

12,650,000

$60,292,642

31


Canadian Model Forest Network Model Forest

Website

Telephone

Canadian Model Forest Network

www.modelforest.net

613 258 8400

Model Forest of Newfoundland & Labrador

www.mfnl.ca

709 637 7300

Nova Forest Alliance

www.novaforestalliance.com

902 639 2921

Fundy Model Forest

www.fundymodelforest.net

506 432 7575

Projet Le Bourdon

notreforet.ca/lebourdonproject.aspx 819 623 5398

Forêt modèle du Lac-Saint-Jean 

www.foretmodeledulacsaintjean.ca

418 275 5386 ext. 448

Cree Research and Development Institute 

819 753 2441 ext. 341

Eastern Ontario Model Forest

www.eomf.on.ca

613 258 8242

Lake Abitibi Model Forest

www.lamf.net

705 272 8449

Northeast Superior Forest Community

www.nsfc.ca

705 864 2031

Manitoba Model Forest

www.manitobamodelforest.net

204 367 5232

Foothills Research Institute

www.foothillsresearchinstitute.ca

780 865 8330

Prince Albert Model Forest

www.pamodelforest.sk.ca

306 922 1944

Weberville Community Model Forest

www.wcmf.ca

780 624 1987

Clayoquot Forest Communities

www.ecotrust.ca/clayoquot/fcp

250 725 2536

Resources North Association

www.resourcesnorth.org/rna

250 612 5840

The information in this document has been supplied with partial funding provided by Natural Resources Canada through the Canadian Forest Service’s Forest Communities Program. This publication would not have been possible without the significant contributions of the Canadian Model Forest Network sites and their partners.

Copyright 2011 © CMFN All Rights Reserved

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www.modelforest.net 613 258 8400

Devoloping Sustainable Forests and Communities  

Developing Sustainable Forests and Communities ContentS cover photos © Hamilton Greenwood photo © Gene Belanger to Date, tHe networK HaS lev...

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