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MODA

Winter 2013


MODA

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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s Editor-in-Chief of MODA, one of the most rewarding things I get to do is celebrate the fashion and cultural scene of our very own Chicago. Often under-represented in the global fashion context, the tremendous talent of Chicago comes to life in this issue with showcased Chicago-based designers and boutiques. Lagi Nadeau’s show-stopping eveningwear is displayed in all of its romantic, dark glory in Double Trouble, Winifred Grace’s jewelry designs prove to be both dainty and bold in Brains & Bronze, and the decades flashback from vintage shop, Kokorokoko, comes alive within Music Still on MTV. Meanwhile, upcoming cultural events and a guide to the Andersonville neighborhood emphasize even more of what the city of Chicago has to offer. However, we equally keep an eye on fashion in a larger scale; Rebecca Liu analyzes the significance of punk’s pervasive aesthetic in her Life of the Mind piece, and Stacey Chiu traces the origins of the Boho-chic culture in the Web of Fashion’s Past. As such, our Winter Issue presents you with the very best of the current fashion world—from Chicago and beyond. Alexandra McInnis MODA Editor-in-Chief

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MODA Summer 2013

MODA Staff 2013-2014 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Alexandra McInnis

EDITORIAL BOARD:

LAYOUT & FEATURES EDITOR Rachel Scheinfeld PHOTOGRAPHY & CREATIVE DIRECTOR Ivy Zhang STYLING EDITORS Hannah Howcroft & Rebecca Liu COPY WRITING EDITOR Sindhu Gnanasambandan PR MANAGER Lucie Fama (Abroad)

STAFF:

WRITERS & CONTRIBUTERS: Joy Cho, Ellen Swicord, Rayen Rojas, Natasha Chandler, Spencer Moy, Nealey DuVemay, Carmin Chappell, Julie Khidekel, Stacey Chiu, Hoda Katebi, Jenn David, Graham Bacher, Anna Gregg, Sara Hupp STYLISTS: Ogonna Anouby, Krystal Li, Frances Chen, Amutha Muthukumar MAKEUP & HAIR ARTISTS: Michelle De Porto, Nadine Menna, Heather Chan PHOTOGRAPHERS: Kaiwen Luan, Allie Titus, Darien Ahn MODELS: Tess Moran, Ashley Xu, Christiane Murray, Louise Simpson, Priyanka Sethy, Alexandre Moritz, Kevin Shang, Kiran Misra, Jenny Swann, Beth Minney, Amy Risk, Erin Risk LAYOUT ASSISTANT: Maya Hansen

We would like to express our appreciation to The Maroon for graciously allowing us to use their office for our production purposes. Special thanks to Winifred Grace Jewelry, Kokorokoko Vintage Shop, and Designer Lagi Nadeau, for generously providing Moda with their unique pieces and designs to showcase in the Winter 2013 issue. Thank you!


MODA

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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EDITORS’ HOLIDAY PICKS:

It’s that time a year again when we have no clue what to get friends and family for the holidays. MODA Editors bring you their top 6 Holiday picks that will make this Holiday season just a little bit easier on you.

08 Culture Cues: Upcoming events, exhibits, and fashion lines coming your way this winter.

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Image from Arts Institute press site

AN AFTERNOON IN ANDERSONVILLE:

Find out the must-visit shops, restaurants, and more in this guide to spending a few hours in Chicago’s hip North Side.

TECHNOLOCHIC:

The fashion world has been no exception to being a victim of the current tech world takeover. We bring you the top 5 fashion apps that are a must for any fashion techy.

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LIFE OF THE MIND:

Styling Editor, Rebecca Liu, takes this UChicago mantra out of the classroom and into the fashion world through a close examination of the development of the punk culture over time.

WEB OF FASHION’S PAST:

From Renoir to Bob Dylan to the runways of Marni, the Boho-chic vibe has never escaped the fashion world. Stacey Chiu traces this never ending trend.

UChicago student & seasoned photographer, Anna Gregg, takes us behind the scenes of NYFW.

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21 Throwing it back to a time when music was still on MTV, featuring KOKOROKOKO clothing.

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Two of UChicago’s most fashion-forward professors give us the inside info on their style proving that professors can be hip as well as brilliant.

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SIR & MADAME:

An interview with new Hyde Park boutique Sir & Madame.

BRAINS & BRONZE:

Featuring Jewelry from Chicago-based designer, Winifred Grace, we explore the dainty and the bold.

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PROFESSORS HAVE STYLE TOO:

DOUBLE TROUBLE:

Twins Amy & Erin Risk are not to be messed with, sporting the neo-Romantic designs of Chicago fashion designer, Lagi Nadeau.

MUSIC STILL ON MTV:

Channeling our inner 1985, MODA takes on the punk/Breakfast Club culture through this shoot featuring vintage clothing from KOKOROKOKO Mens & Women’s Vintage Shop.

MODA Winter 2013

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MODAloves

Culture Cues: MODA Staff Writers give you the inside scoop on cultural happenings coming up this winter. Check out their coverage on upcoming exhibitions, designers, and more!

Art & Appetite @ The Arts Institute VISIT: Do you remember what you ate for dinner last night? How about this: what does that last meal say about current American society and culture? For all of these answers and more, be sure to check out Art and Appetite: American Painting, Culture, and Cuisine. Behold sculpture, furniture, cocktail services, menus, cookbooks, and over 70 paintings, created by such renowned artists as Norman Rockwell, Rob Dale Peale, Lily Martin Spencer, and Claes Oldenburg. Art and Appetite is now open and goes through January 27th, 2014. Catch it while you can; you’ll never look at food (or your dinner) in quite the same way again. Free with UCID. (Written by Joy Cho) photo from www.vagarights.com.

Christophe Wool @ The Arts Institute EXHIBIT: Chicago-born contemporary artist Christophe Wool earns a retrospective in Regenstein Hall of the Art Institute this winter. Noted for the diversity of his media, Wool employs air guns, silkscreens, sprays, solvents and other techniques to create his signature large, stenciled lettered art pieces. A dash of social commentary and his fun, Neo-pop style makes Wool’s upcoming exhibit a definite must-see! February 23 to May 11; free with UCID. (Written by Ellen Swicord) photo from artic.edu

Eataly Chicago INDULGE: Uchicago foodies, rejoice! Eataly, a 63,000 square foot food emporium, is set to open in River North within the next few months. Originally opened in Turin, Italy in 2007, Eataly is an upscale Italian food mall/market franchise which is domestically owned by celebrity chef Mario Batali. Currently, the only other complex is in New York. We’re sure that this new addition to the city will feel right at home in food-loving Chicago. With its 8 Italian restaurants, a giant high-end food market, two bars and, get ready for it, a Nutella bar, this is definitely something for everyone to look forward to. (Written by Rayen Rojas) photo from nytimes.com

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MODA Winter 2013


MODAloves

Peter Pilotto x Target SHOP: Another season, another collaboration, and this one may have just made our week. Come winter, London-based Peter Pilotto will bring a 70-piece collection across the pond to US and Canadian Target stores, beginning at a price point of $14.99. Duo Peter Pilotto and Christopher De Vos are channeling inspirations from science and nature with their ethereal prints applied to everything from swimwear to accessories. With luxury powerhouse Net-A-Porter in on the deal (don’t worry internationals, we couldn’t let you miss out), we’re already counting down the days until this collection hits stores February 9th, 2014. (Written by Spencer Moy) photos from Target inc. on Elle.com & Style.com

One of a Kind @ Merch Mart GO: The holiday season brings about a scramble for unique gifts, but the ‘One of a Kind’ Show at The Merchandise Mart in downtown Chicago promises to make that search effortless. Shoppers can browse stands of over 600 artists from around the world showcasing handmade and original works, ranging from custom sandals from Capri, Italy to wooden art deco furniture created in Hartland, Wisconsin. And if that’s not incentive enough, you can even experience a runway show, holiday crafting, or simply wind down with a gourmet cup of coffee and delicious baked goods. ‘One of a Kind,’ indeed. $12 (a one time admission fee for this four day event, December 5-8) (Written by Natasha Chandler) photo from oneofakindshowchicago.com

Mario Pinto BE SAVVY: After a successful Kickstarter stint, Maria Pinto, a fashion designer who boasts Michelle Obama as a client, is launching an affordable fashion line. While the $900 pricetag of Pinto’s previous pieces was not feasible for the average woman, the new label comes within a reasonable range of $75 to $250. A veteran of Saks and Bergdorf Goodman, South Side native Pinto is proving that the average woman can dress with First Lady sophistication without the White House budget. (Written by Nealey DuVemay) photo from kickstarter.com

MODA Winter 2013

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MODAloves

Editors’ Holiday Picks

MODA’s Editor-in-Chief, Alexandra, and Features Editor, Rachel, chose their top 6 Holiday picks to gift to friends and family this Holiday Season. ROGER VIVIER BY RIZZOLI Rizzoli may be flooded with fashion tomes, but Roger Vivier is by far the most covetable we’ve seen in a while. A tribute to the shoe designer often accredited with the creation of the stiletto heel, the book displays hundreds of Vivier’s finest creations. Featuring interviews with some of the iconic women who swore by Vivier’s shoes (ahem, Catherine Deneuve and Cate Blanchett), Roger Vivier shows one shoe designer’s tremendous influence on the way women walk the streets. At $75, consider it a coffee table investment. photo from rizzoliusa.com

COCKTAIL CRATE OLD FASHIONED MIXER Cocktail Crate, a New York food start-up, boasts cocktail mixers that let you enjoy mixology-bar level drinks at home. Featuring primarily organic and locally-sourced ingredients, the Holiday Old Fashioned mixer combines fresh orange peel, cinnamon, and allspice for a classic holiday season taste. Pair with bourbon as the name suggests, or give a gourmet touch to home-made apple cider. $10 - $15. photo from cocktailcrate.com

BOOKBINDER’S DESIGN PHOTO ALBUM Maybe you’ve rediscovered your love of Polaroids and film photography. Bookbinder’s, a Swedish design company, offers perfectly minimalist photo albums cloth-covered in an endless assortment of colors. For a truly personalized gift, get your album custom-embossed with a witty title and fill it with your favorite pictures of you and a friend. $27.58 - $54.48. photo from bookbindersdesign.com

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MODA Winter 2013


MODAloves

M.A.C. COSMETICS HOLIDAY 2013 M.A.C Cosmetics has once again outdone itself with a 3-line Holiday Collection perfect for this holiday season. Whether you are stuffing it in a stocking or gifting it to friends and family, this gift is the perfect choice for all makeup lovers. The collections include “Divine Night,” which has a range of eye, lip, and nail styles that capture the deep, warm colors of the winter spirit. In the “Stroke of Midnight” collection, you can find single full palettes containing eye shadow, lip color, liner, and face powder-perfect to throw in your bag for an effortlessly glam look all day long. The third collection is a range of brushes that are great if you are looking to update your beauty tools. Prices vary between collections and items-all available at maccosmetics.com. photo from fashionmagazine.com

SUR LA TABLE POPCORN SET For foodies, and, well, anyone for that matter, nothing sets the tone of winter months by a fire watching movies better than gifting a Popcorn Set this Holiday season. Sur la Table has fun, small gifts for all occasions, and this set, which is now just $39.96, is just what you need to complete that movie night. photo from surlatable.com

OF A KIND COLLECTIONS Have a friend whose style is a little more avant-garde than the rest? Someone whose every outfit is more unique than the next, and you can’t imagine where you could find something “cool” enough to fit into their wardrobe? Look no further than the new “Collections” from OfaKind.com. Of a Kind has recently amped up their game from multi-weekly limited editions, to now selling full lines of some of the best on-the-rise designers. Check out the collections for some great gift options at ofakind.com/boutiques. photo from ofakind.com

MODA Winter 2013

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MODAfeatures

An Afternoon in Andersonville. Staff writer, Carmin Chappell, spends an afternoon exploring this Chicago, North-Side neighborhood, bringing back to MODA the must-visit shops and eats from this hipster-hood with Swedish roots.

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MODA Winter 2013

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6 photos taken by Carmin Chappell.


MODAfeatures 1. PRESENCE: While the Andersonville commercial dis-

trict is not home to many clothing stores, Presence stands out among the rest, and not just because of its hot pink sign. Presence was founded in 1969; decades later, the clothing boutique is still up-to-date on today’s fashion trends. The spacious shop is home to a wide range of clothes and accessories that suit any taste. With a combination of basics, statement pieces, jewelry, and purses, it’s easy to find an entire outfit without leaving the store. Presence lives up to its attention-grabbing namesake by keeping with the current styles while adding a unique element to their pieces. In the window display, carefully styled ensembles serve as inspiration for customers. Presence has an especially great selection of dresses that you won’t spot anyone else wearing.

2.WOOLY MAMMOTH ANTIQUES, ODDITIES,

& RESALE: Not many shops would pride themselves in having the collection Wooly Mammoth does. A sampling of products include antique Ouija boards, Civil War relics, a worn carousel horse, and, perhaps most importantly, enough taxidermy animals to fill a small zoo. The one room shop is wholly overflowing with products, encouraging nervous observers to embrace the weirdness. Once you’ve done that, it’s much easier to see why this store is a staple of the Andersonville neighborhood. Its items are a stark contrast to the romanticized, Victorian era décor found in most antique shops; a breath of fresh air you didn’t know you needed. Some pieces border on terrifying – a real human spine on sale for $495 – but that’s part of the experience. And that experience is what makes Wooly Mammoth such a gem. Looking through the endless collection of items is almost more fun than actually shopping, although, with a little creativity, many items in the store could make a space look better than an IKEA showroom. At its essence, Wooly Mammoth is a curator of the odd, challenging preconceived norms and bringing out the innate, childlike curiosity in its visitors.

3. WOMEN AND CHILDREN FIRST: It’s easy to be-

lieve that the feminist movement is a thing of the past (suffrage was passed in 1920, right?). Juxtapose this notion with the supposed death of brick-and-mortar bookstores, and you’ve got the anomaly that is Women and Children First. Established in 1979, the shop has become a cornerstone of Andersonville and the city as a whole. It showcases an enormous selection of reading material – from fiction to personal narratives to poetry to handmade zines – all with the theme of promoting women’s voices and sharing their stories. Reproductive rights and campus sexual assault are two of the most talked about issues right now, so feminism could not be more relevant to today’s young women – and Women and Children first knows the importance of educating them. An extensive women’s studies section in the back of the store has books written from all perspectives, exemplifying the importance of inclusiveness in social movements. On the more glamorous side, Fred Armisen, former Chicagoan and

creator of IFC’s Portlandia, based the show’s popular parody sketch “Women & Women First” off of the Andersonville shop. Although the real-life bookstore is not as humorously exaggerated, the owners are just as dedicated to the store and its mission as their fictional counterparts. The two ladies are looking to retire soon, but they’re searching for new, passionate owners to continue the legacy – a feminist’s work is never done, after all.

4. KOPI TRAVELERS’ CAFÉ: Step inside this tiny café

and you’ll feel like you’ve transported miles away from the Windy City. Part restaurant and part coffee shop, this store is perfect for those with worldly tastes and a college student’s budget. Not many stores can pull off the ‘exotic’ vibe, but Kopi’s atmosphere doesn’t feel the least bit manufactured, from the art on the walls to the front seating area sans chairs, just low tables and comfy cushions. Its menu items come from all corners of the globe; it’s possible to eat a falafel and Mexican hot chocolate in the same meal. The café also serves breakfast any time of the day. Hidden in the back of the café is a small boutique housing a treasure trove of clothes, accessories, and knick-knacks. The abundance of vivid prints and unique textures could satisfy any case of wanderlust. Frequently hosting live music, Kopi Travelers’ Café is the perfect spot for a midweek getaway.

5. ALLEYCAT COMICS: The clever location of this comic store is one of its biggest draws – if you don’t walk right past it. AlleyCat Comics is literally situated in the back of a long alleyway, a hidden gem sandwiched between shops along the bustling N. Clark Street. The staff is happy to help customers find something they’ll enjoy, so don’t worry if you don’t know the difference between Marvel and DC. The shop is expertly organized, lending itself to curious browsers. Aside from new releases, there is a wall of vintage comics and a $1 bin full of interesting reads. They also host weekly movie and game nights. Although the adventures of Batman may seem a bit juvenile compared to the latest issue of Vogue, sometimes it’s okay to be a kid again.

6. SWEDISH BAKERY: Swedish immigrants first settled

in Andersonville in the late 19th century, and the neighborhood has retained its heritage in a delectable way through the Swedish Bakery. The parameters of this shop are lined with enough sweets to rival Willy Wonka’s factory, and it utilizes a take-a-number ticketing system to deal with the continuous stream of hungry patrons. Forget Ben & Jerry’s, the selection of traditional Swedish desserts lets you indulge your sweet tooth while expanding your palette. Most of the food can be purchased both individually and in larger quantities, perfect for sharing with friends (or keeping for yourself). The bakery also offers custom-made cakes for special occasions. Once you’ve become addicted to their famous marzipan slices, you can use their online ordering system to send a sweet surprise to family back home. MODA Winter 2013

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MODAfeatures

TECHNOLOCHIC:

Fashion’s Top 5 Apps

Staff Writer, Julie Khidekel, gives the inside scoop on some of the top fashion apps currently exploding within the tech market.

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nlike gaucho pants or the mullet, some aspects of the fashion world never lose their charm. We all have favorite winter coats or little black dresses that we treasure for seasons on end, and now it is time to welcome a new fashion best friend: smartphone fashion applications. Because the fashion world has transcended the pages of a magazine and now extends into our phones and tablets, we have the opportunity to track outfits, further develop styles, and constantly stay updated on the newest trends, all from our fingertips. Worried about repeating the same outfit seven days per week? There’s an app for that. On a quest for vintage fashion pieces? There’s an app for that. From creating a virtual version of one’s closet to watching a runway show as it happens, cultivating one’s sense of style has never been easier. MODA has compiled a list of five quintessential fashion apps for every fashion lover.

Shop Style:

Shop Style is fashion heaven. The app features trend reports, style guides, and sale alerts for the newest “it” pieces. Search for a specific trend and see search results from hundreds of retailers; opt for a sale alert and be notified the second the piece goes on sale.

Closet:

Planning the perfect outfit can be exhausting, but envisioning that outfit while far away from one’s wardrobe can be impossible. Luckily, Closet has found a solution. Users take photos of various articles of clothing, sort the photos into categories, and are able to access them from any mobile device. The outfit possibilities are limitless, just like the size of one’s closet within Closet.

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MODA Winter 2013


Walk in My Closet:

Charlotte Ronson, designer, is a fashion icon, and while many would love to have a tour of her legendary closet, few had the opportunity before Walk in My Closet. The app is a venue for users to share their wardrobe online with others and also peer into the closets of friends, top fashion designers, and models through the app’s Moodboard. Users are able to keep track of their favorite closets and clothing items, leaving no closet unexplored.

Style.com:

Between runway videos, reports of fashion shows, and coverage of elite social events, the Style. com smartphone app is the destination to stay updated on the newest trends and fashion news. Users can vote for their favorite high fashion looks and use their new Style.com knowledge to refresh their wardrobes and refine their style.

Wanelo:

Wanelo, pronounced “Wah-nee-loh”, is a collection of everything a girl could want, need, or love. The site features a massive array of clothing and vintage items that users can save for later or purchase. Users can search for specific items on the site, follow other users’ top Wanelo picks, and see trending items, all at a moment’s notice.

All photos from google.com image pages of each fashion app.

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MODAfeatures

On the Scene @ NY Fashion Week University of Chicago’s Anna Gregg takes us behind the scenes of NY Fashion Week through her camera lens.

From the top left going clockwise: Brandon Sun SS14, Brandon Sun SS14, Candela NYC SS14 Backstage, Lela Rose SS14, Candela NYC SS14, Lela Rose SS14. Anna Gregg is a 1st year in the College who has interned for acclaimed photographers such as John Huba. Amongst her many photo-related accomplishments, Anna has had photos licensed through Getty Images and has worked with many professional modeling agencies. This past summer Anna covered NYFW for MODA Magazine. Follow us on Facebook @ Facebook.com/ModaMagazineChicago for more photo coverage from Anna!

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MODA Winter 2013


MODAspeaks

Life of the Mind: Beyond the Classroom and Into Our World. Styling Editor, Rebecca Liu, explores how the evolution of Punk style has intertwined itself within the political culture, cycling in and out of mainstream and avant garde lifestyles.

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rom the hallowed galleries of the Metropolitan Museum to the hidden-away cloisters of too-cool-forschool alt students, punk has truly returned to - dare I say it - the mainstream consciousness. Fashion has historically provided subcultures across a spectrum of socioeconomic, cultural, and gendered lines a means of asserting and defining their group identity through dress. It is as democratic as it is elitist. Though we typically see the more luxurious, status-aspirational side of fashion through mass media - the giant Louis Vuitton billboards to the eye-poppingly expensive styles in high society bible Vogue - fashion has also provided a means for alternative, underground cultures to thrive. Gone are the pret-a-porter, trend-aware mannequin drapers; in their place are highly polarizing ‘doit-yourself’ concoctions that subvert traditional silhouettes, color combinations, and even gender-specific clothing ideals. This is punk. Curator Andrew Bolton, master of the celebrated Metropolitan Punk exhibition, notes that the Anglo-American punk movement of the 1970’s “was a political and economic response to the cultural climate”. In a new sartorial culture that featured t-shirts with provocation slogans, do-it-yourself grunge that pushed the boundaries of what constituted ‘clothing’ (I’m thinking of the dresses made of garbage bags), punk was not only an aesthetic movement, but also an all-encompassing cultural push with strong political and economic implications. In harnessing cheap materials such as studs, safety pins, and garbage bags to construct subversion clothing, punk became low culture’s answer to high culture’s buttoned-up aesthetics of diamond necklaces, silk, and cashmere. Punk was a political rejection of consumer culture and status consciousness of contemporary society, as well as an economic statement that shed light on the beauty and value of the economical. Though we have historically viewed fashion as something derogatorily ‘feminine’ and thus frivolous, punk is clear example of how sartorial change can influence our social politics. At the same time, when I was viewing the livefeed of the

photo from modalab.it

Metropolitan Costume Institute Ball last year, I was discomforted by the odd dynamic at work between cause and celebration. Though supposedly a celebration of counterculture, the anti-establishment, the masses, the event itself seem to cater to everything but; its attendees included society girls and celebrities. Seeing the likes of Kim Kardashian and Miley Cyrus mimic the working-class grunge aesthetic was an exercise both in credulity and patience. Let’s not forgot Lena Dunham, who when interviewed on the red carpet, exhibited the thoughtful sensitivity for which she is well-known, observed “my dog ate a safety pin during the fitting, which is punk”. The night was less a celebration of punk itself, but rather the establishment’s

The dubiously named culture of ‘recession chic’ has once again come to define a culture that is painfully attuned to the importance of the economical.

co-opting of the punk aesthetic whilst sanitizing it of its its original cultural significance. Yet things are looking up. Bolstered by songs like Macklemore’s Thrift Shop and Lorde’s Royals, the dubiously named culture of ‘recession chic’ has once again come to define a culture that is painfully attuned to the importance of the economical. For every acid wash denim jacket Urban Outfitters procures, there are clothes being ravaged by eager buyers at second-hand thrift stores; there are young people once again embracing the do-it-yourself bravado championed by their peers in the 70’s; in true fashion, there are people who inscribe the political on their personal clothing, whether it be from men wearing dresses to women wearing suits. While the centuries-long marriage between fashion and the establishment is still going strong, our everyday sartorial choices have the potential to tap at the roots of the union. MODA Winter 2013

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MODAfeatures

WEB OF FASHION’S PAST Tracing the Boho-Chic Culture Through Time

Trends may come and go, but as we know- some styles never fade. Staff writer, Stacey Chiu, explores the ever-reemerging world of the hippie/bohemian culture, and how it has infultrated our style and closets for decades.

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owards the tail end of Marni’s Spring 2014 Milan fashion week debut, a two-pieced dress smothered in 3-D, tangible flowers lit up the runway, and the voice of Sid Vicious howled from the speakers. His voice screamed and rasped from the first model to the last, and the music never seemed to mesh until the collection transitioned from the stiff, belted jackets of ‘50’s domesticity to the breezy, floweradorned chiffon gowns that aren’t out of place at Coachella. Marni’s collection was most compelling when we saw clothes cut from ghostly organza, when we could almost feel the thriving vivacity of the floral pieces. It seemed like these were the clothes we’ve all seen on the women who’ve colored the streets, the music festivals, and the Tumblr blogs with their bold, individual styles. It was, in short, a collection that embraced the bohemian aesthetic and can be traced back to the bohémien of post-Revolution France, the

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beat movement of hippie counterculture, and the revival of boho-chic in the early 2000’s. The Bohemians arrived in France after the revolution, artists who were deprived of the former system of patronage and plunged into poverty. They traded in their fine threads for cheap, worn clothing that interlocked perfectly with the new age rejection of bourgeois society and gravitation towards the arts. The artist emerged as a hero who expressed individuality in dress. Peasant shirts belted at the waist and long, flowing skirts became the fashion for these artists, reflecting the gypsy culture that served as inspiration for the first Bohemians. Almost two centuries later, New York’s Greenwich Village became the bohemian landmark for the Beat generation, a magnet for the writers, artists, musicians, and poets fleeing from conformity. They hung out in coffeeshops (a lot like our hipsters today), dreaming


MODAfeatures

From the top left going clockwise: Renoir Summertimeimage from wikipedia; Hippie Culture: image from http:// cdn.all-that-is-interesting.com; Bob Dylan and Suze Rotolo, image from http://desertpeace.files.wordpress.com; Marni Spring 2014 Ready-to-Wear, images from Style. com.

of artistic success. Jack Kerouac wrote the transformative novel, On the Road, and the decade produced bohemian style icon Debbie Harry of Blondie. Bob Dylan’s girlfriend, Suze Rotolo, said the Village was “where people like me went – people who didn’t belong where they came from.” Women wore tailored pants and collared shirts, rebelling against the frilly aesthetic of the time. Ten years later, hippie counterculture burst onto the scene with its psychedelic colors and floral motifs, the women wearing bell-bottom jeans, tiedye, and non-Western garments. Hippie clothing was the epitome of Bohemianism, most of it bought from thrift stores as a rejection of the mainstream corporate culture. Today, bohemianism has turned into boho-chic, and the style lives on in sun-dappled Instagrams, the runway, and the red carpet, thanks to Sienna Miller’s festival fashion, Marni, and scores of other designers and

celebs. Bohemian fashion is now known by its gauzy, flowing fabrics and floral prints, a blatant refusal to conform to our stiff, corporate culture. Fashion is not just a personal aesthetic. It’s a reflection of your ideals and what you believe in. Clashes of beliefs have propelled history forward, but voicing your opinion hasn’t always been about being loud or raising a sign at a picket – it can be found in the details, like what you wear. Fashion has been a response to the history surrounding it; bohemianism was born when the world began to embrace arts and culture, the bohemian and masculine fashion of the 50’s was a denial of domesticity, and today, boho-chic is a way to promote individuality and freedom of spirit. What you wear is part of your identity, and for the bohemians, past and present, their clothes have represented their rebellion of the mainstream. MODA Winter 2013

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MODAfeatures MODAInterviews

Meet The Posh Professors Jenn David sits down with two of UChicago’s most fashion-foward professors, bringing us the inside perspective on how these sociologists apply their field of study to their own lives.

Kristen Schilt: The Sociologist of Style

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MODA: How do you define style? kristen I’d say somebody has style when they have a definite look that they’re going for. They pay attention to the way they put together outfits - you can tell they thought about what they’re wearing. It’s cool that they’re putting themseles out there. MODA: How would you describe your own personal fashion style? kristen I think I lean more towards a goth aesthetic. I definitely have a darker style. I only very recently started to wear colors - most of my clothes are black and white. But I also tend to think in terms of different styles. So when I first came to the University of Chicago, I wasn’t quite sure how to translate my personal style into what it was like to be a professor...I started to have this aesthetic that I liked to call “nun on the town” where I would look for things that were dark grey, black, and dark blue, so like, high-waisted skirts and things with long sleees. Then I felt like I was going MODA Winter 2013

more for a 1960s secretary look with things that were very fitted and kind of stylized. I had a phase where I was really into square dancing outfits so I would wear a lot of these black and gold square dancing outfits but I didn’t think that would really work at the University of Chicago [laughs]. MODA: How would you describe your teaching style? kristen I think I’m very similar as a teacher as I am in real life. I really love teaching. I feel very open to students, and I try to be open in my teaching as well. I bring in a lot of humor but at the same time I really love sociology and I think I really convey that in my teaching. I want everyone to do good work. There are rules, there are things I want people to do, but I just [try to make] it this kind of collaborative environment, this sense of ‘we’re all doing this together.’ [It’s] funny because there are 60 people in our class, but somehow we all manage to feel like we really are having a conversation.


MODAfeatures

Forrest Stuart: The Chic Criminologist

Photos of Professor Schilt and Professor Stuart were taken by the writer of the article, Jenn David.

Sociologists are talking about how we communicate in these non verbal ways--the way that someone moves through the world, both literally and figuratively… people’s past biographies get written onto their bodies. I think style is this embodiment of your past history.

MODA: How do you define style? forrest I think it’s all one big package: someone’s gait and the way in which they walk into a room, but also the sort of space they take up in that room. [Sociologists] are talking about [how] we communicate in these non verbal ways--the way that someone moves through the world, both literally and figuratively… people’s past biographies get written onto their bodies. [I think] style is this embodiment of your past history. It raises the question of, how much of style can we control? MODA: How would you describe your own personal fashion style? forrest I am as nationalistic Californian and Angelino as can possibly be, which is a far more casual style. [And] in the academic setting it’s way more laid back. Perhaps people in the Midwest, in professional settings, take themselves a lot more seriously, so I guess in presenting myself I try to keep some of my California in terms of the same thing in class: a little more playful, not taking myself too seriously while at the same time fitting in with the formality that is around here. MODA: How would you describe your teaching style? forrest I enjoy sitting with my academic colleagues and having conversations on an abstract theory but in these street colloquialisms. We’re retranslating these highfalutin terms into street lingo, which I think is something that is not trivial. So I think in the classroom, I try to have this playful discussion, and hopefully some of those wallflowers will participate more.

MODA: What celebrity or famous person’s style do you admire the most? forrest Pharrell. I love this man’s style. It was actually kind of a big moment that Pharrell had in my own life. So as a high school student, going into college was when Pharrell, and N.E.R.D and the Neptunes and just a bunch of guys entering the hip hop scene were wearing skinny jeans and blazers and button ups and like, bow ties, and they’re looking clean and fresh and wearing clothes that, at least in the hip hop community, weren’t seen as necessarily masculine. This was something that was a little taboo to wear, especially as a young man of color. And now you see NBA players wearing these glasses with like the lens popped out, you know, Lebron’s wearing bow ties, and I feel like this wouldn’t have happened if it weren’t for this group of young black hip hoppers. I really admire those guys. MODA: What’s your favorite part about teaching at the University of Chicago? forrest I love the students here. I think for the students and for the faculty members that have been here for a long time you are either unaware, or you have forgotten, or have taken for granted that this place is a special, special place. The intensity with which—a good intensity, which I like—the intensity with which people come to this whole collective enterprise, that what we’re doing is unmatched. Everyone here cares, and they’re showing up, and they’ve read, and they’ve thought about it, and [then] it gets into this really cool critique.

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SIR &

MADAME Graham Bacher sits down with store owner, Brian Merrit, of the new Hyde Park Pop-Up Boutique, Sir & Madame.

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t’s Halloween, and it shows on 53rd street. Kids and their parents are out in droves. I walk into Sir & Madame, where I meet Brian Merrit, co-owner of the store with his wife, Autumn. In the spirit of the day, Brian’s dressed as an old school West Coast rapper, complete with tracksuit and permed wig. And what’s more, he’s entirely comfortable. I get the sense this is a man who totally trusts his own taste. But, I can’t fault him- as co-owner of Sir and Madame, it’s worked out pretty well so far. Founded in 2007, the brand has been lauded by the likes of GQ for their well-edited selection of both men’s and women’s brands, as well as their in-house private label designs. I sat down with him and asked him a few questions about his store, his style and his city. MODA: Why did you choose Hyde Park as the location for your pop-up? Brian: The University actually reached out to us. They really want to create this Hyde Park retail corridor, which can be tough. Growing up here, I saw a lot of stores go under. But, there definitely is a place for retail here, if it’s done right. MODA: Any new pieces, trends or brands you’re stocking this season that you’re especially excited about? Brian: I’m excited about this brand called Isaoragreat outerwear. I’ve been transitioning a bit to the more technical side of clothing. It works well here [in Chicago]. Gore-Tex, you need that gear; rainproof jackets come in handy. There’s another one called Axs Folk Technologyeverything has a function, as well as a great style. MODA: What would you say to a college student who doesn’t think dressing well is important? Brian: I don’t think I’d hear that coming from a uni-

From top left going counterclockwise: Image of inside of Sir & Madame Hyde Park . Photo from sirandmadame. com. Below: Image of stores owners and husband & wife team, Brian and Autumn Merritt. Image from well-spent. com feature on Sir & Madame. Top right: image also from well-spent. com feature on the store.

versity student- they just know better. But, whatever makes you feel comfortable, we’re all for it. Wear sweatpants to class, if that’s what you’re comfortable in. But, there’s always going to be that time when you can’t go into a situation with sweatpants on. MODA: Do you have an ideal customer? Brian: They want to look for something different, something quality. But they don’t want to look like they’re from 2026, or 1836. We let our customers build their own style. MODA: What are the dynamics of running a business with your spouse, especially when a lot of the decisions are more subjective/taste-based? Brian: Sometimes it’s difficult- but we’ve learned to work together, and to have specific roles and jobs- she pretty much lets me do what I want with the men’s, and I let her do her thing with the women’s. MODA:Why do you think your store has thrived like it has? Brian: We only sell what we like. We’ve had a unique style from day one- we’ve carried a lot of brands no one else carried. If we had went with a trendier route, when the recession hit, we would’ve been over the edge. MODA: How does being from Hyde Park, as well as Chicago, influence your style? Brian: When I was growing up, kids from Hyde Park were known as kids that dressed more innovative, more ahead of the curve. In the 90s, hip-hop kind of came around Hyde Park. With that came the Polo, the Tommy (Hilfiger).…I still think that Hyde Parkers are the freshest in the city. Even as I got older, there are certain things I wore like t-shirts, woven shirts that never go out of style. It’s also one of the most diverse neighborhoods in Chicagowhen you get diversity, the style and influences change. MODA Winter 2013

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Brains & Bronze Jewelry by Winifred Grace

In a celebration of the creative minds of Chicago, this shoot showcases the work of jewelry designer, Winifred Grace. As written in her bio, “Each season, she interprets the feminine mystique of natural wonders, but with a subtle edge that adds a bit of reality to the fantasy.� We explore this dichotomy of the real versus the fantastical. Photographed by Ivy Zhang and Kaiwen Luan.

Location: Logan Center for the Arts Jewelry: by Winifred Grace Photographers: Ivy Zhang, Kaiwen Luan Lighting: Anna Gregg Stylist: Ogonna Anouby Models: Tess Moran, Ashley Xu, Christiane Murray, Louise Simpson, Priyanka Sethy Hair Stylist: Michelle De Porto Makeup artist: Heather Chan

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GIRL ON FIRE: Ashley wearing Nine 43 mm Paddle Pendants, 2 1.75’’ Cuff with Triangle Pattern, and 21 mm Bangle with 3mm Screws

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GOLDEN GLARE: Left: Priyanka wears Bronze Bars and Brass Discs Earrings, Dome Ring, Paddle Ring, Ring with Triangle Pattern, Layered Slice Ring, Bronze Trapezoid Pendants necklace. Right: Tess wears Single cast bronze bar necklace, dome ring, crescent moon ring, and Screw Studs.

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STRIKES OF MODERNITY: Left: Christiane wears Black Leather Bib and Dome ring. Right: Louise wears 1� Wide Semi-Circle Pendant Necklace, 22 mm Triangle Pendant necklace, and 60 mm bronze Circle Necklace.

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DOUBLE TROUBLE Within the seasoned halls of the Oriental Institute, our vision began to fade as we began seeing double. Night and day clashed; dark and light merged; we could no longer see just one. Chicago designer LAGI NADEAU helped bring our double vision to life through her Neo-Romantic evening wear. Featuring firstyear twins, Amy & Erin Risk. Photographed by Allie Titus.

Location: Oriental Institute Reading Room Clothing by Lagi Nadeau Jewelry by Lagi Nadeau & Stylist’s Own. Photographer: Allie Titus Assistant Photographer: Ivy Zhang Stylist: Amutha Muthukumar Models: Amy Risk, Erin Risk Hair Stylist: Michelle De Porto Makeup artist: Nadine Menna & Rachel Scheinfeld

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Credits: (left) (right)

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“I chose fabrics with textures and prints that to me, embody a Victorian, regal, and whimsical feel...Escape into a dream world with me.�-Lagi

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“I design feminine designs with a touch of edge focusing on fine fabrics with interesting details. I cater to the woman who is successful in her career as well as personal life, she has a strong sense of self and style. She is a confident woman who loves to play with her style in an effortless way.� -Lagi

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“I love our Christina zipper sweater because it is so cozy and can be dressed up or down, it’s an effortless piece to wear.” -Lagi

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“I’ve been to a lot of places where folklorists say that fairies have been sighted. Nowadays anything supernatural might be purported to be a UFO, but in Victorian times it would be considered to be a fairy, or a will-o’-the-wisp, or whatever. It’s really quite fascinating.” –David Ellwand, Candlewick Press. From Lagi’s Inspiration Board.

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music still on mtv In early 2009, Kokorokoko opened up shop in Chicago, bringing the 80s and 90s back from its grave. In the midst of the rebirth of punk and in an urge to kick it back old school, we teamed up with this one of a kind vintage store to bring you back a few decades. Photographed by Ivy Zhang.

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featuring kokorokoko vintage shop Location: Fountain of Time, Near Logan Center, Cobb Classroom Clothing from Kokorokoko Vintage Store: 1323 N Milwaukee Ave, Chicago, IL 60622 Photographer: Ivy Zhang Stylists: Krystal Li, Frances Chen Models: Alexandre Moritz, Kevin Shang, Kiran Misra, Jenny Swann, Beth Minney Makeup Artist: Rachel Scheinfeld

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“We are inspired by the androgyny Prince and Grace Jones, the wild geometry of Yoji Yamamoto and Thierry Mugler’s designs, as well as the underground energy of professional wrestlers, California skate and surf culture and club kids of the early 90s.”-Sasha Hodges, Co-Owner of kokorokoko

denim & plaid tops are stylist’s own, and not from kokorokoko

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“Although a lot of the 80s was about excess, the rise of hip-hop in the US, the end of Apartheid in Africa, the fall of the Berlin wall and Perestroika in Russia were cultural moments that inspired the artists and designers. Prints were bold, colors were bright and designers were freely sampling each others cultures. The optimism of this time period is what we want to keep alive.�-Sasha

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MODA Magazine Winter 2013  

The student-run MODA Magazine is the University of Chicago's premiere showcase of fashion and design, featuring original photography and edi...

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