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400-Vehicle Fleet Work is Part of Fleet Focus for Top Class Installations The evolution of a business can sometimes take unusual twists and turns. For Tomas Keenan, CEO of Top Class Installations, local demand spurred him to shift from a traditional business model to working on fleet vehicles exclusively as a subcontractor. Most recently, Keenan’s shop finished a 400-truck dash camera project for Baldor Foods. “We installed [Rosco Vision Systems’] commercial-grade dash camera, as well as a side camera and a back-up camera,” Keenan said. With the GPS system and Rosco Vision Systems working in conjunction, the company can watch the

22  Mobile Electronics April 2018

video footage from the vehicle remotely. Top Class Installations has also completed a GPS tracking project for the New York City Department of Education, which included working on just over 5,000 vehicles. Keenan noted that for those looking to get into working on fleet vehicles, the market is far from saturated, thanks to the passing of the ELD (electronic logging device) Mandate. Companies are in a rush to comply with the new mandate, as fines for noncompliance will start being issued as of April of this year. Otherwise, companies that have large

fleets—upwards of 50 vehicles—are under pressure from insurance companies to have certain mobile electronics, such as dash cameras, in order for the insurance company to cover them. “It’s definitely a bit of a different mindset than your traditional 12-volt retail customer,” Keenan said. To get into working on fleet vehicles, Keenan recommended establishing a relationship with a manufacturer partner, such as a GPS company. Flexibility, dependability, capturing data effectively and cultivating relationships are key to making fleet vehicle jobs work for a business.

Profile for Mobile Electronics

Mobile Electronics Magazine April 2018  

Mobile Electronics Magazine April 2018

Mobile Electronics Magazine April 2018  

Mobile Electronics Magazine April 2018