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THE NEWSLETTER OF THE

s

October 2002

o

c

I

Volume 22

T

y

Number 10


Bell Museum of Natural History, 10 Church Street Southeast, Minneapolis Minnesota 55455-0104

Board of Directors President

Jodi L Aherns 612.588.9329 groundgeckofreak@yahoo.com

Vice President Tony Gamble

763.424.2803 tgamble@allbLcom

The S

Minnesota Herpetological , c 1 e t y o

Recording Secretary

Becky Girard

763.691.1650

aveskpr@hotmair.com Membership Secretary

Nancy Haig

763.434.8684

MHS We bpage: http://www.beJlmuseum.org/herpetology/Main.html MHS Group Email: http:Uwww.groups.yahoo.com/group/mnherosoc. Voice Mail: 612.624.7065

Treasurer Marilyn Brasus

blasus@msn.com

952.925.4237 ......................._ ...................................................._ _........_ ........................

October 2002

Newsletter Editor

Sill Moss

651.488.1383

mngatorguy@msn.com Members at Large Nancy Hakomakl

651.631.1380

Brian Ingbrelson

763.572.0487

Jody Holmstrom

651.224.7212

Volume 22

Number 10

The Purpose of the Minnesota Herpetological Society is to: • Further the education of the membership and the general public in care and captive propagation of reptiles and amphibians; • Educate the members and the general public in the ecological role of reptiles and amphibians; • Promote the study and conservation of reptiles and amphibians.

jodyalso@yahoo.com Barb Buzicky zzzbuzzl@aol.com Heather Ingbretson 763.572.0487 h_ingbretson@yahoo.com

Committees Adoption Sarah Richard

The Minnesota Herpetological Society is a non-profit, tax-exempt organization. Membership is open to all individuals with an interest in amphibians and reptiles. The Minnesota Herpetological Society Newsletter is published monthly to provide its members with information concerning the society's activities and a media for exchanging information, opinions and resources.

612.781.9544 RealSarah@aol,com

Education Jan Larson

507.263.4391 jan.skunkhollow@juno.com

Northern Minnesota Jeff Korbel

218.586.2588

LIbrary Beth Girard

763.691.1650 bgirard@worldnet.att.net

Webmaster Anke Reinders anke@umn.edu

Herp Assistance AmphibIans Greg Kvanbek John Meltzer John MorIarty

651.388.0305 763.263.7880

651.482.8109

Chameleons Vern & Laurie Grassel

763·428·4625

Crocodilians Jeff Lang Bill Moss

701.772.0227 651.488.1383

LIzards Nancy Halg Heather Matson

763.434.8684 612.554.8446

Large Boas, Pythons Tina Cisewski

612.856.2865

Other Snakes Jeff Leclere John Meltzer

651.488.6388 763.263.7880

Aquatic Turtles Gary Ash John Levell

763.753.0218 507.467.3076

Terrestrial Turtles Fred Bosman John Levell

763.476.0306 507.467.3076

General Meetings are held at Borlaug Hall, Room 335 on the St. Paul Campus of the University of Minnesota, on the first Friday of each month (unless there is a holiday conflict). The meeting starts at 7:00pm and lasts about three hours. Please check the MHS Voice mail for changes in schedules or cancellations. Submissions to the Newsletter Ads or Notices must be submitted no later than the night of the General Meeting to be included in the next issue. Longer articles will be printed as time and space allows and should be in electronic file format if possible. The business card rate is $5/month. Submissions may be sent to: -orThe Minnesota Herpetological Society Bill Moss 75 Geranium Ave East Attn: Newsletter Editor Saint Paul, MN 55117 Bell museum of Natural History -or10 Church St. SE. mngatorguy@msn.com Minneapolis, MN 55455.0104

Copyright2002, Minnesota Herpetological Society. Except where noted, contents may be reproduced for nonprofit, non·commerclal use only. AI! material must be reproduced without change. Proper credit will be given Including the author/photographer and the MHS Newsletter citing: volume, number and date.


Minnesota Herpetological Society Monthly Newsletter

The Vice-President's Report By Tony Gamble November General Meeting Friday, November 1st, 2002, 7:00

PM Program: Herpetological Health: Veterinary Case Studies Guest Speakers: Dr. Rasmussen, Dr. Burrill and another to be announced Last year I tried a relatively new format for our monthly meetings by having three local breeders discuss care and breeding techniques for a specific species or group of herps. These short, focused talks were well received and I've been encouraged to try this arrangement again. For our November meeting we will hear from local veterinarians, each presenting a case study. These case studies will focus on a particular species, malady, or medical incident. At press time, two vets have been lined up. Check the MHS webpage (www.bellmuseum.orglherpetology/Main) for updates. So far the lineup includes: Dr. James Rasmussen, Minnesota Zoological Garden: Foreign-body ingestion in a Komodo monitor. Cover: Blacktail Rattlesnake (Crotalus molassus) Photo by Jim Gerholdt

October 2002

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Number 10

October Raffle Donors Dr. Pan Burrill, Cedar Pet Clinic: Egg-binding in snakes. This will be a great opportunity to hear about these interesting cases as well as ask questions. Also, don't forget to vote for MHS board members at the meeting.

Upcoming Events: Friday, December 6 th , 2002: Bill Love - "Splendid Isolation: Exploring Madagascar's Herpetofaunal Diversity"

Saturday, December 7 th , 2002: MHS Holiday Banquet Guest Speaker: Bill Love - "New Caledonia's Gecko Grandeur"

November Critter of the Month: "Herps you could elect to public office"

Thanks to the following for their generous donations to the raffle which raised - $71 Marilyn and Randy Blasus Jan Andreasen (2) snake balls Dave Asleson seeds. (3) magazines, suppliments Fred Bosman (4) Reptiles magazines Dan Monson (Blue Lagoon) Fancy Plants Virginia Larson Orange cobra snake-light.

October Critter of the Month The following people were good enough to bring animals to talk about at the meeting. The theme was ''Your strangest herp" Tony Gamble Sand Boas John Moriarty Tiger Salamander from St. Paul and Blandings turtle. John Peterson Aldabran Tortoise Ann McKenzie A story of a rattlesnake bite in Wabasha Philip Bowen-Brazen corn snake "Kim" Nick Bowen-Brazen corn snake "Velvef' Erin Bowen-Brazen Albino Kingsnake "Gamba Katy Bowen-Brazen Burmese python "Bruce"

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NewsleUer of the Minnesota Herpctological Socicty

October 2002

Volumc22

Number 10

News, Notes & Announcements MHS 2002 State Fair Exhibit by Marilyn Blasus

This year's MN State Fair was the 'coolest' it has been in years! I mean that literally since we had the perfect weather this year to display reptiles inside the DNR building. Historically, we have had some real scorchers during fair time. We have protocol for really hot days, but none of that mattered this year.

better lighting. If anyone has suggestions or desire to help, please let me know.

MHS Does Reptile Presentation for Cub Scouts

We will also be creating informational flyers on various herp topics for next years fair-goers. If anyone has topic ideas, desire to write or help in other ways, please let me know. ยง

MHS member Virginia Larson did a reptile presentation for Cub Scout Pack #401 in Brooklyn Center on September 23. Pack 401 is a small group of about 25 members and even so, made a very generous donation of $100 to the MHS as a thank you for the for the talk.

The MHS was a traffic stopper, just like it is every year.

Thanks Virginia and Pack 401!!

I wish to thank the five members who allowed their animals to be in the display this year: Jim Gerholdt, Jan Larson, Kati Marier, John Moriarty, and Andrea Braucks. I would also like to thank the members who took time to make sure everything stayed presentable this year: Nancy Haig, Jim Gerholdt, Laurie Ford, Anke Reinders, Jody Holmstrom, Philip Koch, Bill Moss, Nancy Hakomaki, Karla Anderson, Amy Squires, Ann Porwoll, Jodi Aherns, Randy & Marilyn Blasus. A special thank you to Jim Gerholdt for going in a second time to clean! There are others to thank for support this year. Nancy Hakomaki cleaned and set up the display ahead of time. Jim Gerholdt and Jeff LeClere who were our emergency contacts, should something happen with the venomous snakes. Randy Blasus for helping with various tasks - phone calling, proofing, and other prep work. Next year we are planning on updating the turtle set-up to provide Page 4

ยง

October Adoptions by Sarah Richard, Adoption Chair Another great month for the adoption program.

2nd Call for Original Artwork for the Holiday Banquet Gordon Merck, the MHS Holiday Banquet Chairperson, is asking the artists among the group for a donation of artwork to be raffled as a major prize at our banquet in December. The work can be in any media and should feature (what else?) herps.

We had 23 animals come in: 5 Iguanas, 2 Monitors, 1 Bearded Dragon, 1 Gecko, 3 Boas, 3 Bull Snakes, 1 Py1hon, 4 Turtles, 2 Alligators and 1 Caiman. We placed 22 animals including a couple of Iguanas that have been in foster for a while (thanks to Liz) and we still have 7 Iguanas, 2 Caimans and 2 Alligators looking for homes. If you are interested in any of these animals you should contact Liz Redmond regarding the Iguanas or Bill Moss with regards to the crocodilians.

Your time will count as MHS volunThanks again to all of you that providteer hours. This may also qualify ed homes for these hapless Herps. as a donation to a non-profit You helped raise $315 for the society. organization. Without your willingness to provide homes for these critters the adoption Please contact Gordon at 952program couldn't happen! ยง 471-3582 ยง


Minnesota Herpetological Society MOlltilly Newsletter

October 2002

Volume 22

to other zoos and reptile houses. โ€ข Another thing that they did was to October Speaker Review study behaviors. Visitors were no exception. In fact, in studying the behaviors of visitors and finding out Ray Pauley: what they liked to see and what they preferred not to see, they "Strange but True Tales fro~ improved the appeal of the reptile The Brookfield Zoo Reptile house enough that it became the House" biggest attraction at the entire Brookfield Zoo. by Heather Ingbreson

One of the interesting animal behavior discoveries they noticed was regarding the Goliath frog. No other place had succeeded in the keeping of a Goliath frog at this time. The frogs appeared to be stressed much of the time and they were very dark. One of the workers stumbled across an article about amphibian skin and an idea came to them. They designed a waterfall with a splash-zone to offer a mist to keep the frog's delicate skin moist and they put in fans to keep the air from going stale. This improved the frogs activity and feeding tremendously and soon afterwards they even heard the first Goliath frog call. Since Goliath frogs have no vocal sacs they assumed it was a fan bearin~ that went out, but after having it fixed, they heard it again. They eventually discovered it was the frogs and recorded and studied three distinct calls that sound like a blade of grass held between your thumbs and blown(mating call), and Ray Pauley was the next Curator. a baby chick chirping and a sick He and his crew did some spectaccow mooing (male's defending terriular work with the animals and realtory). ly learned some interesting behav-

The Brookfield Zoo's beginning. is an interesting one. The. Reptll~ House was the first to be ~Ullt, but It was the last to be occupied. The owner needed reptiles to fill the Reptile House and they needed a C~rator to care for them: Grace Wiley was about to be eVicted and so she n~eded a p~ace for her many and vanous reptiles. She also wanted to. ~e curator enough that sh~ was Willing to ~and o.ver ownerS~IP of all of her ammals In order for thiS to hap~en. HO'.,:,ever,. !he Zoo had some Issues with hiring her. Grace Wiley was a well known free handler of venomous snakes and had some pretty offbeat ideas about dealing with venomous snakes. She eventually died from a cobr~ bite. In any event, ~he w~s the first curator of the Zoo s reptile house and lasted only two months because of the escape of a venomous snake.

iors of the reptiles .and visitor~ alike. One of the first things they did w~s to design an emergency snakebl.te alarm system that was the first of Its kind. This system stood as a model

Number 10

old would be about 12 Ibs. They were surprised to find that the tortoises they raised would hatch at about 2-1/2 oz. and by 2 years would be 20 Ibs, at 4 years would be 70 Ibs and at 5 years would be 130 Ibsl They hypothesize that it is due to a more optimal environment in captivity and they don't expect to observe any negative effe~ts from this rapid growth. Another interesting be.havior was noted that they would eat raw meat if they came across it. In fact, he told a story of a chipmunk that must have been getting into the vegetables that they fed the tortoises. He heard a loud screech and turned around to see a live chipmunk in a galapagos mouth. The tortois~ proce.eded to consume the entire chipmunk. Amazing. The last story that ~ay told us was about 2 female File snakes ~hat gave birth to (mal.e) snake ba~les. They assumed It w~s retamed sperm and went to find who the snake father was when they found these snakes had never even interacted with other male snakes. DNA tests revealed this was a true case of parthenogenesis.

II'!

If I recall correctly, snakes have.a gene and a Z gene. Tw~ w.?s mdlcate a male and a WZ Indicates a female. So, theor~tical!y, a fe~ale should be able to gl~e.blrth.to e~ther male or female. ThiS I~ qUite dlfferent from human genetics where XX is female and XY is male.

Galapagos tortoises were another Very interesting indeedl interesting animal they had discoveries about. In the wild, a 4-year ยง old would be about 4 Ibs, a 5-year Page 5


Newsletter of the Minnesota Hell'etological Society

t was now the spring of 2002, and once again a serious ] drought had hit the great American Southwest. As in past years, this must mean that it was time to go herping. For some strange and unexplained reason, there always seems to be a drought when we plan our trips. But, as in past years, once the plans had been made, we had no choice but to forge ahead. This year Dan Keyler would not be with us due to prior commitments. I drove down this time because had a Timber Rattlesnake to deliver to Barney Oldfield, and he had one for me to bring back. After the tragic events of 9-11, this seemed to be the most logical way to transport a venomous snake. On the way down I stopped in Security, Colorado to visit with my son Matt and his family. A lot of you will remember Matt from his younger Page 6

October 2002

days with MHS. He and his wife and my grandson were great hosts for several days, and then it was off to Farmington to hook up with Barney. Little did I know that the route I took. Highway 160, would take me through a nasty snowstorm as I drove over Wolf Creek Pass. I did not leave Minnesota to drive through a snowstorm! Be that as it may, I did make to Farmington, and on the morning of April 28, we were off. After a few stops along the way to look for where we found an

Volume 22

Number 10

Chihuahua" Greater Earless Lizard (CophoSQllrlIS texmms scitlllllS)

interesting scorpion and Barney fumbled away a beautiful male Chihuahuan Greater Earless Lizard that I managed to noose, we


Newsletter of the Minnesota Helpetological Society

arrived in the Florida Mountains of Luna Co. in southwestern New Mexico. A road that began as dirt, then qUI(;KlY became even less, took us

The author's luxurious accommodations inside an old stock tank.

October 2002

Volume 22

Number 10

only one). It was a beautiful Blacklail Ralliesnake laying next to a large rock just above the road. I yelled "molossus", and Barney hit the brakes. This wasn't difficult, as we were not moving very fasll I bailed out the passenger door, and he bailed out his door and went around back to grab a hook and a set of Whitney tongs. As he came up he asked me where the snake was, and the snake rallied and headed for the shelter of the rock. I rather rudely B1acktail grabbed the tongs from him and made previous trip we had found numerous roadkills, but no live ones. And they I yelled "molossus", and move slowly for a lizard and are easy to catch. As I went to grab it, it ran into Barney hit the brakes a bush. But apparenlly it ran through the bush and kept going. I never saw it a quick grab. I was able to get the again! And this was the only one we tongs on the snake just before it made saw on the entire trip. Oh well.

a canyon to a great camping spot. It even had the remains of an old stock tank that I seized as my bedroom while we were there. The scenery was fantastic, with rocks everywhere. A falcon was nesting on the cliff face above us, and quickly let us know that she it to the safety of the rock. I carefully did not approve of our presence. From pulled it out, and we celebrated. This was great, our first morning and we already had our first ralliesnake. lillie did we know that it would be the only one, dead or alive, that we would find here.

We did find quite a few more collared lizards, along with the really neat Chihuahuan Greater Earless Lizards. It was their breeding season, the the males were silling on rocks surveying their territory and allempting to allract females. Several of the whiptaillizards Flushed with success, we continued were also seen. Because their neck is our journey to the flatlands. I saw a the same size as their head, they are lizard make a dash to a bush and yelled for Barney to stop. As he Chihuahuan Collard Lizard stopped, I made the observation that it (Crolaphytus col/aris [llsells) might be a cornuturn (Texas Horned the whitewash on the cliff face, this Lizard). He put the binoculars on it was an annual nesting spot. On the and agreed. This was great! On our way into the Florida's we had seen numerous Chihuhuan Collared Lizards, along with the ever-present tree lizards. We could tell that the drought was limiting the herp activity, This bat is spotted hanging from the side of an old stock tank but lillie did we know just how much. After a restful night we headed down extremely difficult to noose and we to the flallands the next morning to were not able to catch any for positive look for lizards. Shorlly after we left identification. camp, I spoiled the first snake we found in the Florida's (and also the Page 7


Newsletter of the Minnesota Herpetological Society

October 2002

At the mouth of another canyon we and released the Blacktail next to explored around another stock tank, the same rock where we had found and this one was full of water. We it. It was nice to watch it crawl away after we had "borrowed" it for a day. It did not seem to be in any hurry. We also released the lizards near where they had been caught.

Barney co",m,md,eers suite for use as an escape-proof photography studio.

We did spend some time hiking the talus slopes around our camp, but found nothing. This was frustrating, as the habitat was some of the best we had seen. I did bring down a nice background rock to use in my

tumed a lot of ground cover, but found no herps here. We did find a bat cling· ing to the side of the stock tank. And there were lots of cows!

Volume 22

Number JO

We also found a road kill Sonoran Gopher Snake that was being eaten by vultures. They certainly are tidy eatersl All that was left where they had been eating were ribs and ver·

Sonoran Collared Lizard (Crotaphytlls IIebrius)

tebrae. We also found some Barn Owls in an old mine shaft. We found evidence of javelinas where they had been digging, and saw one as

The next morning we spent photo· graphing the herps we had caught. The Blacktail was typically calm, Vultures were picking this Sonoran Gopher snake clean.

photo set. The following morning, we broke camp and headed further west.

i

A Leaf-Footed Bug (family Coreidae)

and made a great subject. The lizards, as always, were more diffi· cult. My bedroom made the task easier, as the sides of the tank con· tained them when they jumped off of our photo set. I had also found a large Leaf·Footed Bug and pho· tographed it. Just as I was finishing with it, it flew off of the set, bounced off of Barney's face, and flew away. He was not pleased! We then headed back down to the flatlands Page 8

We spent a couple of days in Hidalgo County, and found our sec. ond live snake of the trip, a young Mojave Rattlesnake. While com· mon in Arizona and California, this was a nice find for New Mexico.

This old mine shaft had become home to some Barn Owls.

(Gambe/ia

IV.

wis/izenii)

it crossed the highway one evening. Here again, the scenery was beauti· ful, with many cactus blooming in spite of the drought. Long·Nosed Leopard Lizards were present, and

"'estern Collared Lizards male and female (Crotaphytlls col/aris baileyi)


Newsletter of the Minnesota Herpetological Society

October 2002

Volume 22

Number 10

we managed to nab a nice male to rvVJ."'ffifA~3E:-----ToWed11ieacMc:e:amfi()(jj;;-Tc;e;at-l photograph. This is also one of the I' ing lizards since that very time. few places where the Greater Earless Lizards and Zebratail As Lizards occur together. We then headed even further west, to the Gila Bend area of Arizona in search of the Sonoran Collared Lizard. We only found one, a young female. We also found dead cholla cactus, victims of the drought. Oddly enough, we did find a chorus of Great Plains Toads at a pond near a landfill. On the way back to Farmington, we passed through the area that would soon be consumed by the huge fire, and we could see then how dry it was. On our last night we camped

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he hardly live day without lizards. soon as Suvan h",CIRnl eating lizards, stomach pain ished and never troubled him since that time. Nowadays Suvan eats up to 15 lizards a the remedy has cured not only his stomach but it

raised an his spirits as eat a well. Eating lizards has rd a day, improved Suvans it will help you get rid of any potency, and it is getting stronger IdilseElse, The man says, the every year. is always available and nothing. The only thing necI"."""", for lizard treatment is to be Herp-Digest Volume 2 Issue 48 ยง to catch a reptile without its tail, and then immediin Navajo County just north of swallow it. The medicine annual MHS photo contest Snowflake. While doing some vigor- 19l1anmliSeE a quick recovery. March during the White <:::n",i<,d ous rock turning, we found Western Collared Lizards and a cute little '''''"'''' began his lizard treatment categories are: tarantula. I brought the tarantula years ago, at the age of The boy had stomach IH,.rn< with People home and soon discovered that it had a real attitude. and the pain could not in a Natural Setting relieved. Doctors were helpless IMiscElllane()us Herp Related Despite the relative lack of herps, the situation: any anesthetic (under 16) Photo or Art the trip was fun, and we both they prescribed were of a new category this year: returned home revitalized. Neither effect for the boy. Then a neigh- any media. of us shot as much film as we had recommended Suvan to eat a planned either. Who knows, maybe lizard every day, it was this opportunity to sh,')w(;asel one of these years there won't be a ISDecl;3l1v stressed that reptiles talents. drought and we will run out of film! ยง not be chewed. Suvan fol-

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Ne\vsletter of the Minnesota Herpetological Society

October 2002

Volume 22

Number 10

7Jlu!JllaH-J.. by John P. Levell

"The Histo/y of Helpeto[ogy ill Fillmore COUllty, Millllesota" Despite being located in the most herpetologically diverse region of the state (at least 39 of Minnesota's 52 amphibians and reptiles have been recorded in the Blufflands region), the herpetofauna of Fillmore County remains the most p~orly known of any southeastern Minnesota county. Historically, early exploratory expeditions occurred largely in areas immediately adjacent to the Mississippi River and surviving records of these excursions at best provide only brief comments on amphibians and reptiles found in southeastern Minnesota.

mental review of the herpetofauna of North America (Holbrook 1842) was published well before Minnesota achieved Statehood in 1858 and the territory that would be encompassed within the future

tiles are likewise rare in Cope's early "nationwide" herpetological monographs (Cope 1889, 1900). In fact, with the exception of two brief notes by Friedrich (1934) and Swanson (1935), the actual composition of Minnesota's herpetofauna was to remain virtually undocumented until the pioneering investigations and field work of Walter J. Breckenridge in the mid to late 1930s and early 1940s. Breckenridge's study, initially undert?ken in 19?5 as the res.earch portlon of his Ph.D. dissertation (Breckenridge 1941), yielded a myriad of published herpetological contributions and culminated in the publication of his Reptiles and Amphibians of Minnesota (Breckenridge 1944), the first comprehensive review of the state's herpetofauna. In the nearly nine years spent accumulating distribution dat.a for this monograph, Breckenridge "collected material in almost every county in the state," an outstanding demonstration of his endurance and patience when one considers that Minnesota is the 12 n largest state in the Union. Somewhat ironically, verified records for exactly twelve Fillmore County amphibians and reptiles are included among the distribution maps of Breckenridge's manuscript.

While including some of the ear- state is not specifically referred to liest references to the herpetofauna anywhere in the title's five original of southeast Minnesota, nothing in volumes. While many of Holbrook's the ~arratives of Hennepin (1698), scientifically minded predecessors, Keating (1825), and Beltrami (1828) contemporary colleagues, and corprovide any indication that these individuals ever entered what is now considered Fillmore County. Jonathan Carver (1796) most likely also visi~ed the region late in the 18 century and his chronicle of this journey includes a list of ten amphibian and reptile species encountered during his travels. The complete lack of locality data regarding these herpetological observations in Carver'sit impossible journal, however, Since the appearance makes to deter- ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~2~~ Breckenridge's monograph of in mine just where, if anywhere, A map of Fillmore Minnesota 1944, relatively little additional within Minnesota his sightings information has been published occurred. Carver's exploratory for- r.espondents must have had at least on amphibians and reptiles in ays, like those of Beltrami, limited exp.os~re. to .the !auna of the Fillmore County. Subsequent herHennepin and Keating would by Upper MISSISSIPPI River Valley petol~gical collecting activities, necessity have been largely ~on- (Thomas. Say for. exa.mple), organized faunal surveys, and simifined to areas readily accessible f:lolbrook Incorporated Ii~tle ~Istrlb~- lar programs in the Driftless Area from the shores of the Mississippi 1I0nai data from !he reglo.n Into .hls have concentrated largely on and other regional waterways. f!nlshed manuscript. Specimen clta- Houston, Winona, and Wabasha tlons or other references to Counties and have produced only John Edwards Holbrook's monu- Minnesota's amphibians and rep- limited herpetological data from Page 10


Newsletter of the Minnesota Herpetological Society

elsewhere in southeastern Minnesota. The first published update of species known to occur in the county is that of Henderson (1980) who includes records for sixteen Fillmore County amphibians and reptiles in his brief "checklisf' of southeastern Minnesota's herpetofauna. Lang's (1982) report on the state-wide status of Minnesota amphibians and reptiles provides more comprehensive distribution data, revised range maps, and records for two additional Fillmore County species. The Minnesota Herpetological Society's (MHS) survey during the summer of 1985 is one of only two known systematic studies of the general distribution of Bluffland Region amphibians and reptiles to specifically include Fillmore County within study area boundaries. Fillmore County amphibians and reptiles recorded in published MHS survey results include three species previously unrecorded from the county (Moriarty 1986). Two of these previously unrecorded species, the Common Snapper, Chelydra serpentina and the Painted Turtle, Chrysemys picla, are the first turtles ever reported from Fillmore County. More recently, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources/County Biological Survey (MNDNR-CBS) field activities for Fillmore County concluded in 1996 but a complete review of survey results has yet to be published, making it impossible to evaluate the significance of any potential herpetological contributions. Oldfield and Moriarty (1994) summarize the accumulated distribution data of the previous 50 plus years and, with records for 24 Fillmore County amphibians and reptiles, provides the most comprehensive and up-to-date review of species known to have occurred in the county. Moriarty's (1996) update of this title's range maps includes no additional new Fillmore County species records.

October 2002

Volume 22

Number 10

Science 1:14-15. This author's interest in the herpetology of southeastern Minnesota dates back to early 1993. Fillmore County fieldwork intensified following relocation to Lanesboro in August 1996 and to date survey activities have verified the presence, often in significant numbers, of eighteen of the twenty-four amphibians and reptiles recorded in the county by Oldfield and Moriarty (1994). At least two previously unreported Fillmore County species have also been recorded by this author but with "official" recognition still pending this is a tale that must await some future date.

Hennepin, L. 1698 (1903). A New Discovery. A.C. McClurg & Co. Chicago, IL.

Beltrami, J. C. 1828. Discovery of the Sources of the Mississippi and Bloody Rivers. Hunt and Clarke. London, England.

Keating, W. H. 1825. Narrative of an Expedition to the Source of St. Peter's River, Lake Winnepeek, Lake of the Woods, etc. 2 Vols. George B. Whittaker. London, England.

Breckenridge, W. J. 1941. The Amphibians and Reptiles of Minnesota with Special Reference to the Black-banded Skink, Eumeces seplenlrionalis (Baird). Ph.D. Thesis. University of Minnesota. Minneapolis, MN. Breckenridge, W .J. 1944. Reptiles and Amphibians of Minnesota. University of Minnesota Press. Minneapolis, MN. Carver, J. 1796. Travels through the Interior Parts of North America. Key and Simpson. Philadelphia, PA. Cope, E. D. 1889. The Batrachia of North America. U.S. National Museum Bulletin No. 34. Washington, D.C. Cope, E. D. 1900. The Crocodilians, Lizards and Snakes of North America. Smithsonian Institute Annual Report for 1898. Washington, D.C. Friedrich, G. W. 1934. Taxonomy and Distribution of the Fishes, Amphibia and Reptiles of Central Minnesota (abstract). Proceedings of the Minnesota Academy of

Henderson, C. 1980. Guide to the Reptiles and Amphibians of Southeast Minnesota - Region 5. Minnesota Department of Resources. St. Paul, MN.

Holbrook, John E. 1842 (1976) North American Herpetology, 2 nCl Edition. Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles Facsimile Reprint. Oxford, OH.

Lang, J. W. 1982. The Reptiles and Amphibians of Minnesota: Distribution . Maps, Habitat Selected Preferences, and References. Report to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. St. Paul, MN. Moriarty, John J. 1986. A Survey of the Amphibians and Reptiles of Southeastern Minnesota. Minnesota Herpetological Society Occasional Paper 1:2-12. Minneapolis, MN. Moriarty, John J. 1996. Updates to the Distribution Maps in Amphibians and Reptiles Native to Minnesota. Minnesota Herpetological Society Newsletter 16(5):5-7. Minneapolis, MN. Oldfield, B. and Moriarty, J. J. 1994. Amphibians & Reptiles Native to Minnesota. University f Minnesota Press. Minneapolis, MN. Swanson, G. 1935. A Preliminary List of Minnesota Amphibians. Copeia 1935(3):152-154. ยง

Page 11


Nc""slctter of the Minnesota Herpetological Society

October 2002

Volume 22

Number 10

2003 MHS Board Member Candidates by Becky Girard, Recording Secretary

The following people have volunteered to run for positions on the MHS Board of Directors. Please take some time to go over these survey results before election night, November 1, 2002. A survey was sent to each candidate, and all those that were returned have been printed here. Position: PRESIDENT Current number of candidates: 2

Jodi Aherns 1. Number of years in MHS? About 10 2. Have you served on the MHS Board in past? Yes. If yes, what position? Member at large, President 3. What are your special interests? Geckos 4. Why would you like this position? No one else is running. 5. What qualities would you bring to the Board? Me. 6. What improvementslchanges would you like to see for MHS? The MHS move in to 2003. 7. Since you would be responsible for helping shape MHS while on the board, what direction would you like to see MHS move towards? Forward. Randy Blasus

1. Number of years Photo not in MHS? 12 years Available 2. Have you served on the MHS Board in past? Yes. Member at Large 2 years and Recording Sec 2 years 3. What are your special interests? Herpetoculture, Herpetology, and I like Page 12

working with animals in the field, noting habits and Individual variations of species. 4. Why would you like this position? I believe it would be an opportunity to grow with the society and to contribute to the long term vision and direction of MHS. 5. What qualities would you bring to the Board? The years of service I have performed on the Board plus a continuing presence at the Board meeting through chair positions as Historian, Field Survey and Grant Chairs have allowed me to become very familiar with the inner working of MHS. I, also, feel that I am will rounded in my interests in both Herpetoculture and Herpetology allowing me to see the broad picture of our hobby. 6. What improvementslchanges would you like to see for MHS? As a member supported group, I would like to see greater involvement of members in that each person can contribute something unique enriching and strengthening the Society. Having assisted in the past through streamlining society activities, in particular Board related material, as Historian my contribution of research and drive resulted in the formation of a standardized Policies and Procedures Manual to assist in Society decision making. I would like MHS to still serve the broader Herp Community and to continue to be herp centric within the broad range of our members interests. 7. Since you would be responsible for helping shape MHS while on the board, what direction would you like to see MHS move towards? I have no particular plan for the next year other than to continue to serve the societies operational needs. The first year is generally when a new board member settles in and learns his/her role. However, one issue will play an

important role in MHS's future beginning this year - the initial planning for MHS's hosting of the Midwest Herpetological Symposium in 2005. Other than this, the focus will need to be on the immediate future with a nod given to more long term priorities. 8. Since you would be responsible for helping shape MHS while on the board, what direction would you like to see MHS move towards? I would like to continue with the programs we currently have, including the recently added Field Survey. I would envision the core of MHS to cover the center of the pie of the societies' activities, such as renfest, education, etc. without bias, remaining central to our core beliefs. Having missed few meetings due to my enthusiasm for my hobby, the society and the many friends I have made in my years as member as well as my continued interest in Board activities should preclude most absences.

Position: VICE-PRESIDENT Current number of candidates: 1 Tony Gamble 1. Number of years in MHS?13 2. Have you served on the MHS Board in past? If yes, what position? Yes, two years as Vice-president. 3. What are your special interests? Systematics, conservation biology, geckos, and other herps. 4. Why would you like this position? I've already booked half of next years speakers. 5. What qualities would you bring to the Board? I'm open to new ideas and easy to work with.


Nc"vsleUer of the Minnesota Herpetological Society

6. What improvements!changes would you like to see for MHS? I would like to see the MHS continue to grow its membership and stay active in the community. 7. Is there a particular improvement/change you will focus on, if elected, during the next year on the board? As vice-president, I will focus on bringing quality speakers to the monthly meetings. I think that good programs are one of the reasons that we have such high attendance every month and I'd like to continue the work I've been doing. 8. Since you would be responsible for helping shape MHS while on the board, what direction would you like to see MHS move towards? I think MHS does a good job balancing the varied interests of its members and I would try to keep that balance without spreading things too thin.

Position: RECORDING SECRETARY Current number of candidates: 1 Barb Buzicky Survey not returned

Position: MEMBERSHIP SECRETARY Current number of candidates: 2 Nancy Haig 1. Number of years in MHS? 20+ years 2. Have you served on the MHS Board in past? Yes If yes, what position? Member At Large, Newsletter Editor 3. What are your special interests? Maintaining the integrity of the MHS purposes. Welfare of herps and conservation. 4. Why would you like this position?

October 2002

Volume 22

There are still issues that need to be addressed such as converting to a new database that is more user friendly. I think I know where most of the problems lie, and feel best equipped to clean them up. 5. What qualities would you bring to the Board? My sterling personality, 20 years of working with and around the Board, and a life dedicated to herps. 6. What improvements/changes would you like to see for MHS? Cleaning up the lack of communication between Board Members, Chair Positions, and the general public. 7. Is there a particular improvement/change you will focus on, if elected, during the next year on the board? Yes. Updating the membership data base to a more publication friendly program. (White pages, report searching are major pain in the butt to publish right now.) 8. Since you would be responsible for helping shape MHS while on the board, what direction would you like to see MHS move towards? A cleaner, more efficient handling of the business end of the society so we can devote more time to herp issues and actions.

Nancy Hakomaki 1. Number of years in MHS? 9 years 2. Have you served on the MHS Board in past? Yes. If yes, what position? Member At Large. 3. What are your special interests? Crocodilians, general. 4. Why would you like this position? I enjoy serving on the board. I have maxed out my term limit for member-atlarge and want to try serving in a different capacity. 5. What qualities would you bring to the Board? Flexibility, commitment and a sense of humor. 6. What improvements/changes would you like to see for MHS? None at this time.

Number 10

7. Is there a particular improvement/change you will focus on, if elected, during the next year on the board? Encouraging more members to become active members. Formation of a committee to begin working on Midwest to be held here in 2005. 8. Since you would be responsible for helping shape MHS while on the board, what direction would you like to see MHS move towards? Continued education through hands-on programs and workshops and financial support for grant requests.

Position: TREASURER Current number of candidates: 1 Marilyn Brooks Blasus 1. Number of years in MHS? More than 15 years 2. Have you served on the MHS Board in past? If yes, what position? Yes. I have served as the Treasurer for about 10 years 3. What are your special interests? My main interest is MHS. I find great pleasure in doing what it takes to make MHS the best it can be for the members and the general public. Outside of herps, I am interested in Native America culture, in particular, rock art and an interest in all animals. 4. Why would you like this position? I think the position of Treasurer is where I can contribute the most as I am an accountant by trade and education numbers are my thing. 5. What qualities would you bring to the Board? Specifically to the Treasurer position, I bring a degree in accounting and over 15 years of accounting experience. To the board in general, I believe I contribute three things. First, I have great organizational skills useful for facilitating the many less noticeable tasks insuring things are not forgotten. Second, my long history on the board allows for some continuity and provides Page 13


Newsletter of the Minnesota Herpetological Society

a foundation to build upon. Lastly, real dedication to MHS. 6. What improvementslchanges would you like to see for MHS? I would love to see our overall volunteerism improve. I think the more people who volunteer the more ideas and changes MHS will have. We would have more people to spread the work out to (therefore, each person would have to do less). It goes without saying, that if we have more volunteers, we get more done. 7. Is there a particular improvement/change you will focus on, if elected, during the next year on the board? At this point I don't have any major changes that I would propose, but I have a list of little improvements that I will continue to bring to the board. Most will be unseen by the general membership, but I would hope everyone would benefit from them. 8. Since you would be responsible for helping shape MHS while on the board, what direction would you like to see MHS move towards? I believe much of MHS success is due to the balance we have between many interests within reptiles and amphibians. Given people can focus on anywhere from captive care to natural history, large scale breeding to having their first herp, from conservation to education, and the list goes on. I hope we continue to keep that balance in everything we do.

October 2002

3. What are your special interests? Crocodilian Biology and Natural History 4. Why would you like this position? The job of the Newsletter Editor is an important one for MHS, it is one of the ways we are judged by others as a credible organization. I want to raise the bar for future editors of the newsletter. In addition, as the look and feel of the newsletter reflects the style and creativity of the editor, I find it a creatively satisfying endeavor. 5. What qualities would you bring to the Board? A great dedication to the continued success of the MHS 6. What improvementslchanges would you like to see for MHS? 7. Is there a particular improvement/change you will focus on, if elected, during the next year on the board? The newsletter would be my focus. 8. Since you would be responsible for helping shape MHS while on the board, what direction would you like to see MHS move towards? More/continued involvement with local herpetological issues. Position: MEMBER-AT-LARGE Current number of candidates: 7 Number of positions: 5

Heather Clayton 1. Number of years in MHS?3 years 2. Have you served on the MHS Board in past? No If yes, what Position: NEWSLETTER EDITOR Current number of candidates: 1 position? 3. What are your special interests? Education Bill Moss for the public (especially children) about herps, also growing interest in herp rehab 1. Number of years in MHS? 14 years and breeding. 2. Have you served 4. Why would you like this position?To leam more about the MHS and help keep tts puron the MHS Board in past? Yes pose. 5. What qualities would you bring to the If yes, what position? President 5 years; Immediate Board? I feel I am pretty fair, and though not Past President 1-1/2 years; Vice- expeJienced as a Board Member, I have a President 1 year; Editor 1/2 year; strong drive to work towards the MHS misMember at Large 3 years. sion. Page 14

Volume 22

Number 10

6. What improvements/changes would you like toseeforMHS?Rrsti need to leam more about what ooncerns there may be now, but first thing that oomes to mind is more involvement wtth the metro oommuntty and educational programs; also, getting more members put in to action. Z Is there a particular improvement/change you will focus on, if elected, during the next year on the board? Again, more oommuntty education and member involvement, also ensuring equal treatment of members and policies. 8. Since you would be responsible for helping shape MHS while on the board, what direction would you like to see MHS move towards? I would like to see ft oontinue to grow in numbers and influence.

Jody Holmstrom 1. Number of years in MHS? 2+ years 2. Have you served on the MHS Board in past? If yes, what position? Current Member At Large 3. What are your special interests? Education, environmental issues and animal rescue 4. Why would you like this position? I am just becoming familiar and comfortable with the duties and responsibilities of this position. If elected again I would not have to waste time figuring out the boundaries. 5. What qualities would you bring to the Board? Because I refuse to be polarized by group politics, I think I bring a balanced viewpoint to the Board. I try to see all sides of an issue. I don't play games and the membership will always know where I stand. 6. What improvementslchanges would you like to see for MHS? Not at this time. 7. Is there a particular improvement/change you will focus on, if elected, during the next year on the board? 8. Since you would be responsible for helping shape MHS while on the board, what direction would you like to see


NC\'i'sletter of the Minnesota Herpetological Society

MHS move towards? I would like to see the Society continue to build on the goal of quality lectures for the membership. This is a feature that sets us apart from the rest of the herp societies. Tony has done a great job providing informative and interesting lecturers for the meetings and I would like to see that continued.

Brian Ingbretson 1. Number of years in MHS? 6 years 2. Have you served on the MHS Board in past? If yes, what position? 2002 Member At Large. 3. What are your special interests? General/Educating the public. 4. Why would you like this position? It gives me an opportunity to be a part of an organization that I am very dedicated to. 5. What qualities would you bring to the Board? Open to new ways of doing things. 6. What improvements/changes would you like to see for MHS? Try to get more people involved in hands-ons, field surveys, on the board, etc. 7. Is there a particular improvement/change you will focus on, if elected, during the next year on the board? Less iguanas and alligators up for adoption. Ha-ha. 8. Since you would be responsible for helping shape MHS while on the board, what direction would you like to see MHS move towards? Build and maintain some of the relationships we have with agencies like animal control and the DNR.

October 2002

Volmnc 22

Boas, cornsnakes, geckos (leopard) and bearded dragons. 4. Why would you like this position? I really like MHS and I want to support the Society and to help it succeed in any way I can. 5. What qualities would you bring to the Board? I serve as a good back-up Recording Secretary and I also helped run the computer part of the 2002 White Snake Sale. 6. What improvementslchanges would you like to see for MHS? MHS is always looking to grow and improve and I'll look for ways to improve the White Snake Sale. 7. Is there a particular improvement/change you will focus on, if elected, during the next year on the board? I would like to look into ways to make MHS more visible to our community. 8. Since you would be responsible for helping shape MHS while on the board, what direction would you like to see MHS move towards? Education of the public and public visibility.

Nathan Perry 1. Number of years in MHS? 2 years 2. Have you served on the MHS Board in past? No. 3. What are your special interests? Interesting presenters. Have tegu and boa. 4. Why would you like this pOSition? To give my input to the MHS. 5. What qualities would you bring to the Board? Helpful changes. 6. What improvements/changes would Heather Ingbretson you like to see for MHS? 1. Number of years in 7. Is there a particular MHS? 3+ years improvement/change you will focus on, if 2. Have you served elected, during the next year on the on the MHS Board in board? past? If yes, what 8. Since you would be responsible for position? Member At helping shape MHS while on the board, Large; Recording Secretary. what direction would you like to see MHS 3. What are your special interests? move towards? More members events in

Number 10

the community. Raise awareness.

Alex Schmoll 1. Number of years in MHS? 8 months 2. Have you served on the MHS Board in past? No. 3. What are your special interests? Snakes and lizards mainly but all herps. 4. Why would you like this position? I would like to have a more active role in the society. It will also help me obtain more herp knowledge the main reason I joined the society 5. What qualities would you bring to the Board? I am energetic and like to see things get done and done well. I work at a vet clinic right now and am in school. Extreme enthusiasm for all herps 6. What improvements/changes would you like to see for MHS? A lot more member participation and education of each other and those not in the society. I would like to see more conservation issues dealt with and more surveying. 7. Is there a particular improvement'change you will focus on, if elected, during the next year on the board? Member participation and education. 8. Since you would be responsible for helping shape MHS while on the board, what direction would you like to see MHS move towards? I would like to see us do more society interacting events or things that will get us noticed enough that it will intrigue others. Brent Wold 1. Number of years in MHS? 5 years. 2. Have you served on the MHS Board in past? No. 3. What are your special interests? 4. Why would you like this position? I would like to give back some to an organization that has given to me and my family.

Page 15


Newsletter of the Minnesota Herpetological Society

5. What qualities would you bring to the Board? 10 years of experience working in the Minnesota Zoo Education Department and 7 years of education experience in the Minnesota Historical Society. I have also worked with various schools and park programs, I have been doing this for 20 years. 6. What improvements/changes would you like to see for MHS? To get some new people and ideas into the board. 7. Is there a particular improvement/change you will focus on, if elected, during the next year on the board? Outreach to more schools 8. Since you would be responsible for helping shape MHS while on the board, what direction would you like to see MHS move towards? More toward rnore public education and training on how to take care of these critters.

October 2002

the Society as Member-at-Large as a way of helping the Society and learning more about the activities thereof and of the Board in particular, as a way of preparing to someday run for other board offices. 5. What qualities would you bring to the Board? I have ca. 2.5 years experience providing administrative support for other volunteer organizations, making use of my strong attention to details and their relationship to their broader context. I also have strong skills in writing, editing, and proofreading. 6. What improvements/changes would you like to see for MHS? 7. Is there a particular improvement/change you will focus on, if elected, during the next year on the board? 8. Since you would be responsible for helping shape MHS while on the board, what direction would you like to see MHS Philip Woutat move towards? I have no particular agen1. Number of years in da of changes I would like to see in the MHS? ca. 3 years. Society. Aspects of the Society that I most 2. Have you served value, however, and that I would work to on the MHS Board in perpetuate and improve include the edupast? No. cation of both members and the public and 3. What are your speparticipation by the membership in genercial interests? Community ecology and biogeography of al in various Society-sponsored activities terrestrial vertebrates. Herpetologically, I (e.g. field surveys, hands-on opportunities, writing for the newsletter, and maktend to be most interested in reptiles. 4. Why would you like this position? ing presentations at meetings). § Volunteer organizations like the M.H.S. depend on numerous members stepping up to assume the various organizational duties over time so as to avoid individuals getting burned out. I would like to serve

Volmne 22

Number 10

2003 Ballot* President Jodi L. Aherns Randy Blasus Vice President Tony Gamble Recording Secretary Barb Buzicky Membership Secretary Nancy Haig Nancy Hakomaki Treasurer Marilyn Blasus Newsletter Editor Bill Moss Members at Large vote for (5) Heather Clay10n Jody Holmstrom Brian Ingbretson Heather Ingbretson Nathan Perry Alex Schmoll Brent Wold Philip Woutat • The above ballot is not final and may change before election day.

...--------------=============9 A special thanks to the fine people at

Captain's Seafood for the very generous (and delicious) donation of fresh seafood for our closing feast out at the Renaissance Festival. Page 16

Captain llill Young Carolyn Young Oumcn

Office: 612-522-7060 Fax: 612-522-7159 214 nod Ave. N .• Minneapolis, MN 55411 captains@fishnct.rom


Newsletter of the Minnesota HeIpetological Society

October 2002

Volume 22

Number 10

Minnesota Herpetological Society Treasurer's Report Prepared by Marilyn Brooks Blasus, Treasurer English Spot

Oulen

For the Month Ending: September 30, 2002

Jim's Rabbit Shack "IMlero Spots An> Tops'

JIMOALUGE

(763) 296-2818

8700 Jab.r Ave, NE Monticello. MN 55362

Income: Membership Sales (Net) Donations Raffle Mise Total Income:

765.00 396.25 2032.75 71.00 1310.00 4575.00

Expenses: Newsletter Printing & Postage Other Printing & Postage Program Conservation/Donation Supplies & Refreshments Mise Total Expense: Net Gainl(Loss):

464,00 769.71 50.00 0.00 71.64 343.88 1699.23 2875.77

•Repliles' Amphibians -Invertebrates' Small Mammals· Fish' Complele Line of Cagesl Food, Books &Supplies lor ALL Animals ~lN CI7',

i. Hours: Mon.• Fri. 10-8 Sat. 10·6 Sun. 12·5

les

The LARGEST, BEST Selection in the Twin Cities Since 1979

REPTILES

""~CMI ftmM

2363 University Ave. W. SI. Paul, (1/2 Blk E. of Raymond)

Only $5 Per Month .•.••• $60 Per Year

-

(651) 647·4479 www.twincitiesreptiles.com GE'"I' 'THE FAMS ... NOl" 'THE HYRE -

-

----------------

Page 17


Newsletter of the Minnesota Herpetological Society

October 2002

Volmne 22

Number 10

Classified Advertisements Classified ads are free to the member ship. Deadline Is the night of the general meeting to be Included In the next newsletter. 1.0.0 ::: male, 0.1.0 ::: female, 0.0.1 = unsexed, cb = captive bred, abo = or best offer, + = times run{ ads are run only 3x unless requested to continue).

For Sale FOR SALE:2.3 2001 Southern Brown EggEating snakes for sale. All captive hatched and eating. Please contact Michelle or Sean for more information at (651) 6040314_ Price is $175 each. Also, we have a female 1999 hatch Malaysian Blood python for sale. Never been bred. Price is $250.+++

FOR SALE: 5 almost new melamine enclosures. 3 are 24"w x 36"h x 12"d. 2 are 24"w x 48"h x 12"d. Were used for small arboreal lizards. $45 each or all 5 for $150. New Guinea artifacts collected from areas along the Sepik river:storyboards, figures, masks,etc .... add some Original New Guinean tribal art to your hamel Contact John Hogston. 952-8914371. john@goannaland.com++

Wanted Wanted: An adult slender glass lizard and a baby black ratsnake to photograph. For sale or loan. Please contact Jeff LeClere 651.488.6388 or reptilia74@aoi.com+++

FOR SALE: Ornate Diamondback terrapins(malacJemys macrospilotas) C.B. $125.00 ea. call jim 651 5783401+++ Frozen Rabbits - all sizes. Prices very reasonable - pinkies to adults. Jim Daluge 763.295.2818

Flightless Frultflles - Excellent food for dart frogs, mantellas, hatchling geckos, baby chameleons, spiderlings, and other small herps. Two species available: Drosophila meianogaster (small) and Drosophila hyde; (large). $5/culture or $25/6 cultures. Each culture contains 30 to 50 adult flies and has potential to produce several hundred young. Also, Mealworms, two sizes available - regular and mini. $5/1000. Can be delivered to MHS meetings. Call Tony Gamble 612747-6682 or email tgamble@attbi.com

The MRS PreSident says I must have ~oM my' mind to :be Se~~ing rodents thiS good, thiS Cheap •••••••••

We~~ my ~oSS

yDt4f Gainn

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Help support the MHS and get a good deal too! Buy your rodents from MHS

Pinkies

$7/dz

Fuzzies

$7/dz

Fuzzies

$15/dz

HORRers

$8/dz

Sm Adult

$18/dz

Adults

$10/dz

Med Adult

$24/dz

kg Adult

$30/dz

Jumbo

$36/dz

For pick up at monthly meetings only. Orders Must be placed at least one week in advance of date of meeting at which the frozen rodents are to be delivered. Place orders with Jody Holmstrom at 651.224.7212 or jodyalso@yahoo.com Page 18


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legality of any animal, or the quality or legality of any product or service advertised In the MHS Newsletter. Any ad may be rejected at the discretion of the Newsletter Editor. Due to space f1mllaUons, unpaid and complimentary advertisements are subject to

MHSAD RATES

occasional omission. Classified Ads: All active members are allowed a classlffed ad, run free of charge as space permits. Ads may be ran three consecutive months, after whIch time they may

Business card 1/4 Page 1/2 Page

be resubmitted. Corresponding members are allowed a complimentary business card advertisement monthly as space permits. Due to federal restrictions on Non-profit mall· Ing permits, we are not allowed to run ads for travel, credit or Insurance agencies.

$5/Month $60Near $10/Month $120Near $20/Month $240Near

Business card advertisements may be purchased at $51ad, per month, For other rates please Inquire,

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Submissions: Ail advertIsements should be submitted to the MHS Editor, Bell Museum ,of Natural History, 10 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455. Deadline is the night of the General Meeting for InclusIon In the next newsletter. Make checks payable to: Minnesota Herpetological SocIety,

r-----------------------------------------------, Name

New Renewal Membership#

Address City, State, Zip, Phone

Type Check #

Email

List In MHS Directory? Yes

No

Herp related interests

MinnesotaHerp etolo .cal Society Membership A pplication Active Memberships: Sustaining ($60/year)

Contributing ($30/year) Basic ($15/year)

Corresponding Memberships: Basic Commercial ($25/year 2 Bus Cards) Silver ($75/year 2 1/2 pg Ads) Required check info. Drivers Lie #

Bronze ($50/year 21/4 pg ads) Gold ($1 ~O/year 2 Full pg Ads) State DOB

L _______________________________________________ ~


MINNESOTA HERPETOLOGICAL SOCIETY BELL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 10 CHURCH STREET SE MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55455-0104

Non-Profit Rate U.S. Postage PAID Mpls, MN

Permit No. 2275 ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED

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Vol. 22 (2002), No. 10  

Minnesota Herpetological Society Newsletter

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