Issuu on Google+

NEWSLETTER OF THE

MINNESOTA HERPETOLOGICAL SOCIETY

MAY 1993 BELL MUSEUM OF NATURAL mSTORY <),

VOLUME XIII 10 CHURCH STREET SOUTH EAST

NUMBER 5 MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55455-0104


Do you ever have a question about one of your herps and wonder who might be able to provide an answer? Most people who keep pets of any kind have been is this situation at one time or another. A group of MHS members has volunteered to provide assistance. Listed below are the people and their specialties. Please be reasonable about the time of day and how frequently you call.

Large pythons and constrictors Glen (Jake) Jacobsen 757-8268 Vence Jimerson 869-8547

Other Snakes John Meltzer John Levell Connie Delles

263-7880 374-5422 374-5422

Lizards Nancy Haig 789-4637 Bill Moss 488-1383 Drew Newman (Iguana) 774-6008

Amphibians John Meltzer Greg Kvanbek Drew Newman

263-7880 533-7723 774-6008

Terrestrial turtles and tortoises John Moriarty 647-1334 489-7853 Ann Porwoll

Aquatic Turtles Michele Stillinger Dennis Daly

377-8637 633-8370

The purpose of the Minnesota Hepetological Society is: to further the education of the membership and the general public in care and captive propagation of retiles and amphibians; to educate the membership and the general public in the ecological role of reptiles and amphibians; and to promote the study and conservation of reptiles and amphibians.

MHS BOARD OF DIRECTORS PRESIDENT VICE PRESIDENT MEMBERSHIP SECRETARY RECORDING SECRETARY TREASURER NEWSLETTER EDITOR MEMBER-AT-LARGE MEMBER-AT-LARGE MEMBER-AT-LARGE MEMBER-AT-LARGE IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT

(612) 757-8268 (612) 374-5422 (612) 374-5422 (612) 774-6008 (612) 431-2146 (612) 377-8637 (612) 467-3715 (612) 488-1383 (715) 425-7959 (612) 623-7620 (612) 263-7880

Glen Jacobsen John Levell Connie Delles Drew Newman Marilyn Brooks Michele Stillinger Jeff LeClere Bill Moss Hans Paulson Sara Richard John Meltzer

SNAKEBITE EMERGENCY HENNEPIN REGIONAL POISON CENTER

(612) 347-3141

MINNESOTA POISON CONTROL SYSTEM LOCAL

(612) 221-2113

OUT OF STATE

(800) 222-1222

Copyright Minnesota Herpetological Society. The contents of this newsletter may be reproduced for incluSion in the newsletters of other herpetological societies provided that the material is reproduced without change and proper credits are given to the MHS Newsletter, citing, volume, number, and date.


MINNESOTA

HERPETOLOGICAL

Table of Contents

SOCIETY

Vol XIII # 5

From the Editor

Upcoming meeting highlights by John P. Levell

2

MIlS Business

3

This month I don't have much to say except thanks to Tom Jessen for his article and cartoon!

Upcoming Herp Events

4

Reptile Classification Part 8 Final installment by John P. Levell

5

Don't forget to bring your herps to the next meeting, the feature is ANY HERP, not to hard to deal with!

Fox Snake Hibertnation Den in Blue Earth County by Tom Jessen

11

Conservation of Endemic Amphibians of India's Western Ghats Region by Fred Swengel and Rebecca Heller

15

HFYI

18

MIlS Classifeds

20

Classified Ads

22

Hope to see everyone at the next meeting!

***

Please send all inquiries, ads, and articles directly to the editor

***

MHS Editor 524 Indiana Ave. N Golden Valley, MN 55422

Next newsletter deadline:

MHS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

June 4, 1993

Page 1


June Program: Speakers: Where: When:

Conservation Programs, Endangered Herps, and the Endangered Species Act.

Chuck Kjos/Rich Baker

Borlaug Hall, University of Minnesota St. Paul Campus 7:00 pm Friday, June 4, 1993

For the Second month in a row our program will feature two speakers, as both the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources will "tag team" MHS members at our June meeting. Topics to be covered include endangered and threatened reptiles and amphibians, conservation efforts pertaining to herps on both the state and national levels, and the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Also covered will be ways the MHS, both as a society and as individuals, can effectively aid in the conservation of reptiles, amphibians, and other natural resources. Chuck Kjos, of the Endangered Species Unit - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at Fort Snelling, works extensively on the various recovery programs for federally listed species including reptiles and amphibians, and in evaluating potential candidates for that list. Chuck has promised to enlighten us on some of the projects currently underway to conserve herps nationally. He is also very familiar with the Endangered Species Act and should be able to help explain this legislation and its importance to all MHS members in attendance. Rich Baker is the acting Nongame Research Supervisor of the Minnesota DNR's Nongame Wildlife Program. He is also coordinator of the Nongame's biennial Grants Program, under which he has supported a variety of herp research programs, including; timber rattlesnake, cricket frog and Kandiyohi frog surveys, and the bullsnake reintroduction program. Rich is also involved in numerous other herp related projects and his input on the conservation of these animals in our state should be invaluable. Between these two speakers, this month's program promises to be most informative. It is highly recommended that anyone with an interest in the conservation of reptiles and amphibians, on either the state or national level, attend this meeting. JPL

[Writing to our elected officials is one of the simplest and most effective ways to influence public policy on behalf of the environment. Here are some tips on effective tools (DO'S and DOHT'S) for letter writing (courtesy of the Audubon Society): DO address it properly (ex. The Honorable so and so), identify the bill or issue, make sure the letter is timely, focus on your own delegation, be reasonably brief, ask for a response, write your own views, give your reasons for taking a stand, show understanding, be constructive, ask for specific action, share expert knowledge with representative, use personal or business letterhead if possible. DON'T make threats or promises, berate your representative, pretend to wield vast political influence or try to instruct your representative on every issue that comes up (don't be a pen pal). - ed.]

MRS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Page 2


Board Meeting Attending: Glen Jacobsen, John Levell, Connie Delles, Drew Newman, Marilyn Brooks, Michele Stillinger, Jeff LeClere, Bill Moss, Sara and George Richard, Randy Blasus, Donna Calander, Cindy, and Dan Bergquist. MHS Board Meeting notes unavailable at this time. Adoptions Dan Bergquist: Green iguana Todd Cherveny: Burmese python Hans Paulson: Burmese python

*** [Some concerns were raised at the board meeting as to the current adoption procedures. The MHS board is looking into a different method of handling adoption procedures for the future. Temporarily, for next month's adoptions, the request form will only have a space for your membership number. This is required to receive an animal! As always, please put down as much information as possible on these forms. Use the back if needed. This will help adoption committee members find the most suitable home for the animal.-ed.} *** Raffle Winners: Jeff Nielsen, Sarah Richard, Robert Ost, David Munsen, James Rea, and Dallas Ost. Thanks to everyone for purchasing tickets and thanks to whomever donated the items. Refreshments Thanks to whomever brought ice cream sandwiches to the last general meeting. It must have been a hundred degrees in that room that night. It was the perfect treat. I'm very sorry I didn't have your name for the newsletter!

The MHS picinic will be on July 17, 1993 at Islands of Peace Anoka Parks from 9:00 am to 9:00 pm. Map in next issue.

Speaker Review May 7ths speaker review will be in the next issue of the newsletter. Critter of the Month for JUNE:

ANYTHING!!!

MHS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Page 3


Upcoming Herpetological Events is a listing of herp relate conferences, symposiums, shows, lectures, classes and local hands on events.

June & July '93

Aug. & Sept. '93

*IHS - Miami FL 6/17-20

*FI Breeders Expo 8/13-15

*Como hands on Sunday May 30th

*St. Louis Expo 8/29

*MHS Picnic 7/17

*Mid Atlantic Show, Baltimore 9/25-26 *Ren Fest 8/21-9/25

Oct. thru Dec. '93 *Midwest Herp Conference Iowa Herp Soc. Des Moines 10/22-24 *MHS Holiday Party 12/4

CONFERENCES & SYMPOSIUMS 17th Annual International Herp Symposium is on June 17th -20th in Miami Beach FL. Last chance to get your reservations in is June 1st. See your March MHS Newsletter issue for registration form. There are many MHS members going, some are even driving (crazy herpetologists), so there may be opportunities for mass car pooling to help save on gas money. The annual Midwestern Herpetological Conference sponsored by the Iowa Herp Soc, will be held in Des Moines, Iowa on October 22 - 24 at the Shereton Inn. Room Reservations call (515) 278-5575. Info can be receive from Allen Anderson, President of Iowa HS at (515) 981-0402 or fax to same number Mon-Fri 8am-5pm. Tentative Speakers: Dr. Richard S. Funk, DVM, Dr. Dick Ross, MD, Don Perschau, Ia Herp Soc, and private breeders; Eugene Bessette, John McGrath, Al & Cindy Baldogo, and Tom Weidner. EXPOS & SHOWS The Mid Atlantic Reptile Show, sponsored by the Maryland Herp Soc is on Sept. 25 and 26th in Baltimore. Info is in the April MHS Newsletter. 1st annual st. Louis Reptile Breeders Expo and Sale is Sun. Aug 29th at the Kirkwood Community Center. Call (314) 892-6605 or (314) 845-2038 1993 National Breeders Expo, Orlando FL at the Twin Towers Hotel, sponsored by the Central FL Herp Soc, August 13-15. Pre-registration is $10 send to: Central FL Herp Soc, P.O. Box 3277 Winter Haven, FL 33885. Call (813) 294-2235 for info and 1-800-327-2110 for hotel reservations. MHS EVENTS The annual MHS picinic will be held on July 17th at the Islands of Peace Park in Anoka. Further details next month. The next hands on is May 30th at the Como Zoo.

MHS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Contact Michele Stillinger

Page 4


REPTILE CLASSIFICATION. PART 8: CONCLUDING STATEMENTS AND BIBLIOGRAPHY By: John P. Levell

CONCLUDING STATEMENTS: In concluding this series, I wish to point out once again that the classification system presented in ttlis article is a contpilation of int.~:?ncled to rep'!.:i.l f?S 2 as one doesn't existp In reviewing the many ptlblications dealing with the evolution, classification, arld taxonomy of reptiles, i t soon

t.he

~.,Ior·k

r·eprer:5-f.:~f1t

of sever'al dif·ferent the

II

authoriti(-?s~

acc('?ptf?d s1:andartl lf

It is not

cl assi f i cat. i

o·~

DIl

becomes evident that differences of opinion exist about the II

PI'-OPC-?f"

II

al·-j,- angF.!melTt

i n

et~ch

and E~ver'y ont~

K

Tht E. is 8;':"\5i 1 y

understandable when we realize that trying to organize any animal group on the basis of true relatioflships is like building a jigsaw puzzle in which we don't possess all the pieces at once. With nUHH2r'OUf::i. piec:E.~s mif~sinu ou~- overall v:i.E.~ItJ of thf? c:ompletf:?d pictur'e i

~::.

obscured

~

maki ng our percept i on o·f

the vJhol e

a

matt(~I'~

of much

guesswork. As more pieces are discovered and added to the puzzle, the overall picture becomes more clear and the accepted current vision of the completed puzzle is modified accordingly~ Often finding the missing pieces is a puzzle onto itsel'F~ This is partie{liar-ly true among the class Reptilia. Because of this fact, any review of this subject will automatically contain certain aspects which will be in disagreement wit~t the conclusions of other publications. It is also highly probable that all the material on t:his topic I""{;?fl~?ct sOm(-9WhElt, each author '5 (JItHl personal bia~:)es, as does this one. With this in mind, it is hoped that this article will be viewed as a re'Ference point from which to begin looking at reptile classi'Fication and as an introduction to the various orders includ~d irl the class. It is also hoped that this Ilun:i.queness 'l of S~E?v{'2ral o·F Reptilia. The evolutionary icthyosaurs as adaptatiofls by the pterosaurs into the

series has begun to demonstrate the the or-ders includf2c! in the c:lt;i.s5

modifications of body form exhibited by to life in t~le marine environment, and realm o·f flight, are no less impressive

than th~~ er·€:.~ct ~;tancr;) of t.hE} d i nDsaUI'"'S.. Nany oth{-?r l"E~Pt. iIi an ot-dt=~! .. s are equally r'uniquel'~ including today's turtles. The overall liurliqueness ll of the entire class Reptilia is obvious, partictJlarly

when looking at today's s\lrviving orders~ The closely related 1izal'"'(i5 and snakes are Iidistant cousins " to the survivirlg rhynchocephalian, the tuatara~ Between those two groups and the ·Faj.rly advanced crocodilians Ofl the one hand, and the turtles on the othe~, huge gaps of relationship exi5t~ The turtles in partiC\llar presen·t a serious problem in the classificat.ion of reptiles, BS the chelonians show little or no relationship to any o·F tile slJrviving reptile grO\lpS, anei the only reptiles even remotely related to the turtles are found among the most primitivE re0tilian order Cotylosauria. Even with the addition of the various extinct reptile or-ders, numerous lines o·F descent remain obscure,

MHS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Page 5


making ttle t~ue relatiol1ships among many of the reptilian or'ders difficult, if not impossible, to sort Dutu The extreme diversity of body forms exhibited by living and extinct reptiles, combined with the inability to accurately. trace all the various lines o路f descent and relationship, contribute to the chaotic condition s~erl in the classification of

reptiles~

Much has been written on the subject of thermoregulation among reptiles, both living and extinct, ifl the past decade or so, and several titles listed in the bibliography will help interested readers in exploring this topic more fully. It is ilnportant to remember, however, just how much is yet unclear about the ther~mot-E-?(]ul atot-y behaviour o'f many 1 i vi ng j~ni mal s.. (~1S fIlf:?nt i oned earlier in this series, many normally endothermic mammals or birds on occasion approach a nearly ectothermic condition, while some lIel assi c II ectotheTms someho\.路,1 mai nt2.i n el evated body temper'atures regardless of the conditions irl their environmerltal sljrroundings~ Also remember that while now it is commonly assumed that reptiles thrive best in warmer climatic conditions, this may flot have always been trL\e~ as demonstrated by the cool teiTtperatut'~es pt-e'Ferred by t:he TUB,tat-a.

The'=5t2

fact~::.

may

or~

may not havt? a dir"ec:t bf2<Eti'"ing on

the methods of thermoregulation employed by extinct reptiles. A final point to consider is the current trend among some authorities toward "disbanding" the class Reptilia. Various systems of dividing tt18 class have been proposed, generally cerltering on one or both dinosaurian orders and often involving several other ~eptile groups as well~ These proposed realignments of the class Reptilia have rarlged from elevating one or both of the dinosaurian orders into a subclass or class unto itsel'f, to Paul ' 5 (1988) suggestion of combining the entilre reptilian subclass (..)r路chosaur"ia (thecodonts, pterosallrs~ dinosaurs, arld cr"ocodilians) with the class Aves (birds) to form one huge class~ Most of these proposed c:harlges of classi路fication are dlle to the similarity of theropod dinosaurs to birds~ Because of the length of this subject, space (ioes not permit a filII discussion 'of this topic here, bllt i t can be safely said that objections have been presented against each of these proposalsn Orl whettler or not dinoS2tlrS were birds John Horner (1988) writes, "~g.it's undeniable that the dinosaurs weren't just bil.;} lizards ..

They wer'en't mamma,ls cw bit-cis,

relationship of dinosaurs to as bird::.i- -evolv{?-c.1

ft'-om

f....

f':ar-ly

bil~ds

eii:h{~I'''""

.. ",,~ThE:!

is also undeniable, b!Jt expected

C.,3,1'~nivoF'DU5

saur"i!':;chii:lf1

dinCiSaUt-~

Ttlis does not, however~ make dinosaurs birdsa On the contrary, if arlything, it makes birds dinosaurs. Once again, interested readers are referred to ,the bibliography for SOLlr-ces of Inore detailed in f

or~

mat, i on .

important thali '[:he deba,te on v,!hether- t,hi 5 gl'-OUp or that: shoul d be relnoved ,From the class Reptilia, is the recogr\iticlll of the t~1ore

evolutionary ties of all animals~ not only to other members of their own class, but to those of the other classes as well~ The true purpose of the classification of all aniroals is to enhance our understaflding of ttle relationship o'F each to the others~

MHS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Page 6


ACKNO"JLEDGt1ENTS, Besides the obvious staff of various institutions 9 libraries, and publishing companies, the author wishes to express his appreciation to several individuals without who's help the preparation of this paper would have been much more difficult, i路F not impossible. Thanks is due Eric Thiss for the loan of numerous Pllblications needed dllring the course of work on this articlsQ Eric's familiarity with the vast amount of literature on reptiles (both living and extinct) proved most helpftll on more than one accasion~ The author's many cDflversations with Pam Gerholdt about the evolutionary history of reptiles in gener"al an(j diflosaurs in particular cannot go unmentioned, as either can Andrew Newman's corltinual reminder Ilextant not extirlctll. 80th of these individuals g~eatly affected the direction of this article, The excellent job and kind indulgerlce shown the author by the newsletter's two editors~ Julie Cherveny and Michele Stillinger, is also sincerely ;:tppt-t"?C: i at(-~d" Lf.:"lst, but by no OH':.-::-ans 1 ea!:=:-t '1 is my vJi f f? Conn i e wi thGut_ who's lOVE, patience, and encouragement, not to mention constructive criticism and considerable proof reading skills, this project could never have been completedm

INTRODUCTION TO THE BIBLIOGRAPHY, l-he following bibliography is arranged alphabetically by author and includes all the ptlblications citied in the text of this article or in the captions o-f i t ' s illustrationsrt In addition, several other titles ~lave beerl incltlded which may prove useful in finding sources o-f more detaili?d in-fot-mation" {in attempt ha.s been made to include at least one title on each of the reptilian or(je!p-s, althoLlgh this was not always possible.' This bibliography is by no means complete, as that is well beyond the scope of this p'lbli(:ation~ Most of the pIlblications listed in this bibliography contain their own bibliographic listings~ some Q-f them extensive~ which will further aid interested readers in locating more information. On the subjects of thermoregtllation among extinct reptiles and the classification of dinosa~lrs, the reader is referred to the works of Bakker (1986), Desmond (1975), HCJrner (1988), and Palll (1988).

BIBLIOGRAPHY, {Hear-tOil,.

D.

1(7"88.

IITu.y-tles and Tort.o.isE-?s Df

the

Worldl!~

Fact!:::- on

File New York, NY. 1919-191~::' ..

Cu t1J..

Andt-e{-"'Js"

Reptiles of the Oxford Bakkf-::r~ l\~E-?!,,'J

YDt- k

F{"T .. ~ f.-IV ..

1986~

Ballinger-'J R.E ..

anci

Reptiles!!~

Bellairs~

Bialu Rev ..

A"

liThe

and

itA Desc!<-iptive CatalDgue o,e the t~1arine Brit~ Mus. Nat~ Histn I_ondon.

Clayll~

Din(~sau!'"

Lynch~

LlJilliam

t~10F-l""O!tJ

and Co ..

a .. Du 19B3 .. i1HoItJ to Vnot-',I the {imphibians

Wm. C. BrOWf\ Co.

D'A~

HE~reshie~3!1~

Dubuque~

and Underwood'J G.

~_tj51"

Iowa~

liThe O!rigin of Snakes ll

,.

26:193-237~

MHS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Page 7


1

VC)~-k1

NY~

Br-aom,

l

19 f }O

R~

The Pei gn

Am.

Bullo

!.

Jl

p

trl::·u~··theF·

1924"

Fe,

Eosuctlia E{jt-oom~

~

!"L tJ

Ben·tDn

llj25~

0+

Rept i 1 es H"

till;?

Evidence on

Nat_

Mus~

the Stl'-uctur-e 0'['

New

p

the

51:67-76.

Hist~

liOn the Origin Q·f

Cr-escent Book'S;

Lizar-ds ll

..

Proc ..

Zool.

SOCe

L_ondon n

Broom, Ru 1913. lIOn the structure and Affinities of BolosauYl!sl! .. Bull. AmH Musa Nat. Hist. 32:509-516. Camp'S C .. Lo 10,1-1<'.,1.

1930n

the Phyi:osaul'-s 11

"A Btudy 0'1:

i'1em ..

..

Univ~

California

CarrDIl" R"L .. 1969" "Origin C:d-= Reptiles ll " In: C .. Gans, (-i. D'I~n Bellairs, and T.S .. Parsons (eds .. ) 1(i69~ IIBiology o·f the F!eptili2"I'J

1". Academic Press. New York, NY.

Vol.

1911 ..

Case,

E~C~

Ins·t~

Lljashingt.on

IIA Hevision of the D~C.

145:

cotylDsE~uriall"

H.C. and Z~Je:i-fel, R.G. (eds.) 1.992. {Hnphi bi ans!! .. Bmi thmar-k F'ubl .. Ne~J YO\'-k'J NY ..

Coggel~,

Colbert, VD!'-k,

E~H.

NY ..

1968~

liMen and DinoBaurs"~

Also available

Discoveries!'"

1984 ..

liThe Great

i:\Sll

Publ~

Dover

A.J.

Car-negie

"F\eptiles

E~P~

~<

Dutton &

DinCl5£\ur-

Co~

New

Hunt.er-s and Tl-ieir

Mineola, NY ..

de Camp, L__ S. and de Camp, C~C. Bonanza Books. New York, NY. Desmond~

Pub~

1-122~

1985~

liThe Day of the Dinosaur

ll

1976. "The Hot-blooded Dinosal~rs .. A Revolution in The Dial Press/James Wade" New York, NY~

Palaeontology!l.

Ernst, C"H ..

and BaF'bDul~'j

Smithsonian lnst .. Press. Gans,

C ..

C.W.

1989.

lit; Checklist of

lS.J67.

,'1us" Nat. I-list. Gilmore,

lITurtl{?<;;=, 01-= the LlJot-ld ll Washington D.C"

F< . . llJ"

F~ecent

Amphi!:-:.baeniE',nsl!.

Bull ..

Am ..

1.35.

1920.

!!Osteology of the Carnivorous Dinosauria in the

National Museum, wittl Special Reference to the Genera Antrodemtls (Allosaurus) (~el~ato5alIYUS'I. Bull. U.S. Nat. Mus.

U~S.

110,

1-·1~'iil"

Goin~

C.J.

and Gain, O.B.

Fr-E-?E::mis.n E!.nci Co.

Goin,

C"Jn ~

S.:3.~l

Goin, D.B., and

Herpetologyl!. 3rd edition.

!!Ini:roductian to Herpetology'l. WuH.

1962.

FI.... ancisCD,

CA~

Zug~ W.t~.

MHS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

G . . R ..

1978.

IIIntr-oduction to

Freeman and COrt San Franc:isco, CA.

Page 8


G.~!"'ziiTIek ~

(ed~)

B ..

1975 ..

HallidaY:r T~Hm a.nd Adler', Reptiles and Amphibians!'. 1-lo~-ner1

JuFe

1988,.

F. 1936 .. 32:207-217 ..

HUf~n(-2'J

Sci.

Ja(?kE'l" H~::'.l

198f~"

IIThr~

EncyclDpedia of

i.:he

Constii.:ution c)-oF

1989.

"Dinosaur Data Book".

New York~

vJof"kman Publ .. Tht~C:Ddontii;.l!

!lDie v,lir-b21tier-funcie aus dem t<uepef" l'estudinata ll " Paleo. Ztschr. 2~

1916" ber~Et(;~dt" I I"

6 ..

File. New York, NY.

"Digging Dinosauf"sll"

IITh(-:~

0"

Lambert, D.

(eds .. ) Facts on

..

New YOf"k, NY.

Co~

K~

Vo~

Life EncyclopE'dic\

J!Eh-zimek's Animal

Reptiles!l" Vall Nostrand Reinhold

.

{:!m~

NY ..

':Tourn

von

Facts on File.

New York,

NY. MacGregor, J .. H .. 1908 .. l'On HesosauFus brasiliensis nov. 5p .. the Permi an Dof Br az i 111.. Comm. c-?studos carvo pedr a Br~az i 1. • Man,

from

J. 1978. "The Natural History of the Dinosaur". Bison Books.

LondDfi En(]

c

r-larsh, D.C. 1896. "The DinosaLws o-f Nort.h (;merica". 16th Annual RE,por'j: of the U.S. Gecllogical Survey. vJashingtDn, D.C. MattisDn, !\IY.

C.

1989.

"Lizards of the World".

Facts on File.

New York,

r-leht-tens, J. l'i. 1987. "L.iving Snakes of t:he vJorld in Color". Stel-l i n'~ Pub 1. • Co. New York, NY. Obst, FeJ" Press.

"Tur-t.les~

1986 ..

Tortoises~

Paul, G .. 5 .. 1988" "Pr-edatory Dinoi.:;aurs Schuster" New York, NYc

P{-)

K.FL.

TeF"rapins lt

"

St~

Mar-tins

NY.

New York~

Porter-',

and

1972 ..

"l-lerpetnlogyll"

WeB ..

0-\::

the vJor-ldl!.

E)aundef'~s

Co ..

Simon

and

Phi12.delphia,

k

F'I-itcha,-d, P.C.H. Neptune City, NJ.

Rei!::-z,

F:"

Yor-k Ac{;i.. ROJ"ler~

1992 ..

Sci.

A~S.

Chic:a~1C)'

1978.

"Encyclopedia of Tu,·tles".

!IThe Chelonian July/Aug~

195c:) "

storyll~

T.F.H.

Publ.

In: The Sciences, New

1992.

Hllsteology o-r the

Rept:i.le~Y

..

Uni"

Chi"

F're!5s ..

IL"

Romer~ ?LS" 19"'-1-7 .. liThe Relat:ionships of t.he Permian Reptile Pr-otoyosaur-us ll _ !-1mn Jour" Sci. 24~5:19-30.

MRS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Page 9


F:omer~

A"S"

196~)"

Press. Chicago, PlnE~

F:orner',

lf~Jer-tebl"'i3.tf:?

PaJ.eonte'logy!t ..

~5rd

edition ..

Uni ..

Chi ..

IL~

and F'r'ice, L .. I ..

1940 ..

ItRevi(~vJ

0+ the Pelycos·aur-ia l l

,.

Beol. Soc. Am., Spec .. Pap. 28:1-538. F~os.s,

C . . A.

1\1",,·, YOf' k

1I.J89.

(eel,,)

lICt-ocorJilef":5 and {1l1icJatot"" s

t-1cGr-·!:.~.~·,t-+Hl1

..

l;.Je,tson

1

Fact.s Dn File.

NY.

'I

Steel, R .. and HarveY9 A.P. L.ife ll

ll.

D"i'1 .. S"

BOCJk CD.

1914 ..

1979.

liThe Encyclopedia of Prehistoric

I\!r:.:-v,l YOf-k,

NY"

IIEUTlot{)SBUrU5 africanus f3E?ely and the " r-)t-OC:. Zool. Soc. Lc.)n . . London ~ Eng.

P!ncf.7!si:r"y of the Ch€"-:?lDnia ll v.iat.son,

I)"t·LS. ane! F~omer'J t~ .. S. 1956. 1If--; Cl1?,£;:.sificatioll Df f-Jul1. .. 1·"lL\~.a CDmp~ L0l11 .. 114·::35--89 ..

Thef~aps.id

F~ept.ile~j.lln

L1Jebb,

J .. E .. ,

Reptiles ll

vJallvJC)I'~!'::" \J .. A .. , and El{]DOd, J .. H" 1978" Macmillian Press L"rD. London, Eng .

v)ellenhofer', P. CreSCE-?nt Books;,

1991. f\·IE~~'J

IIGuide to Living

"The Illustrated EncyclDpedia of F'tef'OSal.Ws".

York 7 NY.

lIHolotype of Plesiosaur-us longir-ostris Blake and Classification of the Plesiosaurs ll " Jour. Paleo .. 14:451-467 ..

L1Jhite, T ..

E~

I f -l4-0 ..

llJieland,: G .. F! ..

1900 ..

lITI'1e Skull ~

Pelvi5~

and Probable

F~ela.lciDnshipE:.

of the ~Iuge Turtles of the Genus Archelon fro!n the Fort Pierre Cretaceous of South Dakota " . Am . Jour . Sci .. 9 ..

t.1Jillist.Dn,

S .. llJ ..

1925 ..

ItO;;:::.tE?ology o-r

th(-? Heptiles

ll

"

Harva..rd Uni ..

Pressa Camhridge 1 MAg

MRS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Page 10


F"c>:x: Sr:l.a.k~ Hib~rr:l.a.tic>r:l. ir:l. Bl"U.~

D~r:l.

E a . r t h CC>"U.r:l.ty by Tom Jessen

Well fellow field herpetologists, soon comes the day once again when we can dust off our snake sticks, bags, boots and binoculars and get back to the wild country. Back to those wonderful days and places where every flat rock and old rotten log may harbor beneath it those amaz ing, beautiful, living jewels. Hard to imagine that now, since at the time of writing this, it is the middle of February and about 8 below outside! Still, what a better time than now to tell the tale of a wonderful place hidden away deep in the maze of river valleys south of Mankato. The place I speak of is a fox snake hibernation den that I stumbled upon one fine spring day in 1987. Sad to say that the exact location of this den site will not be revealed for fear that some unscrupulous animal dealers might plunder the site. I can reveal that the place is a ruined foundation wall made of large blocks of dolomite limestone set into the side of a steep valley bluff. In several places the concrete sealer has fallen away leaving numerous small gaps between the stones. When facing the wall at ground level these gaps are 10 to 12 feet above the ground. Because the old foundation is set into a hill, the opposite side of these openings are 7 to 10 feet below ground level and provide - access to a safe winter retreat well below the frost line. During the past 5 years of monitoring the site, I never once observed a snake to crawl up the wall

MHS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

to enter into hibernation, except hatchlings in the fall. Adult snakes are only seen exiting through these openings in the springtime. And that is when the fun begins! A day to day account of the 1992 season will describe a typical example of what has become for me, an annual springtime ritual. On April 7, 1992, the head of a western fox snake (Elaphe vulpinaJ, was seen protruding from the main entrance, an opening in the foundation about 3 inches by 1 inCh. I forgot to record the temperature of the day but bright sunlight had been shining on the wall all morning. A total of four noses were seen protruding from the entrance that day ... cold tongues slowly testing the air. During the next 11 days several snakes could be seen cautiously gazing from various openings in the wall if' the sun was shining. On April 19th at 2:00 pm, the first fox snake emerged. The temp was a bright and sunny 70 degrees and it was a fine 38 inch long female that made the long trip down the wall to the ground. Looking up, I saw 10 pairs of snake eyes glaring down upon the scene. Obviously none of them had any intention of getting out of bed that day! I was surprised that this snake decided to emerge because the weather forecast for the coming week declared cold rain and possibly snow. Indeed, the early afternoon sunshine had given way to dark threatening clouos and a rapid drop in temperature. With that in mind I decided to bring the snake home. Now, I must state for the record that I am not in favor of taking wild animals home as "pets". Quite the contrary, every herp that comes to stay at my home does so on a strictly temporary basis. Each one is treated as a visiting dignitary from another world. If anyone else out there is as much of a 'Star Trek' fan as I am you'll know what I mean by that. The fox snake played her part very well

Page 11


during that following ~Ieek since a great number of friends and neighbors came by to see the alien being. Many of them had the opportuni ty to actually touch a snake for the first time. On Saturday the 25th, an earth day celebration was scheduled at Mankato State and I decided it was time to see how the general public would react. The results were astounding, and may old stereotypes were shattered that day. To my personal amazement, the greatest number of people to come running over with the greatest enthusiasm upon seeing the snake \~ere little girls between the ages of four to eight! In fact, the only one of the whole bunch that showed any fear appeared to be a young man of about 17 years old. Stunned with terror, he refused to come any closer that 10 feet of the curious mob! On Monday morning, April 27th, the sun finally appeared and put an end to a week of cold, cloudy days. With the temp. reaching 65 degrees, seven snake heads were seen peering out from the wall. The next day, at a high of 75 degrees, fox snakes began pouring out from the cracks of the old foundation. I arrived late, about 2:00 pm, and from then until sundown I observed eleven of them slowly make there way down to the ground. These included two of the biggest ones I've encountered, a male and female both measuring at least 60 inches ( five feet) . Each snake took about on half hour to complete the trip, slowly winding their way down by gripping the irregularities of the stone and concrete. Some of them crawled out and back into the same opening, others crawled from one hole to another, and occasionally and, individual sometimes took the short cut by losing its grip altogether and falling 10 feet to the ground! The sound of a large fox snake hitting the ground from that height is a most curious one indeed an it's an experience that they don't

MHS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

seem to like very much at all, for they lay motionless on the ground for qui te some time and slowly look around to see if anyone has been watching. It must be dreadfully embarrassing for the poor things for if you walk up to one of them they immediately fill up with air and look.at you as if to say, "I meant to do that!" Once a snake reaches the ground it leaves the area. None were ever observed to crawl back up the wall to spend the night. Sundown and a cool breeze put an end to the parade for that day. The next day I arrived at the den site armed with some very important field herpetology research equipment including such items as a camera, binoculars, a note pad, cooler of soda and munchies, a good book and a bean bag chair. A small radio is always optional since a great variety of warblers and songbirds usually provide the background music. The female fox snake I capture for "show and tell" the week before was also brought along and released at the same spot where she was found. As the temp hit 80 degrees and the flood of fox snakes reached its peak, between 1: 00 and 7: 00 pm I watched as 25 of them made their exit from the openings in the wall. On this day, 20 minutes was the average time it took for each one to make i t down. Once they reached the ground it was very difficult to keep track of their movements in the leaf litter and dry grass. They're fairly easy to see when moving but when they stop they vanish. I t is a strange sensation to know you're literally surrounded by several large reptiles while kicked back and lounging in a bean bag and not able to see any of them. The dry grass and leaves seem to be alive with the hissing sound of big snakes passing near by, and it's only when there is a forked tongue flickering near your ear or a scaly beast crawling over your ankle that they become visible again. Truly a nightmare scenario for many

Page 12


but personally for me, I could hardly wait! By the way, I wouldn't try this in the rattlesnake counties of southeast Minnesota. But then again, I wouldn't advise chasing after tornadoes with a video camera either, but folks are into that so all I can say is whatever you do for a fun time, be careful!

f'E.lO HERPlToLOGY

HEL'PFUL ,",'~T ~ 1 : Nt.~t.'R DR.~ ~OUl C.\GQ\ÂŁ'111S \t\ R~l1L~S"A\(t COU"TR~ !

low on its fox snake supply. I spent that afternoon wandering up and down the river valley coming back to the den only once in a while to check on things. Seven fox snakes were seen that day which brought the grand total to about 45 that I actually witnessed coming out of hibernation. There were equal numbers of males and females and the maj ority of sizes ranged from 31 to 45 inches in length. It is difficult to estimate the number of Elaphe that might use this place during the winter since, in years past, I have seen them emerging in the middle of the night during a cold drizzling rain! When asked about the possible number I would have to say that between 60 to 100 snakes may be all jammed together in there at one time. The great mystery remains as to how, when, and where these snakes enter the old foundation in the fall. Maybe autumn of '93 will reveal these secrets. that's about all that is known of the den site for now. I anticipate spending many more hours watching these animals come and go and finding out all I can about them. In this part of the Minnesota River Valley area, fox snakes seen to be the most common and clearly the most visible of the large snakes, in many places outnumbering even common garter snakes, or so it seems anyway.

.'

~

<).

On April 30th, with the temp the old reaching 85 degrees, foundation wall seemed to be running

MRS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Before finishing this up, there are a couple of fox snake phenomena I have encountered in the past couple years. Around the 25th of June of each year, I have found dead female fox snakes filled with eggs and killed by traffic on local roads and highways. It appears that they are wandering about looking for a suitable nesting site but, the odd thing is, that these snakes were all killed within a space of 24 hours. No gravid female road kills were encountered before or after one particular day in June! Last year, 1991, the "Massacre Date" I had recorded was the 19th. Has anyone else noticed this or is it just a local coincidence? Please let

Page 13


me know if anyone has any information about this. If not, lets keep our eyes open to see if it happens again. Also, I have recently been finding small, young, fox snakes that have increasing shown "zippered" patterns on their bodies. I've heard that corn snakes can be bred with a nearly complete zipper pattern. Has anyone tried this with fox snakes? I've had a hatchling in captivity all winter with nearly one third of its dorsal blotches connected in a zig zag. It looks like a European adder! Well, that's enough for now. Except one last thing, let's hear some stories!! What have you found under a flat rock lately? Don't be shy about it. Remember, if you go out and find things that you think might be boring or uninteresting, more often than not it will most likely be a bit of fascinating news to someone else. Let's hear it! [exactly what I've been saying! - ed.] Happy herping to ya!

au ~)4~T /0

~OO L TW s SUiVIMER?

I~

MRS

NE~lSLETTER

VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Loo ~

SHIRT

Page 14


CONSERVATION OF ENDEMIC AMPHIBIANS

OF INDIA'S WEsTERN

GHATS REGION

Fred Swengel and Rebecca Heller

Summary: The Western Ghats region of western India is home to one of the world's richest and most threatened amphibian faunas. Despite the recent formation of a local conservation group focussing on protecting the area's reptiles and amphibians, little outside support has been directed towards helping to save the 84 amphibian, species restricted to the Western Ghats. An initial $lQOO/year program for assisting and encouraging Indian efforts is proposed.

The moumain range and adjacent coastal lowlands along the western portion of peninsular India are home to a remarkable number of plants and animals found nowhere else on Earth. This area, known as the Western Ghats biogeographic region, has 285 species of vertebrates, and 1500 species of flowering piantS 2 that are considered to be endemic (unique to the area). This area was recently identified as one of 18 global "hot spots": areas that are characterized by a high concentration of endemic species and which are experiencing unusually rapid rates of habitat loss3' Out of these 18 "hot spot" regions, the Western Ghats is especially notable for the richness of its reptile and amphibian faunas. The 84 species of amphibians restricted to the Western Ghats is exceeded by only three other "hot spots" (Brazil's Atlantic Coast, Madagascar, and Colombia's Choco) and the 91 reptile species are the fifth highest among the "hot spot" areas 4 . Despite the importance of the Western Ghats region, almost no organizations have provided assistance in helping to preserve the area's reptiles and amphibians and the uniqueness of this area seems to be little known outside of Indian biological circles. Among the few exceptions to foreign interest in the area are the work of Brian Groombridge (of the World Conservation Monitoring Centre in England) and Edward Moll (from Eastern Iilinois University) with two species of endemic turtles, the Travancore tortoise {Indotestudo forstenil} and the cane turtle (Heosemys silvatica}S'6' Robert Inger of the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago made a major collection of reptiles and amphibians in the Ponmudi area of Kerala In 1982], Out of approximately 175 species of reptiles and amphibians endemic to India's Western Ghats, the group of ten Travancore tortoises at the Bronx Zoo in New York may be the only representatives held in captivity outside of Indias . 9 â&#x20AC;˘ In 1989 an Indian Sub-continent Reptile and Amphibian Specialist Group (ISRAG) was formed under the auspices of the World Conservation Union's Species Survival CommissionlO' This group, co-chaired by Indreneil Das of the Madras Crocodile Bank Trust and Sushil K. Dutta of Utkal University, is comprised of over 70 scientists with a concern for the conservation needs of the reptiles and amphibians in India and adjacent countries. The group held an international conference in February 1992 and is currently compiling information for an action plan which will spell out in detail' the region's highest

MHS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Page 15


conservation priorities. The work of ISRAG has an enormous potential for making sure that India's conservation projects also keep the needs of its reptile and amphibian faunas in mind and will be of major importance in helping to preserve the Western Ghats ecosystems. The involvement of one of us (Swengeil in conservation efforts with a rare species of wild goat, the Ni!giri tahr (Hemitragus hylocrius), that is also endemic to the Western Ghats led to our interest in helping to preserve the amphibians' of the region. Having helped fund several small conservation projects in India involving the tahr, it is especially striking how much can be accomplished on what is by U.S. standards a comparatively small amount of money. The international currency exchange rate for the Indian rupee is currently about 29 for US $1. Despite this great difference in value, within India rupee can buy roughly the same amount of food, housing, transportation, or salary as $1 could in the United States. As a result, a grant of $100 in India is roughly the equivalent of a $2900 grant in the U.S. as long as no imported goods are being purchased. Discussions with Sally Walker, the director of an Indian conservation organization (Zoo Conservation Outreach), helped provide ideas for several projects in support of amphibian conservation in the Western Ghats. Ms. Walker has also begun investigating further the feasibility of the suggested pi'ojects. Current plans are to raise $1000 annually to be divided between several projects. The proposed initial projects are the following:

a

1.

$100 for a research scholarship on Western Ghats amphibians to a M.Sc. student at A.V.C. College in Tamil Nadu. Selection of the student would be by Dr. R. Kanakasabai, the Vice-Principle Head of the Dept. of Zoology at A. V.C. College.

2.

$200 to Dr. Sushi! K. Dutta to help defray the administrative expenses of the Indian Sub-continent Reptile and Amphibian Specialist Group (ISRAG).

3.

$200 to Sally Walker of Zoo Outreach Organisation/C.B.S.G., India to help cover the costs of their reptile and amphibian conservation work (which included publishing gratis and distributing the proceedings of the first International conference of ISRAG) and with the costs of doing the ground work in India to ensure that funds are directed towards qualified parties.

4.

$500 to a conservation project focussed on preserving a specific site or species. The specific project will depend on the results of Sally Walker's background checks with the help of Indian scientists, but may possibly focus on a delta region in Kerala (Kuttanad) that is home to 14 species of amphibians.

If this approach proves productive, we will probably attempt to incr,ease the number of speCific site or species projects supported, The forthcoming action plan by the ISRAG should prove especially useful in targeting worthwhile projects. Contact:

Fred Swengel 425 S. Warwick St. St. Paul, MN 55105 Phone: 612-690-3290

MHS NEIo}SLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Page 16


REFERENCES

l.

Swengel, F.B. (l991) "A checklist of endemic vertebrates of the Western Ghats region." IN F.B. Swengel (ed.) 1990 North American Regional Nilgiri Tahr Studbook. Minnesota Zoological Garden, Apple Valley. 26 pp.

2.

Subramanyam, K. & M.P. Nayar (1974) "Vegetation and phytogeography of the Western Ghats." IN M.S. Mani (ed.) Ecology and biogeography in India. Dr. W. Junk, The Hague.

3.

Myers, N. (1990) "The biodiversity challenge: expanded hot-spots analysis." The Environmentalist 10: 243-256.

4.

World Conservation Monitoring Centre (1992) Global biodiversity: Status of the Earth's living resources. Chapman and Hall, London. 585 pp.

5.

Groombridge, B., E.G. Moll, & J. Vijaya (1983) "Rediscovery of a rare Indian turtle." Oryx 17: 130-134.

6.

Moll, E.G., B. Groombridge, & J. Vijaya (1986) "Rediscription of the cane turtle with notes on its natural history and classification." J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc., suppl. 83:112-126.

7.

Inger, R.F., H.B. Shaffer, M. Koshy, & R. Bakde (1984) "A report on a collection of amphibians and reptiles from Ponmudi, Kerala, South India." J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 81: 406-427 & 81: 551-570.

8.

International Species Inventory System (1992) ISIS Reptile Abstract - 30 June 1992. ISIS, Apple Valley (MN). 124 pp.

9.

Slavens, F.L. & K. Slavens (l991) Reptiles and amphibians in captivity: Breeding longevity, and inventory. Wocidland Park Zoological Gardens, Seattle. 505 pp.

10.

Singh, L.A.K. & S.K. Dutta (eds.)(1992) "Proceedings of the First International Conference of the IUCN!SSC - ISRAG." Zoo's Print 7 (11): 1-24.

'* '* '*MHS

has donated $50 to this cause! '* '* '*

MHS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Page 17


J5r~~~

Herpetological For Your Information

(HFYI is a listing of herp related information, products, trips and expeditions, classes and other items for herp enthusiasts.) EXPEDITIONS Join a sea turtle conservation team working on the beautiful tropical beaches of Costa Rica, Nicaragua, or Mexico. the Sea Turtle Restoration Project is sponsoring expeditions as part of the continuing efforts to save these endangered animals. No expertise or experience is required to volunteer, you will be taught what you need to know to contribute. Volunteers learn about sea turtle biology and conservation, participate in research projects and help scientists in their studies. Trips range around $1,100. Contact Kathy Nielsen, Earth Island Institute, 300 Broadway, Suite 28, San Francisco, CA 94133. 415-788-3666 or 1-800-859-SAVE. Volunteers needed for sea turtle research. 1993 Green Turtle Research Project, Green Turtle Research Station, Tortuguero, Costa Rica. 10 or 17 day programs depart weekly, June 25 to August 6. Cost from Miami: 10 day - $1885 or 17 day $2115. Co-sponsored by The Caribbean Conservation Corporation and The Massachusetts Audubon Society. Natural History Travel, Lincoln, MA 01773. Call 1-800-289-9504 or 1-617-259-9500 for a brochure. A donation of $50 will be made to the organization that advised you of this program. 1993 Herpetological Mini-Expeditions are hassle free packaged trips to exotic places. The next nine day Mini-Expedition is to Costa Rica with Roy Pinney as guide, will leave New York on Sat. June 19th 1993. Depending on the size of the group, the complete package costs approx. $1800. The trip will visit Selva Verde (Dendrobatids) , Tortuegera (marine turtles), and the Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve (here will try to find the golden toad, Bufo periglenes). Other trips include Africa, Jamaica, and India. Contact: Mini-Expeditions, 325 W. 45 Street U516, New York, NY 10036. (212) 246-1349. CLASSES The University of Minnesota's summer Session for 1993 is including a field herpetology course taught by Jeff Lang entitled "Ecology of Amphibians and Reptiles". Classes will be held. 2 days a week (wed/sat) over a 3 week period starting July 22nd at the Lake Itasca Biological Station in Itasca State Park. Tuition is $77.00 per credit and the class is worth 3 credits. Class size is limited so register early. For more info call the U of M Summer Session office at (612) 624-3555 or John Levell at (612) 374-5422. NEW PRODUCTS There is a new Iguana food on the market called NUTRI GROW Iguana Diet that contains: 25% protein, 18% fiber, 1.76% fat, with added vitamins and minerals, including vitamin D3. The info sheet on this is too long to reproduce here, I will bring copies to the next meeting, look for them on the hand out desk during the break. This product may be found in your local pet stores. The Ophidian Herpetological Network is a computer bulletin board for herp enthusiasts. 300-2400 BPS, 24 hours, 8+N+1 Phone (602) 468-9860.

MHS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Page18


NEW PRODUCTS The Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles (SSAR) announces a Facsimile Reprint of the herpetological classic: The Gila Monster and It's Allies, by Charles M. Bogert, and Rafael Martin del Campo, with a new preface by Charles M. Bogert and a retrospective essay by Daniel D. Beck.

T

HIS MONOGRAPH, F1RSTPUBLISIlED IN 1956, IS STILL TIlEONLY

comprehensive treaUnent of the genus HelodemUl, which comprises the world's only venomous lizards. The book covers all aspecL' of the animals' biology and venomology. (CONTENTS: classification and distribution; food and feeding habits; bodily functions, behavior, and activities; life history; ecology; venom apparatus and the venom and its effects; bites inflicted on humans; helodermatids and humans; and a bibliography.) Numerous figures, maps, and tables are included, as well as 20 plates of photographs of helodermatid lizards and their habitats. For this reprint, Charles M. Bogert prepared an extensive and wide-ranging preface (his last scientific contribution before his death in 1992) that gives the history of his collaboration with Rafael Martin del Campo in writing the original book. This preface provides information that Is intended to update the book in the areas of fossil history and distribution; the origin, evolution, and dispersal of venomous lizards; the evolution of dentition and venom appara-

tus; the role of venoms in food acquisition and defense; and the evolution of venomous squamates. The book also includes aretrospectiveessay by Daniel D. Beck, auUlOr of the most recent studies on the ecology and behavior of Heloderma, which evaluates the Bogert and Martin del Campo monograph. Dale Belcher has compiled a comprehensive index. The color frontispiece is copied from a watercolor of a Gila monster drawn by the noted wildlife artist, David M. Dennis. A special edition of this print, suitable for framing (measuring 9 by 11 inches) and lilluted to llXJnwnbered copies, is available; these have been individually signed by Charles Bogert and David Dennis. Specifications: 282 pages, 4 portraits of authors, 58 photographs, 35 figures, 5 tables, 2 maps. Clothbound in library-grade buckram, format 7 by 10 inches. To be published August 1993. To ORDER Send orders to the SSAR Publications Secretary, Robert D. Aldridge, Deparunent of Biology, SI. Louis University, SI. Louis, Missouri 63103, USA (telephone 314-658-3900 or -3916;fax314658-3117). Make checks payable to "SSAR"; receipt on request only. Overseas customers must make payment in USA funds. Orders may be charged to MasterCard or VISA (account number and expiration date required); a 5.25% bank charge will be added. BOGERT AND MARTIN DEL CAMPO: GILA MONSTER AND ALLIES â&#x20AC;˘ Price to SSAR members before August I, 1993 ........... usS30 â&#x20AC;˘ Price to Institutions and Non-members ............................. S38 (Postage: Add $2 in USA, add $4 for other countries.) GILA MONSTER PRINT, signed and numbered, postpaid ...... $25

Also Available from SSAR:

HELODERW.t.\( ,\PHTlll COPt:. I.K69

MHS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

HERPETOLOGY Current Research on the Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles, edited by Kraig Adler, this new book contains lectures from the First World Congress of Herpetology. Chapters by leading authorities provide a broad review of contemporary herpetology. Specifications: 258 pages, 28 photos, 8 1/2 inch by 11 inches, clothbound_ $28_00 US (postage $2 in USA $4 outside USA). Published December 1992. Send orders to same address and person as above. Page19


MEfS

C . I . a s s i f i e d Ads

All proceeds from the sales of MHS merchandise and donated items goes towards the operating costs of the society such as; speaker fees, books for the library, herp related charitable donations, newsletter printing, etc. MHS is a non - profit organization and is volunteer run. Rat and Mice Sales MICE Pinkies - $6.00 Fuzzies - $6.00 Adults - $9.00

doz. doz. doz.

RATS Pups - $10.00 Adults - $12.00 $24.00

doz. for six doz.

Orders taken by Terry Scheiber only! Must be made at least one week before the general meeting where they will be delivered. Phone:

(612) 440-7482

***** Mice and rats must be purchased by the dozen except for adult rats which can be purchase in allotments of six. Rat pinkies unavailable. ***** Cage Sales Cages come pre-built but unfinished with the following; laminate interior, hinged mitered door, glass window, latch, incandescent light fixture and cord. A 7.5 watt bulb will be included. Some cages are available for immediate purchase at the meetings.

*** MRS does not take responsibility for any injuries to animal if purchaser uses a higher wattage bulb or other hardware. *** Specifications

1 x wx h

small: large:

24 x 18 x 12 48 x 18 x 18

$ 50 $ 75

MRS also offers an assortment of other herp related items for sale at the general meeting. These include: Books MHS stickers T-shirts MRS buttons Posters Assorted Donated items Note cards Look for sales of MRS merchandise and items at the far right hand side of the meeting room. Items will be for sale during the break and before and after the meeting if time permits. Please have sales final before the meeting begins so as not to disrupt the meeting proceedings. The new MHS T-SHIRTS are now in!! And they look great. They have a multi colored dart frog on the frontof a white shirt and our logo on the sleeve. The shirt is 100% preshrunk cotton. Sizes are in kids and adults. Price is $12.00.

MRS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Page 20


II

WISCONSIN HERP ATLAS WANTS YOU! II

With another field season upon us, anyone doing field work in Wisconsin can contribute to the Wisconsin Herp Atlas Project. Now in it's eighth year, the Wisconsin Herp Atlas has documented nearly 400 new county records. The Herp Atlas depends largely upon the volunteer efforts of hundreds of people who are willing to report their herp sightings, salvage roadkills, and photograph their finds. For a full reporting package with species maps, report forms and a want list for each county, send your name and address to the project coordinator: Gary Casper, Milwaukee Public Museum, 800 W. Wells St., Milwaukee, WI 53233. (414)278-2766. FAX (414)278-6100. Email gsc@csd4.csd.uwm.edu. Following are want lists for Wisconsin counties bordering Minnesota.

r········ ..···························..····..······..··············.. i

··········w~i~~··~~ID··O;·Ai~···············

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

DOCUMENTATION FOR THE FOLLOWING HERPS IN THESE COUNTIES

i. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .~~. ~y.~~~~.!. . !.~.~!.. ?.~~y~. ~. .~~.~~. y~. .~.~?~.E!.~. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. DOUGLAS co. Spotted Salamander Central Newt

Bullfrog Bullsnake N. Ringneck Snake BURNE'ITCO. Spotted Salamander Bullfrog Wood Turtle

N. Ringneck Snake ST. CROIX CO. Central Newt Redback Salamander Bullfrog E. Milk Snake Brown Snake Plains Garter Snake Water Snake N. Ringneck Snake E. Hognose Snake Smooth Green Snake GRANT CO. Central Newt Wood Turtle Massasauga Plains Garter Snake W. Hognose Snake W. Worm Snake

PIERCE co. Blue-spotted Salamander Central Newt

TIger Salamander Bullfrog Wood Frog Smooth Softshell Thrtle Blanding's Thrlle Wood Turtle

False Map Turtle

BUFFALO CO. Blue-spotted Salamander TIger Salamander Mudpuppy Bullfrog False Map Thetle

Bullsnake Redbelly Snake E. Hognose Snake Smooth Green Snake

Six-lined Racerunner

Map Turtle Brown Snake

Plains Garter Snake N. Ringneck Snake Redbelly Snake Smooth Green Snake PEPIN CO. Dlue-spotted Salamander Central Newt TIger Salamander Mudpuppy Bullfrog Gray Treefrog sp. Wood Frog Spring Peeper Chorus Frog sp. Wood Turtle Map Thrtte Bullsnake E. Milk Snake Plains Garter Snake Brown Snake N. Ringneck Snake Redbelly Snake E. Hognose Snake Smooth Green Snake

MHS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

LA CROSSE CO. Blue-spotted Salamander Central Newt Mudpuppy Bullfrog Wood Frog Spring Peeper Chorus Frog sp. Smooth Softshell Turtle Stinkpot Turtle

TREMPEALEAU CO. Blue-spotted Salamander Central Newt Tiger Salamander Mudpuppy Bullfrog Wood Frog Chorus Frog sp. Six-lined Racerunner BuUsnake E. Milk Snake N. Ringneck Snake Prairie Ringneck Snake Redbelly Snake Smooth Green Snake VERNON CO. Mudpuppy Wood Turtle Stinkpot Turtle Massasauga Timber Rattlesnake Prairie Ringneck Snake Redbelly Snake W. Hognose Snake

E. Milk Snake Prairie Ringneck Snake Redbelly Snake E. Hognose Snake W. Hognose Snake Smooth Earth Snake

CRAWFORD CO. Central Newt Mudpuppy Spring Peeper False Map Thrtle Map Thrtle Stinkpot Turtle Massasauga Fox Snake Plains Garter Snake Timber Rattlesnake W. Hognose Snake POLK CO. Water Snake N. Ringneck Snake Smooth Green Snake

Page 21


CLASSIFIED ADS 1.0.0

0

oale, 0.1.0 ' feoale, 0.0.1 ' unknown

fOK SALE:

fAKlED:

Solooon Island boas, Candoia carinata paolsoni, yearlings to 3 year juveniles. All captive bred and feeding well on dead mice. Unrelated pairs available. Prices start at $75.00 Call Steph Porter (612) 690-2589.

Yearlings or adults of the following: Snow, ghost, or blizzard corns, gray-handed kingsnakes, and leopard corns. will purchase or accept trades, see ahove ad. Joel Eidbo.

20 gallon cooplete aquarium set up, with powerhead, gravel, rocks, flor. light, rod iron stand, and fish if you want then - $125. Call Rob at 690-9030.

IlIse:

1.1 Burmese pythons,S yr old oale, outstanding breeder, female breedable next year, $750 pro Call Karl at (612) 774-1044. 1.0 Yellow anaconda, 2.5' & exhibit - $180.00. 0.1 Ball python, 18" - $60.00. 0.1 Burmese python, 5'- $200. Call Shannon at (612) 388-7435 after 3:30pm for more info. Nev World Monkey Chow, vegetarian formula, $1.50 lh. 60w red light, tvo per pack, $6.00, 7.5w clear ned. base bulb, $1.75, 7.5v red med. base bulb, 12.25. Call Jodi at: 552-1545. Leave message. Speckled kingsnake hatchlings, $20 ea. Black ratsnake hatchlings, $15 ea. Contact: D.K. Compton at 872-7266 days and weekends. 0.1 Adult amelanistic corn, $75. 0.1 Adult anerythristic corn, $75. 1.0 Young adult gray-banded kingsnake, $150. 1.0 Hatchling gray-banded king, 1100. 1.1 Adult motley corns, $200 pro 1.1 Adult Baird's ratsnakes, 1200 pro 1.1 Hatchling red-phase northern pines, $100 pro 0.1 Adult okatee corn, 150. Contact Joe Eidbo (814) 724-8351

BOA SURVEY: Please write for my questionaire on Boa constrictor reprouction. Even if your animals have not reproduced, please respond if they are least 4 yrs old and have had the opportunity. In return for a completed survey you will receive a chart shoving the subspecies, their scale counts and range. William Joy, P.O. Box 821433, Dallas, TX 75382-1433. FAUNA CLASSIFIEDS: Monthly classified publication for reptiles, amphibians, food items supplies, literature and more. Excellent information source, worldwide circulation. Subscription $14.00 year. Free sample &info. Write: FAUNA, 2379 Maggio Circle Unit C, Lodi, CA 95240.

&

Albino King-snakes * Milk-snakes * Rat-.snakes 8. Reg"llla! Corn-makes * Boa Constrictors I Taranl1ilas Albino & Reg'olw Burmese Pyt.hOIl! Leopard & Sul",l> Toriois.. Bearded Dragons Emerald Tm !has Poison h",," I'r<gs Anacondas and Leoparo. Geckos

*

*

*

* *

1993 HERPETOLOGICAL DIRECTORY: A valuable information source containing private & cODoercial breeders, foreign exporters, U.S. &foreign herp societies, wholesalers, sources for rodents & other food items, supplies & equipment, and publications. Send $15.00 to FAUNA, 2379 Maggio Circle Unit C, Lodi, CA 95240.

MHS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Page 22


INFORMATION REQUEST Anyone keeping live reptiles and amphibians Is asked to contribute to the annual Inventory. Please submit the following Information current January 1st of each year. (1) A complete Inventory of all reptiles and amphibians living In your

collection as of January 1. Sexes of adult animals should be Included and listed male (1.0.0) female (0.1.0) unknown (0.0.1). Juvenile animals should also be listed using the same format. For example, 1.2.1 + juv 0.0.10 would read: 1 adult male, 2 adult females, 1 adult of unknown sex, 0 Juvenile males, 0 Juvenile females and 10 Juveniles of unknown sex. (2) A list of all species bred during the previous year. Information may be

sparse with simply an Indication that the taxon was bred during the year, or It may be quite lengthy Including, but not limited to: dates of copulation, dates of egg laying and hatching, types of substrates and temperature used during Incubation, light cycles, hibernation, etc. Any type of valuable Information up to three or four paragraphs may be used. (3) A list of all specimens In your collection which you believe may set longevity records for the species. List the date of acquisition; your specimen ID number; the sex; estimated age at capture; wild or captive bred; living or dead; there Is also room for brief notes.

(4) A list of any publications (Including books, museum bUlletins, journals, magaZines, etc.) with reference to reproduction of captive reptiles and amphibians. (5) Please be sure to list your name, address and telephone numbers as you want them listed.

All Information should be sent to: Frank L. Slavens P.O. Box 30744 Seattle, Washington 98103.

MHS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Page 23


D::i.. s r e . g a . r d Classified Ad instructions on back

P 1 e.a.se.

inside cover of the newsletter.

'*"*"*

Send all newsletter i terns and ads directly to the editor

"*"*"*

MRS Editor 524 Indiana Ave N Golden Valley, MN 55422

MeIllbers

Prices:

Ads are run as a free service to paid members. Ads for venomous, illegal or sick animals will not be run. MHS takes NO responsibility for legality or health of an animal advertised here. Ads may be run for three consecutive months at which time ads may be re-submitted. The Editor reserves the right to omit ads when space is limited so as to allow all members a chance to advertise. Size of free ad is limited to approximately (4) typed lines or (1) standard size business card. Deadline for all newsletter items is the date of the general meeting. Non

Me~ber

Line Ads:

&

expanded

ad

size

Prices:

10 cents a word

Business Cards: 1/4 page ad:

1/2 page ad:

Full page ad:

$5.00 a month

$5.00 a month for six (6) or more months $7.50 a month for three (3) or more months $10.00 for one month only $10.00 a month for six (6) or more months $15.00 a month for three (3) or more months $20.00 for one month only $15.00 a month for six (6) or more months $25.00 a month for three (3) or more months $40.00 for one month only

MRS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII NUMBER 5

Page 24


1 CLASSIFIED AD INSTRUCTIONS: Ads are run as a free service to paid members. Ads for venomous species, illegal species, or sick animals will not be run. MRS takes NO responsibility for legality or health of animal advertised here. Ads may be run for three consecutive months at which time ads may be re-submitted. The editor reserves the right to omit ads when space is limited so as to allow all members a chance to advertise. Size of ad is limited to four (4) typed lines or one (1) standard size business card. DEADLINE for all newsletter items is the date of the general meeting. Send all newsletter items to: Minnesota Herpetological Society, Attn: Newsletter Editor, Bell Museum of Natural History, lO Church Street South East, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0lO4.

MEMBERSHIP AND T 路Sf.HRT ORDER FORM MINNESOTA HERPETOLOGICAL SOCIETY

NAME(S) ________________________________________________________________ ADDRESS~

_______________________________________________________________

CITY ________________________ PHONE ___________________________

STATE ________

ZIP CODE

LIST IN MRS DIRECTORY?

YES

NO _ _

HERPRELATEDINTERESTS: ____________________________________________________

TYPE OF MEMBERSHIP? MEMBERSHIP LEVEL?

NEW ____ RENEWAL ____ ____SUSTAINING ..... $60.00

----.lNSTITUTION .... $25.00

____CONTRIBUTING .....$30.00

__--"BASIC .... $15.00

Are you currently ( or will be) a University of Minnesota student? ___(check if yes) HOW DID YOU HEAR OF MHS? _____________________________________________________

OFFICIAL MHS T-SHIRT ($7.00 includes postage)

Please indicate how many of each size This is a limited quanity left in most sizes!

ADULTS: KIDS ___

SMALL_

MEDIUM___

X-LARGE___

Please enclose payment. MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO: Minnesota Herpetological Society. Membership is for 12 months from date of joining. A receipt will be sent only on request. Allow 6-8 weeks for processing. MAIL TO: Minnesota Herpetological Society, Bell Museum Of Natural History~ 10 Church Street South East, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0104


Non-Profit Bulk Rate U. S. Postage

MINNESOTA

PAID . Mpls.MN Permit No. 2275

HERPETOLOGICAL SOCIETY BELL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 10 CHURCH STREET S. E. MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55455-0104

+

+

+

+ DELIVER BY MAY 26, 1993


Vol. 13 (1993), No. 5