Page 1

NEWSLETTER OF THE

MINNESOTA HERPETOLOGICAL SOCIETY

-

OCTOBER 1993 BELL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY .,,-

VOLUME XIII 10 CHURCH STREET SOUTH EAST

NUMBER 10 MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55455-0104


Do you ever have a question about one of your herps and wonder who might be able Lo provide an answer? Most people who keep pets of any kind have been is this situation at one time or another. A group of MHS members has volunteered to provide assistance. Listed below are the people and their specialties. Please be reasonable about the time of day and how frequently you call.

Large pythons and constrictors Glen (Jake) Jacobsen 757-8268 Vence Jimerson 869-8547

Other Snakes John Meltzer John Levell Connie Levell

263-7880 374-5422 374-5422

Lizards Nancy Haig 789-4637 Bill Moss 488-1383 Drew Newman (Iguana) 774-6008

Amphibians John Meltzer Greg Kvanbek Drew Newman

263-7880 533-7723 774-6008

Terrestrial turtles and tortoises John Moriarty 647-1334 Ann Porwoll 489-7853

Aquatic Turtles Michele Stillinger Dennis Daly

224-7212 633-8370

The purpose of the Minnesota Hepetological Society is: to further the education of the membership and the general public in care and captive propagation of retiles and amphibians; to educate the membership and the general public in the ecological role of reptiles and amphibians; and to promote the study and conservation of reptiles and amphibians.

MRS BOARD OF DIRECTORS PRESIDENT VICE PRESIDENT MEMBERSH~SECRETARY

RECORDING SECRETARY TREASURER NEWSLETTER EDITOR MEMBER-AT-LARGE MEMBER-AT-LARGE MEMBER-AT-LARGE MEMBER-AT-LARGE IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT

(612) 757-8268 (612) 374-5422 (612) 374-5422 (612) 774-6008 (612) 431-2146 (612) 224-7212 (612) 488-6388 (612) 488-1383 (715) 425-7959 (612) 623-7620 (612) 263-7880

Glen Jacobsen John Levell Connie Levell Drew Newman Marilyn Brooks Michele Stillinger Jeff LeClere Bill Moss Hans Paulson Sara Richard John Meltzer

SNAKEBITE EMERGENCY HENNEPIN REGIONAL POISON CENTER

(612) 347-3141

MINNESOTA POISON CONTROL SYSTEM LOCAL

(612) 221路2113

OUT OF STATE

(800) 222路1222

Copyright Minnesota Herpetological Society. The contents of this newsletter may be reproduced for inclusion in the newsletters of other herpetological societies provided that the material is reproduced wittlout change and proper credits are given to the MHS Newsletter, citing, volume, number, and date.


MINNESOTA

HERPETOLOGICAL

From the Editor

Table of Contents Upcoming meeting

2

MHS Business

4

MHS Program Review

5

Blast From the Past

8

Snakes of Minnesota by Jeff LeClere

10

Articles of Interest

13

HFYI & Upcoming events

14

Classified Ads

15

MHS Classifieds

18

Banquet Registration Form

20

Next Newsletter Deadline:

***

SOCIETY

A special note on a couple of things for this month, at the back of the newsletter you'll find the registration form for the MHS holiday banquet. Please fill it out and return it asap. Second, from now on the Critter of the Month will be "anything!" Thanks to all who brought herps last month, this was a great turn out! Third, I put a map of the U of M on page three for all those interested. And lastly, please, please, please, send me articles, clippings, anything!!! Thanks to all those who help me out with this request but that is only a few! If you have any suggestions, ideas, articles you would like to see in the newsletter, please, write me. Thanks!

November 5th, 1993

Send all inquiries, ads, and articles directly to the editor

***

MHS EDITOR 234 West George St. St. Paul, MN 55107

MHS NEWSLETTER

VOLUME XIII

NUMBER 10

PAGE 1


UPCOMING

MHS

MEETING

HIGHLIGHTS

November Program: Natural History and Captive Care of Garter Snakes Speaker: Eric Thiss Where: Room 335, Borlaug Hall, U of MN St. Paul Campus When: 7:00 pm, Friday, November 5th, 1993

***

See maps next page for directions

At the November meeting o-f the ~1innesota Herpetological Society, t1HS member Eric Thiss will present a program on the snakes of the genus Thalf'tTiophis. Eric, familar to many of us as' the D\.~net- of Serpent's Tal e Natural Hi story Books, has an encycl opedi c knm'Jl edge of herpetology and has maintained numerous types of reptiles and amphibians over the years. Among his favorites are the garter snakes and through hi s long associ ati on ~Ji th the herpetocul tut-al communi t y, he ha.s had the opportunity to e>:a.mine and photograph many of the various types of these snakes. In addition to the natural history aspects of this subject, Eric will enlighten路 us on the captive care and propagation of ga,-ter snakes. Hopefully, this portion of the program will include a look at some of his albino garter snake specimens. Although frequently overlooked by most herpers, the garter snakes are in real i ty an extreme! y i nteresti ng group, 2.nd Dn the whol e thE genus Thamnophis is easily one of the most succEssful of all snake genera. In addition, several varieties of garter snakes are e>:tremely beautiful. Don't miss this program, as I think you'll be suprised by how underrated these ar.imals actually are. JF'L SPECIAL EARLY DECEMBER PREVIEW: The month of December promises to be one to r~member, as the Minnesota Herpetological Society is fortunate to have as OUt- special guest. 路Thomas Tyni ng. Tom is a natural i st for thE M2ssachu".etts Audubon Soci ety as well as the author of a路 t-eall y gt-eat het-p bock, the "Stokes Nature Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles". Tom will present a.. program on the conset-vation of Ti mbet- R2.ttl s-sna.kes 2:t th,=:, December general meeting follo\.~ed by a specie,l pY""esentatiof"! o-f IIUncommon Behavi our in Common Her-psI! at our :3.nnual hoI i de.y banquet on

saturday night. Plan on attending both p,-ograms, e.s Tom Tyr,ing i;; one of the most dynamic and hUffiorous speakers in the entire herpetological community. You may ~Ian.t to o,-ing along ,,=oPY of his book also,

as I'm sure he will gladly autogt-apn i t fot- you.

the,-e'

JPL

MHS NEWSLETTER

VOLUME XIII

NUMBER 10

See you

PAGE 2


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MRS

BUSINESS

General Meeting

Raffle Donors

Raffle Winners

Randy Blasus John P. Levell Karin Rea Waunita Shaw

Tara Olson Jodi Ahern Sarah Richard Robert Ost

(approx. 65 people attended Oct. meeting) Chase Delles Ryan Osterholm Dave Munson

Refreshments Thanks to Gary Ash for refreshments for October's meeting. If you would like to bring treats for a meeting contact Nannette Jimerson at 869-,8547. Critter of the Month

(from now on Critter of the Month will be anything you want to bring!)

John P. Levell - Ambystoma laterale ( salamander) Dan Bergquist - Tokay gecko Dav Lydon - green snakes- red bellied Jerry Burtson - Reticulated python Jeff LeClere - Bull snake Beau Larson - Eastern milk snake Bill Moss - Albino prairie king snake Becky Helgesen - Blue-spotted salamander Fred Bosman - Leopard tortoise John Moriarty - Bull snake, spring peeper, eastern garter Chase Delles - Desert king snake Bring a proper display case, clear all potentially dangerous reptiles with a board member first, this includes venomous animals! Keep animals inside their bags or cages in the meeting room at all times before and after Critter of the Month. If you must show someone ahead of time your favorite pet, go outside in the hall. This ensures some safety for the animal, too many hands and people trying to catch a glimpse can cause an accident or escape. Thanks! *********************************************** Board Meeting

Attending: Randy Blasus, Marilyn Brooks, Jake Jacobsen, Jeff LeClere, Bill Moss, Drew Newman, George & Sarah Richard, Michele Stillinger, John & Connie Levell, Nancy Hakomaki. Membership Update

Sept. Treasurers Update

Sustaining 1 Contributing 20 Family 45 (91 family members) Individual 149 Life 1 Gratis 8

Income: 968.14 Expenses: 997.57 Net Income: -29.43

Total

MHS NEWSLETIER

315 members in the Minnesota Herpetological Society!!!!

VOLUME XIII

NUMBER 10

PAGE 4


Highlights New business cards were handed out, new t-shirts were ordered, volunteer hours discussed, idea to design new MHS brochures.

*****************

REM I ND E R S

*****************

MHS has a very large library for member use. There are a variety of books, magazines, and other newsletters for your use. Books may be checked out using your membership ID #. The checkout time is ONE MONTH, then you must return the book and renew if you want. There is a fee for late books. MHS also sells new books at the meetings with the other MHS items. If you are new to the Society and are concerned about parking at the meetings, see the map on page 3. The university stops checking meters at 6:00pm and checking contract lots at 4:30, so don't worry about getting a ticket. For those of you who were at last month's meeting, the parking lot was all torn up. It should be finished by November's meeting. Upcoming MIlS Meetings

December:

Thomas Tyning - Natural History, Ecology and Conservation of the Timber Rattlesnake

Holiday Banquet:

Thomas Tyning - Uncommon Behavior in Common Herps

Hands on Events

October 31st, Bell Museum of Natural History, Halloween Hands_on, costumes optional, nothing too gory, this is child oriented, bring reptiles, arachnids, unusual herps. 12:00 (noon) to 3:30pm. Call Bill Moss for cretails, 488-1383.

INNe3of-q

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MRS NEWSLETTER

VOLUME XIII

NUMBER [0

PAGES


REVIEW

by Drew Newman

MRS

PROGRAM

Speaker: Program:

John Moriarty Bullsnakes, Blanding's Turtles and Garter Snakes

John Moriarty, a past MHS president and employee of Hennepin Parks was our speaker for October. John opened his presentation explaining that Hennepin Parks manages some 26,000 acres of natural habitat. In these areas only 20% can be developed for recreational use. Though work with mammals and other activities often take precedence, John has been able to do some interesting work with reptiles and amphibians. One project John worked on was a spring peeper reintroduction project. Many tadpoles were collected, however, difficulty arose when trying to identify the species from other indigenous larvae. Prairie burning is one type of management tool that is used. animals may be lost, overall, many species will benefit.

While a few

Working in conjunction with MHS, John and Hennepin Parks collected bullsnakes in the Sherburne Refuge and implanted them with transmitters. Though beset with problems, they were able to track some of these animals. Turtles also have been fitted with radio telemetry devices and tracked. Since many turtles are cryptic in their coloration, bright (nontoxic) paint was applied to the carapace. Many garter snakes also occur in the parks. Management isn't specific to these animals but rather to the environment in general which in turn benefits them. John gave a very informative talk. With all the habitat loss and other pressures on our native fauna, it is heartening to see someone work so diligently towards the continued existence of the animals and their environment. -D.N.

MHS NEWSLETTER

VOLUME XIII

NUMBER 10

PAGE 6


VOLUNTEERING BY RANDY BLASUS

In todays working world where everyone is always running hectic schedules time becomes very precious. However, sometimes people feel the need to contribute their time to a cause to feel they are somehow making the world a better place. However, There are so many ways and and places to contribute one's time that the idea of volunteering becomes daunting. Questions of 'What can I doT, or 'Where do I beginT arise. The following list is an attempt to help alleviate some confusion and to hopefully to generate an interest in other herper's to volunteer for M.H.S ... Board of Directors (elected) Chairperson (appointed) Herp Assistants (appointed) Newsletter folders (volunteers) Hands On Helpers (volunteers) Holiday Banquet Helpers (volunteers) White Snake Sale Helpers (volunteers) (appointed) Election Committee Members Adoption Committee (appointed) Newsletter Articles (volunteer) (volunteers) Newsletter Artwork Name Tag Box Keepers (volunteers) Rodent sales Person (appointed) (appointed) Meeting Item Sales Person Raffle Sales Person (volunteer) Meeting Information Person (volunteer) Construction Project Person (volunteers) Raffle Donors (volunteers) Refreshment Supplier (volunteers) Critter Of The Month Contributors(volunteers) Some of these pOSitions are elected or currently filled. Being appointed means that anyone can apply, but the board reviews the situation. Often pOSitions change as members move on or slots can be hard to fill. Anyone with an interest is encouraged to inquire of any board member. We also need to give thanks to members who presently fill our needs and to all others who helped in the past.

MHS NEWSLETTER

VOLUME XIII

NUMBER lO

PAGE?


MHS

BLAST

FROM THE PAST by Michele Stillinger

MHS Blast From The Past is a look back on the past accomplishments and contributions of MHS members. This month I decided to run a 13 year old article on the use of black lights on reptiles. Why? For several reasons! First, many people do not know that there is a difference between black lights (B.L.) and black light blue (B.L.B.) bulbs, which this article addresses. Secondly, there is currently a lot of discussion as to whether Vita-lite brand bulbs and their equal really help in vitamin D3 uptake in reptiles. I hope that in printing this article about our ideas of proper reptile lighting 10 years ago, it will encourage some of you readers to write an article or find an article on "Reptile Lighting for the '90's" for me. This is a controversial topic and many of our readers, and myself would like to hear some new ideas or opinions on this subject. Once again, this is a reprint from 13 years ago. It is not to be taken as the current belief and practice of the institutions and people cited.

A NOTE GN THE USE OF BLACK

LIGh~

FLUORESCENT TUBES FOR PJeFTILES

by Ronald L. Tremper During a visit to the Bronx Zoo, New York, in June 1980, John Behler presented me with written and verbal testimony concerning his experience with a little known two pin tube called a black light (B.L.). I immediately wondered if anything could be better than Vita-lite (True-lite), but my pessimism was quickly washed away by the actual results I witnessed. John's tour of his herpetology department included a number of off exhibit lizard tanks which were supplied with 40 watt B.L. tubes. Numbers of Uromastix, Dipsosaurus; Sauromalus, Cnemidotlhorus, and Ameiva ~ere in perfect condition and several pairs of Ameiva ~. were constantly copulating during my three hour visit. Thriving young lizards gave further proof of captive propogation and husbandry success. It had been John's experience, as I am sure many others know, that these genera are often poor captives due to improper lighting which affects vitamin D3 and calcium uptake. Prior to the use of these tubes, their zoo had very marginal results with such species and some chelonians. Naturally, I acquired several tubes upon returning to our zoo and over the past 18 months they have been used, in place of Vita-lite, for all of our diurnal lizards â&#x20AC;˘ . Our Dipsosaurus, Phelsuma, Chamaeleo, Anolis, Naul tinis, Heterophilus, and Lacerta have done very well; appetites improved, activity . increased , and reproduction occurred in most cases.

MRS NEWSLETfER VOLUME XIII

NUMBER 10

PAGE 8


Black light tubes are commonly used in nocturnal insect traps and have been the item used by the entomological pro{ession for-years, in this regard. They should not be confused with the more popular black light blue (B.L.B.) used for lighting items with a luminescent quality such as minerals. It is essential that any form of artificial lighting be positioned not more than 24 inches over the animals, so that beneficial ultra-violet rays are not allowed to diffuse aver a larger area. The ballast of fluorescent fixtures produces some heat, but this is usually insufficient for most reptile caging. We provide incandescent spot lights focused on a suitable basking site which are within the proper range of the black light. Keepers will find that the exclusive use of black light gives the cage a violet colour. We always use cool white or Vita-lite and/or a basking bulb, with a B.L., to provide some white lighting in order to enhance visibility for the keeper and the kept. We have found that two common sizes are the most workable: the 20T-12 BL (20 watts) and 1"40 BL (40' watts). These are 24 and 48 inches in length respectively. According to information provided by the Bronx Zoo there is a 4% loss in illuminance and 3-5% decrease in ultra-violet irradiance after one year of use (approximately 3000 hours). Tubes and specifications should be available from any large electrical distributor. I have read about some controversy between reptile enthusiasts as to whether Vitalite is of any use at all. I can clearly say that the black light is essential for most lizards and turtles. To solve this debate, one needs merely to acquire a run down sickly pet shop Ameiva or Anolis and install a black light fixture, at groupd level even, and generate an adequate background temperature. After less than seven days, you will see increased activity and appetite. Overall body colour will brighten in time. The use of a vitamin/mineral supplement will increase the health of any captives, since the presence of D} serves as a. vehicle for calciUlp uptake. Vita-lites work better than the plant enhancing forms, and after using black lights . over Vita-lite, I have concluded that the B.L. is far more effective for captive lizards and turtles. Although I haven't tested the black lights on snakes, I suspect they would benefit most diurnal species, which have a high exposure to ultraviolet radiation in their natural habitat. EDITOR'S NOTE: The preceding article was reprinted from "The Berptile", International Herpetological Society, Vol~~e Seven, Number One, ~hrch 1982, with the permission of the author. MIlS thanks Ron for this courtesy. Ron is Curator of Reptiles and Amphibians at the Roeding Park Zoo in Fresno, California.

MHS NEWSLETTER

VOLUME XIII

NUMBER 10

PAGE 9


Snakes of Minnesota

bv Jeff Le Clet-e

Texas Brown Snake

(Storeia dekavi texana)

DescriDtion--This snake is also called "Def<ay's snake" after New York naturalist James Edward DeKav. I~ is nat venomous. It reaches a length of 13-18 inches. There is a light striDe that runs lengthwise from the head to the tiD of the tail. A row of black spots border the stripe on both sides. There is an inverted black V directly under the eve and stoDs at the mouth line. A large, black semi-ring is present on the nape and may extend well down onto the bellv scales. The ground color is always some shade of brown varying from a verv light tan to a rich reddish brown to almost a dark grav. In the darker specimens the stripe. spots, and head markings will be very obscure or absent. The belly is pale and unmarked except for a row of black spots on both sides of the snake where the ventral seal es start. The bel 1 v col m- is cream, brownish, yellowish, or pinkish. The scales are keeled and the anal plate is divided. Subspecies--There are two species of Brown snake, the Northern and the Florida. Onlv the Northern has subspecies (three of them), one occuring in Minnesota - the Texas Brown snake which was described above. Range--In Minnesota the Brawn snake seems to base itself around the Twin Cities and the Mississipoi river. Whether this snake is found throughout central and western Minnesota is really unknown because a few records indicate that populations may occur farther west and north than now shown. Habitat--In nature. these snakes are mostly found clc)se to water - bogs, marshes~ streams~ ponds and lakes although they are usually found quite some distarlce from the water's q

edge. They hide under rocks, logs, and debris. They are extremely adaptable to environmental Cha!lges 2fld are frequently found in city parks~ city lots, cemeter-ies~

and

backvar-ds. Habits--Brown snakes are secretive and may be found by turning rocks, logs, ()oards, and trash. These snakes may also be found under street lamps at night although they a~e

generally dirunal except during very hot weather. When encpuntered, this snake flattens it"s head and bodY and white dashes may appear on the

MHS NEWSLETTER

VOLUME XIII

NUMBER 10

~;ides.

It releases a mild

PAGE 10


musk and some may bite viciouslv., but its small teeth do not penetrate human

skin~

B~own

snakes are related to gar-ter afld

water snakes and are often found hibernating with them. Hiberl1aculums incillde rock crevices bridges. and road It may breed twice a year once in spring and q

embankments.

(rarelv) again in the fall.

The young are born alive in late

summer or early autumn and are 2-4 inches in length.

The

young are 11earlv black with faint dark spots and a light collar around tt\e neek.

There may be 3-20 young born in a

littel路-. Food--Earthworms. slugs. small snails. and soft bodied insects .. Care--Brown snakes do excellent in a 10 gallon aquarium~ or YOU can make your own cage. but it must not t,ave any small openings or you will have escapees! Remember that snakes can

get through openings SMALLER than their diameters, so put ventilation holes a few inches higher than the total length of the snake.

These snakes do very well on newspaper or

indoor/outdoor caroet. to hide

under~

Include a hide box or rocks for them

You can als() use soil, aspen

sha~ir,gsq

or

sphagnum moss. A water dish full of clean water must be present at all

times~

even if

yOU

choose to mist them

regularly. These snakes eat earthworms with no problems. You can al~;o feed slugs~ small salamanders, and frogs~ I once caught a soecimen in Cedar Rapids, Ia. that was 1 1/2 feet long that ate chorus frogs and an occasional small leopard frog and did great up through its release. They are not fussy about food and will usually eat even if you are moving about the room in which it is keot. Dehydration can be a problem if kept too drv and skin lesions may appear if kept too moist. If vou caught your brown snake yourself, take notes on what tyoe of habitat in which it was found. Was it moist or relatively dry? This will help you decide how to keep it. Room temperature is sufficient~ but if the temp~ falls to the lower 70's, ventral heat or a light on ONE side of the cage will helD. Hibernation for a few months is beneficial, especially if vou want to breed them. Dehvdration is common during the winter esoeciallv in hibernation. Trv to pick the dampest part of your cool rOoin to hibernate them. Mist them once a week ONLY if it is necessary while in hibernation~ Young browl' snakes are born alive like red-bellies and

are not hard to take care of. They will eat tubifex worms. oieces of earttlwor-ms~ fruit "fliesn 51(lg5& and small crickets. Seperate the young because they will fight over the same food iterna In qeneral~ these are the hardiest of the small snakes~ They adapt to captivity well~ eatirlg r-egular"lv and respondinG well to temperature changes.

MHS NEWSLETTER

VOLUME XIII

NUMBER 10

PAGE II


Breckenridge, W. J. 1944. Reptiles and Amphibians of Minnesota. Conant

~

F(oger

1975. A Field Guide to Reotiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. Rossi. John V. 1992. Snakes of the United States and Canada. Trutnau, Ludwig. 1981. Nonvenomous Snakes.

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HCA T

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MRS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII

NUMBER 10

PAGE 12


MINNESOTA HERPETOLOGICAL SOCIETY 1993 HOLIDAY BANQUET SOCIAL HOUR: 6:30 - 7:30 POTLUCK DINNER 7:30 SPEAKER: FOLLOWING DINNER

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1993 TERRACE CAFE, ST. PAUL STUDENT CENTER ST. PAUL CAMPUS, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA 6:30 PM TO 10:30 PM

$5.00 PER PERSON (except children who can sit on parent's lap) MHS will be providing coffee, wine, beer, pop and water. Tableware will be provided. People attending are asked to bring a food item and it's necessary serving utensils.

PLEASE MAKE RESERVATIONS BY NOVEMBER 24,1993. CONTACT MARILYN BROOKS IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS. DETACH FORM AND SEND WrrH A CHECK PAYABLE TO MINNESOTA HERPETOLOGICAL SOCIETY AT: Minnesota Herpetological Society Bell Museum Of Natural History 10 Chuch Street South East Minneapolis, MN 55455-0104 ............

--- _ ......

............

-_ _-- _---_ ---- __ ........... .......

......

......

......

NAME(S) __________________________________________ PHONE NUMBER _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ NUMBER OF ADULTS _ _ NUMBER OF CHILDREN _ _ NUMBER OF FREE CHILDREN (those who can sit on parent's lap) TOTAL NUMBER ATTENDING _ __ TOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED$ _ _ _ _ _ __ FOOD YOU ARE BRINGING: (CIRCLE ONE PER FAMILY) APPETIZER

VEGETABLE SALAD

MAIN DISH BREAD

DESSERT

LET ME KNOW WHAT IS NEEDED


You and your family are hereby invited to attend the Minnesota Herpetological Society 1993 Holiday Banquet on Saturday, December 4th from 6:30 pm to 10:30 pm. The special guest speaker will be the well known author of the "Stoke's Nature Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles," Thomas Tyning. His presentation, "Uncommon Behavior in Common Herps," is a light -hearted and humorous overview of herpetology. Not only is he a highly knowledgeable speaker, but thoroughly enjoyable also. So come join in the fun with good food, good friends, and a great program. Your presence is requested at Terrace Cafe at the St. Paul Student Center on the St. Paul Campus of the University on Minnesota. Please R.S.V.P. by November 24, 1993 to Minnesota Herpetological Society at Bell Museum of Natural History, 10 Church Street South East, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455.


Ar-t:i..c:l~s

<>:f

Terrible Turtle Tots

I

N THE CENTRAL AND SOUTHER"

United States, newly hatched red-eared slider turtles share the warm, slow-rna\'ing waters of ponds and lakes with hungry largemouth bass. Bass eat other things that are the size of young turtlescrayfish, for instanceyet they do not seem to feed on turtles. Carol Britson, a biology graduate student at Memphis State University, thinks she knows why. The inch-long hatchlings put up such a fuss, she says, Clawing and biting as they're swallowed, that the fish spit them outand quickly learn to avoid the unpalatable morsels altogether. Each day for six weeks, Britson plied her experimental group of bass with turtle hatchlings-live ones, dead ones, or ones that had been anesthetized by being cooled in a refrigerator. "The first day, when I tested the verv first fish with a live hat~hling, he just attacked it," she re-

lings from then On. Britson thinks the fish had probably learned to recog-nize the bright colors and bold patter;" on the turtles' undershells. "Avoidance aiter experience is one of the key indicators of warning coloration," she 5~1\路S.

That would help explain why turtle h~ltch1ings have sud: colorful l11ark.inzs in the first place, and also why the cC:-lors fade by the time the turtles grow

tOO big bass to eat. If Britson is right. calls. IIA few seconds later your intestines, then, then turtle hatchlin拢s he spit it out. He did that you fat fish? are the first example "Of three more times with the same hatchan animal that displays colors to warn ling. After that experience, that bass of a beha\ioral defense. Skunks, snakes. would not touch a live hatchling, a dead buttertlies, and other animals with hatchling, or an anesthetized hatchling warning colors typically defend themthroughout the rest of the e'1'eriment." seh'es with noxious chemicals. The turThe other bass responded in the tles' defense, though, is easily as effecsame wav. If a fish had never encounth路e. In the year and a half that Britson tered a live hatchling, it promptly dehas been srudving the bass-turtle relavoured dead or anesthetized ones. But tionship, onI'y 2 of 20 bass ha\'e died. after its first encounter with a ljye turBoth had gulped down a live hatchling tle, the bass ignored all other hatcht\\路o weeks earlier.

MRS NEWSLETfER VOLUME XIII

NUMBER 10

PAGE 13


Herpetological For Your Information

HFY I

HFYI is a listing of herp related information, products, trips, expeditions, classes and other items of interest for herp enthusiasts. NEW PRODUCTS The Ophidian Herpetological Network is a computer bulletin board for herp enthusiasts. 300-2400 BPS, 24 hours, 8+N+l Phone (602) 468-9860. HERP-NET BBS, is a computer bulletin board with the subject of herpetology as the main interest. Contributors are from allover the country. All you need to participate is a computer, a modern and communication software. The #'s are (215) 698-1905 - for 9600 baud or higher and (215) 464-3562 for 2400 baud modems. If you have questions you can call Bill Moss at 488-1383 and he'll try to get you set up. UPCOMING

HERPETOLOGICAL

EVENTS

Upcoming herpetological Events is a listing of herp related conferences, symposiums, shows, lectures, classes, and local ~s hands on events. QUICK VIEW

October 93

* MHS

hands-on, Bell Museum of Natural History, 12:00 - 3:30 Oct. 31st.

November 93

* Various

classes and seminars at the U

December 93

*

Holiday Banquet, Dec. 4th, 6:30 - 10:30 U of M St. Paul Student Union

BIOLOGY SEMINARS & CLASSES Mending Injured Birds of Prey, Bell Museum Live Learning Series, Nov. 4th, call (612) 626-2220 for information and registration. Swan and Eagle Migration I & II, Nov. 13th & 20th, 6:00 am to 7:00 pm, trip offered through the Bell Museum, $31 members, $38 nonmembers. Contact the Bell Museum 626-2220 for more info. Forest history processes related to deforestation, Marc Parren, Wageningen Agricultural University, the Netherlands. Dec. 5th, Rm 365 Borlaug Hall, 3:00 pm. MHS EVENTS Halloween hands-on at the Bell Museum, 12:00 to 3:30, Sunday, Oct. 31st. Contact Bill Moss, 488-1383, for details. The MRS Annual Holiday Party is on December 4th at the St. Paul Student Center on the University of Minnesota Campus. The guest speaker will be Thomas Tyning. Registration form is in this months newsletter. Hurry and send it in! I look forward to seeing everyone there. Last year was a great time!

MHS NEWSLETrER VOLUME XIII

NUMBER 10

PAGE 14


C l a s s : L f:L e d

Ads

1.0.0

= male,

0.1.0

= female,

0.0.1

= 7??

fON SALE:

1.0 Florida blue eastern garter snake, $15. 1.1.0 Western hognose snakes, $100 pro 1.0 yearling black ratsnake, $35. Call lancy or Dav 536-9783 days. 1.0 Albino banded Cal king, pinkish - lavander, with bright yellow bands, $100. Call Becky evenings at 612-699-8031. 0.1.0 comDon Okatee corn, 3 yr old, $35. 0.0.1 red albino corn, 3 yr old $45. Glass lab mouse cages, gravity feed with water bottles, size for 4 mice, $4 each. Call David at 612-444-9775. 1.0 Sonoran gopher snake, $40., .0.0.1 savanah monitor, 3 ft., $100.00. Call Jodi at 552-1545. 1.1 Burmese pythons, both 8 ft. 1400.00 pro or best offer. 1.1 Peruvian red-tailed boas, F-4 ft, M-2 ft, $850.00 or best offer, Lisa (612) 895-0242. 1.1 Ball pythons, captive bred, 30', 1135.00 pro Call Jeremy at (612) 871-1244. Feeder Rabbits, 11.50 lb. Crickets, 50 cents a doz. Call Dan 487-3258.

Captive bred snakes at affordable prices. Delivery at MHS meetings available. Send stamp for 1993 price list. Plains Reptile, P.O. Box 5818, Fargo, NO 58105. (701) 241-9742. 1.15 Brazilian rainbow boas (Epicrates cenchria cenehria) C.B. '93 - $225. 6.7 Columbian rainbow boas (Epicrates cenchria naurus) C.B. '93 - 195. 1.1 D'Albert's pythons (Liasis albertisi) C.B. '92 - $400.00 pro Can deliver to the Tvin Cities. Contact Mark or Kathy Wendling at (319) 857-4787. Veiled chameleons, $100. Boas, $75. Ball pythons, $40. Green Iguanas, $25. Niles, $50. Tokay Geckos, $15. Cages, heat tape & misc accessories. Contact Hans at (715) 425-8888. Solomon Island boas, Candaia carinata paulsoni, 18 months to 3 year juveniles. All captive bred and feeding veIl on dead mice. Price: $75.00 - $150.00. Unrelated pair (3 yrs. old) available, 1300.00. Call Steph Porter (612) 690-2589, st. Paul, MN. fAH1ED

2.1 Bimini boas (Epicrates striatus fasteri), make offer. 1.0 Columbian rainbow boa, $150. Call Greg at 612-533-7723.

Butterfly Agama - viII trade. Call Nancy or Dav at 536-9783 days.

WE CURRENTLY HAVE A HUGE SELECTION OF CAPTIVE PRODUCED GEMS. CALL AND RESERVE YOURS NOW!

Hamster habitat or cage, good condition, cheap! Call Becky at 699-8031 evenings. All the shed snakes skins in the world, always, to use at hands-on programs, Bob Duerr 541-9417. RISC:

SNAKE SKINS TANNED. Call Jane for more info at 724-7437. BOA SURVEY: Please write for my questionaire on Boa constrictor reproduction. Even if your animals have not reproduced, please respond if they are least 4 yrs old and have had the opportunity. In return for a completed survey you will receive a chart showing the subspecies, their scale counts and range. Villiam Joy, P.O. Box 821433, Dallas, TX 75382-1433. INTERNET: 72223.220@COMPUSERVE.COM FAUNA CLASSIFIEDS: Monthly classified publication for reptiles, amphibians, food items & supplies, literature and more. Excellent information source, worldvide circulation. Subscription $14.00 year. Free sample &info. Vrite: FAUNA, 2379 Maggio Circle Unit C, Lodi, CA 95240. 1993 HERPETOLOGICAL DIRECTORY: A valuable information source containing private! commercial breeders, foreign exporters, U.S. &foreign herp societies, vholesalers, sources for rodents ! other food items, supplies & equipment, and publications. Send 115.00 to FAUNA, 2379 Maggio Circle Unit C, Lodi, CA 95240.

JOHN & RUTH MELTZER (612) 263-7880

MHS NEWSLETIER

VOLUME XIII

NUMBER 10

PAGElS


FOR SALE OR PETTING ZOOS PARTIES OR PROMOTIONS

ANIMALS OF WALTON'S HOLLOW EXOTIC 8; FARM ANIMALS

BILL &: JEAN WALTON 5425 PETERSON ROAD WHITE BEAR LAKE, MN 55127-6713 (612) 426-9163

smORD' S EXOTIC A:m:MAL HOUSE BILLY SECORD (612)-920-4502 SPECIALIZES IN CAPTIVE BREEDING OF FINE EXOTIC MAMMALS. HEDGEHOGS, FENNEC FOX, AND MANY OTHERS! USDA LICENSED!

Largest Selection of Reptiles & Amphibians in Minnesota Cages, Books, Feed & Supplies

540 Winnetka Ave. No. Golden Valley, Mn 55427

:ll'"

VIVARIUM PETS

~

iii

o

(612) 593-0298

Featuring ... lAMS .. , KT ... ProPlan. , . ScIence Diet Tetra ... Toppers ... Other SpeCialty Foods

•, ~

Sat iO-5 Sun 12-5

Sarah M. Richard

A Full line of Pet Supplies & Unusual Pets

Call Me For Your Housing Needs REALTOR"

.~

!

(612) 781-6061 21 Bus. '[1 VM/Pager (612) 223-0407 (612)781-2311 ~ Fax:

MRS NEWSLETTER

6519 Nicollet Ave. So. RIchfield, MN 55423 Northeast Metro Office

Gloria Anton 612-861-8868

4111 Central Avenue N.E.

Columbia Heights, MN 55421

VOLUME XIII

n~m0

NUMBER 10

PAGE 16


At last! Three T-shirts that really express your interest in reptiles. Shirts are 100% white cotton with vivid 10-color designs filled with ass!. reptiles. Rain oresl design

This Anniversary design is also available in a 24" x 33" print for $20 + $4 StH. (Unframed) . ... T-Shirt sizes are: M, L, XL, XXL. $15ea + $3 StH. Add $1 StH each additional shirt. International orders add $5 StH per shirt. U.S. funds ONLY. White Tank , Sizes L & XL ... T-Shirts not sold to general public in California. California residents can for store in your area . ... California Zoological Supply does not sell reptiles to the general public. Reptiles only sold to retail pet shops & zoos. PAGE 17


MHS Classified Ads

All proceeds from the sales of MHS merchandise and donated items goes towards the operating costs of the society such as; speaker fees, books for the library, herp related charitable donations, newsletter printing, etc. MHS is a non profit organization and is volunteer run. Rat and Mice Sales MICE Pin kies - $6.00 Fuzzies - $6.00 Adults - $9.00

doz. doz. doz.

RATS Pups - $10.00 doz. Adults - $12.00 for six $24.00 doz.

Orders taken by Terry Scheiber only! Must be made at least, one week before the general meeting where they will be delivered. Phone:

(612) 440-7482

*****

Mice and rats must be purchased by the dozen except for adult rats which can be purchase in allotments of six. Rat pinkies unavailable.

*****

Cage Sales Cages come pre-built but unfinished with the following; laminate interior, hinged mitered door, glass window, latch, incandescent light fixture and cord. A 7.5 watt bulb will be included. Some cages are available for immediate purchase at the meetings.

***

MHS does not take responsibility for any injuries to animal if purchaser uses a higher wattage bulb or other hardware. Specifications

***

1x w x h

small: large:

24 x 18 x 12 48 x 18x 18

$ 50 $ 75

Misc MHS also offers an assortment of other herp related items for sale at the general meeting. These include: Books MHS stickers, decals Posters MHS buttons Note cards Bumper stickers T-shirts, several styles Look for sales of MHS merchandise and items at the far right hand side of the meeting room. Items will be for sale during the break and before and after the meeting if time permits. Please have sales final before the meeting begins so as not to disrupt the meeting proceedings.

MRS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII

NUMBER 10

PAGE 18


You and your family are hereby invited to attend the Minnesota Herpetological Society 1993 Holiday Banquet on Saturday, December 4th from 6:30 pm to 10:30 pm. The special guest speaker will be the well known author of the "Stoke's Nature Guide to Amphibians and Reptiles," Thomas Tyning. His presentation, "Uncommon Behavior in Common Herps," is a light -hearted and humorous overview of herpetology. Not only is he a highly knowledgeable speaker, but thoroughly enjoyable also. So come join in the fun with good food, good friends, and a great program. Your presence is requested at Terrace Cafe at the St. Paul Student Center on the St. Paul Campus of the University on Minnesota. Please R.S.V.P. by November 24, 1993 to Minnesota Herpetological Society at Bell Museum of Natural History, 10 Church Street South East, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455.

MHS NEWSLETTER VOLUME XIII

NUMBER 10

PAGE 19


MINNESOTA HERPETOLOGICAL SOCIETY 1993 HOLIDAY BANQUET SOCIAL HOUR: 6:30 - 7:30 POTLUCK DINNER 7:30 SPEAKER: FOLLOWING DINNER

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1993 TERRACE CAFE, ST. PAUL STUDENT CENTER ST. PAUL CAMPUS, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA 6:30 PM TO 10:30 PM

$5.00 PER PERSON (except children who can sit on parent's lap) MHS will be providing coffee, wine, beer, pop and water. Tableware will be provided. People attending are asked to bring a food item and it's necessary serving utensils.

PLEASE MAKE RESERVATIONS BY NOVEMBER 24, 1993. CONTACT MARILYN BROOKS IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS. DETACH FORM AND SEND WITH A CHECK PAYABLE TO MINNESOTA HERPETOLOGICAL SOCIETY AT: Minnesota Herpetological Society Bell Museum Of Natural History 10 Chuch Street South East Minneapolis, MN 55455-0104

-------_ ........... ---------------_ ................. NAME(S) ________________________________________ PHONE NUMBER _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ NUMBER OF ADULTS _ _ NUMBER OF CHILDREN _ _ NUMBER OF FREE CHILDREN _ _ (those who can sit on parent's lap) TOTAL NUMBER ATIENDING _ __ TOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED$ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ FOOD YOU ARE BRINGING: (CIRCLE ONE PER FAMILY) APPETIZER

VEGETABLE SALAD

MHS NEWSLETTER

VOLUME XIII

MAIN DISH BREAD

NUMBER 10

DESSERT

LET ME KNOW WHAT IS NEEDED PAGE 20


CLASSIFIED AD INSTRUCTIONS: Ads are run as a free service to paid members. Ads for venomous species, illegal species, or sick animals will not be run. MHS takes NO responsibility for legality or health of animal advertised here. Ads may be run for three consecutive months at which time ads may be re-submitted. The editor reserves the right to omit ads when space is limited so as to allow all members a chance to advertise. Size of ad is limited to four (4) typed lines or one (1) standard size business card. DEADLINE for all newsletter items is the date of the general meeting. NON MEMBER & EXPANDED SIZE ADS: Line ads:$.l0 per word. Business Cards: $5.00 per month. One month only Three or more months Quarter page ads: $10.00 per month $7.50 per month Half page ads: $20.00 per month $15.00 per month Full page ads: $40.00 per month $25.00 per month

Six or more months $5.00 per month $10.00 per month $15.00 per month

Send all newsletter items to: Minnesota Herpetological Society Newsletter Editor, 234 West George Street, St. Paul, MN 55107.

MEMBERSHIP AND T-SHIRT ORDER FORM MINNESOT A HERPETOLOGICAL SOCIETY NAME(S) _____________________________________________________________ ADDRES~S

_______________________________________________________________________

CITY _________________________ PHONE ____________________________

STATE _______

ZIP CODE NO _ _

LIST IN MHS DIRECTORY? YES

HERPRELATEDINTERESTS: ______________________________________________________

TYPE OF MEMBERSHIP? MEMBERSHIP LEVEL?

NEW ____ RENEWAL ____ ____SUST AINING ..... $60.00

----.INSTITUTION .... $25.00

____CONTRIB UTING ..... $30.00

_--"BASIC .... $15.00

Are you currently (or will be) a University of Minnesota student? _ _(check if yes) HOW DID YOU HEAR OF MHS'! ______________________________________________________

OFFICIALMHS T-SHIRT ($7.00 includes postage)

KIDS - - -

Indicate how many of each size SMALL- - ADULTS: MEDIUM- - - X-LARGE___

NEW POISON DART FROG T-SHIRT ($14.00 postage included) Indicate how many of each size KIDS - - -

ADULTS:

SMALL- - -

LARGE- - -

MEDIUM___ X-LARGE_

Please enclose payment. MAKE CHECKS PAY ABLE TO: Minnesota Herpetological Society. Membership is for 12 months from date of joining. A receipt will be sent only on request. Allow 6-8 weeks for processing. MAIL TO: Minnesota Herpetological Society, Bell Museum Of Natural History, 10 Church Street South East, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0104 ,-"


Non-Profit Bulk Rate U. S. Postage

MINNESOTA

PAID Mpls.MN Pennit No. 2275

HERPETOLOGICAL SOCIETY BELL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 10 CHURCH STREET S. E. MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55455"0104

+

+

+

+ DELIVER BY OCTOBER 20, 1993

Vol. 13 (1993), No. 10  

Minnesota Herpetological Society Newsletter

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