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MINNESOTA HERPETOLOGICAL SOCIETY NEWSLETTER VOLUME II

NUMBER 1 FEBRUARY MEETING Thursday, Feb. 4, 1982 7:00PM Room 225, Smith Hall University of Minnesota

The February meeting will be somewhat of a follow up to the August meeting, which was presented by Kevin O'Brien, Special Agent" USDI, U. S. F ish and Wi 1 d 1 i f e Se r vic e. This me e tin 9 wi 1 1 100 kat the liSt i n9 from our side of the fence. By our side, I mean that of the collect9r abd hoooiest. Part of the meeting-will be recommendations on how we can protect ourselves. As you will find out, even innocent parties are not immune! Be sure to attend! II

MHS continues to grow! We are up to 76 members. Despite the cold weather, 22 attended the January meeting.

A new feature will begin with the February meeting. Refreshments! We will have' coffee, cider or Koolaid, and cookies, etc. If you are interested in helping with this, please let us know.

Election~ will be held at the Annual Meeting in March. At this time write-in candidates will be accepted. We will also vote on a Constitutional Amendment to add a 4th Member-at-Large. The function of this position is to bring additional input to the Board from the membership. This input is essential to the welfare of MHS.

The Nominating Committee has submitted the following nominations: Pres'identVice-PresidentSecretary-TreasurerNewsletter EditorMember-at ... Large-

Delvin Jones Terry Odegaard Connie Delles Jim Gerholdt John Dee Bruce Delles Karl Hermann Fred Bosman

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The "Critter of the Month" for February will be amphibians. This includes all amphibians, so don't be bashful. Please let Bruce or Con n i~. knOV:;- if yo u p 1ant 0 br i n9 ani mal s •

The January meeting, as presented by John Willie Dee, was really a good one. John is, as reputed, a master in setting up turtle tanks. His self designed and built tanks are certainly an improvement over the standard all-glass tanks. If you missed the meeting and have any questions about these tanks, John will be happy to answer them for you.

We had a nice assortment of aquatic turtles (and a couple of tortoises) at the January meeting. They were: Alligator Snapping Turtle Blanding's. Turtle Mata Mata Spiney Soft Shell Star Tortoise Striped Mud Turtle Western Painted Turtle Twist Neck Turtle These were brought by Matt Cutler, John Dee, Terry Odegaard, and M.ike Schwartz. Thanks from MHS!

The MHS Library continues to grow with the followi.ng recent donations: Bruce and Connie Delles Reptilian Disease: Recognition and Treatment by J. S. Dobbs A Brief Outline of Suggested Treatments for Diseases of Captive Reptiles by James B~ Murphy Thanks from MHS!

WANTED: Books and Journals in the field of Herpetology. Help build our MHS Library!


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s BELL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 10 CHURCH STREET S.E . • MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 55455-0104

MINNESOTA HERPETOLOGICAL SOCIETY INCOME STATEMENT FOR ~HE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER )1, 1981 RE.'VENUE: Membership Dues Sale of Food Animals Library Fines TOTAL REVENUE

$ 365.00 422.30

EXPENSES: Program Expenses Postage Offi.ce Supplies Library Books Printing Mileage Miscellaneous TOTAL EXPENSES

5.00

$ 792. JO

)3.00 267.79 59.44 156.2) 65.33 15·00

11.64 608.43

$ 18).87

NET INCOME

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MINNESOTA HERPETOLOGICAL SOCIETY STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FINANCIAL POSITION FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER Jl, 1981 Cash, January 1, 1981 Net Income for the Year Total Expenses for the Year Cash, December 31, 1981

$

0

792.10 608.43

$ 181.87


PROPER HANDLING OF HERPS by Jim Gerholdt

The most important thing to remember when handling any form of herp is safety. This includes the safety of the ~nimal as well as that of the handler. A severely traumatized animal Is no better than a severely traumatized handler. Even an aggressive animal can be safely and gently handled if the proper tools and procedures are used. Amphibians can be merely grasped and held with one hand. Larger species may r e'q u ire the use 0 f bot h han d s. A dip net i s a use f u 1 tool for capture. Remember to control the entire animal so that it cannot injure itself in its efforts to escape. Lizards can usually also be grasped and held with one hand. Larger species will require the use of both hands, one to control the head, and the other to control the hind legs. The claws of a large lizard such as a Green Iguana,can cause serious wounds. The tail of an Iguana should also be controlled, as it can raise some nasty welts if it is allowed to whip back and forth. Be extremely careful of the tail of many lizards. Many, like the skinks, can discard it easily. It will grow back, but will never look quite the same. A good technique for handling skinks is to cover the entire animal quickly with one hand, then locate the head. Once the head is found, a firm grip behind it will protect both the handler and the tail. Lizards such as the Six Lin e d Ra c e'r unne r are be s t cap t ured wit han 0 0 s e • Turtles can generally be handled with no problem. Soft Shells and Snappers are an exception. Soft Shells can be grasped with one or both hands at the rear of the shell. Be wary of the head, as it has an extremely long reach. Small Snappers can be handled by the tail, while larger ones sWould be grasped by a hind leg. Again, be wary of the head. A front and rear shell hold may be necessary for large examples of both types. In this technique, the hand grasping the front of the shell is used to control the head. Snakes will present the most problems in handling. They are strong and agile, and a large non venomous snake can inflict a serious wound on the handler. It may itself be injured by the handler. Always remember that a firm grip is not the same as a death grip. Small, harmless species ~an simply be grasped and picked up. Most won1t bite, and if they do will rarely. break the skin. Once they hav.e been picked up, many will "hold you. Even a ,snake that has just tried to bite will settle down if you let it IIhold you. Always give full support to the body. Remember that some species are great bluffers. What may seem to be aggressive behavior may be only an act. ll

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Handling a large qggressive snake free hand may be as simple as feinting with one hand and making a quick grab with the'other. A , firm grip behind the head and support of the body complete the job. Another technique is to grasp the snake by the tail, and sling the head between your legs. The body is then slowly pulled out until a safe grip can be secured. This is not recommended if you are wearing shorts! ,The handling job is made much easier with the aid of a tool of some sort. The best all around tool is a hook. These are available commercially or can be home made. A noose pole may also be a useful tool. Tongs should never be used! They present too great a risk to the snake! A properly used hook is safe for both the handler and the handled. It may be used to control the' head while the tail is grasped with the other hand, or merely to pick the snake up. This is done by sliding the h60k under the snake at mid body, and lifting it. It may take a few tries before the snake clings to the hook. Once it does, it may be eas~ly and gently moved. A hook may also be used to pin the head down to secure a safe grip. This should be done only if absolutely necessary, and if done at all should be done gentlYe Once the head is pinned down a safe grip may be secured behind the head. Again, a safe firm grip and a death grip are not the same. Moving on to venomous species a good rule of thumb is this: unless jou feel comfortable with non venomous species, leave the venomous ones alone! The lift and pin techniques described above are also used for these animals. Another technique that has recently come into broad use is that of tubing. The snake is steered into the open end of a clear piece of plastic tubing with the aid of a hook. Once partly inside, the snake is grasped along with the tube. One end of the tube may be closed, or may have slits cut into it. This is useful if eyecaps need to be removed. This is also an effective way to give injections. While it may take a while to maneuver the snake into the tube, any time lost will be offset by the total lack of trauma to both the snake and the handler. Squeeze boxes may also be used to control venomous species. In closing, always remember that the animal to be handled and the handler should be afforded the same courtesy. If you don't feel comfortable, neither will the animal. For further information and illustrations, see Conant (1975) and Fowler (1978). References: Conant, Roger. 1975. A Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America. Fowler, Murray E. 1978. Restraint and Handling of Wild andDomestic Animals.

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CAll FOR PAPERS All herpetologists are invited to submit for consideration the titles of papers they wish to present at the 6th Reptile Symposium on Husbandry and Propagation. Paper lengths may range from 15 to 40 minutes. A preliminary' program will be established by.~pr~l! 1982. Speakers will be expect~d to submit a 100-150 word,abstract of their talk by April 30, 1982; a completed copy-ready manuscript must be submitted prior to the Symposium. Submit all . prog'ram information to: Thomas A~ Huff, Program Chai rperson ~Repti 1e Breeding Foundation, PO Box 1450, Picton, Ontario KOK 2TO Canada; 613/476-3351, 476-3691. Symposium Coordinator is: Dr. Martin J. Rosenberg, Department of B;ology~CaseWestern Reserv"'e uni'~ersity, Cleveland, OH 44106; 216/3682755, 368-~558, 45'1-1081. Has t Camm; ttee Chairperson is: Bel a Demeta r, . Department of Herpetology, the National Zoological Park, Washington, D.C. 20008; 202/357-1300. Symposium Series Director is: Richard A. Hahn, Zoolo~ical ConsortiuM, Inc.) 13019 Catoctin Furnace Rd., Thurmont, MD 21788; 301 /662'4f.f28.

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Center for Environmental Education Inc. 624 9TH STREET, N.W. WASHINGTON, D.C. 20001

The

Sie's,turtte'Resdue' Fu~dis,;tfie ~

',';;'~lpr91ecf Qf the Center ',,J6{ . ;1 ,'n1eO'la1 Ed~'c'ati.on. The '" "•. :;~,~',~,. e~~a.r)Q.i,n~,' Marine Con-

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,:;;$~rvatron Pro~rarn,ln9Iupes effo,ts in ~ehalf, of tO~lLgreat whales (The

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Fund) and the , (S~~I;;Rescye Fund)~ , ,~ Center ·is a nonprofit, educa/];':al otganiizaUon and all contri:,O,ijllons arefulfy 'tax;.deductible~ ancial report is available on re~ OUE~st>from the Center. New York re,sidents may also obtain a ",-'...:....... th~bugh the Depa,rtment of ":t;uue.Office of Charities RegistraJP f y Qr~\11~2~,1,,~ I,

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ORDER FORMS

Reptile Symposium Prooeedings, Volume 1, 1919, 55 pages Reptile Symposium Proeeedings, Volume 2, 1919, 134 pages Reptile Sympo'sium Prooeedings t Volume 3, 1980, 111 pages Reptile Symposium Prooeedings, Volume 4, 1981, in print Reptile Symposium Prooeedings, Volume 5, 1981, in print Breeding Snakes in Captivity by Riohes, 90 pages, 23 color plates, 13 black and white plates Poisonous Snakes of U.S.A. Identifioation Chart, Snakebite treatment, 25" X 31", 22 full oolor plates The Python Breeding Manual by Ross, 51 pages European Herpetological Symposium, 1980, edit~d by Coburn Handling and Postage add $2.00 (Overseas oustomers double (2X) the regular rate. Over 1 item, add $l.OO/item Send Money Order or Certified Check for fastestrespohs9s to Zoological Consortium Ino., 13019 Catootin Furnace Road, 301-271-1488 ~ Thurmont, Maryland 21188

Name Address City.·

.State

Zip

Cod~

$ 7.50 $15.00 $18.00 $20.00 $22.50 $ 6.00 $ 5.00 $13.00 $171150 ',).

Total: "\I


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PLEASE POST IN HERPETOLOGY DEPARTMENT HOME 206 1525路2'13:2 W~~~

REPTILE DEPARTMENT WOODLAND PARK ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS

(206) 625-5403 L. SLAVfNS P. O. Box 30744

i=RANK

SEATTLE,

WA. 98103

December 17, 1981

INFORMATION REQUEST: Dear Colleagues: The 198~ Inventory of Live Reptiles' and Amphibians in North American Collections is in the final planning stages. If you maintain a collection of live reptiles and/or amphibians please respond with the fo~lowing information current as of January 1, 1982:

(1)

A complete inventory of your herpetological collection. Include numbers of male/female/unknown sex for each species.

(2)

A complete list of all species which were bred in your collection during 1981.

(3)

A complete list of all species which have bred in your collection over the years which you feel to be significant. 'Put emphasis on i.irst breedings in captivity and rare or difficul tto-breed species. If this information was listed in an earlier inventory it need not be listed again.

If your new inventory will not be completed and in by March 1st please update last year's inventory with pencil and mail it as soon as possible. Information cannot be included after the final deadline of March 1, 1982. ======~============================================~========~========

1981 Inventory is still .vailable: i

The 1981 Inventory contains approximately 200 pages of infor'mation compiled from 160 (70 public and. 90 private) reptile and amphibian collections. It is a~ailable in paper cover $ 15.50 (includes $ .50 handling) or hardcover $ 22.50 (includes $ 1.00 handling). Order from: Frank L. Slavens

P.O.Box 30744

Seattle, Washington 98103

'PLEASE SHOW THIS NOTICE TO ALL PERSONS KEEPING LIVE REPTILES AND AMPHIBIANS IN CAPTIVITY

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CLASSIFIEDS

,Educational Programs Exhibits

Lectures 1833 Hampshire Ave. So. Sf. Louis Park, MN 55426 Phone: (612) 544路6406

\ JUST IMAGIN!! -

"1.1. 00 TMIIt RII!ST

LARGEST SELECTION OF REPTIl.ES IN MINNESOTA

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AND A FULl.. l.INE OF PET SUPPl.IES FOR ALl. ANIM.t\LS

TWIN CITIES REPTILES PET SHOP

DIS1GNING II CREATING JIliN!! JIlWIlI.RY

CAI.I. FOR ApPOINTMENT 10 A.M. TO ,7 P.M. MON. - FRI 10:00 - 0:00

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SUN 12'00路 5:00 ~"'.-.-~-'--"'-'''''':!:''

ont AIIII!NUI!

NORT"

HO"'''INS. MINNesoTA 515343 '6121938-0680

SAT. 10:00 - 6:00

GARY BAECHER

'. --MINNESOTA

~ERPETOLOGICA~

SOCIETY DIRECTORY

OFFICERS Delv1n Jones

President

938-8555

Terry Odogaard

Vice-President

544-6406

Connie

Secretary-Treasurer

938-1679

Jim Gerh'oldt

Newsletter Editor

507-652-2996

John Dee

Member-at-Large

699路8859

Bruce Oelles

Member-It-Large

938-1679

Kul Hermann

~ember.4t-large

225-6794

Oelle~

MINNESOTA HERPETOLOGICAL SOCIETY DELICATESSEN REMEMBER-After each meeting we will have available our featured take-out items. FRESH FROZEN MICE-$3.00 per dozen FRESH FROZEN RATS-JUMBO SIZE-$1.50

NEWSLETTER DEADLINE The deadline for submitting ads, etc., is the 15th of the month. Please send to me: Jim Gerholdt P.O. Box 86 Webster, MN 55088

Remember, if you want rats or mice, they are available by reservation only. Please let Bruce or Connie know your needs.

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NOTES Breedings from January AAZPA Newsletter Los Angeles Zoo 1 Leopard Tortoise Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum 4 Arizona Chuckwalla 2 San Esteban Chuckwalla 4 Sonora Whipsnake 19 Sonoran Gopher Snake 2 Desert Tortoise Jacksonville Zoo 5 Cuban Boa

Lafayette Zoological Park 7 Black Rat Snake 10 Rough Green 2 Haitian Curly-Tailed Lizard Gladys Porter Zoo (Brownsville) 2 Tokay Gecko 1 Rhinoceros Iguana Memphis Zoo and Aquarium 3 Gold Dust Gecko 1 Giant Day Gecko

Metrozoo (Miami) 17 Siamese Crocodile 2 Cuban Boa

The Minnesota Herpetolqgical Society is newly formed and looking for new members. As a member you.will receive monthly informative newsletters and can attend monthly meetings which are highlighted with guest speakers covering a broad scope of subjects important to all herpers. So if you'd like to exchange information and ideas with others who share your interest, please send $5.00 annual membership to: Minnesota Herpetological Society Bell Museum of Natural History 10 Church Street S.E. Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455-0104

Name________________.......;Any Specific Interest in Herpetology? Address

--------------------------

Home Phone No.

--------------------

Make all checks payable to: Minnesota Herpetological Society


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MINNESOTA HERPETOLOGICAL SOCIETY BELL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 10 CHURCH STREET MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 55455-0104

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Vol. 2 (1982), No. 1