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Also in this issue: p. 6 Cycling Club on the Rise p. 9 Modernize Your Workout p. 14 Mens Rowing

Issue No. 6

Fall 2009


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TABLE of

CONTENTS Issue No. 6, Fall 2009

2 3

Q&A

What is your favorite intramural sport?

Into the Wake

Water Skiing at ND by Kaitlynn Riely

6

Out and About

Cycling Club on the Rise by Lisa Bucior

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At the Rec

Myisha Eatmon: RecSports Professional Rescuer by Amber Travis

9

Page

14

At the Rec

Modernize your Workout by Kate Zinsmeister

10

Competing at ND

Rectors Show Pride in Their Halls’ Athletic Accomplishments

RecSports Mission Statement

Workin' It

To serve the Notre Dame community by enhancing the mind, body and spirit through recreational sports.

by Kate Donlin

12

Get Out of Your Fitness Rut by Amber Travis

14

Clubs

The Bow, the Stern, and the Hull by Michelle Nguyen

Rec Magazine is published by RecSports twice a year at the beginning of each semester. Contributors to this issue: Dave Brown, Alyssa Corcoran, Kate Donlin, Neeta Kamat, Christopher Wilson, and Madelyn Zollo. Sally Derengoski: Director of RecSports Design: AgencyND

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Word Search

Principal Photography: Matt Cashore


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Q&A

TEAMRECSPORTS

What is your favorite intramural sport and why? Basketball, because it’s a sport I play, and you have an opportunity to play in the Joyce Center if you advance far enough in finals.

Kevin Fobi ’10

I like soccer. The “sisterly” bond is awesome, and it’s a good way to meet lots of new friends.

Holly Napleton ’12

I’m on the cross country team and ran cross country in high school. It’s a good way to blow off steam, and the competition is low key.

RecSports Staff Listed Left to Right

Sheila Keefe ’12

Front Row: Brooke Derouin, Bill Drew, Jennie Phillips, Derek Neill, Sarah Ryckman

Soccer. I’ve played forever and tried out for the varsity team. I’m glad I can continue to play on the intramural team.

Second Row: Sally Derengoski, Cathy Brown, Tim Novak, Lana Wright, Erik Pedersen Back Row: Dave Brown, Shellie Dodd-Bell, Kerry Kemp, Matt Lewandowski, Sean O'Leary, Mark Benishek, Jeff Walker

Jesse Hernandez ’11 Soccer has always been my sport. I played in high school and could have played for a Division 2 team but came here instead. There are great athletes on the intramural teams.

Conner Cox ’10

Saturday September 26

WORDSEARCHANSWERS KEY: pg. 16) (from

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Shayler Pierson ’12

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intothewake

Water Skiing @ (yes, water skiing) By Kaitlynn Riely

Notre Dame senior Adam Carlson cannot remember a time in his life when he didn’t know how to water ski. His parents, both avid water skiers, helped Carlson “ski” for the first time when he was two years old, carrying him on a platform board behind their boat. He’s been skiing ever since.


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intothewake

Carlson knew coming to Notre Dame that the school lake to await the start of the tournament Saturday had no water skiing team. So he decided to start one morning. The new Notre Dame Water Ski Club held its himself. But first, he had to find other people who first practice the Friday night before the tournament liked water skiing. He turned to the internet and, at 10:00 p.m. “kind of creeper-style,” Carlson said, he searched “It was an awesome experience, terrible ski,” for people who listed water skiing as an interest Feutz said. on Facebook. That’s how he found Steve Feutz. Feutz, who graduated in spring 2009, also started waterskiing early in life, at age six. At Notre Dame, he competed on the snow ski club. Carlson and Feutz started talking about forming a water ski team with Carlson drafting a constitution and budget for the club and Feutz reading over the documents.

Early the next morning, hours before the football team suited up for the first home game against San Diego State, Carlson and his four teammates were putting on their bathing suits.

“We set a lot of school

The Ball State Fling marked the first time any of the teammates had competed in a water ski tournament. With the short notice, they had no time to get uniforms, so they purchased some T-shirts at the bookstore and put them on over their life jackets. Another team let them borrow jump skis since the Notre Dame club didn’t have any to use.

records those first two

tournaments,” Carlson joked.

The two applied for club status to the Student Activities Office in October of 2007. By August of 2008, Notre Dame had an official water ski club. Once it was official, Carlson and Feutz had less than a month to prepare for their first tournament, the Ball State Fling in Van Wert, Ohio. They recruited three other water skiers and drove to Van Wert. They arrived at the lake at night, to see the whole course lit up, with boats running skiers back and forth. Other teams had set up camp in tents along the

“Water skiing is just such a different brand of sport,” Carlson said. “The normal rivalries that you see in basketball and football just fall away. You go there, and everybody’s friendly to everybody. You go there, and pretty much everybody’s your best friend.” The tournament started early in the morning, around 7:30 a.m., and the women’s team went first. Saint


5

Mary’s junior Margaret Burke, the captain of the women’s team, said other teams yelled out advice as she tried to wakeboard for the first time. Saint Mary’s sophomore Christina Kolling, the team’s secretary, completed her first-ever slalom course at the tournament. The five Notre Dame water skiers competed in slalom, trick, and jump. The slalom portion of the tournament involves going around six buoys on progressively shorter lines. In the trick portion, each skier gets 20 seconds to do as many tricks as possible, and in the jump, the skiers are pulled up a 5'2" ramp and have to land the jump while trying to cover a long distance. The first tournament, as well as the second one the following month, were learning experiences for the new teammates. “We set a lot of school records those first two tournaments,” Carlson joked. Since they only had five people at the first tournament, they couldn’t field a full squad, and placed 15th out of 16 teams. But at the next tournament, they were able to field a full squad of at least five men and five women, and placed 10th out of 18 teams. At their second tournament, they had the Notre Dame Marching Band there to cheer them on. Kind of. Feutz, who is a member of the band, brought his trumpet to cheer on his teammates.

“At one point we were on a big float dock, and while somebody was trick skiing, I was playing the jig and we had our whole team doing the jig on the dock,” Feutz said. The team had its first spring practice this year in early April. In water, that was 40 degrees, and with air temperatures that dropped from 50 degrees to 39 over the course of the three-hour practice, Carlson and his teammates skied on a lake near Carlson’s house in Michigan. The team is negotiating with the owner of a private lake near campus to see if they can hold practices there this year. Skiing on either of Notre Dame’s lakes is not an option, Carlson said. “That was one of the first things they told me, when we were starting out, that there’s no way you can ski on St. Mary’s or St. Joe’s Lake,” he said. This year, the team said, they want to get more people to join and build the excitement surrounding the Notre Dame water ski club and, possibly, go to regional championships. The team has grown quickly in just one academic year and now has about 25 members. Carlson said the water ski tournaments are some of the most fun times he has had in college. He encourages Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s students to join the team, no matter what their water ski skill level.

For more information about the water ski club, send an email to acarlso2@nd.edu or visit the club’s website at nd.edu/~waterski.


6

outandabout

Cycling Club on the

Rise By Lisa Bucior ’10

Four years ago, the Notre Dame Cycling Club looked to be on its last legs, with only four dedicated riders. Yet thanks to a determined group of students, the sport is now making a comeback on campus. The Cycling Club is part of the Midwest Collegiate Cycling Conference (MWCCC) and competes in an average of eight race weekends a year. While it had a large following during the 1990s, team membership began to dwindle after 2000. When Meghan Johnson, 2008–09 club president, and Timothy Campbell, former club president and “Web dude” for the club, joined their freshman year, there were only 10 registered members, four of whom would ride every day. Senior Jennifer Perricone says the team was more focused on cycling well instead of recruiting. “They were all really good cyclists and just liked riding. They would just fill out paperwork and go out and ride,” she says. The main goal of the current leadership, however, is to raise membership and overall interest in the Cycling Club. “Lots of people don’t even know we have a cycling team,” Johnson says. “It’s good to get the word out and let people know we’re here.”


7

Cycling Club Advisor The club has promoted itself mostly through word of mouth, a tactic that has proven effective: It now has 23 regular riders and almost 40 registered members. “Answering all those questions gets clubs far,” Campbell says. “Returning emails is the single best thing we’ve ever done.” The increase in interest allowed the team to host Notre Dame’s first road race in the spring. At least 30 different schools from the MWCCC participated, and the event drew an estimated 250 spectators.

yourself since none of the guys are going to wait up for a girl,” she says. Training and conditioning are a major part of cycling. Although the racing season takes place during the spring, the club organizes two-hour group rides six to seven days a week during the fall, Johnson says. They also arrange two weekly indoor training sessions to stay in top cycling form throughout the winter months.

“To be really good, you have to do it every single day,” Campbell says. “With skills sports like basket“It was something I’ve wanted to do since freshman year,” Campbell, ball, it’s okay to take a few days off. If you miss a day cycling, you are who organized the event, says. that much farther behind.” “Notre Dame never hosted a race, and I thought it would be good to The team members say the large get people on campus to check amount of time spent training it out.” has led to a unique team dynamic. “You get to know people while Despite the Cycling Club’s overall training because you’re spending growth, the team still has trouble so much time together,” Johnson recruiting women to the sport. says. “Rides take around two Johnson was the only female hours, and there is no better way cyclist when she joined in 2005. to share conversation than on the The group now has six women registered, four of whom compete open road.” regularly. The club has also developed a unique subculture, complete with The Notre Dame team’s problem its own behavior code and cycling is not unique. Perricone says only humor. “People are fascinated by about 50 women compete in races each weekend, compared to the amount of spandex involved, and they think it’s kind of weird between 150 and 200 men. She that the men shave their legs,” credits the low number of women Johnson says. “But I really don’t cyclists mostly to the mistaken belief that cycling is a “men’s sport.” find any of it odd.” “Outside of the Olympics, there really aren’t that many big women’s races,” Perricone says. “And even then, they aren’t really covered.” “It’s frustrating [having so few women riders] because there is no one to train with. If none of the other women come out to ride that day, you end up riding by

Says Campbell, “There are lots of ins and outs. You must play by the rules to be accepted into cycling culture. But, it’s also fun to step back and make fun of it.”

Dan Skendzel Dan Skendzel currently is in the rotational program working in Human Resources.

What first drew you to the Cycling Club? I enjoy cycling and have been a cyclist since my early teenage years, going out for rides with my dad on Old Mission Peninsula in Grand Traverse County, Mich. I enjoy competing in triathlons now as well. In 2005, Amy Geist from Student Activities notified me that the club was looking for an advisor and asked if I’d be interested, so I agreed.

What do you get out of being an advisor to the club? Being an advisor gives me a connection to the students in the club, and they are so passionate about cycling. My role at ND doesn’t offer regular direct interpersonal interaction with students, so this is a great way to get connected. The energy and enthusiasm of the cycling club officers and members is really infectious. That gives me a boost.

How do you fit in cycling with all of the other demands on your time (work, family, social life, etc.)? Truth be told, cycling and triathlons have taken a backseat the past two years. With three kids aged 4 and under and a busy work life, I’m relegated to an everyother-weekend warrior! But there’s nothing better for the body and soul than to hit an open country road for a couple-hour ride. In addition to the physical benefits, cycling clears your head and gives you an appreciation for the beauty of the rural areas in Indiana and Michigan—so in that regard, there is a real spiritual component to riding. I know it will continue to be an important part of my life.

Any suggestions for students who would like to get involved? Interested students can get more information from the club website (nd.edu/~bike/) or by contacting the club officers at bike@nd.edu. Even if a student isn’t completely sure, I encourage them to contact the club and go out for a ride. There are all levels of experience in the club, so it’s not one-size-fits-all, and you don’t have to be in Tour de France shape, or even know what the Tour de France is!


8

attherec meet myisha eatmon:

RecSports

Profession al By Amber Travis ’09

Rescuer If you were to make a list of the most interesting campus jobs, Myisha Eatmon's job would be at the top of the list. Along with fulfilling the usual roles of most people her age—such as student, friend, and teammate— Eatmon also has a completely unique role as a RecSports Professional Rescuer (RPR).

No workday is ever the same for an RPR. Eatmon’s duties consist of anything from putting ice on a swollen ankle to addressing a possible concussion.

No workday is ever the same for an RPR. Eatmon’s duties consist of anything from putting ice on a swollen ankle to addressing a possible concussion. The former athlete said one of the best parts about her job is being around sports again, but the idea of having extra money certainly did not discourage her from applying for the new program, which began during the 2008–09 school year. “I was broke, so I had to get a job,” Eatmon says. “It's way more than minimum wage, but it's moderate on the university scale for student workers.” Eatmon, a political science and history major from North Carolina, said she first became certified by Red Cross in high school when she used to babysit infant twins. Of course, she admits that some of the medical assistance she and her coworkers provide now is drastically different from what she did as a babysitter. Eatmon says she has encountered everything from swollen ankles to dislocated shoulders and concussions. “We see what we can do before we call NDSP,” she says. “If it's something minor like icing a wound, we take care of it.”

There is no such thing as a steady work schedule for an RPR. Eatmon said at one point a typical work week had gotten down to one day, but during the Bengal Bouts her hours picked up significantly. The popular boxing sporting event is also the scariest time for an RPR. She particularly remembers the most recent Bengal Bouts when one of the athletes dislocated his shoulder. “He was in so much pain that he couldn't even move,” she said.

Jennie Phillips, assistant director of RecSports fitness and fitness facilities, says active leadership qualities like Eatmon’s are just what she was looking for when they first began the Professional Rescuer Program last school year. Phillips also says each of the six RPRs had to be Red Cross certified. This is because the RPRs were intended to take the place of emergency medical technicians to provide medical assistance at various intramural events. There were 12 applicants for the initial RPR positions but only six, including Eatmon, were hired after an extensive interviewing process. “In a medical situation, the main thing you do is serve people, so serving people has to be your top priority,” Phillips says. “We also looked for people who show initiative and can remain calm in a scary situation.”


9

Modernize your workout

By Kate Zinsmeister

Those days when the thought of jumping on a treadmill keeps you away from the gym—or the days when your regular routine just isn’t making you sweat like you want to—provide a perfect opportunity to test out some of the modern fitness gear that is available at the Rolfs Sports Recreation Center. This innovative equipment (for example, BOSU balls, balance pods, kettle bells, and medicine balls) adds a new dimension to a workout, said Jennie Phillips, assistant director, RecSports fitness and fitness facilities. “In exercise, you always want to be changing things up,” she said. “When you do the same thing over and over again, your body adapts. If you want more of a challenge, if you want to see improvement, you’re going to want to use different tools.”

RecSports to set up an orientation on this equipment. In the Cardio Express class, for example, participants may do traditional step exercises one day and use the BOSU the next, said Phillips. Also, the Yoga and Pilates classes, in which over 850 participants were enrolled from May 2008 to April 2009, make use of modern fitness gear. Phillips explained that in yoga classes, straps and blocks are often used to gradually increase flexibility. In pilates, rings that can be stretched around the feet or arms provide extra resistance. The benefits of this new fitness gear are many; but, the main benefit is that using the different items adds a new dimension to a standard workout and provides a fresh challenge. Doing crunches on a BOSU ball, versus doing crunches on a mat, forces your body to use muscles not typically used since the stable surface of the ground has been eliminated. Whereas more traditional machines and equipment might camouflage weaknesses, or allow one side of the body to compensate for the other, this new gear highlights the person’s strengths and weaknesses.

The BOSU ball, which stands for “Both Sides Up,” is perhaps one of the most popular and versatile of all of the modern fitness gear because it integrates core, functional, and balance training. Shaped like a half sphere, it rests flat on the ground and acts as an unstable surface on which to do stepping, lunges, squats, crunches, and other exercises. The underlying premise with this new gear, Phillips calls this kind of working out and particularly the BOSU, is instability, said “functional fitness.” The equipment allows you Phillips. “When you’re providing an unstable to mimic the motions you use in the activities environment, your body has to work harder. of daily living. “When you’re on a machine, the You’re using muscle groups that you typically motion is defined," she said. wouldn’t use,” she said. The bottom line for you? This new fitness RecSports has implemented this gear into gear allows you to work in different planes daily fitness classes, and many students and at different angles, resulting in a more are able to learn how the equipment works challenging, fulfilling, and modernized by taking these classes. You can also call workout experience.

Using different items adds a new dimension to a standard workout and provides a fresh challenge.


10

competingatnd

rectors show pride in their halls' athletic accomplishments

by kate donlin ’10

“Intramural sports really bring out the best in a Notre Dame student,” says Siegfried rector Father John Conley. With seven championships and counting this year, and a reputation for excellent sportsmanship, the men of Siegfried Hall have proved Father John’s statement to be true. Most students who have participated in interhall athletics have spotted their rector cheering them on from the sidelines, but few athletes recognize the extent of the pride and respect their rectors have for their efforts. And there are no better examples of this than Father John and Sister Mary Lynch from McGlinn.

As Sister Mary proudly showed off the trophy case in McGlinn’s entry lobby filled with photos, trophies, and patches purchased for the football and basketball participants, it is clear that no rector could genuinely be more proud of their hall’s enthusiasm and success. And while Sister Mary says she cannot always get to as many games as she would like, she does not minimize the importance of showing her support for the Shamrocks in interhall athletics. As she sees it, being present at the hall’s athletic competition really shows a common thread of pride and spirit among residents and the hall staff.

In her fourth year as McGlinn’s rector, Sister Mary has never seen such spirit and enthusiasm from the Shamrocks as she did the last two semesters. And for good reason—over the course of the 2008–09 school year the girls from West Quad dominated the competition in interhall sports, taking home championships in flag football, dodgeball, and bowling, as well as being runners-up in the basketball championship.

Father Conley agrees that it is very important to be visible at intramural events, and he makes a point to make it to at least one game for all sports, both var-

Sister Mary’s favorite memory in McGlinn’s athletic history was their come-from-behind victory in this year's women’s flag football championship game, played in Notre Dame Stadium. “It was so exciting to see the McGlinn flag out on the field and all the girls so excited and so proud of their big win,” Sister Mary remembers. “After that game, I had to buy a trophy case,” she continues. “The girls got McGlinn’s name on the championship trophy for the first time ever and started a strong athletic tradition for the hall.”


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sity and intramural, in which a Rambler competes. “I am their number one fan, sometimes—their only fan,” Father John jokes. But in all sincerity, by attending athletic competitions, Father John is able to see some of the greatest strengths of the men of his hall. “Our guys are happy and proud of their successes, but they are not braggarts. They are humble and modest in everything they do.” In a year that boasted many championship firsts—such as hockey and lacrosse— stellar participation, and a feature article on ESPN. com, Father John could not be more impressed by his residents’ capacity to maintain their spirit of humility and continue to represent the hall as fair, spirited competitors.

Intramural sports not only offer students an outlet for their competitive spirit and a chance to try new activities, but they also provide a unique opportunity to bring together all members of a hall. Students bond with their teammates of all years, majors, and social circles in order to work toward their common goal of victory. Perhaps more powerful is the possibility for rectors to see their residents outside the halls, discovering each player’s unknown talent and drive in full force, and to demonstrate their genuine pride and respect for the work the athletes put forth as they represent their hall.


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workin' It

fitness rut

get out of your

tr y a new group fitness class By Amber Travis

Shellie Dodd-Bell knew something needed to change. Dodd-Bell, the fitness coordinator at RecSports, says people have always enjoyed the group fitness courses, but offering the “usual” classes just didn’t seem to be enough anymore. “People are always looking for the newest and hottest thing,” Dodd-Bell says. In an attempt to keep group fitness fun and exciting, RecSports now offers more unique classes than ever before. Despite the fact that many of the traditional group fitness classes, such as Yoga and Pilates, remain popular favorites, there are new classes that are beginning to gain attention. These classes range from Cardio Sculpt and Cardio Circuit to a variety of dance-based classes such as Hip Hop Fusion and Zumba, a Latin dance-andstep class. One of the more popular classes Dodd-Bell hears the most about is Cardio Funk. Graduate student Suzanne Orr says one of her favorite things about the class is learning new dance routines each week while getting a great workout all at the same time. “I have taken regular instructional dance courses, but this one is much more aerobic and active,” she says.


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Another class that is particularly popular with students is the high-energy cycling class. Senior and instructor of the class Kate Donlin says students are a bit uneasy about the cycling class and its intensity at first, but they eventually grow to love it. “Most people who end up cycling have never done it before, but by the end, everyone has it down,” Donlin says. Just ask Erin Kelly. The senior says the thing that makes the class great is the required high levels of energy and the friendly instructors. “Before taking this course, I’d never really done cycling before, but it’s great cross-training,” Kelly says. Students like Kelly also love the indoor cycling studio at the Rock. The facility consists of 20 bikes, and there are always at least 10 to 15 students who attend each class session. Dodd-Bell says that so many people choose to take group fitness classes like cycling because of the social aspect. “I find that I’m much more motivated to work out hard and exercise longer if I have someone else doing it with me,” she says. “It gives me a little more motivation when I look next to me and see that I’m not in this by myself.” For individuals who would like to take their group fitness a step further, Dodd-Bell says RecSports began offering Group Fitness and Personal Training Instructor courses last school year. These classes are designed to teach the students how to create a safe, effective fitness class and motivate others to reach their fitness goals. “It takes a little bit of talent to get people to learn how to do the exercises without hurting themselves,” Dodd-Bell says. Although many people would love to be a part of many of these classes, there is only so much space. Dodd-Bell says the number of individuals who are allowed to participate in each class depends on the room capacity, but the maximum amount for any room is 40 people. “We could probably fit more than that in a room, but we want participants to be able to move and not kick their neighbor,” she says. RecSports group fitness classes are offered to the entire Notre Dame community, which includes current students, faculty and staff, and their spouses. Those interested are able to sign up by using RecRegister online.

Alyssa Corcoran


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clubs

T he B ow, T he S tern , and T he H ull By Michelle Nguyen

Whether you’re the coxswain riding shotgun, a sweep rower in the gimp seat, a novice, or a sculler, it makes no difference, so long as you’re cutting through the water and crossing the finish line not as one of nine rowers, but as one team. Crew—the sport of rowing, is becoming increasingly popular in the world of water sports, as well as here at Notre Dame. As the oldest collegiate sport in the United States, “it is the ultimate team sport” says 2008–09 Rowing Club President Tom Mazzacavallo. Consisting of a shell, or boat, with eight rowers and one coxswain (the oar-less crew member responsible for steering and race strategy), rowing is a demanding sport that requires all nine people working together in perfect unison.


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The Notre Dame Men’s Rowing Club stands as the University’s second-oldest club sport, experiencing rich tradition and excellence both in and out of the water. (ed. note: Notre Dame has a varsity women’s rowing team.) In a 55-plus-footlong boat, less than two feet wide, rowers work together, in sync both mentally and physically, pushing with sheer force and strength along with great endurance and balance to achieve their goal. In the sport of rowing, no one team member is more important than another. Success requires precise timing and effort; if one rower misses a stroke, the results can be catastrophic. With its growing popularity, rowing incorporates the same team values as any group sport—teamwork and communication, but also those of individual sports—such as self-confidence and determination. By combining the values inherent in team and individual sports, rowing has become a sport where team camaraderie forms a fraternity of teammates on and off the water. As a senior, Mazzacavallo spent the last four years committed to rowing not only as a sport, but also as a lifestyle. “Although the team evolved greatly over my four years here, one thing that didn’t change was the friendships formed on the team. My best friends were the guys in my novice boat freshman year, and that is the same for every member of the team.”

Practices vary from long, steady states on sunny spring afternoon days without the need of direction from the coxswain, to other days when icy blasts of 45 mph winds create a 15-degree windchill. “Those days are not fun” says Mazzacavallo, “but for the most part, it’s about making sure that your hands are in the right place, your legs are coming down hard, and that you’re keeping your boat set while trying to beat the boat next to you.” In the wintertime, when the windchill can be dangerous, the rowers practice indoors a few times a week on the indoor rowing machines called “ergs.” Branching out beyond the walls of Notre Dame, the rowing club has joined a brotherhood of rowers who began with a similar interest and whose friendships are now sustained through a collective passion. Rowers in the Rowing Club continue to keep in touch with alumni crew members, bridging the gap between former, current, and future members with friendships, memories of championships, and time out on the water.


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Answer Key on page 2

rich o'leary1946 –2009 Director, Intramurals and Club Sports Office of Recreational Sports University of Notre Dame The Office of Recreational Sports lost a beloved member of its team on July 17, 2009, when Rich O’Leary, director of intramurals and club sports, passed away at the age of 62, after a long and courageous battle with cancer. Rich’s contributions to the University’s RecSports program were extensive, and spanned the course of a 37-year career in athletic administration at Notre Dame.

His oversight of the club sports program included growing the historic Bengal Bouts boxing club into a model program for collegiate boxing. In the early 1970s he played a significant role in the development of women’s club teams as women undergraduate students were enrolled at Notre Dame for the first time. Over the years, Rich developed the leadership skills of hundreds of club officers — skills that would serve them the rest of their lives.

Under Rich’s direction, intramurals grew to offer more than 60 programs, including unique offerings such as lacrosse, men’s tackle football and ice hockey. On two occasions Sports Illustrated named Notre Dame’s intramural program best in the nation and, in the most recent Princeton Review, Notre Dame’s intramurals were listed #1 in the category “Everyone Plays Intramural Sports”. Rich will be remembered for his kindness and quick wit, and for

the positive impact he had on the lives of generations of Notre Dame students. His willingness to help out anyone, at any time, anywhere, will leave a lasting legacy of service at RecSports.


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RecSports Magazine Fall 2009