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CITY LIFE & FINE LIVING

RIVERSIDE m ag a z i n e

Sunrise on Mount Rubidoux

o c to b e r – n ov e m b e r 2 013

| 08/12

Gabriel Luis Acosta

| 1967-2013


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FOX Performing Arts Center

Riverside, California

UPCOMING SHOWS IN THE FALL SEASON and the STEEP CANYON RANGERS featuring

Broadway Series The Award Winning International Percussion Sensation

Hot Beats Great Melodies Cool Rhythms

The World’s Best Mariachi

Sheila E. Jessy J

Video Taping for Future Broadcast on PBS “Great Performances” Series

October 11

Special Guest

October 12–13

Los Lobos

Special Guests: Sinfonia Mexicana Mariachi Youth Academy

LAKIN

October 18

Robert Cray

October 26 BEFORE THE BEATLES, BEFORE THE STONES

ON LIVE GE! STA

ONE KID WAS MAKING HISTORY

Comedy Sensation

ANJELAH JOHNSON First Show Sold Out Second Show Added

November 1 ELVIS

PRESLEY

Rod Piazza and The Mighty Flyers

November 7

November 22 THE BROADWAY MUSICAL INSPIRED BY

THE ELECTRIFYING TRUE STORY

November 8–9

La Sierra University

JOHNNY PERKINS CASH LEWIS CARL JERRY LEE

HOLIDAY SPECIAL

Sounds of the Season

November 23

December 7

December 8

The Righteous Brothers’

BILL MEDLEY

December 12

December 20

You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’ Soul & Inspiration Unchained Melody Time of My Life

Special Guest

Darlene Love

December 28

He’s a Rebel Da Doo Ron Ron He’s a Fine Boy Christmas (Baby Please Come Home)

Fox Performing Arts Center, 3801 Mission Inn Avenue, Riverside Tickets available at Fox Box Office (951) 779 9800 and Ticketmaster. For full show information, visit foxriversidelive.com.


contents

RIVERSIDE M

o c to b e r - n ov e m b e r 2 013   •  VO L U ME 6 , I S S U E 5

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br o u ght t o y o u b y :

FEATURES

Ron Hasse

14 Small scale, real weight Think family owned or businesses with just a few employees don’t count? Way wrong — in fact small businesses make up 99 percent of the commerce that runs the Riverside business engine. Need some examples of the “typical” operations — we’ve got a few inside, but likely there’s one just around the corner in a neighborhood near you. 20 Old folios, true grit What’s it take to compete against the big boys? Ask an independent book retailer. With monster-sized Internet operations and big chain stores in the game, the local shop has to be better, different, personal and community oriented, at least if success is in today’s chapter. Downtowne Bookstore is just one of the Riverside stores finding the way. 24 Saxo-man J. Boykin moves easily from playing on the set of the TV teen-musical drama “Glee,” to stage performances at venues including The Box in Riverside and into the recording studio. His new CD, “Pink Sand,” is out, and he’s in.

PUBLISHER & CEO

Don Sproul MANAGING EDITOR

Jerry Rice EDITOR

Jim Maurer V.P. SALES & MARKETING

Lynda E. Bailey SALES DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR

Shawna Federoff RESEARCH DIRECTOR

Leslie and Allison Dale, co-owners of A to Z Printing

26 Tastes great, speakeasy ProAbition Whiskey Lounge & Kitchen recreates the dynamic atmosphere of a 1920s speakeasy with modern food plus employees, and sometimes clients, in period wear. At 9th Street Italian, Elephant Thai Cuisine and Mission Martini, families have brought their dreams to life through the recipes served up every night. All of these new dining spots are bringing new flavor downtown. 34 tribute A look back at Riverside Magazine covers shot by our photographer, Gabriel Luis Acosta.

DEPARTMENTS From the editor 6 Out & About 7 Calendar 10 Seen 29 Save the date 29

CONTR I B U T I N G W R I TER S & E D I TOR S

Amy Bentley, Luanne J. Hunt George A. Paul, Carla Sanders e di to r i a l g r a p h i c D E S I G N

Steve Ohnersorgen

Rick Sforza PHOTO EDITOR PHOTO G RAPHER S

Gabriel Luis Acosta, James Carbone Micah Escamilla, Jonathan Hinderliter Rachel Luna, Frank Perez

Melissa Six, Jack Storrusten SALES MANAGERS A DVERT I S I N G S A L E S E X EC U T I VE S

Minnie Cooper, Carla Ford-Brunner Jack Galloway, Andre McAdory, Millie Merriam Melissa Morse, Joseph Rodriguez, Adil Zaher S A L E S A S S I S TANTs

Flo Gomez, Dixie Mohrhauser Maria Rodriguez, Victoria Vidana g r a p h i c a rt is t/a d c o o r di n ato r

Rose Anderson marketing

Veronica Nair, Ginnie Stevens

LANG Custom Publishing Frank Pine EXECUTIVE EDITOR

C o n n e c t wi t h us !

Follow us on Twitter (@riversidemag) and Facebook (facebook.com/ riversidemagazine) to be among the first to know what we’re planning for future issues. Have a question or story suggestion? Tweet us! Thank you for your support.

Joe Robidoux V.P. OF CIRCULATION CONTACT US Editorial: 909-386-3015; fax 909-885-8741 or jerry.rice@inlandnewspapers.com Advertising: 909-386-3006; or lynda.bailey@icpg.biz. Riverside Magazine is produced by LANG Custom Publishing of The Sun and Inland Valley Daily Bulletin. Single copy price: $3.95. Subscriptions $14.95 per year. Postmaster: Send address changes to 2041 E. Fourth St., Ontario, CA 91764. Copyright ©2013 Riverside Magazine. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. Riverside Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos or artwork even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope.

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from the editor

Goodbye, Gabe. Goodbye, friend.

A

Nikon D700 camera, assorted lenses, a tripod, lights and battery packs — that was just some of the equipment that photographer Gabriel Luis Acosta would bring to an assignment. There also were other tools — his intuition and a sharp eye to frame that perfect image, among them — that he used to produce the beautiful portraits and spectacular photos that brightened the pages of Riverside Magazine. Of course, there was more to Gabe than his resume as an award-winning photojournalist for more than 20 years at The Sun newspaper in San Bernardino and for this publication. He was a dedicated family man, loving brother and son, caring friend and a faithful Christian. Actively involved with the youth ministry at The Grove Community Church, Gabe led a group of young

people to the Bay Area in June to serve the disabled, homeless and others in need. Missionary work also took him to Mexico, Brazil and Thailand. Closer to home, he mentored aspiring young photojournalists. Helping others and giving back to the community — that was his way. Gabe also was known for pursuing perfection in his photos because his dedication to the craft would allow nothing less. True to form, he was at work on two potential cover photos for this issue, including one subject that he had already shot but he thought with a second photo session he could come back with a better image. Instead, tragedy intervened. At age 46, Gabe died Sept. 14 in an accident at his Wood Streets neighborhood home. Actually, all of Riverside was his

home — which made him the perfect photographer for us. Gabe rode with then-Mayor Ron Loveridge for a tour of the Renaissance projects that were featured in our first issue in 2008, and captured a mariachi dancer in a colorful flowing dress for the August 2013 cover. In between, he traveled to all corners of the city taking pictures of the landmarks and people that make Riverside such a special place. Mount Rubidoux at sunrise. The Mission Inn at night. Artists, musicians and street performers. Families, Little League baseball players and kindergarteners. Thanks for everything, Gabe. We’ll miss you.

Jerry Rice jerry.rice@inlandnewspapers.com 909-386-3015 @JerryRice_IE

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6 | riversidethemag.com | october-november 2013

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out & about

wild and crazy

weekend

T

here’s so much going on in downtown Riverside during one weekend in October that it takes four days to fit it all in. Here are the highlights: Steve Martin and the Steep Canyon Rangers Thursday and Friday, Oct. 10-11 Early in his standup comedy career, Steve Mar tin was famous for his “Wild and Crazy Guy” routine, but he also plays a pretty mean banjo. Mar tin will be at the Fox Performing Ar ts Center with the Steep Canyon Rangers and Edie Brickell. The concer t will be recorded for the PBS series “Great Performances” for a later broadcast. Information: www.foxriversidelive.com

Photo courtesy Liz K Photo, lizkphoto.com

An electrifying demonstration during last year’s Long Night

Long Night of Arts & Innovation Thursday, Oct. 10 Building on last year’s success, the Long Night of Ar ts & Innovation returns with hundreds of ar t, science, music and other presentations at more than 20 locations in downtown Riverside. New this year is the Curious Kids Zone at the Riverside Auditorium & Events Center, where there will be lots of hands-on, par ticipatory activities geared toward families including puppet shows and a demo on building roller coasters. Information: www.longnightriverside.com

Steve Martin, Edie Brickell and the Steep Canyon Rangers

Mayor’s Celebration for Arts & Innovation

Citrus Classic Bike Ride

Saturday, Oct. 12 Riverside’s ar ts, technology, research and education will be showcased during the 35th annual Mayor’s Celebration for Ar ts & Innovation, which will take place in the city’s newest enter tainment venue — the Fox Enter tainment Plaza. Tickets are $75, and proceeds benefit the Riverside Ar ts Council and the Community Ar ts Par tnership program. Information: www.mayorscelebrationriverside.com

Sunday, Oct. 13 Cycling enthusiasts will be out spinning their wheels during the four th annual Riverside Citrus Classic Bike Ride. Distances range from 7 to 100 miles, and par ticipants will follow routes that will take them through Riverside’s scenic citrus belt. For riders and non-riders alike, there will be music, food, vendors and enter tainment to enjoy at Riverside Plaza, where all of the excursions star t and finish. Proceeds benefit the Riverside Educational Enrichment and Alvord Educational foundations. Information: www.rusdlink.org/citrusclassic october-november 2013 | riversidethemag.com | 7


3 questions with … Charles R. Humphrey III

C

harles R. Humphrey III is the upright bass player for the Steep Canyon Rangers. The bluegrass band was formed in the late 1990s, and this is the fourth year they’ve been touring with the comedian Steve Martin. “Nobody Knows You,” the band’s 2012 studio release, won a Grammy for best bluegrass album in February, and their newest CD, “Tell the Ones I Love,” climbed to the top of Billboard Magazine’s bluegrass charts immediately after its release in September. In advance of the band’s Oct. 10 and 11 shows at the Fox Performing Arts Center, Jerry Rice had three questions for Humphrey.

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| riversidethemag.com | october-november 2013

Question: What’s it like to win a Grammy? Answer: It’s a big honor. When we star ted our bluegrass band in college (at the University of Nor th Carolina in Chapel Hill), we never thought about winning a Grammy one day. It brings attention to your band from music fans outside of bluegrass, which is nice. You can sell a couple records, and raise your prices a little bit, maybe. You do get some unique musical oppor tunities because of it. Of course, working with Steve Mar tin has brought a lot of publicity and oppor tunities our way as well. I feel our band has always worked hard and kind of slowly ascended to where we are now. It was never a really big jump, and it has helped us get ready to handle the bigger stages and oppor tunities. Q: It must be a lot of fun to tour with Steve. A: He’s always working on new jokes and material for the stage and having us try it out — and

some of that stuff is pretty hilarious. But he’s not really a jokester. He’s real professional and serious. Comedy, like his music, is a craft. He can kind of turn it on and off when he wants to. He’s very professional and knows how to really work a room, a crowd. He’s very motivating, and we’ve learned a lot of things from his live shows that we’ve tried to incorporate into ours, such as timing, show flow and how to engage the audience. Q: What do you have planned for your Riverside performance? A: Our live shows are 80 to 90 percent original material, with a heavy focus on song-writing with bluegrass instrumentation. We pick the arrangements with the individual songs. We might have one song that sounds like something Earl Scruggs and Lester Flatt could have played in the 1950s then you might hear something totally different right next to it.


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october-november 2013 | riversidethemag.com | 9


calendar

TROLLEY DANCES RIVERSIDE OCT. 19  –  Site-specific choreography presented at various sites along Riverside Transit Authority’s Route 1 bus line. Downtown Riverside; 951-222-8669; www.trolleydancesriverside.com.

‘CONFESSIONS’ THROUGH OCT. 26  –  Exhibition reconsiders Garry Winogrand’s “Women are Beautiful” (1975), a set of 85 photographs culled from hundreds he shot of women in public places between 1964 and 1973. California Museum of Photography, 3824 Main St., Riverside; 951-827-4787; http://artsblock.ucr.edu. Also: “Flash: Jessica Eaton,” through Oct. 26; “Zoe Crosher,” through Nov. 9; “More American Photographs,” through Jan. 11; “Different Particles & Indeterminate States,” Oct. 10Nov. 23; “Flash: Joe Piston,” Nov. 9-Jan. 25. FILM SCREENINGS THROUGH NOV. 30  –  “Hannah Arendt,” Oct. 11-12; “Army of Darkness” and “Shaun of the Dead,” Oct. 18-19; “Blancanieves,” Oct. 25-26; “La Camioneta,” Nov. 1-2; “Stories We Tell,” Nov. 8-9; “J’Entends Plus la Guitare,” Nov. 15; “Grey Gardens,” Nov. 22; “The Attack,” Nov. 29-30. Culver Center of the Arts, 3834 Main St., Riverside; 951-827-3755; http://culvercenter.ucr.edu. MAYOR’S CELEBRATION FOR ARTS & INNOVATION OCT. 12  –  Music, exhibition, dance, performance along with cuisine prepared by some of Riverside’s best chefs. Benefit for arts programs, presented by the Riverside Arts Council. Fox Entertainment Plaza, 3635 Market St., Riverside; 6-10 p.m.; $75; 951-680-1345; www.riversidemayorsball.com. ‘STOMP’ OCT. 12-13  –  Award-winning show featuring percussion, movement and visual comedy. Fox Performing Arts Center, 3801 Mission Inn Ave., Riverside; 951-779-9800; www.foxriversidelive.com. Also: “Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story,” Nov. 8-9; “Million Dollar Quartet,” Nov. 22; “The Addams Family,” Dec. 12; “Man of La Mancha,” Jan. 13; “West Side Story,” March 9.

ZOMBIE CRAWL OCT. 19  –  Event features Halloween-themed activities and entertainment, including zombie face-painting and a screening of “Warm Bodies” at dusk. Pedestrian Mall, between Mission Inn and University avenues, Riverside; 3-9 p.m.; 951-781-7339; www.facebook.com/RiversideZombieCrawl. RIVERSIDE TRIATHLON OCT. 20  –  Second annual 5K run, 12-mile bike ride and 150-meter swim, featuring individual competitors and team relays, to benefit the Riverside Police Foundation’s efforts to promote youth programs and community outreach. 2060 University Ave., Riverside; 6 a.m. registration and packet pickup, 8 a.m. event start; www.riversidetriathlon.com. PHOTO BY DOUG McCULLOH

‘52’ OCT. 3-DEC. 31  –  Sue Mitchell, co-founder of Riverside Personnel, displays the works she created during a 52-week art sabbatical. Reception, 7-9 p.m. Oct. 18. Riverside Art Museum, 3425 Mission Inn Ave.; 951-684-7111; www.riversideartmuseum.org. Also: “Transcending Traditions: Dia de Los Muertos,” through Nov. 25; “The First of its Kind: The Riverside Auto Center, 1965,” Oct. 3-12; “About Hunger & Resilience: Photography by Michael Nye,” Oct. 6-Dec. 15. Season, Dec. 7; Masters of Harmony, Dec. 8; “Miracle on 34th Street,” Dec. 20; Bill Medley, Darlene Love, Dec. 28.

CITRUS CLASSIC BIKE RIDE OCT. 13  –  Rides of 100, 50 and 28 miles in addition to a 7-mile family ride and a kiddie ride. Free bike festival for everyone featuring music, food, vendors, beer garden and other activities. Proceeds benefit the Riverside Educational Enrichment and Alvord Educational foundations. Riverside Plaza, 3535 Riverside Plaza Drive; first ride begins at 7 a.m.; www.rusdlink.org/citrusclassic.

ANTIQUES APPRAISAL OCT. 19  –  Craig Roubinek, owner of Riverside Stamp and Coin, will appraise jewelry, coins and other collectibles during an event presented by Riverside Alumnae Panhellenic Association. Tickets are available from Panhellenic members and at Parkview Nursery and Riverside Stamp and Coin. Funds from Panhellenic events go to local philanthropies and scholarships for high school seniors and re-entry students. Evergreen Masonic Center, 5801 Chicago Ave., Riverside; 909-797-8776 or 951-742-5523.

MARIACHI VARGAS OCT. 18  –  Performing with the Sinfonia Mexicana Mariachi Youth Academy. Fox Performing Arts Center, 3801 Mission Inn Ave., Riverside; 951-779-9800; www.foxriversidelive.com. Also: Sheila E., Jessy J Lakin, Oct. 26; Anjelah Johnson, Nov. 1; Los Lobos, Robert Cray, Nov. 7; Abba Mania, Nov. 23; La Sierra University Sounds of the

TALES FROM THE VICTORIAN CRYPT OCT. 19  –  A tour of the historic Evergreen Cemetery (which dates to 1873) followed by an evening of recitations, hosted by author “Bram Stoker,” with seating in front of the Victorian Crypt. Evergreen Cemetery, 14th and Pine streets, Riverside; 6:30 p.m.; 951-781-3168; www.dickensfest.com.

10 | riversidethemag.com | october-november 2013

GHOST WALK OCT. 25-26  –  Original tales of ghosts and ghouls, featuring local high school drama groups and noted community speakers, and incorporating local landmarks. Five tour options set out from the Main Street Pedestrian Mall, including two family friendly excursions. Downtown Riverside; $15; 951-787-7850; www.crballet.com. FALL PLANT SALE OCT. 26-27  –  Nearly 10,000 plants and more than 500 varieties will be available for purchase. UC Riverside Botanic Gardens, 900 University Ave.; 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 26, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 27; 951-784-6962; www.gardens.ucr.edu. Also: Art in the Garden, Nov. 10. STAR PARTY OCT. 31-NOV. 3  –  Riverside Astronomical Society event at the Palm Canyon Resort in Borrego Springs. Open to non-members. 951-785-7452; www.rivastro.org. ‘SHREK THE MUSICAL’ NOV. 1-10  –  Stage production, based on the Oscar-winning animated movie, presented by Riverside Youth Theatre. The Box, Fox Entertainment Plaza, 3635 Market St., Riverside; 7:30 p.m.; 951-826-2427; www.riversideblackbox.com. ROBOT EXPO NOV. 2  –  Robot battles, with competitions featuring teams from several colleges, seminars and more. Woodcrest Library, 16625 Krameria Ave., Riverside; noon to 4 p.m.; free; www.meetup.com/the-riverside-robotics-society ARTS WALK NOV. 7  –  Browse more than 20 art galleries, studios and museums with exhibits in various mediums. Special performances, poetry,


RIVERSIDE COUNTY PHILHARMONIC NOV. 30  –  “Holiday Magic,” with selections from Bizet (“Farandole”), Handel (“Messiah” with the La Sierra University Chamber Singers) and Tchaikovsky (“Nutcracker: Waltz of the Flowers”). Also, the world premiere of David Fick’s “Symphony of Carols.” Fox Performing Arts Center, Riverside; 7:30 p.m.; 951-787-0251; www.thephilharmonic.org. Also: “Classical Titans,” Jan. 25.

theater, hands-on art activities, refreshments and more. Continues the first Thursday of every month. Downtown Riverside; 6-9 p.m.; 951-682-6737; www.riversidedowntown.org. ‘WILD PARTY’ NOV. 8-17  –  An assortment of people living on the edge arrive at a Manhattan apartment shared by a vaudeville dancer and vaudeville clown, as they get ready for one wild evening. For mature audiences. Landis Performing Arts Center, 4800 Magnolia Ave., Riverside; 951-222-8100; www.performanceriverside.org. Also: “Kinetic Conversations,” Dec. 5-7; “Spamalot,” Feb. 7-16. MISSION INN RUN NOV. 10  –  36th annual event featuring a half-marathon, 5 and 10K runs, 5K walk, and shorter events for kids. Weekend

music THE BARN THROUGH NOV. 13  –  Mad Caddies, Suede Head, Oct. 23; Elephant Revival, Oct. 30; John Brown’s Body, Stick Figure, Nov. 6; Chuck Inglish, Kings Dead, Nov. 13. 900 University Ave., Riverside; 951-827-4403; http://rside.ucr.edu/barnseries. CANYON CREST TOWNE CENTRE THROUGH OCT. 29  –  Jay and Gil, Oct. 8 and 22; Party of 2, Oct. 15; August Melody, Oct. 29. Canyon Crest Towne Centre, 5225 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside; 951-686-1222; www.cctownecentre.com.

includes a two-day Clark’s Nutrition health and fitness expo, Nov. 9-10. Downtown Riverside, between Mission Inn Avenue and Sixth Street; www.missioninnrun.com. VETERANS DAY NOV. 11  –  Annual ceremony begins in the amphitheater at 11 a.m. Riverside National Cemetery, 22495 Van Buren Blvd., Riverside; 951-653-8417; www.rncsc.org. ‘INTIMATE APPAREL’ NOV. 15-DEC. 1  –  Set in New York City in the early 1900s, a young African-American woman is a gifted seamstress who dreams of opening a beauty parlor in Harlem and finding a husband. Riverside Community Players Theater, 4026 14th St., Riverside; 951-686-4030; www.riversidecommunityplayers.com. Also: “A Shot in the Dark,” Jan. 24-Feb. 9; “Spider’s Web,” March 28-April 13. ‘A CASTLE CHRISTMAS’ DEC. 1  –  Open house and live Nativity production, with carolers, music, tours, food, beverages and the festive lighting of an historic landmark. Benedict Castle, 5445 Chicago Ave., Riverside; $5 per car; 6-8 p.m.; 951-683-4241. HISTORY LECTURE DEC. 1  –  “Frank A. Miller: Beliefs, Peace and Culture,” presented by Jerry Gordon. Dining Commons, La Sierra University, 4500 Riverwalk Parkway, Riverside; 11:45 a.m.; $10; 951-353-0770; www.riversidehistoricalsociety.org. Also: Casa de Anza Hotel, Jan. 26. ‘TOTALLY CARRIED AWAY & OFF THE WALL’ DEC. 6-15  –  Sale featuring works by artists and craftspeople from throughout the Inland Empire. Pop-up boutique will be featuring artwork and fine handmade crafts, including one-of-a-kind pieces of jewelry, fused glass, textiles, mosaics, metal work, ceramics,

LAKE ALICE TRADING CO. THROUGH NOV. 30  –  Pac Men (1980s), Oct. 11-12 and Nov. 9; David Paul Band (classic rock), Oct. 16; After Party (1980s rock), Oct. 18 and Nov. 29; Gravity Guild (alternative rock), Oct. 19; The Groove (classic rock/funk), Oct. 25; Driven (rock/classic rock), Oct. 26; Eclipse (rock/dance), Oct. 31 and Nov. 15-16; Entouraj (dance), Nov. 1; All In (rock/ alternative/funk), Nov. 2; Disciples of Sabbath (rock), Nov. 8; Fail Safe Project (original rock), Nov. 11; Vengeance (classic rock), Nov. 22; Killer Shades (rockin’ classics), Nov. 23; ProgKnowSys (progressive classic rock), Nov. 30. 3616 University Ave., Riverside; 951-686-7343; www.lakealicetradingco.com. LAW’S RESTAURANT THROUGH OCT. 18  –  Staggs Bros., Oct. 11;

pottery and more. Get a jump on the art sale during the Jolly Moose Jamboree on Dec. 5. Riverside Art Museum, 3425 Mission Inn Ave.; 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily; 951-784-7377; www.riversideartalliance.org AN EVENING OF KLEZMER MUSIC DEC. 7  –  The band Hot Pstromi will perform Eastern European Jewish folk music for the entire family. Dessert reception follows. Riverside Temple Beth El, 2675 Central Ave., Riverside; 7 p.m.; $10-$36; 951-684-4511; www.tberiv.org. RIVERSIDE MASTER CHORALE DEC. 8  –  In concert. California Citrus State Historic Park, 9400 Dufferin Ave., Riverside; 6 p.m. wine and hors d’oeuvres, 7 p.m. concert; $25; www.riversidemasterchorale.com. RIVERSIDE LYRIC OPERA DEC. 29  –  “Amahl and the Night Visitors,” about a shepherd boy and his mother who witness a miracle when visited by the three wise men. The Box, Fox Entertainment Plaza, 3635 Market St., Riverside; 951-781-9561; www.riversidelyricopera.org. Also: Gianni Schicchi, May 3. DOWNTOWN FARMERS MARKET ONGOING  –  Fresh fruits, vegetables, flowers and more. Downtown, Main Street between Fifth and Sixth streets, Riverside; 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays; 951-826-2434. ‘TELLING RIVERSIDE’S STORY IN 50 OBJECTS’ ONGOING  –  First installation of artifacts that tell Riverside’s history from the prehistoric days of the mammoths through 1930. Second installation will cover 1930 to the present. Metropolitan Museum, 3580 Mission Inn Ave., Riverside; 951-826-5273; www.riversideca.gov/museum. Also: “John Muir and the Personal Experience of Nature,” through Jan. 19; “Force of Arms,” ongoing.

Tightrope, Oct. 18. 9640 Indiana Ave., Riverside; 951-354-7021; www.lawsrestaurant.com. ROMANO’S CONCERT LOUNGE THROUGH SEPT. 28  –  Double Vision (Foreigner tribute), Oct. 5; No Duh (No Doubt), Oct. 12; Caress of Steel (Rush), Oct. 18; Led Zepagain (Led Zeppelin), Oct. 19; The Spazmatics, Oct. 26; The English Beat! Nov. 1. 5225 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside; 951-781-7662; http://theconcertlounge.com. THE VIBE BAR & GRILL THROUGH NOV. 27  –  Wicked & El 40 (hip hop), Oct. 18; NekroG (rap), Nov. 2; West of Mainstream (rock), Nov. 27. 1805 University Ave.; 951-788-0310; www.thevibebarandgrill.net.

GIVE BIG RIVERSIDE AND OTHER NONPROFIT EVENTS | PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 29 october-november 2013 | riversidethemag.com | 11


Excellence, Quality & Service Guaranteed!

E

Introducing

Bni “riverside tC” Each of us is a member of BNI (Business Network International), an association of professionals, chosen by invitation only, whose references and reputations have been verified before acceptance. Our mutual mission is to serve you as well as to provide you with connections to trusted associates who can help meet your needs. When you do have the opportunity to experience the products and services of the people listed here, we’d love your feedback! Please contact any one of us to share your experience. We are selfgoverning and committed to providing only the most excellent, reliable, & quality service! Also, your referral to a friend, family member or associate in need of any of the products and services we offer is the highest compliment we can hope to receive.

We’d love the opportunity to serve you! Pictured Left to right from the front: Lauri Pitcher of Lucia & Co. CPAs, Jessina DeMarco-Bettey of Massage by Jessina, Derek Anderson of Biztek Solutions, Gary Foltz of Foltz Law Corporation, Don Plessel of Southland Insurance Services, Dave Yarnall, of PD Contracting, Adil Zaher of Digital First Media, Coco Hitt of Graff Technologies, Hazel Cummins of Realty Executives, Kelley Anderson of K Graphics Design, Nick Milazzo of Waddell & Reed, Bernie Powers of Action Coach and Brian Bettey of Concordia Insurance and Financial Solutions. not shown: Martha Peña of REMIN and Cesar Reya of Provident Bank.

Elite Members of

(Business Network International) One PrOfessiOn Per ChaPter... exClusive referrals!

Once you’ve worked with this group of professionals, you’ll be the first to raise your hand when someone asks, “Do you know someone who...? ”

& m a b R w p m b g

A p o A p o o th c y

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stablished in 2003, this chapter of Business Network International (BNI), Riverside Town & Country (TC) has built some very strong ties. Every member is committed to each other and to the group as a whole. We gather weekly to learn about each others businesses, build relationships and refer business. BNI Riverside TC is an amazing team who introduces people we know and work with to our other members as prospective clients, those of which they might never have met otherwise. We act as each others sales force helping build awareness, obtaining invaluable knowledge and growing our businesses’ bottom line. Another important focus of our group is creating power partnerships. Just one example at BNI Riverside TC is our Realtor, Mortgage Loan Originator and Insurance Agent. Because these three professions often come into play when someone is purchasing a home, there is plenty of opportunity to refer business to one another! Add our contractor for fixing up a property ready to go on the market or perhaps a new homeowner that wants to customize their house once it’s purchased, and you have yet another avenue for referrals.

“People do business with people they like and trust...” Though we are all committed professionals, there is an easy camaraderie and overall “fun” feel to our chapter. Our meetings are structured and serious but liberally sprinkled with laughter and good natured ribbing. We consider ourselves family and have built many strong personal friendships amongst our members. This is what makes our particular chapter so successful. People do business with people they like and trust. They also refer business to people they like and trust... making these relationships and this group all the more valuable. Our network of professionals is an incredible group of amazing people. BNI is a business tool no company should be without. The value extends not only to our current members but to prospective future members as well. We are always looking for individuals who are as committed and motivated to grow as we are.

Want to GroW Your Business? Come See for Yourself!

We meet every thursday mOrning at 7:00 am

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• Electrician • Web master • Sign Maker • Screen Printer • Auto Repair • Photographer • Salon/Spa • Staffing Co. • Chiropractor

Facts about Business Network International – the Organization Last year alone, Members of BNI passed 7.1 million referrals member to member, which generated more than $3.3 Billion dollars worth of business for one other! BNI is a business and professional referral organization that allows only one person from each professional classification to join a chapter. Benefits n n n n n n n n n n n n n

Increased exposure to many other business professionals Substantially increase business through referrals Learn to effectively talk about your business Sharpen your presentation skills Participation in up to 52 networking meetings per year New Member Packet: Business card book, name badge holder, orientation CD, BNI pin Success Net newsletters with educational material on networking, public speaking, and business Member Success Program workshop Advanced Education Series workshops Leadership Team Training Participation in business trade shows Participation in local conferences And much, much more!

For more information go to: www.bniriversidecounty.com


marketplace

Small business,

big impact Whether it’s one employee or dozens, these enterprises play a major role in the local economy

R

iverside’s largest public and private employers are well-known — the County of Riverside, the University of California, the Riverside Unified School District, Kaiser Permanente. And while they are all important players in the city’s and, for that matter, the region’s economy, they don’t hold a candle to the neighborhood pet groomer, the computer industry start-up, the downtown antiques store, the auto-body shop, the printing company and countless others. 14 | riversidethemag.com | october-november 2013

Photo by Gabriel Luis Acosta

Tina Teets grooms a Yorkshire terrier at Tina’s Pampered Pet Palace.

“Small business is what drives the economy,” said Scott C. Barber, city manager. That’s especially true in Riverside. While the federal Small Business Administration classifies a “small business” as one that has 500 employees or less, 99 percent of the businesses in the city actually have fewer than 100 employees. And Riverside is always looking to add more, Barber says. Through the Office of Economic Development, the Greater Riverside Chambers of Commerce and other agencies, business owners have access to a variety of resources that offer help with everything from applying for financial incentives to navigating the permitting process. (For more details, visit www.riversideca.gov/econdev and http://riverside-chamber.com.) Those efforts have been producing


tangible results, according to Barber. During the last calendar year, 3,200 jobs in the city were either created or retained — 90 percent of them at companies with less than 100 workers. “We work very hard to find opportunities for small businesses to either survive or relocate or become created here,” he said. “There’s a lot more confidence in our economy, so people who are starting new businesses are seeing the opportunity to succeed at a better rate than before.” To get a feel for the local smallbusiness climate, writer Amy Bentley recently visited with the owners of five Riverside enterprises.

Tina’s Pampered Pet Palace Tina Teets and her mother opened a pet grooming shop in Riverside 14 years ago because Teets wanted to run her own business and her mom was looking for a career change. Her mom has since moved to Oregon, but the 47-year-old Teets still enjoys her clients — both human and the furry kind. She especially loves working on terriers and Yorkies at her shop, Tina’s Pampered Pet Palace, in Lincoln Plaza. It previously was called Groomingdales. “I’m part Yorkie,” Teets joked. The shop also sells gourmet pet cookies and handmade bows made by a local friend, as well as offering a place for people to bathe their own animals for a small fee. Teets is proud to support other local businesses. “I could buy a bunch of junk from China or sell things from a local artisan,” she said, adding that she buys her supplies from local vendors. “I want to survive as a local business and use my money to keep our community alive as well.” Teets is keenly aware of the challenges facing small, independent businesses. Before the recent recession, when people groomed their dogs more often, she had six or seven employees. Today, business is down 50 percent and

Photo by Micah Escamilla

Brian Hawley, Luminex chairman and chief technology officer

Teets does everything herself. “In this economy, we’re just hoping we can do a good job, and people will keep coming,” she said. “I haven’t raised my prices in seven years. I am always doing budget evaluations. I have to shop smart and spend smart.” A single mom with a teenage son, Teets looks for sales and buys grooming products in bulk. She shopped for a better deal on business insurance and her efforts paid off to the tune of $800 in savings per month. She also strives to give customers the services they want at reasonable prices. Many bring her gifts and food from their gardens. “Riverside people are amazing. I have the best people in Riverside,” she said. “It’s a really sweet way to live life.” Founded: 1999 Employees: 1 Address: 2955 Van Buren Blvd., Suite H-7, Riverside Phone, website: 951-403-4443, http://tinaspetpalace.com

Luminex Software, Inc. An entrepreneurial spirit led Brian Hawley to start Luminex Software Inc. with Mike Saunders and Art Tolsma in 1994. The three were previously co-workers at another company, and Hawley wanted to “control his own destiny,” as he put it. Headquartered in Riverside, Luminex develops computer hardware and software to provide connectivity

between mainframe computing systems and open systems storage. Most Luminex customers are in the Midwest and Northeast, where financial and insurance centers are located. The company now has nearly 50 employees working in Riverside and around the United States. There’s also an employee based in Hong Kong, where the company opened its first international branch last year to provide sales and technical services for the emerging Chinese and Asian markets. As the company has grown over the years, it’s been a challenge for the three founders — who remain active in the day-to-day operations — to manage an expanding staff. “As we have grown from three to almost 50, that’s a culture adjustment,” said Hawley, a Riverside resident and the immediate past chairman of the board of the Greater Riverside Chambers of Commerce. “You have to find talented mid-level managers. You can’t do it all. You can’t manage everybody, and do all the work.” Communications are now a little more formal, and employee needs, ideas and feedback are always considered. “For us it’s finding a balance [between] being very entrepreneurial and having too much structure and bureaucracy,” Hawley said. The privately funded company reported revenues of more than $10 million in 2010. Hawley said much october-november 2013 | riversidethemag.com | 15


of the subsequent profits have been plowed back into the business, which has hired 12 new employees in the last two years. As a tech company, having vision and watching emerging technology are critical to being successful. “The trick for surviving 20 years is seeing what is coming next and getting there before anybody else,” Hawley said. Founded: 1994 Employees: Almost 50 Address: 871 Marlborough Ave., Riverside Phone, website: 951-781-4100, www.luminex.com

Old Glory General Store Old Glory General Store isn’t the typical antiques and collectibles retailer. It’s a gathering place where customers can bring their antiques for appraisal, where shoppers enjoy activities with catered food, where old rings and necklaces are sold during “gold parties,” and where customers can book their own private events. Part of its charm comes from the fact that the merchandise — which includes vintage clothing, seasonal goods and thousands of assorted nostalgic knickknacks — is on display in a 9,000-square-foot structure that originally was a new car showroom when it was built in the 1930s. Special events are important to bringing in new customers The store’s fall schedule includes a quilt appraisal and lecture on Oct. 12 and a preChristmas open house on Nov. 9. While Old Glory is only a few blocks from the larger Mission Galleria on the Main Street Pedestrian Mall, owner Sherry Young believes the two stores actually complement each other by their close proximity. “People like to go to more than one place,” she said, referring to antiques shoppers. Young’s store is open seven days a week. She gets help from her granddaughter, Alicia Chavez, and Ubaldo Panattoni, a decorator and caterer who lives with Young and cares for her husband Jed, who became a 16 | riversidethemag.com | october-november 2013

Photo by Frank Perez

Sherry Young, owner of the Old Glory General Store, helps customers.

quadriplegic after accidentally falling off a ladder four years ago. There have been other challenges. The recent recession put a major dent in sales, and business is slowly recovering, but Old Glory was dealt another setback in August when sudden heavy rain flooded the building and damaged merchandise. Through it all, Young remains philosophical. “We lost quite a bit, you know, but you move on.” Founded: 2007 Employees: 3 Address: 4344 Market St., Riverside Phone, website: 951-682-4860, www.oldglorygeneralstore.com

Hamblins Body, Paint & Frameshop When Rod Perry bought Hamblins Body, Paint & Frameshop 22 years ago, the business already had been in the same Riverside location on Cypress Avenue since 1967 and had many loyal clients. Perry kept the established name and has been working on cars of all makes and models while growing his business from six to 30 employees. When asked what has been Hamblins’ secret for success for the past 46 years, Perry answered simply, “Quality workmanship. We have a guarantee for life.”

That philosophy apparently held true during the recent recession; Perry said his business didn’t suffer. “We treat you the way we want you to treat us,” he said. “If you treated everybody good when the economy was good, they still come back when it goes bad.” Perry, 58, started at the age of 18 washing cars in the auto body shop of a car dealership. “From there I just kept going and going,” he said. His son, Eric Perry, 35, runs the company’s satellite shop at the Riverside Auto Center, where Hamblins lands business on referrals from auto dealerships that don’t have their own body shops. The satellite location helps with logistics, Rod Perry said. A change in the law two years ago that allows insurance companies to steer body shop clients to their preferred shops or facilities has proven challenging, but Rod Perry isn’t going anywhere because of it. He said 45 percent of clients are repeat customers. “We’ll survive it,” Perry said. “We have been here so long.” Founded: 1967 Employees: 30 Address: 7590 Cypress Ave., Riverside; 7840 Indiana Ave., Riverside Phone, website: 951-689-8440, www.hamblinsbodyandpaint.com


A to Z Printing The printing industry has seen many changes in the past century — most notably the transition in production to the digital world — but A to Z Printing Co. has survived and thrived under the ownership and management of the Dale family. Benjamin Eben Dale opened his small printing business in 1921 in the garage behind the family home in downtown Riverside. A to Z produced much of the print materials for numerous businesses in Riverside, including the Mission Inn, which at the time was owned by Frank Miller. After Dale died in 1964, his five children inherited the company. When their mother died in 1974, the children moved the business to its current location in the Arlington area. Today, Dale’s granddaughter Allison Dale is the president and handles sales and customer service, while her sister Leslie Dale runs the production end. The company has five additional employees. In recent years, the recession and the digital revolution have challenged A to Z. “Literally our phones stopped ringing

Photo by Frank Perez

Bill Beckman works with a plate at A to Z Printing.

(in 2006),” Allison Dale said. “It was part the digital age and part the recession. It was soon clear that a large segment of the paper print business was gone forever.” To adjust, A to Z started making

Photo by Gabriel Luis Acosta

Rod Perry, right, owns and operates Hamblins Body, Paint & Frameshop with his son, Eric.

specialty items such as banners, cups and nametags. “We opened up our market away from just paper,” Dale said. The Dales now use digital presses so they can be competitive on small jobs, like printing 100 business cards. “I listen to my customers. When they tell me what they want, we do it,” Dale said. During the lean years, the Dales gave up their own paychecks to make sure they met payroll, she said. The Dales secure employee loyalty and reduce turnover by paying the staff relatively high wages, a pension and benefits. Allison Dale said she constantly seeks new clients and stays active in the community by serving on the boards of nonprofits and giving to charitable causes. She also tells her customers directly that she needs and appreciates their business. “We are willing to do whatever it takes to survive,” she said. Founded: 1921 Employees: 7 Address: 4330 Van Buren Blvd., Riverside Phone, website: 951-689-4411, www.a-zprinting.com october-november 2013 | riversidethemag.com | 17


tr e n ds

Rare editions Owners of the Downtowne Bookstore overcame challenges faced by many independent book retailers. Today, they are writing new chapters for their business on the pedestrian mall.

Downtowne Bookstore owners Vera, left, and Nadia Lee

Written by Luanne J. Hunt Photos by Frank Perez

N

adia and Vera Lee easily could have given up and closed the Downtowne Bookstore when they were confronted with growing competition from giants Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Nobody would have blamed them if they did. After all, the final chapters had already been written about other independent bookstores in Riverside — part of a national trend that saw more than 500 “indies” close between 2002 and 2011, according to the American Booksellers Association trade group. It even was rough going for the chains, as Borders declared bankruptcy in 2011 and closed hundreds of stores nationwide including a location at Riverside Plaza. “There came a point where we looked at each other and said, ‘We have to do something or we’re not going to make it,’” 20

| riversidethemag.com | october-november 2013

recalled Nadia, who has co-owned the pedestrian mall business — specializing in used books, magazines and other goods — with her sister Vera for 11 years. Besides competition, the bookstore had other challenges including a decline in foot traffic after the 2006 cancellation of two annual downtown events: the Orange Blossom Festival and Harvest Festival. But despite the disappointing sales during the first few years, Nadia and Vera weren’t about to surrender their dream. Eventually, the sisters found new ways to attract a steady stream of customers — including offering as many as 4,800 books (at $6 to $10 apiece) from their inventory online at Amazon.com. “It has worked,” said Nadia, adding that she fills about 120 orders from buyers through Amazon every month. “The business we receive from them has kept our doors open.” Customers who venture into the actual bookstore near the Mission Inn Hotel & Spa will enjoy an all-toorare book-shopping experience in a decades-old building with plenty of character. The well-worn wooden floors creak, works from local artists are prominently on display, and the shelves are filled with


thousands of titles representing nearly every genre, from poetry and mythology to fiction and children’s classics. Religious subjects seem to be especially popular, Nadia says. That may be appropriate because something highly spiritual seemed to be happening in the days before she and Vera acquired the Downtowne Bookstore in November 2002. They had just received a payment from an insurance policy on their mother, who had died that April. As they were going through her old books, they decided to take some of them to the Downtowne Bookstore, which at that time was owned by Paula Ferree. Ferree was looking to sell the shop and asked the sisters if they knew anyone

who might be interested in buying it. “It was an amazing moment because Vera and I had been dreaming about owning our own bookstore since high school,” Nadia said. “That night, neither one of us could sleep. We went back to see Paula the next day and told her we wanted to buy the store. “Thanks to Mom’s insurance money, we had the exact amount of money for the down payment. This was definitely destined to be.” Over the years, the Downtowne Bookstore has built a steady clientele that consists of local residents, students and tourists. While the Lee sisters once took books on consignment, they now accept them on a trade basis, offering $1 in trade for a paperback and $2 for a hardbound copy. They also acquire books

Local artwork and woven rugs add to an environment conducive to browsing used titles at the Downtowne Bookstore. october-november 2013 | riversidethemag.com | 21


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from estate sales. “We will take donations too, providing they are books we have a demand for,” Nadia said. Nadia is confident the little store has many more chapters left to write. And while book-lovers are increasingly turning virtual pages on their tablets, she believes there will always be a place for independent book retailers. “The more the big bookstores disappear, the more people are coming to us,” Nadia said. “I don’t think there’s ever going to come a time when people aren’t going to want to hold a book in their hands. I am planning on being here as long as I’m alive.”

| riversidethemag.com | october-november 2013

A page from 2-foot-tall hardbound copy of “The Secret Teachings of All Ages” by Manly P. Hall., at the Downtowne Bookstore.

Downtowne Bookstore Inside cover: 3582 Main St., Riverside; 951-682-1082; http://downtownebookstore.com Introduction: The bookstore was established in 1979. Contents: Used hard-bound and paperback books, audio books, old magazines and other items Genres: Classic novels, self-help, children’s, young adult, poetry, mythology, science and more Best-sellers: Religion and philosophy, as well as children’s books In the margins: A 2-foot-tall hardbound copy of “The Secret Teaching of All Ages,” by Manly P. Hall, priced at $400; and a limited-edition copy of “The Pig Society,” by Dean Koontz, Gerda Koontz, Vaughn Bode and Doug Lovenstei, for $200, are among the rarest items. Publisher’s comment: “Our store really is a destination in downtown Riverside,” says co-owner Nadia Lee. “We’re in a wonderful old and quaint building with lots of atmosphere. Downtowne Bookstore is a very sweet place that’s wor th taking the time to visit.”


Linda Sherman-Nurick owns Cellar Door Books, below.

Cellar Door Books Inside cover: 5225 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside; 951-787-7807; www.cellardoorbookstore.com Introduction: Opened in October 2012 Contents: New books Genres: Novels, self-help, children’s, young adult, poetry, mythology, fantasy, science and more Best-sellers: “The Dog Lived (and So Will I)” by Teresa Rhyne; “The Gods of Gotham” by Lyndsay Faye; “World War Z” by Max Brooks. In person: Book clubs, local authors and poets, and exper t lecturers. Publisher’s comment: “Our customers are so excited to have an independent bookstore that offers personalized service, as well as so much variety,” says Linda Sherman-Nurick, owner. “We have received such loving suppor t from the community, and it’s a really nice feeling they are interested in making sure we do well.”

Renaissance Book Shop Inside cover: 3772 Elizabeth St., Riverside; 951-369-8843; www.renbook.com Introduction: Opened in 1983 Contents: New and used books; does not accept books on consignment, but welcomes books for trade credits; has a large collection of jazz and 1960s rock CDs Genres: Specializes in history, philosophy, science and economics. Also offers a large selection of science fiction, and fantasy as well as books about Europe, Asia and the Middle East. Best-sellers: Science fiction, academic texts In the margins: 1853 hardbound collection of stories by Alexander Dumas, best known for his book, “The Three Musketeers.” Publisher’s comment: “The demand for books is very diverse these days, so we try to offer a large variety of all types of books,” says Gene Berkman, owner. “The academic books really sell well. There are a lot of people out there who want to learn things.”

Gene Berkman, owner of Renaissance Book Shop Science fiction and fantasy are among the top sellers at the Renaissance Book Shop.

october-november 2013 | riversidethemag.com | 23


From recording studios to the concert stage to TV, J. Boykin’s musical talents are earning him a growing following Written by George A. Paul

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almon-colored Caribbean shores might be far removed from the Inland Empire, but J. Boykin’s new album “Pink Sand” will bring a similar relaxed atmosphere closer to home. The Riverside native says the collection’s “eclectic mix of jazz, gospel and R&B” emphasizes his production, saxophone skills and songwriting ability like never before. His first all-original disc, “My Name is J.,” produced by Rufus Troutman III (formerly of Zapp), came out in 2006. According to Boykin, it sold more than 100,000 copies — an impressive tally 24

| riversidethemag.com | october-november 2013

for an independent release. “That was a really big success and a big chapter in my life,” he said. “On this new one, I’m capturing a fresher essence.” The luxurious title track includes silky vocals and a line in Spanish; “Pray 4 Me” features a spiritual lyric rap over sleek sax runs; the billowy “Heaven” boasts a searing guitar solo from Cesar Ramirez. More of Boykin’s mellifluous sax work is on prominent display amid “Running” and the appropriately-titled “Kick Back and Chill.” Boykin also arranged all the new music and recorded at Vivid Tone Studio in Rancho Cucamonga. Eric Tucker, Gregory Fletcher and Ariana Perez provide vocals.

Since the mid-2000s, the John W. North High School grad has shared a stage with some major talent: John Legend, Brian Culbertson, Take 6, Andre Crouch, Harry Belafonte and Shirley Caesar. “Seeing how they interact with the audience is something that I really take to heart,” Boykin said. “I treat every show like it’s my last. That keeps me motivated.” Among his favorite local places to play are the Riverside Auditorium and Events Center and the Fox Performing Arts Center. In September, he was the first original recording artist to christen The Box, the downtown entertainment venue


adjacent to the Fox. Both shows (with “American Idol” finalist Jacob Lusk) sold out. “I actually got my start at an old club [around] here that used to be known as the Downtown Supper Club (located on Main Street). Now it’s known as ProAbition,” he said. Two years ago, Boykin landed a coveted recurring role as a background musician on Fox’s popular series “Glee.” Having previously submitted a head shot to the show’s casting director, one morning Boykin received a call requesting him to submit another without facial hair. “By 7 a.m., I did it and by 8, I was driving down to Paramount Studios,” he said. “That was my first episode.” Once there, he met a few band members from Riverside City College’s Marching Tigers, who also worked on the teen musical drama. “The cast is so lively and full of energy,” Boykin said. “It’s been a really cool experience; just to be on the set and see what all goes into a small scene.” Robert Townsend provided added

J. Boykin • On Nov. 9, Boykin will perform with Frankie Beverly & Maze and Ledisi as par t of the Give Love tour at Citizens Business Bank Arena in Ontario. Tickets for the 7 p.m. show are $39-$99. Information: www.cbbankarena.com • For information about lessons at J. Boykin Music Group Studios on Market Street in Riverside, call 951-742-7097. • Purchase Boykin’s albums via iTunes and cdbaby.com.

media exposure. The actor/director used five of Boykin’s early songs amid last year’s BET film “In the Hive,” starring Vivica A. Fox and the late Michael Clarke Duncan. “Townsend has looked out for me on a few different occasions,” Boykin said. “I did a trailer for a show he was supposed to do. A few months after that, he contacted me and wanted to use my songs for the movie.” Boykin started on clarinet in elementary school “because people said my fingers were too small for the sax.

The following summer [at age 8], I got my first sax, and I just knew it was right for me. I never put it down after that.” He cites Charlie Parker and John Coltrane as formative sax influences. “They had distinctive styles and dared to be different. I respect how they set the tone for music worldwide. Recently, I started a music teaching school and I’ve incorporated a lot of the old [jazz] standards into my classes when I teach to give a little background.” Boykin’s plans encompass opening charter music schools in Los Angeles and on the East Coast. Young people in Georgia are particularly grateful for his generosity. “Around Christmas time, we usually donate money to a few organizations — the Ronald McDonald House and other nonprofit charities. One time, I flew out to Savannah to an orphanage that was going out of business. I was able to keep the lights on there so they were able to stay in business, and they gave me a Donor of the Year award. That was a blessing — to see my work really pay off.”

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october-november 2013 | riversidethemag.com | 25


taste

Photo by Micah Escamilla

Christopher Sylvestro, restaurant manager at ProAbition Whiskey Lounge & Kitchen, third from left, shares a drink with chef Andrew Calvin, left, servers Ashley Autrey, Brian Hopper, Ashley Powell and patron R.J. Rodriguez.

Local flavor New restaurants bring varied tastes to downtown Riverside Written by Carla Sanders

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he resurrection of downtown Riverside has extended to its cuisine as well, with new and novel establishments joining the mix of longtime favorites to ratchet up the flavor factor.

| riversidethemag.com | october-november 2013

ProAbition Whiskey Lounge & Kitchen 3597 Main St., Riverside 951-222-2110 www.proabition.com

ProAbition Whiskey Lounge & Kitchen is a playful take on the Roaring Twenties prohibition era that is housed in a building constructed during that same era. It opened March 15 on Main Street. “It has a great feel. The theme of the restaurant blends perfectly with the building,” said Christopher Sylvestro, ProAbition manager. “We offer something different than every other establishment in the Inland Empire has to offer.” ProAbition features a staff outfitted in period attire, including bow ties, fedoras,

suspenders and flapper dresses, and serves up about 100 different whiskeys “We want to get to 130,” Sylvestro said. There is beer on tap from several regional breweries, live entertainment WednesdaySaturday nights, and a menu with varied and enticing entrees such as sliders made from Korean braised short ribs, filet mignon with Brussels sprouts, pork belly and seafood. “It’s mostly American, but with a twist,” Sylvestro said of the menu’s eclectic mix. ProAbition is owned by brothers Daniel and Marco McGuire, whose other businesses in town include The Board Room, a traditional men’s barbershop with expertise in


vintage-style haircuts from the 1920s and 1930s, and Bail Hotline Bail Bonds. “They are really investing in the city,” Sylvestro said, noting that most of the 56 employees also live within the city limits. “Riverside has a rich history — over 200 years of history — and we want to help that continue. The city has had its trying times, but as we get more entertainment and dining options, it’s becoming more of a destination city.” 9th Street Italian 3790 Ninth St., Riverside 951-686-8871 www.9thstreetitalian.com

A few blocks away, 9th Street Italian has been bustling since it opened around Thanksgiving last year, on Nov. 28, at the site of a former florist shop. Owners David and Regina Powell — he’s also the head chef — have created an inviting eatery in the historic White Park Building, just across from its namesake open space. “We were definitely looking in this specific area for a downtown location,”

said David Powell. When they saw their current locale, they knew it was the right fit. The burgundy awning outside was already up, and it fit perfectly with their color scheme and the ambiance they were seeking to create. In addition, “it was close to City Hall. It was a no-brainer for us,” he said. “We saw the building and knew we had to have it to make it into a restaurant.” The transformation took about four months. Powell previously operated a restaurant in Kansas City, Mo., and has been back in the Riverside area for about 17 years involved in a family wholesale plumbing business. But cooking and Italian food were never far from his thoughts. “Italian food became the love of my life,” he said. “We love Italian-style dining.” He has studied recipes and cooking for 25 years and knew that when he opened a restaurant, it would be Italian. Everything is made fresh daily at 9th

Photos by Frank Perez

9th Street Italian Restaurant is in the historic White Park Building.

Street Italian, and the crowd favorites thus far seem to be lasagna and chicken marsala. The recipes are a closely guarded secret. The restaurant offers a casual dining atmosphere with room for 38 patrons inside. Another 16 spots will be available on the patio, which Powell hopes to open by the holiday season. “Business overall has been good,” he said. “Opening at the holidays was a crazy and wonderful place to start. There were thousands of people (in the area because of the Festival of Lights). We are hopeful that the downtown area will continue to grow. More businesses and jobs downtown are only going to help our business.” Elephant Thai Cuisine, Mission Martini 3720 Mission Inn Ave., Riverside 951-682-9300

There is a similar sentiment at Elephant Thai Cuisine, which opened

Owners Regina and David Powell opened their restaurant last November. october-november 2013 | riversidethemag.com | 27


Photo by Micah Escamilla

Pooh Patanasak, left, and Sirithorn Jamie are the owners of Elephant Thai Cuisine and Mission Martini in downtown Riverside.

two years ago this past December. “We really wanted to go to downtown Riverside,’’ said Pooh Patanasak, who co-owns the

restaurant with his two sisters. “We came here on one of the market nights and I thought, ‘They need a Thai restaurant.’ ”

He praised the city’s downtown area for its uniqueness and said he wanted to open his restaurant in a place that has a sense of history. Patanasak has been involved in the restaurant business for about 27 years, running both Thai and Italian restaurants, among them. His most recent previous venture was in Lake Arrowhead. He also co-owns the more upscale Mission Martini, which is next door to the casual, family oriented Elephant Thai Cuisine. He sought his location on Mission Inn Avenue because, he said, “people relate it to the Mission Inn and remember the street.” A Redlands resident for the past 17 years, Patanasak grew up in Thailand and arrived in the United States in 1987. He has an engineering degree from his native country. But it has been his restaurants that have brought him happiness. “When I came here, it was the American dream to own a business. I wanted to do that.”

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| riversidethemag.com | october-november 2013


seen

YWCA Women of Achievement

With its annual Women of Achievement awards, Riverside’s YWCA celebrates the work of women breaking barriers, volunteering and providing creativity, leadership and vision as they work to help those in the community. The 2013 honorees were Victoria Brodie, Cleda Givens-Bullock, Rebeccah Goldware, Evie Guin and Kathy Wright.

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(1) Sally Andriamiarisoa, left, Kathy Wright, Cleda Givens-Bullock, Evie Guin, Victoria Brodie, Rebeccah Goldware and Marlene Allen-Hammarlund (2) Mary Parsons, left, Peggy Nelson, Cecile Johnson, Pam Benson, Kathie Chapman and Lori Copeland (3) Jeanette Marlar, left, Barbara Hanna and Richard Rubio (4) Cynthia Glover-Woods, left, Jeff Kraus and Hilma Griffin-Watson (5) Deanne Irwin and Tony Truong (6) Darcy McNaboe, left, and Barbara Wallace (7) Kathy Wesley, left, and Deizy Ruiz (8) Lanae Harris, left, and Kyrah Harris (9) J.J. Johnson, Karen Bradford and Rosemary Garcia Ph o t o s by B r e n d a Fl owe r s

sav e th e date charitable events

RCC Culinary Academy, 1155 Spruce St., Riverside; $50; 951-328-3807.

Oct. 12 – Spirit of Freedom barbecue dinner and fundraiser, presented by Teen Challenge. Benedict Castle, 5445 Chicago Ave., Riverside; 4:30 p.m. refreshments and seating, 5 p.m. dinner; $25; 951-683-4241; www.teenchallenge.org.

Oct. 19 – Light the Night Walk to raise funds for research and to suppor t people battling cancer. California Baptist University, 8432 Magnolia Ave., Riverside; www.lls.org/aboutlls/chapters/ocie.

Oct. 14 – Smar tRiverside’s seventh annual charity golf tournament to suppor t and expand the programs and services the nonprofit organization offers, such as the Digital Inclusion Program. Victoria Golf Course, Riverside; 951-826-5109; www.smar triverside.org. Oct. 18 – California Autumn Nights, the ninth annual fall fundraiser for Riverside City College’s Culinary Academy. Evening star ts with a wine and hors d’oeuvres reception and continues through a six-course meal. Proceeds benefit the academy’s programs and students.

Nov. 16 – Step Out Walk to Stop Diabetes, sponsored by the American Diabetes Association. Castle Park, La Sierra at the 91 Freeway, Riverside; 619-234-9897, ext. 7432; www.diabetes.org/stepoutriverside.

Oct. 19 – UC Riverside Chancellor’s Dinner, a benefit for UCR scholarship and fellowship initiatives, includes a desser t reception and enter tainment by student performing groups. UCR Highlander Union Building, 900 University Ave., Riverside; 5:30 p.m. reception, 6:30 p.m. dinner; 951-827-3144, http://chancellorsdinner.ucr.edu.

Dec. 5 – IELLA Legal Aid annual fundraiser. Bid on spor ts memorabilia, spa days, local ar twork and vacation getaways during an 80-item silent auction while sipping wine and tasting appetizers at an event to benefit pro bono legal clinics held by the Inland Empire Latino Lawyers Association. Riverside County Law Library, 3989 Lemon St., Riverside; 6-8:30 p.m.; $30; fundraise@iellaaid.org; www.iellaaid.org.

Nov. 12 – Give Big Riverside, a 24-hour community-wide online giving campaign, with the goal of raising $300,000 for more than 150 nonprofits serving the communities of the greater Riverside area. www.givebigriverside.com.

Dec. 7 – Junior League of Riverside’s 58th annual charity ball. Proceeds suppor t the organization’s community outreach, including projects like fitRiverside. 951-683-0622, www.juniorleagueriverside.org. october-november 2013 | riversidethemag.com | 29


seen

Habitat for Humanity

Habitat for Humanity Riverside, a nonprofit Christian ministry which seeks to help families own their own homes, through volunteer support, recently marked 25 years of work in the community with a celebratory evening at the Riverside Auditorium and Events Center. More information at www.habitatriverside.org.

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(1) Darcy and Jim MacNaboe (2) During a ceremonial wall raising: John Aguilar, Jack Olree, Moreno Valley Mayor Tom Owings, Emilio Ramirez, Riverside Councilman Mike Gardner, Al Arguello, Assemblyman Jose Medina, Susan Campbell, Assembyman Eric Linder, John Field, Grand Terrace Councilwoman Darcy McNaboe (3) Jeannie Holmes, Jim Almgren, David Roberts, Ellen Clizbe (4) Front row, Dr. Harry Cole, left, Erin Thomas, Annie Wooldridge, Debbie Neal, Rory Dyer; back row, Anita Silvestri, left, Dr. Sue Spitzer, Robert Spitzer, Pat Silvestri, Jim Almgren, Jim Wooldridge, Margaret Scott, Sonja Almgren (5) Patricia Chavez, left, Kathy Michalak, Al Arguello, Martha Arguello (6) Habitat Riverside founder Dr. Barnett Grier and Executive Director Karin Roberts

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Photos by Michael J. Elderman

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| riversidethemag.com | october-november 2013

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Sheltering heARTS

Path of Life Ministries’ efforts to help Riverside’s neediest were at the center of the Sheltering heARTS September gala at the Riverside Art Museum. The evening’s guest speaker was Laura Schroff, author of “An Invisible Thread: The True Story of an 11-year-old Panhandler, a Busy Sales Executive and an Unlikely Meeting with Destiny.” Info: www.thepathoflife.com

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(1) Marney Hamilton, left, Christi MacNee, Rachelle Merrihew, Sharon Bruckschlager and Wendy Grover (2) Carrie Miller, left, and Gregory Adamson (3) Steven Fontes, left, Beth Yeager, Jim MacNee and Cindie Perry (4) Victoria Brodie, left, Laura Schroff and Damian O’Farrell (5) Ai M. Kelley, left, Nicole Tartoni and Kathryn Poindexter (6) Linda Fregoso, left, Assemblyman Jose Medina and Janice Rooths (7) Grey and Lindsey Frandsen Ph o t o s by M i c a h E s c a m i l l a

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october-november 2013 | riversidethemag.com | 31


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UC Riverside White Coat Ceremony

What’s it take to be a doctor? A white coat is the official start, but it’s preceded by interviews, intense study and followed by years of dedicated training. UCR’s new School of Medicine recently celebrated its first class with a formal ceremony, awarding white coats to its first 50 students.

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Da’ Hip-Hop WizzarD of oz

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october 19 & 20, 2013

at the corona civic center auditorium (815 W. sixth st., corona, ca)

purchase tickets online at lqspac.org

got hearing problems?

sponsored by floyd e. milner, audiologist serving the i.e. for more than 30 years. “associated specialist in hearing disorders” 4440 brockton avenue, suite 210 • riverside, ca. (951) 778-0181

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we are excited about being one of the sponsors for our daughter’s long-running, family-friendly production! Previously Performed in Hollywood, Beverly Hills, San Bernardino, Fontana, Bakersfield, Los Angeles, Riverside and Rialto.

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(1) Talab Ibrahim (2) Maryin Altamirano (3) Janel Gracia, left, and Dr. Emma Dean (4) University of California Riverside medical students (5) Paul Chan (6) Dr. G. Richard Olds (7) Medical students share high fives as they head back to their seats

for more info visit WWW.lqspac.org 661.343.0442 32

| riversidethemag.com | october-november 2013

Ph o t o s by J o n a t h a n H i n d e r l i t e r


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UC Riverside Chancellor’s Reception

Local officials and the educational community gathered recently at the UCR Alumni and Visitors Center to welcome Dr. Kim A. Wilcox to his new post as the ninth chancellor of the University of California, Riverside. Wilcox, 59, was formerly provost and executive vice president at Michigan State University.

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(1) Tasha Hudson, left, and Sylvia Martin James (2) Violeta Aguilar Wyrick, left, state Sen. Richard Roth and Yunzeng Wang (3) University of California Riverside Chancellor Kim A. Wilcox and his wife, Diane Del Buono (4) Elena Bautista, left, Kayla Benites, Nancy Harvey and Majread Togneri, (5) Arturo and Maria Cisneros (6) Tomas Morales, Nancy and Bruce Varner (7) Councilman Mike Gardner, left, and Joshua Walters (8) Scott Megna, left, Marcia Gilman and Daniel Hantman

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Ph o t o s by J a m e s C a r b o n e

RIVERSIDE COUNTY

PHILHARMONIC

CLASSICAL Titans

The Riverside County Philhamonic and Music Director Tomasz Golka present our 2013-2014 season

GUEST ARTIST, ORION WEISS PIANO

SAT, JAN 25, 2014 7:30 P.M.

the Classics

Beethoven, Piano Concerto #4 Wagner, Siegfried Idyll Haydn, Symphony #103 Drumroll

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HOLIDAY Magic

SAT, NOV 30, 2013 7:30 P.M.

Bizet, Farandole from L’Arlesienne Suite #2 Tchaikovsky, Nutcracker: Waltz of the flowers David Fick, Symphony of Carols (world premiere) Handel, Messiah: And the Glory, For unto Us, Hallelujah Chorus with the La Sierra University Chamber Singers Wendel, Khanukah Overture Guaraldi/Pugh, Charlie Brown Christmas Chilcott, 12 Days of Christmas Finnegan, Christmas Carol sing-along

FROM THE Heart GUEST ARTIST, JOSEPH SWENSEN VIOLIN

SAT, MAY 3, 2014 7:30 P.M. Sibelius, Violin Concerto. Shafer Mahoney, World Premiere Brahms, Symphony #2

IN THE Spotlight CULVER CENTER OF THE ARTS

SAT, MAR 15, 2014 7:30 P.M.

Corelli, Trio Sonata in E major, Op. 2 #10 Tartini, Devil’s Trill Sonata Vivaldi, Trio Sonata (TBD) Optional Stravinksky, Soldier’s Tale Chamber Call the Philharmonic concert. for tickets 951-787-0251

For season ticket information please contact the Riverside County Philharmonic at 951-787-0251. All concerts begin at 7:30 p.m. ~ Dates, times, locations, artists and programs are subject to change. october-november 2013 | riversidethemag.com | 33


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RiveRside will get festive this fall

08/13

Remembering Gabriel Luis Acosta, 1967-2013. Gabe once said he wanted to take every photo that appeared in Riverside Magazine. It was a lofty, unachievable goal, considering his other role, as photographer for The Sun newspaper in San Bernardino. But it reflected his exuberance, passion for the job and his connection with the Riverside community. The covers he shot for the magazine, shown here, are but a small part of the work he did for us over the last five years. 34

| riversidethemag.com | october-november 2013

Gabriel Luis Acosta Photo by Rachel Luna 09/13/13

e! Us $3.95


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9/26/13

2:31 PM


Riverside Magazine