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CITY LIFE & FINE LIVING

RIVERSIDE m a g a z i n e | a p r i l – m ay 2 0 1 0

Food wars

The art of competitive cooking

The fight from afar Vampires to angels 82nd Airborne salute


Generations of Care for the Generations to Come In 1935 two physicians started Riverside Medical Clinic in the rotunda of the Mission Inn with a vision of providing Riverside area families a single premier source for their healthcare. Their vision lives today. In fact, one of their grandsons is part of our team now. In addition to the most wonderful primary care physicians, our patients can turn to practically any specialists they might need. Imaging service and lab work. Right here. Urgent care. Pharmacy. Vision care. Health education. Chiropractic care. Also right here. And we accept virtually all health insurance plans. For 75 years, generations of families have entrusted their healthcare to Riverside Medical Clinic. If we aren’t already, let us care for your family for your generations to come. To select a Riverside Medical Clinic doctor, call us at (951) 683-6370 www.RiversideMedicalClinic.com

Join our family tree

We’ll treat you right


contents

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april- may 2010

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COVER STORY

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HOME

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VOLUME 3, ISSUE 2

THE BEST INGREDIENTS Meet three chefs who dish it out during cooking competitions PREDATOR FLIGHT Pilots at March Air Reserve Base patrol the skies half a world away ‘ANGEL’ HAS LANDED Mission Inn a perfect setting for Anne Rice’s latest novel YOU’RE INVITED Wood Streets residences have welcome mats out for annual tour

DEPARTMENTS HOT LIST The Fox comes alive with Warren Hill, “Hairspray” DINING From fun to fancy and more, your resource for eating out SEEN Our cameras catch guests at four big events in town Cover photo: Priscilla Iez zi, Che Studios

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Riverside Dental Group Comprehensive Dental Care For The Entire Family

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iverside Dental Group was established January 28, 1974 by Dr. Ed Rouhe and four other partners. The doctors built an award winning modern office on the 1.9-acre site of the old Samuel Carey Evans mansion at the corner of El Hijo Street and Magnolia Avenue. The Group’s building surrounds a large Camphor tree which is estimated to be over 100 years old. The revolutionary aspect of the 9,000 square foot office building is the patient treatment room layout, which focuses on patient comfort and ease of functions. The reception

General & Cosmetic Dentistry Children’s Dental Specialists Endodontics Periodontics & Implant Dentistry Prosthodontics Orthodontics & Invisalign

area is sunken with a gracious hotel lobby feeling. Over the past 35 years the group has grown to an additional 6 offices providing dental care for parts of Riverside and San Bernardino counties. Riverside Dental Group employs over 30 Dentists and 250 employees from our local communities. Annually our offices treat more than 110,000 patients. Riverside Dental Group and Associate offices are pleased to receive the prestigious accreditation from the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC). AAAHC accreditation

demonstrates we are nationally recognized for excellence in care and service to patients. With strong quality assurance programs, doctor mentoring and uniform guidelines for patient care Riverside Dental Group and associate offices are working to achieve the distinction of an enduring organization that has established a tradition of fine dentistry that the community trusts. Our patients are very valuable to us, which is why most of our new patients are referred to us by our current patients.

Riverside - Magnolia

Riverside Dental Group 7251 Magnolia Avenue Riverside, California 92504 (951) 689-5031

Riverside - Central

Dental Associates of Riverside 3487 Central Avenue Riverside, CA 92506 (951) 369-1001

Moreno Valley

Dental Associates of Moreno Valley 22500 Town Circle, Ste 2074 Moreno Valley, CA 92533 (951) 697-6800

Corona

Dental Associates of Corona 1380 El Sobrante Road Corona, CA 92879 (951) 273-9580

Riverside Dental Group AT WOODCREST

O. Edgar Rouhe, DDS Dr. Rouhe is one of the four original partners that founded Riverside Dental Group in 1974 and has recently joined the staff in our Woodcrest office on a full-time basis. A life-long resident of Riverside, Dr. Rouhe received his DDS from Loma Linda University and brings many years of experience to his practice of dentistry. Dr. Rouhe has had advanced training in full-mouth reconstruction and cosmetic treatment, and enjoys providing the highest quality of care and service to his patients.

Temecula

Dental Associates of Temecula 40820 Winchester Road, Ste 1500 Temecula, CA 92591-5508 (951) 296-6788

Palm Desert

Desert Dental Specialty Group 72- 415 Park View Drive Palm Desert, CA 92260 (760) 568-5928

Woodcrest

Riverside Dental Group at Woodcrest 19009 Van Buren Blvd, Ste 204 Riverside, CA 92508 (951) 776-9001

Tonia Cantrell, DDS Dr. Cantrell completed her undergraduate degree at San Diego State University in 2000 and went on to earn her doctorate degree at UCLA Dental School in 2004. She completed her training at a children’s hospital in Wisconsin where she worked with special needs patients, dental trauma management, and sedation techniques. Dr. Cantrell has always felt at ease working with children. She takes great pride in her work as a clinician, but also hopes that she can be one more influential role model in a child’s life.


from the editor

Time for remembrance

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Jerry Rice jerry.rice@riversidethemag.com, 909-386-3015 Riverside Magazine We welcome your ideas and invite you to subscribe. Contact the editor: jerry.rice@riversidethemag.com or 909-386-3015 For subscriptions: www.riversidethemag.com/subscribe or 909-386-3923

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Fred H. Hamilton PUBLISHER & CEO

Don Sproul

MANAGING EDITOR

Jerry Rice EDITOR

Dan Walker

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Lynda E. Bailey

SALES DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR

Shawna Federoff

RESEARCH DIRECTOR C O N TRI B U TI N G W RITER S & EDITOR S

Amy Bentley, Elaine Lehman, Lauren McSherry, Michel Nolan, Jim Steinberg, Frank Teurlay e d i to r i a l g r a p h i c DE S I G N

Steve Ohnersorgen

Rick Sforza

PHOTO EDITOR PHOTO G RAPHER S

Gabriel Luis Acosta, James Carbone, Al Cuizon, Micah Escamilla, Priscilla Iezzi, Khai Le, Frank Perez

Michael Ellis, Sandra Gray Debbie Salame SALES MANAGERS

ADV ERTI S I N G S A L E S E X E C U TI V E S

Jeannie Adair, Kim Alverson, Cur t Annett Vikki Contreras, Carla Ford-Brunner, Willie Merriam Bernadette Palos, Mark Ryan, Adil Zaher S A L E S A S S I S TA N T

David Wastell ADV ERTI S I N G g r a p h i c DE S I G N

Christie Robinson, Lead Designer/ Production Coordinator Kathy Cox-Tur teltaub, Designer MAR K ETI N G

Veronica Nair, Ginnie Stevens

Inland Custom Publishing Group Steve Lambert V.P. OF NEWS

Frank Pine

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Kathryn Johnson V.P. OF FINANCE

John Wartinger

V.P. OF OPERATIONS

Kathy Michalak

V.P. OF CIRCULATION CONTACT US Editorial: 909-386-3015; fax 909-885-8741 or jerry.rice@riversidethemag.com Advertising: 909-386-3936; fax 909-884-2536 or sales@riversidethemag.com. To subscribe to Riverside Magazine call 909-386-3923 or go online at www.riversidethemag.com/subscribe. Riverside Magazine is produced by the Inland Custom Publishing Group of The Sun and the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin. Single copy price: $3.95. Subscriptions $14.95 per year. Postmaster: Send address changes to P.O. Box 9400, San Bernardino, CA 92427-9400. Copyright 2010 Riverside Magazine. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the consent of the publisher. Riverside Magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photos or artwork even if accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope.

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6 | riversidethemag.com | april-may 2010

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volume 3, issue 2 b roug ht to you by:

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emorial Day weekend for many is the unofficial kickoff to summer, a time for backyard barbecues and family getaways. It’s also a time to remember the men and women of our armed services who died while at war. Nowhere is that more true locally than at Riverside National Cemetery, the largest and busiest national cemetery in the country. This year will be no exception. On Friday of Memorial Day weekend, the Roll Call Project will pick up where it left off a year ago — with volunteers reading the names of the 6,000 veterans who have been buried at the cemetery in the past 12 months. It’s a brief recognition for the service of each individual, but it adds up to an extremely moving tribute. During last year’s roll call, when the names of the first 146,892 veterans buried at the cemetery were read, dry eyes were rare. “Everybody was very emotional about being a part of it,” recalls cemetery spokesman Jim Ruester. To participate in this year’s roll call, visit www.socalpgr.org and click on the RNC link. The Web site is for the Patriot Guard Riders, a group of motorcycle riders and others who are helping with the project. Much like before, the names will be read around the clock, with the last few saved for the start of the ceremony on Memorial Day, which begins at 11 a.m. There will be speeches and other forms of tribute. Music will be provided by the 1st Marine Division Band, based at Camp Pendleton, and a choir from Cross Word Christian Church in Riverside. In our small way, we also would like to recognize the men and women who have served and are serving our country. In this issue, we visit an area of Riverside that in the 1940s was known as Camp Anza, a place where troops received final training before shipping off for battles in the Pacific; we meet members of the 82nd Airborne World War II Living History Association; and go behind the gates of March Air Reserve Base, where the 163rd Reconnaissance Wing of the Air National Guard has an important role in today’s war effort. Beyond recognizing that vital work and remembering the sacrifices past and present, we also would like to say, “Thank you.”

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FOX

Performing Arts Center Riverside, California

2010 Inaugural Season

Pat Benatar & Neil Giraldo All the Hits. All the Memories.

Hit Me With Your Best Shot Love is a Battlefield We Belong All Fired Up Heartbreaker

Warren Hill with the Corona Symphony Pops April 10

Promises in the Dark Shadows of the Night

With Special Guests

David Sedaris

May 6

Thursday, April 15

Screening of “Duck Soup”

May 7

%URDGZD\6HULHV A NEDERLANDER PRESENTATION

Apr 20–25

Bill Cosby June 5

America May 8

Tickets available at ticketmaster.com, all Ticketmaster outlets and the Box Office. For Box Office Information call (951) 779 9800. Visit us on the web at foxriversidelive.com


O UT & A BO UT Wr it te n by A my Be nt ley Photo by G a br iel Luis Acost a

IN SERVICE TO H I S TO RY

Group is a living tribute to World War II vets

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here’s a simple reason why Jim Palmer joined the 82nd Airborne World War II Living History Association. “Legends are still walking among us, and we need heroes,” says the 37-year-old Riverside resident, who enlisted eight years ago and is the group’s president. Members — there are about 30 of them — go beyond re-staging famous WWII battles. “We like to call ourselves ‘living historians’ versus re-enactors. We spend more time and energy bringing history to life,” says Palmer, who will lead the association in the fifth annual Salute to Veterans Parade on April 17. Of the 16.1 million Americans who were members of the armed forces during World War II, fewer than 2 million are still alive, according to some estimates. And with the median age of WWII veterans now in the mid-80s, about 850 of them are dying every day. “We talk to the vets, hear their stories, tell them ‘thanks,’ and then pass their stories on to younger generations,” Palmer says. Two members of those younger generations are teenagers Joel and Jacob Levine, who belong to the 82nd Airborne group, along with their father, Jason Levine. “It’s something that we all have in common,” Joel says. “We all like history and guns, and we put the two together.” Association members collect World War II uniforms, weapons and equipment — both vintage and reproductions — from gun shows, swap meets and Web sites including eBay. The Levine family has

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a huge collection Salute to of World War II Veterans Parade gear and weapons Downtown Riverside worth as much as The parade star ts at $20,000, including Riverside City College, then proceeds nor th on Magnolia old radios, uniforms Avenue, up Market Street, and a working 1903 right on 10th Street, then Springfield rifle. south on Main Street. Members attend 10 a.m. to noon April 17 12 to 14 public 951-687-1175, www.asalutetoveterans.com events a year, 82nd Airborne World War staging mock battles II Living History Association and displaying tents www.82lha.org with field gear and equipment. They dress as American paratroopers, British, Russian or German soldiers, playing roles ranging from privates to officers. Mike Wilgus attends many events with his wife, who portrays an Army nurse. Their son, Ian, is also looking forward to joining. “We found most kids don’t learn as much about it anymore,” says Wilgus, referring to the war’s combat sacrifices. Wilgus’ late great-uncle fought in the Pacific during World War II. Besides the Salute to Veterans Parade, the group also will appear at the Planes of Fame Airshow at the Chino Airport on May 15-16 and the Wings Over Gillespie Airshow at Gillespie Airport in San Diego on June 5-6. “We always get a warm welcome,” Palmer says. “Kids come over and check out our equipment and uniforms. We get a lot of people thanking us for what we are doing.”


Members of the 82nd Airborne World War II Living History Association next to a 1943 Douglas C-53 D Skytrooper plane at Riverside Airpor t. Top row from left: Jim Palmer, Rusty Rorke, Mike Wilgus and Jason Levine Bottom row from left: Joel and Jacob Levine


hot list WARREN HILL APRIL 10  –  Saxophonist performs with the Corona Symphony Pops Orchestra. Fox Performing Ar ts Center, 3801 Mission Inn Ave., 8 p.m., $50-$129, 951-788-3944, www.foxriversidelive.com. Also: Pat Benatar, April 15; David Sedaris, May 6; “Duck Soup,” May 7; America, May 8; Bill Cosby, June 5.

CELEBRATE DANCE 2010 MAY 27-29  –  A celebration of student choreography and performances featuring new dances within eclectic styles, directed by Sofia Carreras. Landis Performing Ar ts Center, 4800 Magnolia Ave., Riverside; 8 p.m.; $10$12; 951-222-8100, www.landispac.com.

calendar ‘THE NEED TO HOLD STILL’ THROUGH MAY 8  –  Selections from German photographer Mirjam Dröge. UCR/California Museum of Photography, 3824 Main St., Riverside; 951-827-4787, www.cmp.ucr.edu. Also: “Aguaen España,” photos by Craig Richards and Henry Vaux Jr., through April 17; “Ansel Adams at Work,” through May 8. ‘INTIMATE DISTANCE’ THROUGH JUNE 12  –  The modernism of Schuyler Standish, who has been creating visual ar t for nearly 60 years. Riverside Ar t Museum, 3425 Mission Inn Ave.; 951-684-7111, www.riversidear tmuseum.org. Also: Riverside County High School Ar t Show, through April 10; UC Riverside MFA Exhibition, through May 15; “Mark Indig: Recent Works,” through May 29. ‘ADORNMENT’ THROUGH FEBRUARY  –  Examples of personal adornment, which transcends necessity and reflects the history, culture and environment of the individual. Methods have included tattooing, branding, shaping and surgically enhancing the human body. Metropolitan Museum, 3580 Mission Inn Ave.; 951-826-5273, www.riversideca.gov/museum. Also: “Chinese Treasures,” through April 18; Discovery Days, the third Wednesday of every month. 10

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‘HAIRSPRAY’ APRIL 20-25  –  It’s 1962, and pleasantly plump Baltimore teen Tracy Turnblad has only one desire — to dance on the popular “Corny Collins Show.” When her dream comes true, Tracy is transformed from social outcast to sudden star. Fox Performing Ar ts Center, 3801 Mission Inn Ave., Riverside; 877-308-2929, www.broadwayinriverside.com.

CANYON CREST TOWNE CENTRE APRIL  –  Events include an ar t show, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 10; car show, 4-7 p.m. April 11. Canyon Crest Towne Centre, 5225 Canyon Crest Drive, Riverside; 951-686-1222, www.cctownecentre.com. THE WINERY AT CANYON CREST APRIL  –  Drum circle, April 9; Fruit Wine Friday, April 30. 5225 Canyon Crest Drive, Suite 7A, Riverside; 951-369-9463, www.americaneagleriverside.com. THE PROMENADE SHOPS APRIL-MAY  –  Spring Break Carnival, April 8-11; Run With the Panthers (5k run/walk), May 8. The Promenade Shops at Dos Lagos, 2780 Cabot Drive, Corona; free; 951-277-7601, www.promenadeshopsatdoslagos.com. ‘EQUUS’ APRIL 8-11  –  A psychiatrist is confronted with a boy who has blinded six horses in a violent fit of passion. Landis Performing Ar ts Center, 4800 Magnolia Ave., Riverside; 8 p.m. April 8-10, 2 p.m. April 10-11; $15; 951-222-8100, www.landispac.com. Also: “How I Learned to Drive,” April 29-May 2. PARADIGM APRIL 9  –  Modern dance luminaries all over the age 60 present an engaging reper toire of commissioned works for seasoned, professional dancers — a reminder that dance’s domain is not limited to the young.

UC Riverside’s University Theatre, 900 University Ave.; 8 p.m.; $32, $30 for seniors, $16 for students; 951-827-4331, http://culturalevents.ucr.edu. ‘OKLAHOMA!’ APRIL 9-10  –  Musical by Rodgers and Hammerstein. Wallace Theater, California Baptist University, 8432 Magnolia Ave., Riverside; 2 and 8 p.m., $12-$15, 951-343-4319. FLOWER SHOW & GARDEN TOUR APRIL 10-11  –  The 63rd annual floral fantasy for the everyday and weekend gardener. Elks Lodge, 6166 Brockton Ave., Riverside; 1-6 p.m. April 10, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 11; $8 in advance, $10 at the door; 951-643-8890, www.riversideflowershow.org. THE STORY OF THE WILLIE BOY MANHUNT APRIL 11  –  Riverside Historical Society hosts a program presented by Dr. Clifford Trafzer, UC Riverside professor of history. Dining Commons, La Sierra University, 4500 Riverwalk Parkway, Riverside; 12:30 p.m.; $10 (includes lunch); 951-780-2313, www.riversidehistoricalsociety.org. ‘FREEDOM TRAIN’ APRIL 13  –  Production by Theatreworks USA (www.twusa.org). Riverside Municipal Auditorium, 3485 Mission Inn Ave.; 8 p.m.; 951-788-3944, www.riversidemunicipalauditorium.com. Also: “Max & Ruby,” April 27.


April 20th - 25th FOX Performing Arts Center

3801 Mission Inn Avenue, Riverside 951.779.9800 BroadwayinRiverside.com or 800.982.2787

Group Sales 877.316.2929 Visit our website for our new 2010 - 2011 season.

the exclusive partners of broaDway in riverside

Official Partner Hotel M A G A Z I N E M A G A Z I NE


calendar JUAN BAUTISTA DE ANZA APRIL 16-17 – Learn about the first Spanish explorer to blaze a trail through what would become Riverside County during a symposium, tour and other activities. Crestmore Manor, 4600 Crestmore Road, Rubidoux; 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 16 (8 a.m. registration); $25. Mar tha McLean-Anza Narrows Park, 5687 Jurupa Ave., Riverside; 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 17; free with registration ($2 park entry fee); 951-955-4300, www.riversidecountyparks.org. RIVERSIDE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL APRIL 16-25 – Eighth annual event will screen features, shor ts and documentaries from around the globe. UltraStar Cinemas, University Village, 1201 University Ave., Riverside; $8, $5 for students and seniors, $100 for season pass; www.riversidefilmfest.org. INTER-TRIBAL POW WOW APRIL 17 – 25th annual event includes dancing, grand entry and Miss Sherman Pageant. Sherman Indian Museum, 9010 Magnolia Ave., Riverside; 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; free ($3 parking); 951-276-6719, www.shermanindianmuseum.org.

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‘THE INCREDIBLE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE’ APRIL 23 – Explore the history and discoveries of the famous telescope. Dixon Planetarium, Riverside City College, 4800 Magnolia Ave.; 7 p.m.; $2.50-$5; 951-222-8090, www.rcc.edu. Also: “Finding Your Way in the Sky,” May 7; “Exploring the Solar System,” May 21. ‘THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE’ APRIL 23-MAY 2 – The glory of Gilber t and Sullivan at its swashbuckling best. Directed and choreographed by Bar t McHenry. Landis Performing Ar ts Center, 4800 Magnolia Ave., Riverside; 8 p.m. April 23-24, April 30-May 1, 2 p.m. April 24-25, May 1-2; $25-$43, 951-222-8100, www.performanceriverside.org. Also: “Aida,” by Elton John and Tim Rice, June 11-20.

RIVERSIDE PHILHARMONIC APRIL 24-25 – “New York to Vienna,” season finale featuring Time for Three and guest conductor Adam Flatt. Riverside Municipal Auditorium, 3485 Mission Inn Ave.; 8 p.m. April 24, 2p.m. April 25; $11-$74; 951-787-0251, www.thephilharmonic.org. Also: Tickets available for the 2010-11 season. UC RIVERSIDE CONCERTS MAY – World Music Festival: A Sampler (in the University Theatre), May 14; UCR Chamber Music Ensembles (in the Ar ts Building), May 15; Music of Latin America — UCR Andean Ensemble: Mayupatapi (in the Ar ts Building), May 21; Taiko Ensemble: Japanese Drumming (in the Ar ts Building), May 25. UC Riverside, 900 University Ave.; 951-827-4331, http://events.ucr.edu. BIRD WALK BREAKFAST MAY 1 – Guided bird walk and continental breakfast in Alder Canyon. UC Riverside Botanic Gardens, 900 University Ave.; 7:30 a.m.; $15; 951-784-6962, www.gardens.ucr.edu. Also: In the Garden Class/Tour Series, April 10 and May 8; Primavera in the Gardens, May 16; Fall Plant Sale, Oct. 23-24.

Sunday, May 2 12 PM 9PM

I VA L O N T H EH

AUTHENTIC GREEK FOOD GREEK DANCING & LESSONS BEER AND WINE TRADITIONAL PASTRIES ART AND JEWELRY CHURCH TOURS

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Saturday, May 1 12 PM 10PM

BIRD WALK APRIL 18 – Enlighten the senses to the sights, sounds and variety of birds that call the California Citrus State Historic Park home. Meet in the gazebo. Next walk May 16. 9400 Dufferin Ave., Riverside; 8 a.m.; free ($8 parking); 951-780-6222, www.parks.ca.us.

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ADMISSION:

K i d s Fu n Z o n e !

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$2.00 per person or $2.00 for 2 people with coupon! Children under 5 = FREE PLENTY OF FREE PARKING

Call now for reservations

For more information

(909) 626-3296 ext 1

www.thecpdt.com


THE GARDENS OF HISTORIC HOMES MAY 1 – The Ar t Alliance of the Riverside Ar t Museum presents a walking tour along Ivy, Hallwood and Victoria avenues with musicians, plein aire ar tists and light snacks. Downtown Riverside; 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.; $30 in advance only; 951-784-6229.

Empire amateur premiere of “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” help RYT celebrate its 10th season. Wallace Theatre, California Baptist University, 8432 Magnolia Ave., Riverside; “Dreamcoat,” May 7-8, 15-16; “Spelling Bee,” May 7-8, 14-15; $12; www.riversideyouththeatre.org.

MARCH FIELD AIRFEST MAY 1-2 – The Inland Empire’s largest air show, featuring fly-overs, aerial demonstrations and static displays. March Air Reserve Base, Interstate 215 at Cactus Avenue, near Riverside; 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.; free; www.marchfieldairfest.com. ‘MERCURY, MARS AND MAYHEM’ MAY 6-15 – The night of Orson Welles’ sensational radio broadcast of “The War of the Worlds,” another drama was spinning out of control in a hilarious world premiere by Paul Jacques. Studio Theatre, UC Riverside, 900 University Ave.; 8-10 p.m., $12-$14, 951-827-4331, http://events.ucr.edu. RIVERSIDE YOUTH THEATRE MAY 7-16 — “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat” and the Inland

‘PORTRAIT OF A NUDE’ MAY 14-30 – An exploration of issues of ar tistic inspiration, history and censorship. Spanning nearly 200 years and based on real events, it traces the history of the sociopolitical response to Francisco Goya’s masterpiece “Naked Maja” from the time of its inception in 1798, to the recent legal case involving the work. Riverside Community Players Theater, 4026 14th St.; $15; 951-369-2100, www.riversidecommunityplayers.com. Also: “Strike up the Band,” July 9-25. RIVERSIDE MASTER CHORALE MAY 16 – A Celtic Celebration concer t, featuring “Letters from Ireland” and other works. Banshee In The Kitchen also is on the bill. Eden Church, Brockton, Riverside; 4 p.m.; $15, $12 for students and seniors; 951-784-3604, www.riversidemasterchorale.com

‘PLAYWORKS 2010’ MAY 26-29 – Premiere productions exploring issues and textures of contemporary life by some of the best UCR student playwrights. University Theatre, UC Riverside, 9100 University Drive; 8 p.m.; free ($5 parking in Lot 6); 951-827-3245, http://events.ucr.edu. JAZZ ENSEMBLE AND CONCERT BAND MAY 27 – UC Riverside jazz ensemble and concer t band, conducted by Bill Helms. University Theatre, UC Riverside, 900 University Ave.; 8 p.m.; $6-$10; 951-827-4331, http://events.ucr.edu. CHILI/CARS/CYCLES MAY 29 – Chili cook-off and car and cycle show, also featuring crafts, enter tainment and fun for the kids. Arlington Village, Magnolia Avenue between Van Buren and Jackson, Riverside; 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; 951-509-1100. DOWNTOWN STREET JAM JUNE 12 – Concer t and community event. Lineup to be announced. Orange and Ninth streets, downtown Riverside; 2 p.m.; free; 951-341-6550, www.riversidedowntown.org.

Don’t miss the Riverside County Philharmonic’s final two concerts of the season!

Performances at Riverside Municipal Auditorium 3485 Mission Inn Avenue, Riverside Concert Sponsors William Hoskins Mireille Savona

Time for Three

www.thephilharmonic.org or

Guest Artist

April 24 & April 25

2010

APPALACHIAN SPRING by Aaron Copland

Guest Conductor

Adam Flatt

Purchase Tickets at 951-787-0251

AMERICAN SUITE

arranged by John B. Hedges

CONCERTO FOR ORCHESTRA by Béla Bartók

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mission&market Ta l e s o f t h e c i t y b r i e f ly t o l d Beyond the diamond

For coach Dennis Rogers, his 21 years at Riverside City College has been about more than just baseball. “What I’ve tried to do is improve human beings — athletes and student athletes — so they can enhance their futures,” Rogers says. “I’m a big believer in advancing preparation and knowledge, and then letting the game happen.” In May, Rogers will be inducted into the Riverside Sport Hall of Fame, along with six other local sports and coaching notables. At RCC, Rogers, 58, has led the Tigers to four state junior college championships. After relinquishing his head coaching role this season to a former assistant, Eddie Cornejo, Rogers remains a full-time instructor, teaching physical

education and baseball theory. Rogers (right) was a top player in high school and college, and played briefly with the San Francisco Giants. His coaching career started at John W. North High School, as an assistant to now-retired coach Rich Stalder, helping guide the Huskies to their first Ivy League title in 1976. He later coached at San Bernardino Valley College and at Cal Poly Pomona, and also managed in the minor leagues for the Oakland As and Pittsburgh Pirates. “I could tell Dennis had what it took,” Stalder says. “He was a very successful communicator with students and ball players, he was a great teacher, and he was tremendously organized.” — Amy Bentley

Green is good

Earth Day turns 40 this year with a range of events, including these: • UC Riverside faculty members will discuss the meaning and importance of sustainability in the context of the earth’s natural resources, climate change, world population and other issues. UC Riverside Extension Building, 1200 University Ave.; 5:30 p.m.; April 22; 951-827-3572, http://chass.ucr.edu. • Habitat for Humanity’s second Earth Day Festival,

Riverside Sport Hall of Fame Plaque unveiling ceremony: 10 a.m. May 8, The SPORT Clinic, 4444 Magnolia Ave. Formal induction banquet: 5:30 p.m. May 10, Riverside Convention Center Information: www.rshof.com

with opportunities to learn about solar energy and water conservation, a kids craft corner, and author Sheila Kee (“Bird Watching in Your Own Backyard of the Inland Empire”). White Park, 3936 Chestnut St., Riverside; 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 24; free; 951-787-6754, ext. 114; www.habitatriverside.org. • Tree planting, grove clean-up and other earth friendly activities at California Citrus State Historic Park. 9400 Dufferin Ave., Riverside; 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. April 24; free; 951-780-6222, www.parks.ca.gov. — Jerry Rice


100,000 PATRONS AND GROWING! THE INLAND EMPIRE’S PREMIERE THEATRE

CALIFORNIA THEATRE OF THE PERFORMING ARTS

May 7, 2010

June 5, 2010

MORRIS DAY & THE TIME

April 11, 2010

April 23-25, 2010

BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY

FRANKIE AVALON

June 12, 2010

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cov e r story

Kitchen

competitions These chefs can really stand the heat Ph o t o by Pr i s c i l l a I e z zi M a ke u p by Christina M. Gaudy

xx

| riversidethemag.com | month 2010

Wr it te n by L aure n M c S her r y


T

he Food Network has stirred the pot — along with interest — for reality shows that pit competitors against one another in a battle to win fame and fortune. But those who move in culinary circles know that a lot of hard work and dedication goes into crafting a chef ’s signature style and that rising to the top takes willpower and guts. Three Riverside residents have pursued their passion for cooking to become masters of the kitchen, with some surprising experiences along the way. These chefs have earned recognition — as well as a little TV time and prize money — in the process.

Ph o t o by G a b r i e l L u i s Ac o s t a

Robert Sevaly

Born and raised in Riverside, chef Robert Sevaly, 36, got his unlikely start in cooking as a deck hand on a sport fishing boat. Being at sea for extended periods began taking its toll on Sevaly, but not before he acquired some crucial knife wielding skills from filleting fish after each day’s catch. He returned home where he was hired to work in the butcher shop of an Italian market at the Brockton Arcade on Magnolia Avenue. “It was an Old World butcher,” he says. “Beef came in hind quarters and forequarters, hanging from the ceiling.” Sevaly’s passion for cooking had been stoked. He moved to San Diego to attend culinary school. In 2006, he returned again to Riverside to open The Cooking Store in Mission Grove Plaza where he is owner and executive chef. In addition to selling gourmet cookware, the store offers cooking classes five days a week, on topics from baking bread to making sauces and soufflés.

april-may 2010 | riversidethemag.com | 17


‘There are too many people these days, especially young people who don’t know how to cook and couldn’t boil spaghetti to save their life.’

“I’ve always felt that with any business I opened, I would need to wear several hats under one roof,” Sevaly says. “The cooking school drives the business on the retail floor. It’s a very good marriage.” Along the way, Sevaly has tried out twice for the Food Network’s “Top Chef ” and “The Next Food Network Star.” He also has filmed some cooking show episodes for Riverside’s cable access Channel 3. Sevaly aspires to having his own cooking show one day, but it’s not because he hungers to be a celebrity. “I really enjoy teaching,” he says.

“There are too many people these days, especially young people who don’t know how to cook and couldn’t boil spaghetti to save their life. “My philosophy has always been, it doesn’t cost you any more money to make food taste good.” Brein Clements

Brein Clements always knew he wanted to be a chef, enrolling at the California Culinary Academy in San Francisco straight out of high school. Twelve years later, he has risen through the ranks, working long hours, six days a week, to reach his goal of

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operating a place with his wife, Roryann Clements: the acclaimed Restaurant Omakase on Mission Inn Avenue. “To be a chef, you have to be a little bit crazy,” he says. “The hours, they’re just grueling. It’s very high-paced. There’s a lot of memorization.” Restaurant Omakase, which for a short time was rebranded as Bistro O at Omakase, has been featured in more than 45 articles by regional and national publications, and also set itself apart by incorporating rare types of citrus from the UC Riverside Citrus Collection in its recipes. In 2007, Clements was invited to cook at the James Beard House in New York City. Such invitations are only extended to chefs who are at the top of their game. Clements says that with the rise of reality cooking shows, some young

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‘To be a chef, you have to be a little bit crazy. The hours, they’re just grueling. It’s very high-paced. There’s a lot of memorization.’ adults are enrolling in culinary schools with the false notion that they will quickly find fame and fortune. “It’s never an easy road,” he says. “The hardest thing about being a chef is that you have to be a jack of all trades. You have to be able to do a little bit of everything.” And now Clements is going down a different avenue, closing Omakase and preparing a new restaurant-pub concept, The Salted Pig, which is expected to open early fall in a larger location nearby that will accommodate more than twice as many diners. The menu will feature American and international culinary delights, from novel snacks to hearty sandwiches to savory entrees — all fused with Brein’s personal flair. “We are excited for the opportunity to create a whole new restaurant offering, one that can be described as a casual, inviting and ‘whimsical’ restaurant,” he says. “(It) will offer a quirky combination of a rustic pub and upscale steakhouse in both its atmosphere and menu items.”

Ph o t o by G a b r i e l L u i s Ac o s t a

Laureen Pittman

Ph o t o by M i c a h E s c a m i l l a

20

‘I’m having

In 2003, Laureen Pittman a lot of fun. took a gamble and entered I’ve made a lot her recipe for shrimp in of good friends orange chipotle cream sauce in from across the a cooking competition at the old Orange Blossom Festival. country. It’s Pittman, a paralegal whose a great hobby.’ hobby is cooking, was shocked when she won the grand prize. “I just enjoyed it so much,” Pittman says. “That’s what set me off thinking about entering more contests.” Six years later, Pittman, 46, has won thousands of dollars and other prizes in bake-offs and recipe contests. She’s competed in more than a dozen contests, from “Good Morning America” to Emeril’s Comfort for the Coast Recipe Contest. In 2009, she appeared in the “Hot and Spicy” episode of Food Network’s “Ultimate Recipe Showdown.” She made Baja chile rellenos mariscos and paniolo steak but was eliminated by the end of the show.

| riversidethemag.com | april-may 2010


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de f e n s e

Eyes in t

t h e P r e d at o r p r o g r a m p u t s

I

n a windowless room in a training facility at March Air Reserve Base, a pilot and co-pilot carefully maneuver a Predator drone hovering high above the blowing sands of the Mojave Desert, more than 100 miles from Riverside. Flanking the pilots is a tall, thick, humming wall of computer equipment — all part of the advanced technology used to fly an unmanned plane through computer commands transmitted by satellite. The 163rd Reconnaissance Wing at March is the first Air National Guard unit to fly the Predator as well as launch Predator maintenance and training programs. It is rare for a National Guard unit to take on a training program, but the Predator has proven

24 | riversidethemag.com | april-may 2010

to be one of the most essential tools in the U.S. military arsenal for offensives overseas. The Predator has increasingly played a critical role in surveillance and tactical missions in Iraq and Afghanistan — from searching for and capturing suspected terrorists to swooping in and taking out targets to helping soldiers besieged by intense gunfire. “This is the work horse,” says Master Sgt. Carson Brassfield. “It is the most called for resource we have in the military right now.” Once criticized as being an expensive, impractical experiment, military officials now speak of the aircraft in enthusiastic, even reverent, terms. The surveillance images that these drones capture

M


n the sky

s

M a r c h AR B o n t h e f r o n t l i n e s Writ ten by L auren Mc S herr y | U. S . A ir Force photo by M a ster Sg t . Scot t Reed

may have a decisive role in combat situations because they are beamed to soldiers positioned on the ground equipped with laptop computers. In military circles, the perspective captured by the drones is often referred to as a “God’s eye view.” It’s one thing to work off of a single computer screen, but flying a drone and manipulating its cameras for surveillance or tactical missions requires the ability to multi-task. Back in the training facility, the pilot and co-pilot, who is officially called the sensor operator, face 14 flat-panel computer screens that display maps of the terrain, weather patterns and nearby aircraft. Other screens stream video images from two

cameras attached to the drone’s body. On this day, the co-pilot is learning how to use a camera to zoom in on a target more than a mile away. He has homed in on Medina Wasl, a simulated Iraqi town at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin near Barstow. Medina Wasl is used to put soldiers through battle scenarios similar to the ones they might encounter overseas. The co-pilot has focused the camera on two blownout cars abandoned on the side of the road. The battered car bodies and the ground beside them are splattered with red paint. In the grainy image on the

april-may 2010 | riversidethemag.com | 25


Left, Master Sgt. Carson Brassfield with a Predator in the maintenance classroom at March Air Reserve Base. Below, A pilot and sensor operator at March control a Predator during a training exercise, which had the drone flying over Fort Irwin near Barstow.

Ph o t o s by A l C u izo n

The Predator • • • • • •    

Wing span – 50 feet Top speed – 130 mph Altitude limit – 25,000 feet Weight – 2,000 pounds Fuel capacity – 100 gallons Video optics – mounted on the belly of the plane, remotely controlled from a ground command station

Source: 163rd Reconnaissance Wing

computer screen, the paint gruesomely resembles blood. Zooming out, the co-pilot refocuses the camera on a nearby mosque — its gold and blue dome distinct in the video feed on the screen. “OK, now switch to infrared,” the instructor sitting next to the co-pilot orders. The color images are replaced by a black-and-white video feed, which allows the co-pilot to see, in this pretend scenario, if anybody is fleeing the scene. The technology being employed by the co-pilot has come a long way. The Predator was first used in 1995 in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Kosovo for video surveillance. It was employed again in 2003 in Iraq for surveillance missions. Later, Hellfire missiles were added to its wings. 26 | riversidethemag.com | april-may 2010

With Predators increasingly being called in to assist soldiers on the ground, the Air Force has ramped up training and added more Predator pilots for missions in Iraq and Afghanistan. In 2007, March Air Reserve Base began participating in operations overseas. Today, earthbound pilots stationed in California and Nevada are flying missions in battles half a world away in Afghanistan and Iraq. Satellite technology is so far advanced that a pilot can radio a soldier on the ground to update him about what the drone is seeing from above.

“Think about the capabilities it gives these guys,” says Commander Blake “Hedley” LaMar, who oversees the day-to-day operations of squadron personnel. “We talk to him like we’re sitting next door, talking on the phone. You can sometimes hear the gunfire in the background.” A Predator costs $700,000 to build, which is much less expensive than other military aircraft. But the surveillance equipment attached to the plane, valued at $3 million, is where the real investment lies. Lasers on the drone may be used as


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pointers to identify targets for soldiers on the ground or to guide missiles. The drone is so light that the nose of the plane can be lifted with one hand. “It’s virtually invisible just because it’s so small and so quiet,” Brassfield says. In a conference room in one of the training facilities, LaMar turns on a video captured by a drone in Afghanistan that shows how the lasers aren’t just used to blow things up. In the black-and-white video, a group of suspects have evaded soldiers who have raided a compound. As the suspects attempt to hide in a field, the drone pinpoints the men with its infrared camera and uses a laser beam to show the soldiers where to find them. The suspects are taken into custody. “We’d rather capture them,” LaMar says. “That’s the way we’d really like to conduct business. Obviously, if they’re shooting at you, all bets are off.”

Numbers are a ‘challenge’ The March Air Reserve Base training facility for Predator pilots and co-pilots is affectionately called “the schoolhouse.” March is one of three bases in the nation that provide such training. The other two “schoolhouses” are operated out of Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada and Holloman Air Force Base in New Mexico. As commanders in combat zones have put in more and more requests for the Predator’s “unblinking eye,” the urgent task before the Air Force has been recruiting and training crews fast enough to meet demand. “That’s been the challenge,” says Lt. Col. Tom Pritchard. “The hardest thing is training the crews.”

Of the approximately 5,000 people who work at March, 950 are par t of the 163rd Reconnaissance Wing. Each year, about 40 crews, comprised of a pilot and sensor operator, are sent to the base for nine weeks of training. In addition, up to 50 mission intelligence coordinators are trained there each year. During missions, the coordinators act as go-betweens for the soldiers on the ground and the crew flying the drone. Before learning how to fly a Predator, pilots go through a year of pilot training, the same training required for all Air Force pilots. In some cases the training involves flying high performance jets. At the training facility, pilots are put through battle simulations and emergency situations, such as engine failure.

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N E IG H BOR HOO DS

After Camp Anza, a unique playground Wr it te n by Fr a nk Teur lay | Cur re nt photos by Fr a nk Perez

A

s a child growing up in the Arlanza district of Riverside in the 1960s, friends and I would often re-enact the World War II battles we saw in the movies or on television. Little did we know that our skirmishes took place precisely where U.S. troops had trained before they fought real WWII battles just 20 years earlier. At Camp Anza, troops spent their last 10 days on American soil before boarding a transport ship bound for the Pacific theater. They received immunizations and cultural orientation appropriate to their destination, were trained to use gas masks and learned how use a rope ladder to descend from a ship

at sea into an amphibious landing craft. Soldiers also made final equipment checks and prepared wills. To boost morale, Hollywood stars — including Orson Welles, Lena Horne, Harpo Marx and Jimmy Durante — performed for the men and women headed into the conflict. Bob Hope and Kay Kyser broadcast their popular weekly radio programs from the Camp Anza Theater to a nationwide audience. Desi Arnaz was stationed there as a private and was often visited by his wife, Lucille Ball. At war’s end, Camp Anza was a major welcome home point for nearly half a million victorious soldiers. They were served a steak dinner and could rest on a bunk with sheets and a pillow, Rope ladder training Ph o t o c o u r t e s y Gen. James K . Herbert family


but the biggest hit was that first phone call home. Camp Anza built one of the largest telephone centers in the country so homesick GIs could speak with loved ones — many for the first time since leaving for overseas. After the war, Rohr Corporation built a manufacturing plant on part of the former Camp Anza property. It soon became the largest employer in Riverside, building components for aircraft and the space program. In the area surrounding Rohr, former barracks were converted into housing and newly built subdivisions sprang up leading the evolution into the dynamic Arlanza we know today. For this “baby boomer,” Arlanza in the 1960s was a great place to grow up. Little League, school activities and relatives working at Rohr made for a unique feeling of community.

A former movie theater is now Hamblin’s auto body shop.

Frank Teurlay is the author of “Riverside’s Camp Anza and Arlanza” (Arcadia Publishing, 2008), which may be found at book retailers both online and throughout Riverside. For an autographed copy, or if you have information or ar tifacts about Camp Anza/ Arlanza, write Teurlay at P.O. Box 30261, Walnut Creek, CA 94598, or e-mail camp_anza@pacbell.net.

One of the two phone service buildings is now a small retail center.

The colored servicemen’s club is now the Alano Club.

Barracks were converted into single-family homes.

The former laundry is now subdivided into several small businesses, including medical and auto service establishments.

april-may 2010 | riversidethemag.com | 31


l a n dm ar ks

For Anne Rice’s latest thriller, the Mission Inn is a divine setting

‘Angel’ among us Wr it te n by L aure n M c S her r y Photo by A l Cuizon

Author Anne Rice in the Amistad Suite at Riverside’s historic Mission Inn.

“Angel Time” By Anne Rice 288 pages in hardcover, Knoff, $26 Also available for Kindle; mass market paperback release scheduled for Aug. 31

32 | riversidethemag.com | april-may 2010

A

nne Rice is in love with the Mission Inn Hotel & Spa. In fact, the prolific author was so taken with the historic landmark the first time she visited that she chose it as a key setting in her latest novel, “Angel Time.” “I was immediately swept off my feet by it,” Rice says, sitting by a window in the hotel’s Innkeeper Suite while sipping one of her signature Diet Cokes. “I just immediately started taking notes, and the story unfolded. I came back and visited the Inn again, and I’m sure I’ll be back many times.” After returning to the Catholic

Church in 1998 and announcing in 2002 that she would be dedicating her work to God, Rice’s writing career took a new turn. No longer does she write about the witches and vampires that made her the bestselling author of “Interview with a Vampire” and other novels. Those characters do not speak to her anymore. “I had loved writing those books, but they were about sadness and grief and loss,” Rice says. “They were being haunted by a lost faith, and I really told all the stories I had to tell.” “Angel Time,” which is the first in a series called “Songs of the Seraphim,” adheres to Rice’s


‘I’ve never written a real series before. I’ve written a lot of stand-alone books about the same characters, but this is a real planned series.’ commitment to Christian writing. The novel is about an angel, an assassin and a chance at redemption. “It’s much easier for me to write about somebody who repents and tried to do good in the world, than it is to write about a vampire who is doomed to search in the night for answers that he’ll never get,” she says. The protagonist, a 28-year-old hit man named Toby O’Dare, is called to carry out a contract murder in his personal retreat — the Mission Inn’s Amistad Suite — when the angel Malchiah appears to him. O’Dare then travels through time to 13th century England to save a Jewish family whose lives are threatened. Rice is known for doing thorough research into various historical eras for her novels, and “Angel Time” is no exception. It’s part of her promise to readers that her novels will be accurate. She also extensively researched angels by reading scriptural passages, writings by theologians and accounts by people who claim to have seen angels. “I love to write about the Middle Ages

5 HIGH

Anne Rice’s five things to love about the Mission Inn: 1. Its architecture. “I love the wooden doors, the arches, the towers, the bells, the statues.” 2. The hotel’s layout is a labyrinth. “You can get lost in it. You can roam through different cour tyards, go down the rotunda stairs. I love that.” 3. The flowers, the greenery, the landscaping. “It very much reminds me of New Orleans. When I came in the spring, when I was first writing the book, I was just knocked out by the fruit trees, the bougainvillea. It’s just lavishly landscaped. It’s beautiful.” 4. The restaurants. “A great hotel should have great restaurants, and I think it does have great restaurants.” 5. The views from the valley. “You can look out the windows and see the mountains. It’s sor t of the essence of California that you have those contrasts.”

and different periods in history; I always have,” Rice says. “I’ve made this a series in which I can do that, and to me, that’s quite a wonderful challenge. I would love to do a lot of novels.” Rice hasn’t yet decided how many books will comprise the “Seraphim” series, but she hopes it will go on and on. “I’ve never really written a real series before,” she says. “I’ve written a lot of stand-alone books about the same characters, but this is a real planned series.” After the death of her husband, Rice left New Orleans, her hometown, and moved to Rancho Mirage in 2005 to be closer to her son, Christopher, a novelist in Los Angeles. “We’re all from the South, and I think

we’re comfortable with the heat,” she says. “It’s wonderful to have blue skies just about every day. (Rancho Mirage is) a very peaceful, beautiful area.” It was after her move to Southern California that Rice visited the Mission Inn. In the first chapters of “Angel Time,” she lovingly recreates the hotel through vivid descriptions, calling it “a giant confection and confabulation” and “an extravagant and engulfing place sprawling over two city blocks.” She writes about its verdant landscaping, bubbling fountains, bell towers and flying buttresses. “It makes me think of New Orleans,” Rice says of the Inn. “It makes me less homesick. It’s very picturesque and very beautiful.”

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So start walking. And eat right. For Dr. Deo Martinez, a Moreno Valley internal medicine and geriatric specialist, the complications from diabetes are too severe to head down that path if it can be avoided. The “thrifty gene,” which helped the human species survive famines thousands of years ago, has turned against us, now that food is plentiful, he says. Excessive weight may lead to Type 2 diabetes, and you don’t want to go there. Watch what you eat, exercise and keep an eye on the scale. Type 2 used to be informally called adult onset diabetes. But that nickname doesn’t seem to work anymore. Martinez, who is on the medical staff of Riverside Community Hospital, has seen children with it at age 12 and heard about cases as young as five. Dr. Clifford Douglas, a neurosurgeon, views diet as an important issue as well. Strokes can happen because particles in the blood vessels break off and block the the flow of blood into the brain, says Douglas, also a Riverside Community Hospital team member. A good diet, exercise and keeping a good handle on blood pressure may minimize the risk for stroke — and

heart attack for that matter. Incidentally, if you have some heart issues and have diabetes too, your heart attack risk zooms, Martinez says. Dr. Esmond Gee, a Redlands-based colon and rectal surgeon, says several types of cancer risks can be reduced with proper diet and exercise. Decrease fat in the diet, exercise, drink alcohol in moderation and — it almost goes without saying — if you smoke, stop.

Although not a heavyweight on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention list of killers, Gee is becoming concerned about the rate of increase for rectal cancer. Unfortunately too many people self-diagnose its main symptom — bleeding — as a hemorrhoid problem. Big mistake, says Gee, a Riverside Community Hospital medical staff member. Have a specialist rule out cancer. As with other cancers, early detection improves treatment outcomes significantly. So get your diet right, exercise, drink in moderation and, if you are still smoking, get into a program to help you quit. And there’s one more thing: Nurture your emotional well-being, Douglas says.

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pro f i le Wr it te n by M ichel N ola n Photo by K ha i Le

Kindness

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iceness is not wimpy. In fact, it’s the best tool for a company during a recession — good for other people, good for the giver. So says Riverside author Kristin Tillquist, whose book, “Capitalizing on Kindness: Why 21st Century Professionals Need to Be Nice,” takes the stigma out of being nice in business. A columnist, business consultant, inspirational speaker and attorney, Tillquist wants to affect a change in business culture to encourage people to not be shy about being nice. “It became mislabeled as weakness,” she says. “Niceness was mislabeled as weak, Kristin Tillquist as wimpy. One of the purposes of the Book: “Capitalizing on book is to redefine niceness and Kindness: Why 21st kindness as strong, savvy, intentional Century Professionals and as the pursuit of mutual success.” Need to Be Nice” Publisher: Career Press Tillquist was born in Buffalo, N.Y., Available: Amazon.com; and raised in Vancouver, British Barnes & Noble, Borders Columbia, where she practiced law and independent as a civil litigation attorney. book stores In 2000, she and her husband, John, Information: www.kindnesscapital.com moved to Riverside, where she is chief of staff to Mayor Ron Loveridge. As a proponent of nice, she believes businesses should adopt kindness for the right reasons and in the right way — not to curry favor. “Be it a mom and pop shop or a Fortune 500 company, they really should make kindness part of their business strategy,” she says. “When we endeavor to help other people, we not only enrich their lives, but our own.” She’s talking about a pairing of caring and firmness — savvy optimism, not blind optimism. “People should attempt to be kind, considerate and generous and helpful all the time. It shouldn’t be only to gain a benefit to themselves or only when they see the value to their own bottom line. It has to be more of a philosophy — of how we approach business, how we approach the professional world.”

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The Mermilliod residence is one stop on the Old Riverside Foundation’s 19th annual Vintage Home Tour.

Improving on history Wr it te n by A my Be nt ley Photos by G a br iel Luis Acost a

J

ennifer Mermilliod is an architectural historian, so it may come as no surprise that she and her husband, Greg, are restoring their historic Spanish-Mediterranean home with Gothic and modern influences. The Mermilliods will open their residence during the Old Riverside Foundation’s 19th annual Vintage Home Tour and Restoration Faire on May 15. At least six residences in the Wood Streets area will be featured in the showcase of homes. Riverside City College’s Alumni House, a former private residence built in 1910, a bungalow, Mediterranean-Spanish Revival houses and a storybook cottage are among the homes on the self-guided tour. The Mermilliod home was built around 1929 and designed

38

| riversidethemag.com | april-may 2010

Greg and Jennifer Mermilliod in the great room of their home viewed from the orchestra loft.


Points of pride Bathroom “When we bought the home, the man who owned it was in the process of remodeling the house and had laid down new tile. One of our contingencies was, ‘We’ll buy it if you stop everything.’ There’s a lot of great rooms in this house but this bathroom is really great,” Jennifer Mermilliod says.

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Orchestra loft “The Carter family owned the home from the 1940s to the 1990s, and when they entertained guests, musicians would be performing in the loft area. The acoustics are wonderful. We use it as a library, but I’m also continuing to keep music in that room. I have my mom’s violin that she played as a girl, my husband’s guitar and we’re going to have an old-fashioned record player.”

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by well-known Riverside architect Robert Spurgeon. It has about 3,900 square feet with a separate studio and maid’s quarters. The first floor has three bedrooms and a large bathroom, and the upstairs features a bathroom, a bedroom used as a home office, and an orchestra loft with instruments and a musical theme. Renovations include painting, plasterwork and plumbing, and Greg did much of the work himself. “We’ve tried very hard to maintain its historic character,” Jennifer says. The dining room is filled with period furniture, including a carved, darkstained wood-and-iron table and carved wooden chairs with tooled leather. Other Spanish features include wrought iron light fixtures and a beautiful iron courtyard gate. Don’t miss the main bathroom with

A hand-carved table, china cabinet and side board from Spain accent the dining room.

the original white hexagonal floor tiles bordered by black and white tiles in a checkerboard pattern. A large porcelain tub, pedestal sink, art deco light fixtures and a Gothic-style door with a pointed arch make this a room worth seeing.

Old Riverside Foundation Vintage Home Tour Wood Streets neighborhood 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 15 $15 in advance, $18 on the day of the tour www.oldriverside.org

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| riversidethemag.com | april-may 2010


dining out W H E R E TO E AT

N

OTEWORTHY restaurants selected from our rotating list. Before going, confirm information, and we also solicit your help in correcting errors. We invite your feedback on dining experiences.

DUANE’S At the Mission Inn, 3649 Mission Inn

ABBREVIATIONS & PRICING RS, reservations suggested. (While some restaurants suggest reservations on cer tain nights, others request them only for par ties of five or more.) FB, full bar. $ mostly under $15, $$ mostly under $20, $$$ mostly under $50, $$$$ above $50

5250 Arlington Ave.; 951-354-5100, www.farfallasrestaurants.com UÊPizza, pasta, calzones and more. Lunch and dinner daily, except Saturday when only dinner is served. $ THE GOURMET DETECTIVE Avila Terrace Theatre, 3663 Main St.; 866-992-5424, www.gourmetdetective.com UÊ“Murder at the Cafe Noir,” a murder mystery dinner theater. Show and dinner included in the price. RS, $$$$

DOWNTOWN & MID-CITY BELLA TRATTORIA Mission Inn, 3649 Mission

Inn Ave.; 951-784-0300, www.missioninn.com UÊSidewalk dining featuring Southern Italian cuisine. Lunch and dinner Tu.-Sa. $$ CIAO BELLA RISTORANTE 1630 Spruce St.; 951-781-8840, www.ciaobellariverside.com UÊCasual fine dining indoors or on the patio. Lunch M-F, dinner M-Sa. RS, FB, $$ CITRUS CITY GRILLE Riverside Plaza, 3555 Riverside Plaza Drive; 951-274-9099, www.citruscitygrille.com UÊSteaks, seafood, lamb, chicken, pasta and more. RS, FB, $$ CRESCENT JEWELL 3597 Main St.; 951-684-1000, www.crescentjewell.com UÊNew Orleans style restaurant and lounge serving a full menu of Cajun and Creole fusion dishes. Entertainment nightly. FB, $$

Ave.; 951-341-6767, www.missioninn.com UÊPremier steakhouse and seafood restaurant, which has received the AAA Four Diamond award every year since 1996. Dinner M-Sa., brunch Su. $$$

FARFALLA’S CUCINA ITALIANA

GRAM’S MISSION BAR-B-QUE PALACE

3527 Main St.; 951-782-8219, www.gramsbbq.org UÊBarbecue items have been served at this Riverside institution for two decades. $ ISLANDS 3645 Central Ave.; 951-782-7471, www.islandsrestaurants.com UÊBurgers, sandwiches, tacos, salads and more. FB, $ JOE'S SUSHI 9555 Magnolia Ave.; 951-353-1929, www.joesushi.com UÊThis pioneer of the all-you-can eat sushi concept in Riverside also specializes in teriyaki, teppan and tempura dishes. RS $$ KILLARNEY’S RESTAURANT & IRISH PUB

Riverside Plaza, 3639 Riverside Plaza Drive, Suite 532; 951-682-2933, www.killarneys.com UÊEnjoy a glass of Guinness in a pub that was built in Ireland

and reconstructed at Riverside Plaza. Diners may order traditional Irish fare or choose American favorites. FB, $ LAS CAMPANAS At the Mission Inn, 3649 Mission Inn Ave.; 951-341-6767, www.missioninn.com UÊAuthentic Mexican cuisine served in a beautifully landscaped outdoor garden. Lunch M-Sa., brunch Su., dinner nightly. $ LOUNGE 33 Riverside Plaza, 3639 Riverside Plaza Drive; 951-784-4433, www.loungethirtythree.com UÊMore than 30 creative cocktails are on the drink menu, and several large appetizer platters — perfect for sharing — are served. FB, $ MARIO’S PLACE 3646 Mission Inn Ave.; 951-684-7755, www.mariosplace.com UÊChef Leone Palagi’s take on northern Italian cuisine is widely praised. Dinner M-Sa., lunch Fri. RS, FB, $$$ MASA'S PLACE 5228 Arlington Ave.; 951-689-8054, www.masasplace.com U Traditional Japanese sushi prepared by a head chef who started more than 30 years ago in Japan. RS $$ MISSION INN 3649 Mission Inn Ave.; 951-341-6767, www.missioninn.com UÊSignature “comfort foods” prepared in a new state-of-the-art display kitchen. Breakfast and dinner daily, lunch M-Sa. $ THE OLD SPAGHETTI FACTORY 3191 Mission Inn Ave.; 951-784-4417, www.osf.com UÊSeveral varieties of pasta, salads and desserts. Lunch and dinner daily. FB, $

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OLIO RISTORANTE At the Marriott, 3400 Market St.; 951-786-7147, www.olioristorante.com UĂŠNorthern Italian steak and seafood with an eclectic California twist. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. FB, $$ PEPITOS 6539 Magnolia Ave.; 951-788-2652 UĂŠTraditional Mexican fare including carnitas, chile verde, fajitas and steak picado. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast items also served. FB, $ PHOOD ON MAIN 3737 Main St., Suite 100; 951-276-7111, www.phoodforthought.com UĂŠChoose from mix-and-match menu items akin to tapas and dim sum including the whimsically named Duck, Duck ... No Goose and I Don't Eat Meat sandwiches as well as full-sized-plate fare. FB $ SEVILLA 3252 Mission Inn Ave.; 951-778-0611, www.cafesevilla.com UĂŠCasually elegant dining experience featuring Spanish and coastal cuisine. Nightclub with live music and dancing every night, plus a flamenco dinner show weekly. Lunch and dinner daily. FB, RS, $$$

WEST THE AULD DUBLINER Galleria at Tyler, 3775 Tyler St.; 951-354-6325, www.aulddubliner.com UÊBeef stew, shepherd’s pie and other traditional Irish dishes, plus burgers, sandwiches and wraps. RS, FB, $ EVENTS SPORTS GRILL 10560 Magnolia Ave., Suite A; 951-352-2693, www.eventssportsgrill.com UÊBurgers, sandwiches and pizza. Tacos $1 each

on Tuesdays; beer and pool specials on Wednesdays. Four large projection-screen TVs, plus more than a dozen smaller TVs spread throughout. Lunch and dinner daily FB, $ ELEPHANT BAR Galleria at Tyler, 3775 Tyler St., Suite A; 951-353-2200, www.elephantbar.com UÊPacific Rim and wok-fired recipes. Lunch and dinner daily. RS, FB, $ JOSE’S 3765 La Sierra Ave.; 951-359-8000, www.josesmexicanfood.com UÊSouth of the border favorites. Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast items served all day. $ OLIVIA’S 9447 Magnolia Ave.; 951-689-2131 UÊTraditional Mexican fare. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. $ PUNJAB PALACE 10359 Magnolia Ave.; 951-351-8968, www.punjabpalacecuisineofindia.com UÊIndian tapestries and music set the mood for a vast offering of Punjabi delicacies. The buffet is available for both lunch and dinner. $ THE YARD HOUSE Galleria at Tyler, 3775 Tyler St., Space 1A; 951-688-9273, www.yardhouse.com UÊUpscale-casual eatery with a menu that includes pastas, sandwiches, seafood, steaks, ribs and chops. Lunch, dinner and late-night dining daily. RS, FB, $

UNIVERSITY & EAST CREOLA’S 1015 E. Alessandro Blvd.;

951-653-8150, www.creolasrestaurant.com UĂŠChicken, filet mignon, lamb, meat loaf, pork and several varieties of fish. Dinner W-Su. $$

CREST CAFE 5225 Canyon Crest Drive;

951-784-2233 UÊBurgers, pasta, salads and other American and Italian favorites. Traditional breakfast menu includes omelettes, pancakes and waffles. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. $ GERARD’S EVE BISTRO 9814 Magnolia Ave.; 951-687-4882, www.gerardsevebistro.com UÊFrench cuisine in an intimate bistro atmosphere. Dinner entrees include boeuf bourguignon, duck confit and veal milanese. Dinner W-Su., Sunday brunch. $$$ GRA-POW 497 Alessandro Blvd. Suite. D; 951-780-1132, www.grapow.net UÊThai food with California and Pacific Rim accents. Beer and wine available. Lunch and dinner daily. $ MONARK ASIAN BISTRO 5225 Canyon Crest Drive, Suite 64; 951-683-1073, XXXNPOBSLBTJBOCJTUSPDPNr4FSWJOHBSBOHF of classic Chinese and Thai dishes, as well as contemporary Asian-inspired fusion dishes, some of them created by the owner, Karen Chen, a native of Taiwan. Lunch and dinner daily. $ SMOKEY CANYON BBQ 5225 Canyon Crest Drive, Suite 9; 951-782-8808, www.smokeycanyon.com UÊBurgers, sandwiches, catfish, chicken, ribs and more. Bar area has two TVs. Lunch M, lunch and dinner Tu.-Su. FB, $ UNIVERSITY CAFE INC. 1400 University Ave., No. A109; 951-686-6338 UÊChinese cuisine, including sweet and sour pork, Cantonese soy and curry chicken. Combo meals for $6.45 include a drink. Lunch and dinner daily. $

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seen The national March for Meals campaign was a success locally thanks to the volunteers who helped Riverside Meals on Wheels deliver hot, nutritious meals to seniors and disabled housebound residents throughout the city. Riverside police officers were among those who made deliveries during the month. For information, visit www.riversidemealsonwheels.org. 3

Riverside Meals on Wheels Photos G a br iel Luis Acost a

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seen

Riverside Master Chorale Photos by J a me s Ca r bone

Riverside Master Chorale’s inaugural wine and cheese gala at American Eagle Winery in Canyon Crest Towne Centre was a big success. Proceeds will help the chorale cover the costs of staging three concerts this year, including A Celtic Celebration on May 16. For information about the group, upcoming auditions and concerts, visit www.riversidemasterchorale.com.

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(1) Gail Watson, left, Cathie Mason, Gerry and Linda Dalman (2) Kevin and Carolyn Craig (3) Tom and Karen Garrett (4) Baxter and Debbie Miller

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Your Home Improvement Specialist Kitchens and Baths ❘ Room Additions Ron Baskett Construction Inc. 909-882-4436 ❘ 909-229-4744

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Trusted Service in the Inland Empire for Over 15 Years

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STIMULUS SAVINGS Save Up To $1500

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I N TA X C R E D I T S

6 VINYL WINDOWS

 Dual Pane  Energy Efficient

INSTALLED FOR

229900

$

951-471-0996 Lic. #679758

S.A. JONES CONSTRUCTION

DEAL DIRECT WITH CONTRACTOR & WE WILL BEAT ANY ESTIMATE

Waddell & Reed, Inc.

Member SIPC

3610 Central Avenue SUITE 102 Riverside, CA 92506 (951) 781-0573 nickmilazzo@wradvisors.com #OE60251 9655 (09/09) april-may 2010 | riversidethemag.com | 45


seen

Riverside Downtown Partnership Photos by J a me s Ca r bone

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Representing the arts, business, education and other areas of the community, 125 guests gathered recently at the Marriott for Riverside Downtown Partnership’s 23rd annual meeting and awards ceremony. Several people and organizations were recognized for their fine work, including Debbi Guthrie, who received the Roy Hord Volunteer of the Year Award. For information, visit www.riversidedowntown.org.

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(1) Riverside Council members Nancy Har t and Paul Davis (2) Justin Scott-Coe and Nancy Castillo (3) Brian Pearcy, left, and Don Tucker (4) Frank and Marcia Campbell (5) Roryann Clements, left, and Andrea Palagi (6) Chuck Beaty, left, and Bill Gardner (7) Councilman Mike Gardner, left, and Mayor Ron Loveridge (8) Jim and Debbie Guthrie (9) Natasha Ferguson, left, Carol Fick and Oscar Capelli (10) Jonathan Yorba, right, greets guests

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| riversidethemag.com | april-may 2010

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SAV E TH E DATE EVENTS April 13 – Salute to Service, Soroptimist International of Riverside. California Baptist University, 8432 Magnolia Ave., Riverside; www.soroptimistriverside.org. April 17 – 2010 Dyslexia Dash to benefit the Inland Empire Branch of International Dyslexia Association. Fairmount Park, 2601 Fairmount Blvd., Riverside; 951-686-9837, www.dyslexia-ca.org.

AngÊlica’s

Let us be your first choice for flowers.

Special Arrangements for Mother’s Day!

April 17 – Senior salute gala presented by the Janet Goeske Foundation. Victoria Club, 2521 Arroyo Drive, Riverside; 5 p.m.; 951-840-3905, www.janetgoeskecenter.com.

32.95

$

April 24 – Stroll ’n’ Roll to benefit The Carolyn E. Wylie Center for Children, Youth & Families. Shamel Park, Arlington Avenue at Yellowstone Drive, Riverside; 9 a.m.; 951-683-5193, Ext. 241, www.wyliecenter.org.

Teleflora’s 3UNNY3MILES

If smiles were flowers, they’d look just like this. A cheery bouquet of yellow, peach and white blossoms is like a vase full of happiness! Add a matching yellow ribbon, and it becomes a bright day indeed.

April 24 – The March for Babies Walk to benefit the March of Dimes. Riverside City College, 4800 Magnolia Ave.; 951-892-7923, www.marchofdimes.com. April 24 – 20th annual Men Who Cook fundraiser gala. YWCA Riverside County, 8172 Magnolia Ave., Riverside; $20; 951-687-9922, www.ywcariverside.org. April 30 – Playday for Women to benefit the American Red Cross of Riverside County. Marriott, 3400 Market St., Riverside; 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; $60; 888-831-0031, ext. 3004, www.playdayforwomen.org. May 8 – Riverside Area Rape Crisis Center dinner and auction gala. Victoria Club, 2521 Arroyo Drive, Riverside; 5 p.m.; $125; 951-686-7273, www.rarcc.org. May 8 – Riverside Medical Clinic Foundation 25th anniversary gala. Riverside Convention Center, 3443 Orange St.; 6 p.m.; $125; 951-682-2753, www.rivfound.org. May 14 – Olive Crest Black Tie Bowling Night, to benefit programs for abused and at-risk children. Arlington Lanes, Riverside; 800-550-2445, www.olivecrest.org. May 15 – The Magic of Believing, Jefferson Transitional Programs to benefit Ar t Works. 5 p.m.; 951-683-1279, www.jtpfriends.org. May 15 – Backyard Bash and Taste of Riverside to benefit Riverside nonprofit organizations. Cesar Chavez Center, Bobby Bonds Park, 2060 University Ave., Riverside; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; $25; 951-328-8284.

FLORIST & GIFTS

Family Owned & Operated ~ Proudly serving Riverside since 1992

$42.95 Midnight 3NOWFALL

This dreamy blend of fresh blue and white flowers in a blue jardiniere is a sign of a wondrous season! It’s a pretty, petite floral arrangement for any wintry day.

We offer a 10% discount to anyone in the military, firefighters and peace officers.

$47.95 Teleflora’s Pretty Pink Present A splendid bouquet of pretty pink blossoms – nestled snugly inside a gift-wrapped box. It’s a unique way to brighten someone’s day.

We are committed to offering only the finest floral arrangements and gifts, backed by service that is friendly and prompt. 231 East Alessandro 6-E, Riverside, CA 92508

951.780.6497

866.456.7673

Visit our website at www.angelicasflorist.com and place your order online. AMTOPM-ONDAYTHROUGH&RIDAYsAMTOPM3ATURDAYs#LOSED3UNDAY

see our special offers at april-may 2010 | riversidethemag.com | 47


seen

‘Annie’ Cast Party Photos by J a me s Ca r bone

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The first Broadway in Riverside production ­a t the Fox Performing Arts Center — the Depression-era musical “Annie” — was celebrated during a cast party shortly after the opening night curtain call. Since its return, the newly renovated Fox has more than lived up to its billing as a premier venue to enjoy a musical, and Broadway in Riverside has more shows on tap. For information, visit www.broadwayinriverside.com.

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(1) Tawny Castillo, left, Debbie Cowper, Denise Willis and Joan Day (2) David St. Pierre (3) “Annie” cast members Jordan Boezem, left, Mackenzie Aladjem and Ivy Moody (4) Melanie Caricato, left, Marisa Holst and Marse Caricato (5) Walt and Pamela Hogan (6) Tim and Georgia Gesner (7) Jacqueline Thomas, left, Ian Hughes and Emily Hughes with Mary Droser, back (8) Madison Ker th, who plays Annie, and Jeff Duncan, who plays F.D.R. (9) Michelle Alexander, left, John Diamond and Vanessa Ybarra (10) Addison Sisco, left, and Briana Marino

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| riversidethemag.com | april-may 2010


Wedding Receptions Company Events Fund Raisers Dances Concerts

The Inland Empire’s MEATING DESTINATION…

Parties of all Kinds

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pa st liv e s

Trumpeting tradition Wr it te n by A my Be nt ley

G

retired, over 80 of his former students became musicians,” ustav Hilverkus came to Riverside in 1905 says Glenn Wenzel, a minister at St. Paul Lutheran Church in and four years later played the trumpet at the first Easter sunrise service on Mount Rubidoux. Riverside who is writing a book, “Anecdotes on Mount The early morning event turns Rubidoux and Frank A. Miller.” 101 this year and is believed Hilverkus performed on occasion to be the oldest continuous at the Mission Inn with a local outdoor Easter Spanish ensemble and sunrise service in the apparently became friendly United States. with Mission Inn founder A German native Frank Miller, who owned born in 1868, Hilverkus Mount Rubidoux then was a highly regarded as well. musician. He directed After performing the Riverside Military at that first sunrise Band, a city group, and service, Hilverkus in 1908 he took over returned to play the orchestra and band trumpet almost every Easter through 1922, programs at the old Riverside High School. either as a soloist or as part He later went to Poly High of a brass quartet. School and taught there until his “The song he always played retirement in 1939. was ‘Holy City.’ That became a fixture Gustav Hilverkus is behind “He must have made quite an impression of the early services,” Wenzel says. the drum holding a cornet and wearing pince-nez style glasses. on his students. He was quoted in Hilverkus died in 1959 and is buried at C o u r t e s y o f t h e R i ve r s i d e Evergreen Memorial Historic Cemetery. a newspaper article as saying that when he Metropolitan Museum The cross atop Mount Rubidoux Ph o t o by G a b r i e l L u i s Ac o s t a

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| riversidethemag.com | month 2010


Cajun & Creole Cuisine

Grand Opening Crescent Jewell Restaurant & Lounge is a New Orleans-style, full-service restaurant and lounge located in the heart of Historic Riverside and features Creole/Cajun fusion cuisine, plus lively entertainment. This intimate setting of lights, paintings and aromas emanating from the kitchen create a nostalgic and sultry experience reminiscent of the early jazz supper clubs.

Daily Happy Hour Specials Nightly Entertainment

Happy Hour Drinks & Appetizers

Call to reserve for catering, birthday parties and other special occasions.

7 Days a Week

4 pm - 7 pm

Crescent Jewell Restaurant

Crescent Jewell Restaurant

Buy One Lunch and Two Beverages Receive Second Lunch of Equal or Lesser Value for

Buy One Dinner and Two Beverages Receive Second Dinner of Equal or Lesser Value for

Lunch Coupon

½

OFF

One coupon per table. Not valid with other offers or coupons. Expires 5-30-10.

3597 Main Street Riverside, CA 92501

DINNER Coupon

½

OFF

One coupon per table. Not valid with other offers or coupons. Expires 5-30-10.

951.684.1000

See Our Special Offers at

www.crescentjewell.com


1% of all taxable sales come back to the City to support Fire, Police, Museum, Parks, Libraries and Youth Programs.

Visit www.shopriversidenow.com to find out where to purchase your card. Start saving today!

Riverside Magazine April-May 2010  

"Memorial Day weekend for many is the unofficial kickoff to summer, a time for backyard barbecues and family getaways. It’s also a time to r...

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