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3W - THE WORLD WE WANT FOUNDATION

Annual Update 2009


Content 3. Letter from the Founder 4. Letter from the Managing Director 8. Priorities

Poverty Alleviation

Great Apes Conservation

Rainforest Preservation

10. Projects in Detail

Poverty Alleviation

- Hand in Hand, India

- Pratham

- Stree Mukti Sanghatana

- Tretjak Orphanages

16. Great Apes Conservation 20. Rainforest Preservation 21. Past Projects 23. Financial Overview

Funding Overview

2009 - Year end

2010 - Projection


3W - THE WORLD WE WANT FOUNDATION

Letter from the Founder Often when I sit in my cosy office in the centre of Stockholm, I have a sense of disbelief when I look at the website of The World We Want (3W), when I look at the photographs hanging on our office walls, and when I contemplate the change for the better that we can all help to bring about. Were Kirsten, the Managing Director of 3W, and I really out there in the rural areas of Tamil Nadu in South-East India just three months ago? Can it be true that we help to bring needed additional education to some thirty thousand children in the slums of Mumbai? The meetings and events that we are fortunate to experience all over the world are often unbelievably rewarding. I think about the all-boys school in Tamil Nadu where I ended up doing a spontaneous karateshow with one of the teachers, much to the joy of the boys who have been saved from child-labour by Hand-in-Hand. Or Kirsten´s story of how she ended up in an airplane, small as a toy, flying closely over the African “Big-Five” (Elephant, Lion, Leopard, Buffalo, and Rhino) in the Ol Pejeta Sanctuary in Kenya, home to the chimpanzee sanctuary Sweetwaters. I pinch myself in the arm and realize that all this and much more actually happened. 2009 was the year when 3W took the step from being a dormant, part-time, one man-show towards being what I had always envisioned – a very small, yet vibrant, energetic, opportunistic catalyst for change in some

parts of the world. The one thing that enabled this change at 3W was Kirsten Poitras who joined us as Managing Director right after the summer. A key hiring condition was real commitment to the cause, which Kirsten has. Six-months later she has followed through on my unfinished commitments and enabled us to take on new projects and engagements.

Can it be true that we help to bring needed additional education to some thirty thousand children in the slums of Mumbai?

I would not be surprised if some think that doing charitable work on the ground might be depressing due to all the misery that you come in contact with. I thought so too. However, the feel-good effect from tackling the issues and feeling that you actually “do something” more than compensates for the sadness you also experience. Having fun at work is important and I have fun when I work with Kirsten, and when we meet and discuss things with our valued board members Jacob, Camilla, and Peter. During the second half of the year we evaluated the portfolio of existing projects. We made valuable findings from this exercise and it strengthened my conviction that we should avoid outsourcing vital

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things such as project monitoring. My experience from the world of financial investments has taught me that we should always visit projects and organizations before supporting them and we will continue to follow this principle. 3W has a dual purpose – to provide human support as well as to protect the environment. In this effort, we have continued with proven partners, started working with many inspiring new partners, and met several potential future partners. It is encouraging to meet so many people and organizations that generously share their knowledge. In regard to past partners, we have decided to prolong our support of the award-winning Pratham organization in India. Through Pratham, we hope to build on our already very successful education programs in the Mumbai slums. We decided to gradually withdraw from another organization in Mumbai. SMS – Stree Mukti Sanghatana – is a project that we will have supported for four years. SMS continues to help empower women and offers excellent support to them, but the job creation effort never got off the ground. It is much, much more difficult to create jobs in a huge city like Mumbai than in rural communities. Such decisions are never easy but we have to look at both qualitative factors and hard facts such as incremental income generation. In Russia, we stepped up our annual support of the Tretjak Orphanages.

3W has a dual purpose - to provide human support as well as to protect the environment.

One of our new partners is Arcus Foundation, which was founded by Jon Stryker. Arcus is the largest benefactor of the cause of Great Apes. Together, with team leader, Annette Lanjouw, we are now working on exploring ways to protect apes and their natural

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habitats. We also decided to share the cost with Arcus of the expansion of the existing chimpanzee sanctuary, Sweetwaters in Kenya. Another new partnership initiated in 2009 is with Hand-in-Hand. Hand-in-Hand (HIH) is a non-profit organization lead by Percy Barnevik. HIH focuses on job creation for women through crash courses coupled with group savings and often micro-loans. After an intensive study we decided to grant 1.5 MUSD to the Indian operations of HIH. The Indian programme has been running for almost ten years and has created over half a million jobs. The organization has a strong structural backbone in the state of Tamil Nadu and a competent local leadership. Active Capital or Impact Investing is an area that we have started to monitor. We have met with Acumen and ROOT Capital, who are two of the leaders in the field. We are familiar with the investment perspective they take and like the way in which they are combining a market-oriented and development approach. There are numerous examples of where such an approach could help to augment the chances of success in, for example, conservation projects. One of our core beliefs is that hardly any conservation efforts in places under threat can be carried out successfully without taking the local, or indigenous, populations into consideration. The main thing is usually to find ways, or alternative to established ways – such as growing and selling things rather than poaching, for people to make an income. Market linkages and shortterm affordable credit are often two vital ingredients. ROOT Capital has shown great ingenuity in doing just this. Peruvian coffee farmer collectives are given working capital credit against security, such as an order from Starbucks. Once the collective ships to Starbucks, Starbucks then pays ROOT Capital, which forwards the proceeds net of the loan and a decent interest. The environmental challenges facing the world keep growing. For some of us it is only a question of the value we put on nature experiences, for others


3W - THE WORLD WE WANT FOUNDATION

however, it is a question of survival. When we at 3W travel, we see the effect that the degraded environment is having on many vulnerable groups. Many species are on the brink of extinction, some of which we at 3W are becoming increasingly familiar with such as gorillas, chimpanzees and orang-utans. We believe in collective action, either in the form of multilateral organizations such as the UN or through groups of companies pressing for action. However, solutions and actions are not being agreed upon fast enough and the outcomes not always positive enough, as the UN meeting in Copenhagen showed. It is easy to become disillusioned and cynical. It is easy to seek refuge in the view that it is all ’made up’ – Earth has survived most challenges. Nothing has been proven, there is no scientific foundation for, say, global warming. That misses the point. Firstly, how many of us demand foolproof information and evidence before taking action? This is the right approach for a court of law but not for practitioners. Can a CEO hope to have such a non-contradictory basis for decisions before deciding on crucial matters for his company? Can a parent hope to find out every aspect of a new school before deciding that she should take her child out of the school where her child is being bullied? Most of us use information at hand and then use intuition and experience to arrive at decisions that will guide us in life. This is also how the medical industry works. At some point a medicine or a treatment is shown to have negative side effects and it is improved. The same approach should be applied when it comes to environment upgrading initiatives. The conclusion is that in the absence of satisfactory collective actions, inertia is not the right response. It is up to us all, as individuals, to find ways to tackle the issues. In 2010 we will focus on identifying a conservation project and scaling-up our support for Great Apes. Within the field of conservation, we are looking at building a holistic approach to apply to a piece of land that is likely to come under threat in the coming 5 years. Some 25 percent of greenhouse gases that are

released into the atmosphere are due to deforestation, mainly in Brazil and Indonesia. We do not intend to take a “colonial” approach where local people are kept out. On the contrary, we will not consider anything a success if we fail to provide a better solution for the local people. In regard to preserving ape populations, 3W will move towards habitat conservation, in partnership with Arcus, based on best practices from identified case studies. We will stage our investments to procure immediate impact on the ground in the most strategic areas and to drive effective and collaborative conservation efforts for the future. To summarize, the strategic objective for 3W in 2010 is to entrench our position in two or three areas where we feel we can get maximum leverage on our input. The organizational objective is to perfect the engine of 3W: to continue learning which key competencies are typically needed in projects we are likely to be involved in and to continue to apply sound business rationale, and suitable requirements on governance and structure, to the projects and to our partners…combined with lots of passion.

March 2010

Paul Leander-Engström Founder and Chairman

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3W - THE WORLD WE WANT FOUNDATION

Letter from the Managing Director The World We Want – a world which affords basic services and opportunities to all, where natural resources can be utilized today but also preserved for future generations, where local communities, flora and fauna live in beneficial subsistence. Although disagreement ensues around the approach, most desire the end result. Our work is dedicated towards this end. Paul started this journey in 2005 with an idea in mind for effective and impactful philanthropy to support humanitarian and environmental initiatives. The beauty of 3W is in its simplicity – to strive to make the world a better place. Most of us do this in our daily lives by whatever means we possess – a helping hand to a friend in need, a bag full of PET bottles to the local recycling station, your kids’ outgrown clothes to the Salvation Army. Some are fortunate to have the means to make a greater difference on a larger scale. Paul knew this and created 3W. No buzz words, no grand schemes. Yet, simplicity is not to be mistaken for naiveté; there is no delusion of easy fixes, on the contrary. As we all know, and as Paul and I have experienced in the past months, real change takes real work.

The beauty of 3W is in its simplicity - to strive to make the world a better place.

Although our mission is broad, as a small organization we know our time limitations; and, therefore, we have set clear priorities for the work ahead. 3W has a very simple modus operandi that mirrors Paul’s financial approach. We look for well-defined opportunities that promise strong returns, for 3W this translates to results on the ground. We are willing to take greater risks for potentially high-return projects, but mitigate these risks with a wellbalanced portfolio. We increase our operational capacity and deal flow by utilizing the expertise of a few trusted partners, be it partner foundations or best-in-class NGO’s. We are well equipped to perform quick and effective due

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3W - THE WORLD WE WANT FOUNDATION

diligence, calling on the expertise of our very knowledgeable board. Our small size makes us flexible; the information chain is short and the decision process is fast. And finally, we are in this for the long haul. We have learned that duration is often as important as quantity. Continuity in philanthropic endeavors is too often only an after-thought. We choose and develop projects carefully with a focus on long-term implementation, management, and ultimate success. The process may be more time-consuming but we are confident that this approach will lead to sustainable change.

The world we want can only be found together!

In the past months we have learned a great deal. Although the learning curve may be steep, we understand it is also long. We are impatient and eager to continue on this path – steadily moving towards success on the ground. We look forward to the promising journey ahead – building on our current relationships, establishing fruitful, new partnerships, and honing our skills in effective and impactful methodology and successful implementation. I urge you to continue this journey with us – the world we want can only be found together! March 2010

Kirsten Poitras Managing Director

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Our board Fortunately, we have a very engaged and competent board to support and govern the 3W organization. Our board members offer a balanced mix of expertise in business competence, investment management, and humanitarian aid. As an organization, we strive to keep the board updated and involved on important issues. In return we receive valuable advice, objective opposition, and direction. Paul leander-engström - FOUNDER AND CHAIRMAN: Paul is a graduate of the Stockholm School of Economics and the Law School of Stockholm University. His business activities have mostly been focused on Russia where he helped to set up Brunswick UBS, a leading investment bank, as well Prosperity Capital Management Limited, the world’s largest fund manager of Russian equities.   He is a board member of Vostok Nafta Investment, an investment company listed on the Stockholm Stock Exchange, and founding investor of Ture Invest, a private investment company with focus on public as well as private equity transactions in the Nordic countries. Kirsten Poitras - Managing Director: Kirsten has an undergraduate degree in Political Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After receiving her MBA from the University of San Diego, she began her career with Procter and Gamble where she held numerous brand management positions including Nordic Business Team Leader of FemPro.  Wanting to get involved in International Development and poverty alleviation, she went on to study International Affairs at The Fletcher School in Boston

and received her Master’s in 2009. Her area of focus was the impact of entrepreneurship and technology on populations facing severe poverty. Jacob Röjdmark - Board Member: Jacob graduated from the Stockholm School of Economics in 1990. After working for the investment bank Indosuez Capital, he held various management positions at the public investment company, AB Industrivärden. In 2006 he started the private investment firm, Ture Invest. He is currently Managing Director and Chairman of Ture Invest, Chairman of Selected Brands, and Board Member of Bringwell Nutrients and Health foods and of Future Trading. Camilla Grebe - Board Member: Camilla graduated from the Stockholm School of Economics with a degree in economics.  She worked for Procter and Gamble and Telenor in the Nordic Region, as well as Grameen Phone in Bangladesh.  She also founded and managed an audiobooks production company called Storyside, as well as a consulting firm.  She is now a full-time writer.  Her first novel, Någon Sorts Frid, was released in 2009.  She is currently working on the sequel. Dr. Peter Walker - board member: After working for over 25 years in humanitarian crises around the world, including as the Director of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, Dr. Peter Walker was appointed Director of the Feinstein International Center at Tufts University in 2002.  At the Center, he leads a team of 30 academics and practitioners working on policy and practice issues in the fields of humanitarian action, human security, and human rights.  In 2007, Dr. Walker was made Rosenberg Professor of Nutrition and Human Security, and in 2008, he received the American College of Nutrition’s annual Humanitarian Award.   He has published a number of books, book chapters and articles in various journals throughout his career. He also writes the blog Getting Humanitarian Aid Right.

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Our priorities for 2010 A guiding principle of 3W is to keep overheads low, ensuring that maximum funding goes towards impact on the ground. To do this we compliment our competence and capacity by partnering with expert foundations and best in class NGOs. Due to our small size, we must be mindful of time constraints. We have therefore set the direction of our work on the following priorities: 1. Poverty Alleviation: 3W’s Poverty Initiative works with development projects that are well defined, limited in scope, and run by skilled and dedicated social entrepreneurs. We focus on support to the most vulnerable – women and children facing severe poverty – through job creation and education programs. 2. Great Apes Conservation: The bulk of our support will be to positively impact the situation on the ground. Our hope is to have a portfolio of investments that 1) support successful ongoing projects, 2) develop holistic programs in strategically important areas, and 3) drive collaboration and best practices among key stakeholders.

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3. Rainforest preservation: The goal of 3W’s Rainforest Initiative is to help rainforest nations conserve their significant tropical forest landscapes for the long-term. 3W aims to deliver this by supporting local organizations, entities, and stakeholders. We will, however, work with international organizations where appropriate and necessary to build local capacity in important forest areas. How we work on our priorities will depend on the situation at hand. All current funding has been through grants, but we also believe in applying business practices to philanthropy. We therefore hope to use a mixture of grants and financial tools such as loans and capital equity when applicable.


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Poverty Alleviation One of the major contributors to poverty is a lack of access to sustainable income. 3W therefore focuses on job creation and education programs to provide the tools, training, and opportunities to the most vulnerable, women and children facing severe poverty. Job creation through Hand in Hand: With 1.13 billion inhabitants, India has about 830 million people living on less than $2 per day and 270 million on less than $1 per day (World Bank statistics). Despite the high growth of the Indian economy, little is changing for the poorest. Tamil Nadu is one of the Indian states that have benefited most from this growth. Still, 21% of its 62 million people live below the poverty line and many of these live in the rural areas where selfemployment is the only way towards a better future. Hand in Hand (HiH) helps poor women and their families in Tamil Nadu to enhance their livelihoods by investing in productive assets and creating microenterprises. Since 2004, Hand in Hand has organized more than 500,000 women into self-help groups, trained them in financial literacy and entrepreneurship, provided them with microcredit, and assisted them in setting up and sustaining microenterprises. The families invest in livestock, irrigation, bakeries, citizens’ centers (IT-

Since 2004, Hand in Hand has organized more than 500,000 women.

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kiosks), and many other farm and non-farm activities. Find out more at www.hihseed.org. Hand in Hand is an excellent grassroots organization with decentralized operations, well-developed systems for financial management and operations monitoring, and a results-oriented and pragmatic approach. Although the self-help group model is not unique, HiH adds value by emphasizing enterprise creation. This emphasis, combined with highly effective support material and staff, enables HiH to reach unprecedented results: • The “entrepreneur rate” (number of enterprises/ number of women) is over 75%. • The cost-benefit ratio is extremely attractive, at $35 per job created. 3W supports HIH India with $1.5 million ($500,000/ yr for 3 years). With these funds, we expect to create 12,500 jobs per year. Given that each job created affects a family of 5, this investment provides significant impact to 60,000 people/year.   We will continue to actively monitor our investment in HiH India. We look very much forward to evaluating results, and learning from the local organization.


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Education with Pratham: Pratham is the largest non-governmental organization working to provide quality education to the underprivileged children of India. Pratham was established in 1994 to provide education to the children in the slums of Mumbai city. Since then, the organization has grown both in scope and geographical coverage. Today Pratham reaches out to millions of children living both in rural and urban areas through a range of interventions. Pratham’s mission is clear – “Every child in school and learning well”. With financial support from 3W, Pratham is able to achieve this mission in 212 new communities. These communities are in the Urduspeaking, densely populated areas around Mumbai – Baiganwadi and Shivaji Nagar in M(e) ward. We chose these areas because Muslim communities often face greater marginaliazation and obstacles. The populations are more transient and the areas are more difficult to work in. Because of these issues, Pratham found it difficult to raise funding for these Urdu-speaking communities. It is within this space – a proven organization unable to access funding through normal channels – that 3W aims to work. The 3W support has directly impacted over 30,000 children in the past two and a half years.

The 3W support has directly impacted over 30,000 children in the past two and a half years.

Projects and Success indicators in 3W supported wards: • Pratham aims to provide pre-primary education (Balwadi) in order to mainstream children into regular schools. The Balwadi program enables children to

adjust to school and to become better and happier learners – thus tackling the problem of retention and achievement at an early stage. The number of children in Pre-school has increased by over 90%. • Knowledge of reading and math has increased by 40% among pre-school age children. • Knowledge of reading and math increased by 36% among primary school children. • The Read Mumbai Initiative, which works with parents to promote regular attendance and parental involvement with homework, has significantly contributed to improved learning levels: Standard 1 and 2, Reading: Increase of 65% Standard 1 and 2, Math: Increase of 31% Standard 3–5, Reading: Increase of 35% Standard 3–5, Math: Increase of 41% • English Classes Standard III and IV (age 8–10) have been successful with a 53% increase in children who can read a paragraph in English. • The scholarship program helps children that have fallen through the cracks and have little hope of passing the Standard IV (age 9–10). Without tutorial help through this program, they will fail the exam and ultimately drop out of school, all together. The number of participants in the scholarship program has doubled since pilot in 2007. 612 have enrolled and 61% have passed the standard exam. • The learning lab is a multi-functional community center which helps build knowledge of English and computer skills to youth as well as provides necessary guidance to youths and young adults who have left school. Over 1,500 children and 10 Pratham staff have been enrolled in the Learning Lab activities since August 2008. Pratham has a well-run regional team. The organizational structure and goals are clear and focused. The effects of 3W’s funding are significant and measurable. Given these successes and the dire educational needs of these communities, 3W is proud to continue its support through 2012.

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Our focus is to provide humanitarian support to the most vulnerable - women and children facing severe poverty.

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Stree Mukti Sanghatana Stree Mukti Sanghatana (SMS) was founded by Mrs. Jyoti Mhapsekar in the 1970s as an apolitical organization with the aim to support women, irrespective of caste class and religion. In 1998, SMS started the Parisar Vikas program to address the problems facing waste-picking women and the overall problem of waste management in Mumbai. 3W initiated its support for this project in 2006 and has provided US$350,000 to the program. Currently 2,500 rag-pickers are organized into self-help groups in four areas in and around Mumbai. These groups not only empower the members with knowledge and education, but also provide much needed emotional support. The Parisar Vikas program also provides educational services to the 2,000 children of the participating rag-pickers. These services include tutorial classes, life-skills training, and access to much-needed reading material.

Parisar Vikas has moved almost 500 women into permanent employment.

Many of the program results are impressive. For example, Parisar Vikas has established a “steering committee” made up of women who have taken part in and “graduated from” the self-help groups. These women are very inspiring. The program empowered them to improve their savings ability, their health, their standing in society, and their children’s education. They are now working towards an eventual leadership role in the organization. In regard to the education program, the Parisar Vikas’ scholarship has enabled some of the participating women to further their children’s education. We had the chance to meet some of these extraordinary students. One is trained to work in film production, the other will train as a

mechanical designer, and the final teenager we met is attending beauty school. These young students are the first in their family to gain functioning literacy and are now moving on to college level training. Although we are proud of many aspects of the program and do believe that positive impact has been achieved, we do not feel that we have been able to reach our ultimate goal of job creation. Since inception, Parisar Vikas has moved 500 women into permanent employment – less than our original target. Unfortunately, permanent employment has been more difficult to achieve than expected. We have therefore decided to reduce funding in 2010, and then to end 3W support. With the help of our partner Social Initiative, the Parisar Vikas program will look for new donor opportunities and eventual self-sufficiency.

These young students are the first in their family to gain functioning literacy.

Tretjak Orphanages As Paul has significant experience with Russia, he began his support for the Tretjak project prior to the establishment of 3W. As Tretjak’s largest sponsor, 3W provides annual contributions of ca $25,000. These funds are used to bring 200–300 Russian orphans to Sweden for a few weeks every summer. The visits allow the children to understand and experience the dynamics of family life – an important aspect of psychological development.  In addition, as the children usually repeat the visit annually, a strong relationship is built; this relationship often acts as a familial support throughout the child’s and young adult’s life.

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Great Apes Conservation 3W will move towards habitat conservation in partnership with Arcus Foundation based on best practices from identified case studies. Arcus Partnership Through Arcus, 3W has access to knowledge, experience, and expertise in this complicated landscape. As a small organization, 3W benefits tremendously from the Arcus vetting process and subsequent deal flow. In regard to area focus, Arcus has identified 15 strategic areas for conservation focus based on a matrix of biological and institutional factors in pristine, frontier and isolated landscapes. From these areas, we hope to support ongoing and/or develop new projects that provide a holistic approach to conservation – a combination of scientific, political, and local economic implementation -- based on the best practices of successful case studies.

Best Practices

through job creation models such as Hand-in-Hand and market linkages and financial institutions such as Root Capital.

Best Practices Conserving large landscapes requires a holistic approach -- recognizing the validity of development and wealth aspirations at different levels, and finding ways to facilitate these without losing ape habitat. We must design mosaic landscapes that integrate the varied interests, needs, and cultural values of all stakeholders, but that are also able to support viable ape populations. Broader socio-political actions need to be woven into project work to increase long-term success.

Based on successful programs (see sidebar), best practices have been identified. The chronology of the conservation work is as follows: • Obtaining information for strong decisions, i.e. information on apes and how people use the forests. • Developing a holistic, long-term approach. • Engaging all stakeholders around coordinated plans. • Implementing/Supporting activities on the ground. • Building the leadership of the local organizations.

Examples of such projects:

3W can enter this cycle at any given point depending on the specific project needs. An area of potential expertise for our organization may be to facilitate economic development of the local community

provide a powerful economic incentive for the conservation

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Hutan, a NGO, is working along the Kinabatangan River in Sabah, Malaysia to implement an integrated program of work focused on conserving forest patches inhabited by orangutans. Hutan is supporting the development of alternative economic livelihood activities for neighboring communities. The NGO is also working with the palm oil industry to reduce the risk of deforestation. International Gorilla Conservation Programme for mountain gorillas uses carefully controlled ecotourism to of this charismatic species. Today, gorillas are one of the chief earners of foreign revenue for Uganda.


3W - THE WORLD WE WANT FOUNDATION

Conservation The bulk of our support will be to positively impact the situation on the ground. Our hope is to have a portfolio of investments that 1) support successful ongoing projects, 2) develop holistic programs in strategically important areas, and 3) drive collaboration and best practices among key stakeholders.

Funding 2010 In line with the above portfolio mandate, projects for the coming year include 1) Sweetwater Chimp Sanctuary at $200,000 USD (support successful ongoing projects), 2) Jane Goodall Institute Conservation Action Plan for the Eastern DRC at $195,000 USD (develop holistic programs in strategically important areas), and 3) Apesmapper project at $100,000 USD over 2 years to drive collaboration and best practices. Total Great Ape Funding for 2010 will be $450,000 USD.

Apes Projects in Detail Sweetwaters Chimpanzee Sanctuary: Although 3W’s focus is on habitat conservation, we are also concerned about the plight of apes that have been captured for the illegal trade of exotic animals. These animals are often traumatized and abused. We are therefore proud to support the Sweetwaters Chimpanzee Sanctuary in Kenya. With our funds, the sanctuary will be able to double its occupancy from 45 to 90 chimps. Unfortunately, there is a dire need for such sanctuaries around the world. We will continue to have compassion for these animals, as well as look for ways to protect their habitat. JGI - Conservation Action Plan DRC: We are working closely with the Jane Goodall Institute (JGI) and Arcus to develop an effective and well-controlled Conservation Action Plan in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Although the area is risky and expensive, we feel that its strategic importance and proven government support warrant potential action. We will mitigate risks by being very involved in the

project development and implementation with key partners and by graduating investment based on milestones. JGI proposes to work in the Maiko-Tayna-KahuziBiega landscape of the DRC. JGI is particularly interested in preserving this landscape as it is home to an estimated population of 15,000 eastern chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) and 5,000 eastern lowland gorillas (Gorilla beringei graueri). It is globally significant for: 1) its rich biodiversity (high species richness, high numbers of endemic species, significant numbers of globally threatened and endangered species); 2) encompassing nearly the entire range of the eastern lowland gorilla; and 3) its large blocks of intact forest. These forests, at the headwaters of the Congo River, not only regulate local climate and soil protection but are critical to maintaining global ecological services – storing carbon that counteracts global climate change and playing a role in regulating one of the world’s largest river basins.

These forests, at the headwaters of the Congo River, not only regulate local climate and soil protection but are critical to maintaining global ecological services.

Although the project landscape contains significant tracts of wilderness, its eastern edges also contain some of the highest human population densities in Africa, which have led to the greatest deforestation rates in DRC. The eastern lowland gorilla’s forest habitat, shared with chimpanzees, is disappearing at a rate faster than that of any other gorilla subspecies. Without appropriate conservation strategies and management, economic activities like mining, unsustainable hunting, and conversion of forests to

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We will stage our investments to drive effective and collaborative conservation efforts for the future.

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agriculture will continue to have a profoundly negative impact on great apes and their habitats, and ultimately on forest peoples who depend on these resources. The rural population of the eastern DRC has demonstrated its willingness to protect great ape populations and habitat through the establishment of over 12,000 sq.km of community-managed natural reserves across the landscape, and the active participation of local communities and community leaders in the development of conservation strategies for the region. However, their participation has been predicated on the idea that protecting habitat will provide measurable material and economic benefits to the communities living alongside these natural reserves. If improved livelihood opportunities and social infrastructure are not supported, the long-term cooperation of the local population will be difficult to sustain. To initiate effective sustainable development strategies that also promote chimpanzee and gorilla conservation, traditional and government leaders, scientists, conservationists, donors and other stakeholders need to develop a comprehensive and spatially explicit conservation plan that clearly identifies both the most important threats to great apes and their habitats across the landscape and the conservation actions most likely to directly eliminate or minimize those priority threats.

The rural population of the eastern DRC has demonstrated its willingness to protect great ape populations and habitat.

de la Nature (ICCN). This plan will identify threats to species and habitats in a critical landscape of the eastern DRC, and develop recommendations for a range of conservation, livelihood and social infrastructure interventions that will directly address those threats. Apesmapper: Decision makers interested in supporting conservation of Great Apes in the wild, including donors, need information to support their decision-making processes. This information will ensure that actions are targeted appropriately, with the best possible long-term impact. The information needs to be readily accessible, easy to interpret, and fit for purpose. It should be as up-to-date as possible and allow a wide range of questions to be answered. Any deficiencies in the data should be readily identifiable. With these parameters in mind, the Apesmapper database is under development by UNEP-WCMC, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology (MPI) and the SSC Great Ape Specialist Group. Given existing deficiencies in collaboration and knowledge dispersion, the database will be a useful tool to increase the effectiveness of overall conservation. By providing timely and integrated knowledge, this website is a one-stop center for policy makers, conservationists, and donors. This database will provide relevant knowledge on how to take into consideration ape populations in areas of interest for various stakeholders. It will enable effective decision-making for policy-makers, local governments, conservationists, and industrial actors. The database will link information from the UN (Great Ape Survival Plan), JGI, FFI, Max Planck, etc. Such collaborative knowledge sharing strengthens the ability to lobby for ape conservation.

3W plans to support JGI’s development of a detailed great ape conservation action plan in partnership with the Institut Congolais pour la Conservation

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3W - THE WORLD WE WANT FOUNDATION

Rainforest Preservation 3W is now developing an initiative focusing on Rainforests, which will sit alongside our planned work on conservation of great apes habitat. The goal of 3W’s Rainforest Initiative is to help rainforest nations conserve their significant tropical forest landscapes for the long-term. 3W aims to deliver this by supporting local organizations, entities, and stakeholders. We will, however, work with international organizations where appropriate and necessary to build local capacity in important forest areas. We have decided to first focus on Latin America with particular emphasis on tropical forest in: • The Brazilian Amazon • Colombia, Ecuador and Peru • Southern Atlantic Rainforest (where criteria on size and scale-ability are met) • The Guyana Shield

Key forest landscape criteria The following are all criteria that a given forest landscape will need to meet for it to be considered by 3W. • Threat: there must be a significant risk to the landscape in question within the next 5 years. Projects must show how they are going to combat this, as well as all other current or potential threats, via a brief problem analysis. • Multiple benefits: projects should show how they will derive maximize positive impacts in the following areas, which are given in order of 3W priority: 1. climate i.e. carbon retention in native forest sinks, or adaptation [human and biodiversity]

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2. biodiversity i.e. ecosystems and species assemblages [not single species conservation] 3. livelihoods & water i.e. sustainable diversified income sources, food, or other resources for vulnerable communities; and conservation of key watersheds, etc. • Landscape leveraging: priority will be given to projects that influence larger areas e.g. through connecting existing protected areas or helping to buffer indigenous lands, etc. The project must demonstrably help to secure a landscape of at least 200,000ha, preferably more. We have currently employed the help of Evan BowenJones to develop such a project with proven local organizations. Evan Bowen-Jones is an expert in conservation management and implementation and has worked in the South Pacific, South-East Asia and China, Latin America, the Caribbean and Africa. He previously held the post of Regional Director for Fauna & Flora International’s Americas Program, and his 15 years experience has included establishing and managing protected areas; working to improve the livelihoods of local communities; and monitoring animals and their habitats around the world. We hope to move into implementation at the end of this year or the beginning of 2011.


3W - THE WORLD WE WANT FOUNDATION

3W aims to address the inter-connected problems of human poverty and environmental degradation through a holistic approach to forest preservation.

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3W - THE WORLD WE WANT FOUNDATION

We have helped to give more than 5,000 students and teachers access to clean water and sanitation facilities.

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3W - THE WORLD WE WANT FOUNDATION

Our past projects In co-operation with the Lundin For Africa (LFA) Foundation, 3W has co-financed the following humanitarian and environmental initiatives.

Voluntary Action for Development - Uganda: The Ugandan organization, Voluntary Action for Development (VAD), educates and enables women to run more sustainable and profitable agricultural businesses. The project targets approximately 175 women in 4 parishes of Wakiso and Nsangi Sub counties. 3W financed this project with US$20,000 per year for two years. Reforestation in Cameroon:  In Cameroon, LFA and 3W co-sponsored a community led reforestation management program in the Far North Province. In short, the project created ten new community groups that have planted 60,000 trees, to date. The community groups are all managed by local women, thereby conserving nature, as well as, creating economically sustainable societies focused on growing and harvesting trees. 3W financed this project with US$20,000.

agricultural project, and housing for up to 30 women and their children. To date, 12 women have been healed, learned to support themselves, and returned to their homes. 3W financed this project with US$20,000. WaterCan - Uganda and Ethiopia: In Uganda and Ethiopia, LFA and 3W, in co-operation with Watercan, have given more than 5,000 students and teachers access to clean water and sanitation facilities in the remote, rural areas of Werebabo District of central Ethiopia and Wakiso District of central Uganda. The access to clean water and sanitation facilities has improved the educational environment and increased attendance, especially among female students.  3W financed this project with US$20,000.

Grounds for Hope - DRC: In Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), LFA and 3W co-sponsored Grounds For Hope. The organization has built a community for women who cannot heal from fistula surgeries. The centre includes a community school, a medical clinic, general hall, animal husbandry, a Living Stones

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3W - THE WORLD WE WANT FOUNDATION

Financial overview

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3W - THE WORLD WE WANT FOUNDATION

Overview of 3W Projects $000’s USD Actuals to Date Q1 2010 2006 Area

2007

2008

2009

Project

2010 Q1 only

Total

Russia TBU

15

25

15

35

90

SMS

35

100

60

120

27

342

40

100

120

45

305

India Pratham Hand in Hand

250

250

Africa Sweetwaters

0

VAD Uganda Hope DRC

20

20

40

20

20

Reforest Cameroon

20

WaterCan Ethiopia

20

20

20

Global ApesMapper TOTAL

70

205

215

525

50

50

122

1,137

Actuals and Commitments as of Q1 2010 2006 Area

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Project

Total

Russia TBU

15

25

15

35

20

20

20

150

SMS

35

100

60

120

60

40

100

120

120

120

60

560

250

500

500

250

1,500

India Pratham Hand in Hand

375

Africa Sweetwaters

200

VAD Uganda Hope DRC

20

40 20

20

WaterCan Ethiopia

TOTAL

20

20

Reforest Cameroon

Global

200

20

20

20

JGI (pending)

195

Apesmapper

50

50

1,145

690

70

205

215

525

195 100 330

3,180

25


3W - THE WORLD WE WANT FOUNDATION

2009 Year End SEK 2009 Funding (SEK) Project

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Total

% of total

Stree Mukti

238,050

238,050

238,050

238,050

952,200

27%

Pratham

172,250

172,250

172,250

172,250

689,000

19%

1,750,000

1,750,000

49%

188,000

188,000

5%

2,348,300

3,579,200

100%

Hand-in-Hand Tretjak TOTAL

410,300

410,300

410,300

2009 Operational Costs (SEK) Q3

Q4

Total

Rent

Item

Q1

Q2

10,000

10,000

20,000

Office Expenses

19,000

29,000

48,000

8,000

5,000

13,000

0

5,000

5,000

Project Monitor

40,000

50,000

90,000

Board

10,000

0

10,000

Field

0

20,000

20,000

Salary

75,000

150,000

225,000

Internet

20,000

5,000

25,000

Acct Service

2,500

2,500

5,000

HiH SA Due Dil.

70,000

70,000

Events

10,000

10,000

335,500

520,000

Trips: Organization Network

TOTAL

26

184,500


3W - THE WORLD WE WANT FOUNDATION

2010 Projections SEK 2010 Funding Budget (SEK) Project

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Stree Mukti

200,000

200,000

Pratham

330,000

300,000

HIH India

1,600,000

HIH International

% of Total 5%

300,000

930,000

11%

1,600,000

3,200,000

39%

160,000

320,000

4%

188,000

2%

1,400,000

17%

160,000

Tretjak

188,000

Sweetwaters

1,400,000

ApesMapper

350,000

JGI (pending) TOTAL

Total 400,000

1,400,000 530,000

3,510,000

2,088,000

2,060,000

350,000

4%

1,400,000

17%

8,188,000

Pipline: Root

1,750,000

1,750,000

Haiti TOTAL w/ Pipeline

1,000,000 530,000

5,260,000

3,088,000

3,810,000

12,688,000

Split by Priority: Poverty Alleviation: 47%, Apes: 25%, Rainforest: 28%

2010 Operational Budget (SEK) Item

Q1 – Actual

Q2 – Projected

Q3

Q4

Rent

15,000

30,000

30,000

30,000

Office Expenses

32,000

17,000

17,000

17,000

5,000

5,000

50,000

Trips: Organization Network

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

Project Monitor

50,000

50,000

50,000

50,000

25,000

0

150,000

150,000

150,000

1,500

0

0

0

0

20,000

0

0

25,000

25,000

309,500

329,500

Field Salary Internet Annual Report

150,000

PR

15,000

Rainforest Consult

25,000

55,000

Acct Services

2,500

2.500

281,000

349,500

TOTAL

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3W - THE WORLD WE WANT FOUNDATION

3W – The World We Want Grev Turegatan 13B 114 46 Stockholm Tel:28+46 8 611 56 10 www.theworldwewant.se

3W - Annual Update 2009  

At The World We Want, our aim is to encourage and support organizations which are finding innovative solutions to today’s most pressing glob...

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