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NOVEMBER 2016

DON’T IGNORE

HEARING LOSS

ARIZONA

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BEYOND THE GRAND CANYON

BUYING A CAR?

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READ THIS FIRST PAGE 30

SUe Zelickson Minnesota’s famed foodie is still shaping the local culinary scene at 82 PAGE 32


Contents

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Unsung Arizona Think beyond the Grand Canyon when planning your next trip.

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→→On the cover Foodie philanthropist: Hometown girl Sue Zelickson first became famous for her award-winning WCCO radio show. But her philanthropic efforts have made her a Twin Cities legend. Photo by Tracy Walsh / tracywalshphoto.com

40 Remembering Mom My mother stayed in her home until the end and left me a trove of precious jewels.

44 Housing Resources 48 Brain Teasers 6 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


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Contents Good Start From the Editor 10 I’m amazed at Sue Zelickson’s accomplishments, but also her kindness. My Turn 12 Seniors can lead the charge in helping others find homes. Memories 14 Don’t worry if you’re doing things the right way. It may not matter.

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This Month in MN History 16 Minnesota Sen. Eugene McCarthy was the Bernie Sanders of his day.

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Good Health House Call 18 Sound is one of the riches of life. Don’t ignore hearing loss. Caregiving 20 Celebrate the triumphs and the joys of caregivers this month.

Good Living Housing 28 Take a look at a local continuing care retirement community. Finance 30 Fall is the best time to buy a car, but read this before you do.

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Good Start / From the Editor / By Sarah Jackson Volume 35 / Issue 11 Publisher Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com Co-Publisher and Sales Manager Terry Gahan 612-436-4360 tgahan@mngoodage.com Editor Sarah Jackson 612-436-4385 editor@mngoodage.com Contributors Jamie Crowson, Carol Hall, Virginia Chase Sanderson, Dorothea Harris, Skip Johnson, Julie Kendrick, Lauren Peck, Dave Nimmer, Sandra Scott, Dr. Michael Spilane, Tracy Walsh Creative Director Sarah Karnas Graphic Designers Valerie Moe Amanda Wadeson Client Services Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com Circulation Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2016 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $12 per year.

10 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

The energizer I want to be like Sue Zelickson —

this month’s Cover Star — when I grow up. How can I — and her many Minnesota fans — not look up to her? She’s a lover of good food, but also of people. And though her career as a food journalist is profoundly impressive, it’s her secondary career that’s the most astounding to me: She’s a philanthropist. She — happily, daily, always — gets things done. One of her biggest and most recent accomplish▲▲Sue Zelickson shows off her ments was co-founding the Charlie Awards, a jam-packed month-at-a-glance brand-new event to honor exceptional contribuplanner during a lunch with Good Age editor Sarah Jackson. tions to the local culinary industry. This month the awards (set for Nov. 13 in downtown Minneapolis) are entering their sixth year, in a city fast becoming known for its world-class food scene. Also today’s Charlie Awards festivities have gone beyond the one-night affair to include free happy-hour panel discussions for food industry folks. And did I mention her age? She’s 82 and still at it, and not slowing down in the slightest, near as I can tell. Zelickson proves age really is just a number for some folks. And I have to say — because I was lucky enough to snag a lunch with her — that she’s as energetic and delightful in person as she is in print and on the radio. She’s kind and patient and playful, too. So there you go: We have another Minnesota gem, a bone fide local celebrity, who’s somehow managed to stay down to earth. I hope you enjoy reading about Zelickson’s life adventures (well, just some of them). I sure did. In this issue, you’ll also find a travel story highlighting 10 awesome destinations in Arizona that aren’t the Grand Canyon. With winter on the way, it might be the perfect time to plan a little trip to warmer climes. Yes? And, finally, very near and dear to my heart, is Virginia Chase Sanderson’s beautiful personal essay about the loss of her mother and the time she spent cleaning up the home she left behind. I’ve read her essay half a dozen times, and it tugs at my heart — without fail — every time. Happy reading!


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Good Start / My Turn / By Dave Nimmer

Housing for all →→Seniors aren’t the only ones who need safety, security and affordability

This month’s issue of Minnesota Good Age is highlighting the topic of

housing, which can be a huge challenge for all ages, not just us seniors. And that got me thinking about how important the idea of “home” has been in my life — and in my service on the board of a nonprofit affordable-housing provider. I grumbled a bit when I first joined the board of CommonBond because I knew it was expected that board members of the nonprofit put the organization at the top of their charitable contributions lists — in addition to giving of their time and talent which, for me, meant producing videos about the outfit that’d been around for 40 years.

The Lord’s work The mood lasted until the second board meeting when I was seated next to a feisty nun, Mary Heinen, one of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet of St. Paul. In fewer than five minutes, she let me know how lucky I was to be doing “the Lord’s work” for such a fine organization. People can’t rise out of poverty, she said, unless they have a roof over their heads and we, who’ve always had that, should be paying it forward. I got the idea she wasn’t asking for my opinion. Over the next three years of board service, I learned how right she was. I interviewed senior citizens who found affordable apartments. I talked with single mothers who needed safe places to raise their kids. And I chatted with recent refugees who needed help learning English and finding doctors. Currently, CommonBond owns or manages 5,500 rental apartments and townhomes in 50 cities in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa. More than 9,000 people ⊳⊳ Hsa Dohsoe, 26, and her husband Doh Soe, 27, sit on their front steps in St. Paul with their boys, Banyan, 7 (left), and Wilson, 8.

— families, seniors and people with disabilities — call CommonBond home. And 2,400 of them are children. For those children, CommonBond offers a “study buddy” program, in which volunteers work with youngsters who need help with learning and language.

One family’s story Hsa Dohsoe and her husband, Doh Soe, had two young sons when they moved into CommonBond’s Vista Village in St. Paul five years ago. They came to the U.S. in 2008 from a refugee camp in Thailand. The St. Paul apartment they’d been living in was costly and cramped. Then they learned they qualified for Section 8 (subsidized) housing and moved into their Vista Village townhome — with two bedrooms. Their boys — Banyan, 7, and Wilson, 8, — received their own room. And their parents received some peace of mind. “We felt safe there,” Hsa said. “We had a place to park the car. We had nice neighbors and I didn’t have to worry about being safe. It was easier for me to concentrate on education, my school work.” She and her husband both got their high school diplomas and she’s now a medical assistant with Allina. He’s a technician with Premium Waters, Inc. Doh Soe would like to get training to become an automobile mechanic and Hsa wants to go back to college and complete requirements for a registered nurse degree.

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As I see them now, sitting on the front step, I’m impressed with their grit, gumption and grace. I see refugees who had to learn English, get an education, encounter a new culture and find decent jobs. And, oh yes, raise two boys, who are now in 2nd and 3rd grades in neighborhood schools. After hearing the family’s story, I’m even more aware that having a safe place to call home is incredibly important. And I’ve known this simple fact since I was a kid, watching summer thunderstorms roll in late at night from my bedroom window, and feeling safe from all harm. Sister Heinen was right: If we’re not paying it forward — especially us senior citizens — we’re sliding backward. Dave Nimmer has had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@ mngoodage.com.

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Good Start / Memories / By Carol Hall

Doing it wrong →→Knowing ‘the right way’ to do things may not be as important as we once thought

I’m right-brained, and therefore creative. I mean, if you give me

a topic to write about, I’ll easily give you an essay. But as is typical with we rightbrainers, my left-brain sometimes seems brain dead. I struggle with the simplest math problem. And God forbid I ever try attempting “some assembly required” directions. My good friend, Dale Hagfors, however, appears to have equal portions of rightand left-brain skills. Dale writes exceptionally well. He also flew Boeing-727 airliners as a Northwest Airlines pilot, and helicopters during his hitch with the U.S. Marine Corps. Dale also can fix most anything that breaks:

Thirty years ago, I gave my dad an air rifle to protect his bird feeder from squirrels. He was then the age I am now, so I’m sure he threw away the directions and just used it as he saw fit. When he died 17 years later, I got the air rifle back. Since then, I’ve used it myself pretty much the same way he did. Then it quit working. I’ve always been of the opinion that if I couldn’t fix something — at least by the time I was done with it — nobody else would be able to fix it either. So I searched the Internet for information relating to the BenjaminSheridan C9 air rifle. I learned that this model of air rifle has a sealed air chamber that needs to be left in a lightly charged state between uses in order to protect its rubber O-rings from damage. I’m certain my dad didn’t do that, and I know I didn’t. Happily, I have the air rifle working like new again, and I’ll follow the proper sequence when putting it away. In fact, now that I’m doing it right, it just might last another 15 years. Then again, it already lasted twice that long with me doing it wrong. Which brings up the notion of doing it right — versus doing it wrong — in LIFE. I don’t care what it is that you’ve been doing, there are people who are going to tell you that you’ve been doing it the wrong way. Parents, teachers and bosses have always provided this sort of guidance. 14 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Spouses, siblings, workmates and other marginally qualified acquaintances at times also have attempted to steer us into what they believed was a more proper course. (My most recent father-in-law would occasionally remind me that it wasn’t so important to know which was the right or wrong way, as long as I did it HIS way.) In addition, support groups, self-help books and websites are available to anonymously to set us straight. The real downside to all of this is I’m now too old to benefit from mending my ways. Whatever I discover now that I’ve been doing wrong is of little use. I won’t live long enough for doing it right to make much of a difference, and I’m already cursed with the consequences of years of wrongness. Amen! Thank you, Mr. Hagfors! Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Writer her at chall@ mngoodage.com.


Good Start / This Month in Minnesota History / By Lauren Peck ⊳⊳ Minnesota Sen. Eugene McCarthy made a campaign stop in New Haven, Conn., in April 1968. Photos courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

The Bernie of his day →→Minnesota Sen. Eugene McCarthy’s campaign appealed to young people

As the current presidential election winds to a close this month, many

reporters have drawn parallels between the 2016 election and the 1968 one. Both years were marked by societal unrest, tense party conventions and an antiestablishment Democratic candidate — Vermont’s Bernie Sanders in 2016, and in 1968, a longtime Minnesota legislator, Sen. Eugene McCarthy. In the late 1960s, many Democrats became disenchanted with President Lyndon Johnson’s Vietnam policies, and a “Dump Johnson” campaign formed to halt the president’s reelection in 1968. In November 1967, McCarthy challenged Johnson for the Democratic presidential nomination. Opposition of the Vietnam War was his primary issue: “I am concerned that the administration seems to have set no limit to the price which it is willing to pay for a military victory,” McCarthy said.

Making it real When the New Hampshire primary votes came in, McCarthy had 42.4 percent of the vote compared to Johnson’s 49.4 percent. His supporters also controlled 20 of the state’s 24 delegates to the Democratic National Convention. Indeed, the senator had dealt a significant blow to the president’s campaign. His campaign was particularly attractive to young people and college students, who were strongly antiwar. During a time when unrest and violence were a constant undercurrent, McCarthy hoped to give youth a political outlet — rather than a radical 16 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

one — for their frustrations. McCarthy’s political appeal became apparent at the New Hampshire primary in March 1968. Student volunteers were able to canvass more than half the homes in the state. At the same time, Johnson’s Tet Offensive had ramped up military efforts in Vietnam, and news of increasing the draft and additional troop deployments swirled. Media outlets across the country — including Time magazine and CBS’s Walter Cronkite — started questioning Johnson’s decisions.

Parade of candidates On March 16, New York Sen. Robert F. Kennedy announced he would also seek the Democratic nomination. (Previously he’d waffled over whether to run. McCarthy had met with him in November 1967 to discuss a potential campaign, feeling RFK was the logical choice to challenge Johnson.) Barely two weeks after Kennedy’s announcement, Johnson shocked the nation by declaring in a televised speech:

→→See a local exhibit You can learn more about McCarthy at the Minnesota Historical Society’s Eugene McCarthy and the 1968 Presidential Campaign exhibit running now through Jan. 22, at the James J. Hill House in St. Paul and at The 1968 Exhibit, which returns in November 2017 to the Minnesota History Center in St. Paul. Learn more at mnhs.org.


“I shall not seek, and I will not accept, the nomination of my party for another term as your president.” He also announced that he would strongly curtail bombing in Vietnam and enter into new peace talks. Johnson and Kennedy’s moves hurt McCarthy’s campaign. RFK was very popular and also strongly antiwar, and Johnson’s decisions to not seek reelection and scale back in Vietnam weakened McCarthy’s momentum on his key issue. Vice President and fellow Minnesotan Hubert H. Humphrey soon entered the race as the establishment candidate, further splitting the Democratic vote. After Kennedy’s assassination in June, most of his delegates switched to supporting Humphrey or remained neutral rather than moving to McCarthy. During the summer of 1968, though his nomination seemed unlikely, McCarthy kept on the campaign trail.

The convention When the Democratic National Convention convened in Chicago in August, Humphrey earned the nomination as expected with 1,759.25 delegates compared to McCarthy’s 601. The convention was also infamously marked by violence and clashes between police and antiwar protesters. During the convention, McCarthy refused to endorse Humphrey and ultimately withheld his endorsement until the last week of the election, arguing that the vice president’s position on Vietnam was too similar to Johnson’s. When the final votes came in on Nov. 5, Humphrey narrowly lost the presidency to Republican Richard Nixon with

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▲▲Minnesota Sen. Eugene McCarthy became the rabblerousing Bernie Sanders of his day when he tried to take on President Johnson and the Democratic establishment in 1968. Visit hobt.org or call 612.721.2535 for more info.

42.7 percent of the popular vote versus Nixon’s 43.4. Some blamed McCarthy for the Democrats’ loss. McCarthy chose not to run for reelection to the Senate in 1970, and after 22 years representing Minnesota, he left office in January 1971. He wrote poetry and books on politics and public policy. But his political career wasn’t entirely over. He made several more presidential runs as a Democrat and as a third-party candidate, but none of the campaigns gained the same momentum as his bid in 1968. McCarthy died in 2005 at age 89 from complications from Parkinson’s.

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Lauren Peck is a media relations and social media associate for the Minnesota Historical Society. Minnesota Good Age / November 2016 / 17


Good Health / House Call / By Dr. Michael Spilane

Facing hearing loss? →→Wear-and-tear can mean a gradual loss of sound. Don’t ignore it.

Do you have trouble hearing when you’re in a crowd? Do you find yourself frequently asking people to repeat themselves? You’re not alone. Hearing loss is a significant problem for 25 percent of people over age 65, and for almost half of those over 80. Hearing loss has many causes, but the type that shows up in later years is almost

always due to degeneration of the sensory nerve cells in the inner ear. In the normal ear, sound waves proceed through the outer and middle ear and then tickle tiny hairs that are attached to nerve cells in the cochlea of the inner ear. With this type of hearing loss — sensorineural — the hairs and nerve cells are unable to collect the vibrations and transmit sound messages to the brain. Sensorineural hearing loss can be hereditary, but it most often occurs in a person with no family history of hearing problems. The best answer to the “why” question isn’t a very elucidating one: It’s due to simple wear and tear.

It starts early Some loss of hearing acuity can be demonstrated in almost all persons by age 50, but it’s usually too insufficient to cause trouble. As the years go by, however, it becomes increasingly more likely that degeneration of the nerve cells will cause significant hearing symptoms. Other factors may be causal or contributive. Loud occupational or recreational noise is harmful to the nerve cells in the inner ear, and with prolonged exposure, hearing loss is likely. These days the wise worker wears ear protection in noisy environments. Unwise kids who like their music at 100 decibels or more are fodder for tomorrow’s hearing aid manufacturers. Some drugs have the potential to damage the ear’s nerve cells. The list of problem drugs isn’t long, but includes life-saving agents in the antibiotic and diuretic (water pill) groups. Aspirin and quinine can also cause hearing trouble at high doses.

Voices lost amid noise Not all nerve cells are affected equally in sensorineural hearing loss. Those that detect high frequency sound wavelengths are most prone to damage. And that isn’t a good thing. Highfrequency sounds are the ones that enable discrimination of

18 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

speech sounds, especially consonants. What’s left are words that sound like they’re made up of all vowels (A-EI-O-U). Speakers sound mumbly. Words are heard, but not understood. In the early stages of hearing loss, discrimination of the spoken words is more a problem than the volume of the speaker. Nerve cells in normal ears have sufficient power to detect and separate specific conversations — even when there’s a lot of background noise. But a nerve-damaged ear is overwhelmed by background noise and separation is impaired. An early symptom of sensorineural hearing loss is trouble hearing conversation in the presence of background noise. Conversation in noisy places is lost, and the impaired person is likely to avoid such environments.


Don’t opt for denial It’s common for an older person to tolerate and adapt to hearing loss rather than seek professional help. But the toleration and adaptations typically lead to yet more problems. A hearingimpaired person may stop attending movies and plays, avoid dining out with friends, sit mute in groups or avoid initiating conversation. At its worst, the resulting progressive social isolation can lead to depression and even confusion. The absence of pain or acute distress, along with the insidious progression of the hearing loss, makes the afflicted person underaware of the severity of the problem and its social consequences. Too often a spouse, friend or family member has to use a baseball-bat approach to convince their loved one to seek help. Sound is one of the riches of life. Missing out on sound is missing out on life. Only about one in five people with hearing loss use a hearing aid: Cost, embarrassment, misinformation and procrastination are the common reasons. Like all technologic devices, the performance of hearing aids has advanced dramatically over recent years. Yes, they’re costly. But they’re absolutely worth the investment.

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Minnesota Good Age / November 2016 / 19


Good Health / Caregiving / By Dorothea Harris

HONORING CAREGIVERS →→Nearly a third of the people in the U.S. are taking care of sick or aging loved ones

November is National Family Caregivers Month.

It’s a time to honor the tireless work caregivers do every day — and to celebrate the personal rewards made possible by this special service to others. I work with caregivers professionally, and I’m a caregiver in my personal life, so I know the many of the challenges — as well as the joys — of caregiving. Becoming a caregiver creates a special relationship and a unique experience the caregiver wouldn’t have otherwise had. Being a caregiver isn’t something everyone can do or wants to do. And yet, there are a great many of us: Caregivers have become their own census classification, totaling an estimated 65 million people. That’s 29 percent of the U.S. population — all providing care at some time during the year for family members or friends who are chronically ill, disabled or aged.

A big life change When a person becomes a caregiver, it usually means that the former relationship with the care receiver is somewhat altered. Children can suddenly become responsible for their parents in a way they never were before. Relationships between spouses can change dramatically, when one person needs a lot of care or has memory loss. All of the extra time and effort required to be a caregiver can put a strain on the caregiver’s relationships, job and physical or mental health. While many care receivers are grateful for all the assistance, some can become demanding and unappreciative or show a lack insight regarding these labors of love. This can be common among people with memory loss. Whatever your situation, it’s important to remember: You’re important. All of your emotions, whether good or bad, about caregiving are not only valid but also worth addressing.

Finding help, resources Fortunately, many organizations can help caregivers in a variety of areas, including education, information and referral, consultation or coaching, respite care and support groups. Each caregiving situation is different. Working with a caregiver support program can be helpful because such programs offer personalized caregiver assessments to helps caregivers figure out what will best meet the caregiver’s needs as well as the care receiver’s. To find services in your community, call the Minnesota Senior LinkAge Line at 800-333-2433 or visit MinnesotaHelp.info: Click on Seniors and then choose Caregivers under Helpful Links.

20 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Self-care and stress Because caregiving can be a full-time job, we often find that caregivers stop really taking care of themselves. Statistics show that caregivers often show increased stress and decreased health. Unfortunately, it’s a lose-lose situation: If caregivers don’t take care of themselves, they can eventually become less able to give good care. So it’s important for caregivers to practice self-care on a daily basis, always remembering to manage stress and make sure to incorporate some time for fun. That means asking for help from others, even though that can be incredibly hard to do. I don’t want to imply that caregiving is all challenges and stress. There also are many rewards and positive aspects to being a caregiver. I believe it’s an honor to care for a loved one — and that it gives a person a unique chance to serve: Caregivers are givers. They learn to be kinder and less selfish in a society that’s often so focused on personal gain. Thanks to caregivers in Minnesota, thousands of people are able to remain safely at home in their communities, where they would prefer to be. In addition, caregivers save taxpayers millions of dollars each year by delaying nursing home placements. If you know a caregiver, please thank him or her. And if you are one, please give yourself a pat on the back! Dorothea Harris is the program manager for Caregiver Support Services at the Volunteers of AmericaMinnesota. Learn more about National Family Caregivers Month at caregiveraction.org.


Good Living / Travel

TO Watson Lake, northeast of Prescott, is a picturesque destination with gorgeous views and access to stunning rock formations known as the Granite Dells.


Arizona’s

TOP 10 BY SANDRA SCOTT

Think outside the Grand Canyon when planning your next trip to this historic, gorgeous state

A

rizona is known worldwide as the home of the Grand Canyon, one of the most amazing natural wonders of the world. It’s one of the deepest gorges on earth, attracting visitors from across the globe. But to visit only the mother of canyons on a trip to this state would be to miss out on the other amazing places in the Grand Canyon State.

Minnesota Good Age / November 2016 / 23


Arizona’s TOP 10 Phoenix:

The state capital is known for its bigleague sporting events, but there’s so much more. Stop by the Jewel of the Desert, The Biltmore Resort and Spa, the only existing hotel in the world with a Frank Lloyd Wrightinfluenced design. Don’t miss the Heard Museum to learn about one of Arizona’s artistic treasures, the Katchina dolls (spirit dolls fashioned by the Hopi Indians).

Flagstaff:

Perched on the famed Route 66 and surrounded by the world’s largest ponderosa pine forest, this mile-high city is a multi-season destination. Wander around Heritage Square and historic downtown, step into the past at the Arizona’s Pioneer Museum or look beyond at the Lowell Observatory, where scientists first discovered Pluto in 1930. 24 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


Tucson:

This popular, gorgeous area is favored by golfers and vacationers alike looking for a sunny winter getaway. During the winter, it’s possible to ski at Mount Lemmon Ski Valley, the southernmost ski resort in the U.S., and return to the city to bask in the sun, poolside. Explore the art, architecture and culinary scene in the downtown’s Presidio Historic District, including St. Augustine Cathedral (left).

Photo by Darla Hallmark / Shutterstock.com Photo by CrackerClips Stock Media / Shutterstock.com

Tombstone: Grab your cowboy hat and head

to the Town Too Tough to Die. This historic, once rough-andtumble cowboy town today features a main street lined with old saloons, candy shops and gift stores. Ride a stage coach through town, see a reenactment of the famed gunfight at OK Corral and visit Boot Hill.

Arcosanti: North of Phoenix, visit an experi-

mental town developed by architect Paolo Soleri based on the concept of arcology which tries to improve urban conditions while minimizing the destructive impact on the natural surroundings. There are various mixed-use buildings, including many housing working artists such as Soleri Windbell Studios. Minnesota Good Age / November 2016 / 25


Arizona’s TOP 10 Sedona: Nestled in an area of red sandstone buttes surrounded by nearly 2 million acres of national forest, this resort town of 10,000 is noted for hiking and biking. It’s an artist community best known for its natural geomagnetic points called vortexes, which are said to facilitate healing and spirituality.

Photo by Wollertz / Shutterstock.com

Photo by Miller Photo Photo by Paul McKinnon / Shutterstock.com

Jerome: Not far from Sedona — up a road of

hairpin turns — is the funky old ghost town of Jerome. It was once called The Wickedest Town in the West back in the day when copper mining was king and the streets were lined with brothels and saloons. Today, it’s known as an artist’s haven with many art galleries and reportedly haunted locations. 26 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Prescott: At 5,300 feet, this city is blessedly cool in

summer and is a showcase for Victorian homes as well as classic saloons. Visit Whiskey Row, where the gunslingers drank and fought. It’s also home to the world’s oldest annual rodeo, held every summer. Watson Lake, northeast of town, is a picturesque destination with gorgeous views and access to stunning rock formations known as the Granite Dells.


Bisbee:

Photo by Chris Curtis / Shutterstock.com

Ninety miles southeast of Tucson, this town of 5,500 is home to the historic Copper Queen Mine. The once-flourishing city boasts a preserved turn-of-the century downtown that today is dotted with artist studios, antiques shops and ghosts. Don your hard hat and yellow slicker and take a tour 1,500 feet into the old mine.

And more: Arizona is dotted with

many unique rural sites including Monument Valley, Four Corners, the Petrified Forest, the Painted Desert (right), Lake Powell, Hoover Dam (above) and more. Learn more at visitarizona.com. Sandra Scott is a longtime freelance travel writer based in Mexico, N.Y. Learn more at sanscott.com. Minnesota Good Age / November 2016 / 27


Good Living / Housing / By Sarah Jackson →→Covenant Village of Golden Valley Where: 5800 St. Croix Ave. N., Golden Valley Ages welcome: 62 and older Number of units: 198 studio, one-, two-, and two-bedroomden apartments, ranging from 490 to 1,570 square feet

HOUSING SPOTLIGHT

A TIERED APPROACH →→CCRCs — such as Covenant Village — offer a variety of services within one community

Do you know what CCRC stands for?

If you’re looking into senior housing options, the acronym should be part of your parlance, just so you know your options. CCRCs — continuing care retirement communities — typically guarantee housing placement and a continuum of health care for seniors, including access to assisted living, memory care, rehab and skilled nursing on a single campus. Sizeable one-time entrance fees guarantee residents a place to call home, regardless of their health-care needs. One local example of this tiered approach to the aging process is Covenant Village of Golden Valley, a faith-based, not-for-profit CCRC. Though it opened in 1980, this Golden Valley facility near Highway 100 and Duluth Street, has undergone many renovations over the years, including new building additions in 1987 and 2001. Special features here include a LifeConnect wellness program to keep seniors engaged with each other, family and their own health, hobbies, lifelong learning and spirituality. Covenant Village is also the only facility in Minnesota to offer drug-free SAIDO Learning memory-support methods that have proven to help improve symptoms for people suffering from Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia. 28 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

Cost for single resident: Entrance fees for independent living range from $90,300 to $284,100, depending on the size of the apartment. Residents also pay additional monthly fees ranging from $1,847 to $3,707, which includes meals, utilities, insurance, maintenance, cable, a phone line, Internet, an emergency-call pendant, scheduled transportation, wellness programs and activities. Residents pay for health-care services, such as assisted living, memory support, skilled nursing, and rehab, as needed, with monthly fees increasing to cover specific types of care. Residents benefit from a guaranteed continuum of care as well as varying rates for health care. Some residential agreements include refund and estate benefit options as well. Care services are available to residents and nonresidents. Ownership: Covenant Retirement Communities is the nation’s sixth largest not-forprofit senior services provider. Based in Skokie, Ill., it serves 5,000 residents at 15 senior living communities nationwide and is a ministry of the Evangelical Covenant Church. Info: 877-804-7017 or tinyurl.com/cvgv-minnesota


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Other amenities ⊲⊲ Great room with a grand piano and fireplace ⊲⊲ Billiards room ⊲⊲ Computer center and community-wide wifi ⊲⊲ Private dining for family gatherings and events; and a guest suite ⊲⊲ Venue for musical and theatrical performances ⊲⊲ Professional grade woodworking shop and a creative arts center ⊲⊲ Gift shop ⊲⊲ Fitness center and lap pool ⊲⊲ Yoga, aquatic and strength classes ⊲⊲ Fitness coordinator and dietician ⊲⊲ Wooded paths for walking or riding ⊲⊲ Personal gardening spaces ⊲⊲ Lifelong learning classes ⊲⊲ Salon/barber ⊲⊲ Worship opportunities and bible studies Sarah Jackson is the editor of Minnesota Good Age.

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Good Living / Finance / By Skip Johnson

BUYING A CAR →→Consider these factors before you acquire a new vehicle in retirement

Fall is one of the best times to buy a car, as auto dealers drop prices on last year’s models to make room for the new vehicles. You may even want to put a vehicle on your Black Friday shopping list, according to Consumer Reports. Since the crowds are at the malls, you may find an empty sales lot and a staff willing to make a deal. Whenever you choose to go car shopping, you’ll be faced with a number of decisions — color, make and model, and don’t forget financing.

Auto loan increases Americans owe more in auto loans than ever before. Car buyers are in debt to the tune of $1 trillion, according to The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. A top banking regulator has warned the growth is “unprecedented,” and we could see a rise in delinquencies that could cause financial stress on some banks. Auto loans, however, don’t pose a threat to the financial system at large. Unlike the loans behind the housing crisis of 2008, auto loans make up a much smaller chunk of lending when compared to mortgages. There are two reasons auto loans are skyrocketing: 1. We’re buying more cars. 2. Cars are becoming more expensive. The price of a new car is rising because of all the advanced technology, like driver-assistance systems and high-end entertainment connectivity options. Many car buyers are attracted to extra-long loans as a way to pay for their fancier rides. The average loan used to be five years, but now it’s common for buyers to stretch out a loan to seven or eight years. It’s important to remember that those longer loans will keep your monthly payment lower, but you’ll end up paying more in interest and finance charges.

30 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

On average, a car loses about 25 to 30 percent of its value in the first year and 50 to 60 percent in the first three years. I recommend sticking to a five-year loan — even shorter is better if you can afford it. How do you know how much you can afford? It goes back to your budget. Calculate the payments, interest included, and be sure to have a plan for how you’ll pay for repairs and maintenance costs. Then, after you’ve paid off your car, continue to put the money in savings so you can start saving for your next car. There are additional considerations when it comes to choosing a car if you’ve already retired:

Safety No one likes to hear it, but as we get older, our vision and reflexes tend to deteriorate. New technology can help older drivers with slower response


The wide range of services and care options at The Residence at North Ridge is one of the reasons we’re considered one of the best senior housing facilities in the community. times stay safe on the road. A camera and rear proximity sensors may be worth the investment. Other good safety features include automatic brakes and warning sensors.

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Depreciation Car depreciation begins the moment you drive it off the lot. On average, a car loses about 25 to 30 percent of its value in the first year and 50 to 60 percent in the first three years. Retirees on a fixed income will want to minimize depreciation as much as they can; consider buying a latemodel used car or research makes and models that do a better job of maintaining their values.

Color Interestingly, a recent study surprised a lot of people about what color cars have the least depreciation. Orange, yellow and green cars were found to hold their value the best, because these odd colors are hard to find, according to the research company iSeeCars. At the other end of the spectrum, which color car depreciated the most? One of the most popular colors on the road: Gold. Skip Johnson is an advisor and partner at Great Waters Financial in New Hope, a financial planning firm and Minnesota insurance agency. Skip also offers investment advisory services through AdvisorNet Wealth Management, a registered investment advisor. Learn more at mygreatwaters.com.

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12/9/152016 12:00/PM Minnesota Good Age / November 31


L BY JU

IE K

EN

TOS BY TRACY WALSH | PHO K C I DR

Hometown girl Sue Zelickson first became famous for her award-winning WCCO radio show. But her steadfast support of the local food scene — including many philanthropic efforts — have made her a Twin Cities foodie legend.

Sue Zelickson — shown here mixing up a batch of her trademark Lacey Sue Z cookies — is the co-founder of the Charlie Awards, an event to honor exceptional contributions to the local food scene, set for Nov. 13 this year in downtown Minneapolis.

Minnesota Good Age / November 2016 / 33


Sue Z

S

ue Zelickson is consulting her calendar. A large daybook — with a hot pink cover — allows the James Beard Award-winning food reporter and radio host to see a month at a glance. And what a glance it is: Each day’s square is penned in from top to bottom, filled with meetings, meals, charity events, gala fundraisers and more. Zelickson consults her autumn schedule, the “high season” for nonprofit events, and muses as she tries to find an open hour for an interview: “There are four fundraisers in a row during this week. And here, I’m supposed to be in two places at the same time. Hmmm.” The 82-year-old dynamo doesn’t seem at all perturbed by her jam-packed schedule. It’s clear she loves to stay busy — and help others while she’s doing it — usually with a theme of food as the foundation for her work.

34 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


⊳⊳ Sue Zelickson’s entry into the food world happened after she started editing cookbooks for charity. Among them are her Minnesota Heritage cookbooks, which have helped raise more than $150,000 for the American Cancer Society.

Miss Congeniality

“Sue has tons of energy. She goes to more events every week than anyone I know,” said Scott Mayer, owner of MAYER, an event-production and sponsorship-marketing company. “I get emails from her at midnight: ‘Come down and meet me at the Dakota, I’m at a show’ — or ‘I’m leaving one event and heading to another.’” Several years ago, Mayer ran into Zelickson and then-mayor R.T. Rybak as they were leaving the Ivey Awards, the annual celebration of local theater that Mayer produces. “Sue said to me: ‘Why don’t we have anything like this to celebrate local food?’” And then, in her trademark never-say-die fashion, she set about working with Mayer and his team to make the idea a reality. The result was the hugely popular Charlie Awards — named after the legendary restaurant, Charlie’s Cafe Exceptionale, a culinary mainstay in downtown Minneapolis until the 1980s.  This month the awards are entering their sixth year — in a city fast becoming known for its world-class food scene. Today’s Charlie Awards festivities have gone beyond the one-night affair to include free happy-hour panel discussions for food industry folks. “Sue was instrumental in the concepting and the execution of the Charlie Awards,” Mayer said. “She’s been in the business for so many years in such a variety of capacities, so she knows people all over the food scene. In the food and beverage business, nothing is more important than relationships, and she has a unique ability to create and maintain personal relationships.” If there were a personality contest in the in the Twin Cities’ food community, Zelickson would definitely win the title of Miss Congeniality, said Molly Steinke, the media relations director at Nemer Fieger, the local agency that manages publicity for the Charlie Awards. “Sue’s positive attitude is infectious, and her philanthropy is inspirational,” Steinke said. “She is just a joy to be around, and she’s one of my favorite people in the world.” Zelickson, though short in stature, cuts a wide swath through the Twin Cities cultural life. She appears at many grand events and galas, but she’s also just as likely to be found having a cup of coffee with a local food purveyor who is seeking her wisdom, or attending a board meeting at one of the multiple charities she supports. It isn’t just her diminutive frame that makes her distinctive, though: With her chic cropped hair, contemporary glasses and impeccably pulled-together wardrobe, she brings a bit of glamour with her wherever she goes. “I’ve always loved art and design in all forms,” she said. “And certainly in fashion.” Case in point: Fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi once caught a glimpse of Sue when both were dashing through the WCCO lobby and quickly veered off course to compliment her on her outfit.

I always say: ‘You can develop a whole committee, or you can get one Sue Zelickson, because she knows how to get things done.’ She’s such a dynamo, and her age has only made her wiser and more energetic. — Jeannie Seeley-Smith, president of Perspectives in St. Louis Park

Minnesota Good Age / November 2016 / 35


Sue Z Crafting her own cookie

Zelickson, who now lives in Golden Valley, grew up in South Minneapolis and attended Washburn High School. She found an early food mentor in her beloved grandmother, who lived on the Bryant Avenue streetcar line.

▲▲Sue Zelickson’s cookie mixes are available online at suezcookiemix.com ($20 for two boxes) and at the Good Day Cafe in Golden Valley ($7.95 for one box).

Zelickson would venture out to the farmers market for ingredients and then take the streetcar to her grandmother’s apartment to help her cook. “She never used a measuring cup, and I’d try to take her handfuls and put them into measuring cups to figure out recipes,” Zelickson said. “But they never turned out quite the same.” In fact, Zelickson’s recipe for her Lacey Sue Z cookies came from a recipe she came up with while baking some of her first chocolate chip cookies — without measuring (just like Grandma). They turned out flat — but delicious. Today mixes for her signature cookies are now sold locally and online to raise money for the Kids Cafe at Perspective in St. Louis Park (more on that later). Despite her sensational cookie recipe, Zelickson makes no claims of culinary greatness, insisting that appreciating and supporting all things food-related is her real talent.

The making of a local foodie

After beginning college studying Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Zelickson finished her studies at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities. Even then, she had an active social life. “Things were different than they are today, and I dated a lot of different people,” she said. “I kept a ‘date book’ that said who I went out with, if we had doubled with another couple, where we went, that sort of thing.” Her grandson, Arlo, was looking at the book recently and said, “Grandma, you had two dates in one night!” Zelickson met her husband, Al, now a retired dermatologist, on a blind date in 10th grade. And they remained “buddies,” even while he was away in New York for his internship in medicine. “He was sending me letters about all the New York debutantes he was dating, and I began to think I was missing something,” she said. The couple recently celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary. Zelickson’s entry into the food world happened through her charitable, editorial work. First, she edited a cookbook for the Guthrie Theater, then another for the YWCA and eventually edited — and promoted — 10 cookbooks for nonprofit organizations. A breast cancer survivor, Zelickson has edited cookbooks for the American Cancer Society, including a variety of Minnesota Heritage cookbooks, which have raised more than $150,000 since 1979. While she was promoting a cookbook on-air at WCCO Radio, Zelickson caught the attention of decision-makers at Rogers Cable, who asked her to do food reporting in the then brand-new world of cable television. 36 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


→→Charlie Awards This sixth-annual event, which is open to the public, salutes the stars of local food and beverage community. This year’s awards will also showcase area farmers and their contributions to the industry. A portion of the proceeds will go to Open Arms of Minnesota, the state’s largest distributor for hot meals for people facing lifechallenging illnesses. When: 3:30 p.m. Nov. 13 at Pantages Theatre, followed by a 5 p.m. after-party reception at IDS Center’s Crystal Court (a few blocks away) and an optional four-course Minnesota chef’s dinner with wine parings at 6:30 p.m. at WINDOWS on Minnesota on the 50th floor of the IDS Center Where: Downtown Minneapolis Cost: $35 ($150 with the optional chef’s dinner) Info: charliesexceptionale.com

From there, she joined the WCCO family, both on television and radio, and was a long-time radio host. Her show, Food for Thought, won a James Beard Award for Best Radio Show in 2005. Along with Greenspring Media’s then-publisher Steve Fox, Zelickson conceived and launched Minnesota Monthly’s Food & Wine Experience, which will celebrate its 23rd anniversary this March. Today Zelickson continues to comment on the local food scene through her long-running column in Minnesota Monthly, Sue Z’s Finds. She’s also judged numerous food-related contests locally and nationally, including the Pillsbury Bake-Off contest, which offers a $1 million grand prize.

▲▲Zelickson’s cookbook collection, displayed in her Golden Valley home, includes many titles she’s edited over the years.

Supporting women

Zelickson’s commitment to helping the community has remained strong. In 1993, she founded Women Who Really Cook, a networking organization for women in the food and hospitality industry. Minnesota Good Age / November 2016 / 37


Sue Z Its mission is to provide members with culinary information, resources and ongoing promotional opportunities to help them reach personal and professional goals. In 2007, the group launched the Sue Zelickson Grant program, which has so far awarded more than $40,000 to female students pursuing education in the culinary or hospitality field. “Her whole motivation in starting the organization was to give women in the food business the opportunity to network and support each other, something they were not able to do in the male-dominated world of food,” said LoAnn Mockler, the organization’s executive director. “Sue has mentored so many people in so many ways — inviting them to meetings, introducing them to people or helping them get a job. She is a great motivator, and her encouragement has led many women to become leaders in their field.” Zelickson’s support of local women has been monetary, too, Mockler said. “She buys their products, donates to their causes, promotes them to others and helps fund their Kickstarter campaigns,” Mockler said. “And when they are having a hard time, she is often there, offering a ride, to babysit, to work behind the scenes. Whatever they need, she offers it.”

More energetic with age ▲▲Sue Zelickson’s WCCO radio show, Food for Thought, won a James Beard Award for Best Radio Show in 2005.

Zelickson continues to support many other organizations. She’s involved in fund-raising activities for The Cookie Cart, a nonprofit in which teens gain work, life and leadership skills at a Minneapolis bakery. (A second branch of the program is in the works in St. Paul, too.) Zelickson also launched Kids Cafes at the Boys & Girls Clubs in North and South Minneapolis — and at Perspectives Family Center in St. Louis Park — to teach young students how to cook and enjoy healthy foods at dinner five nights a week. Jeannie Seeley-Smith, the organization’s president and CEO, said Zelickson has made an invaluable contribution to the organization. “Her enthusiasm is so contagious,” she said. “She can gather more people around a cause than anyone I’ve ever known. I always say: ‘You can develop a whole committee, or you can get one Sue Zelickson, because she knows how to get things done.’ She’s such a dynamo, and her age has only made her wiser and more energetic.”

All this on four hours’ sleep

Zelickson attributes her whirlwind lifestyle to what she calls “an acute case of FOMO, or Fear Of Missing Out.” She sleeps just a few hours a night, going to bed around midnight or 1 a.m., and rising every day at 5 a.m. “You have to be active and take part in things. Otherwise, there’s no reason to get up,” Zelickson said. “If I’d offer advice to anyone, it’s to be aware of what’s going on in the world and take part in it. Don’t sit on the sidelines; go out there and make a difference.”

38 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


visitdecorah.com A mother of two grown sons, Brian and Barry, and mother-in-law to Lisa and Mary, Zelickson is close with her four grandchildren — Zach, Nicole, Eve and Arlo. Eve Zelickson, 19, a sophomore at Brown University, said her grandmother’s busy schedule hasn’t made her any less present in her life. “She has taught me the importance of following through and always keeping your word, because I’ve watched her do it so many times,” she said. “She is the Energizer bunny in human form, and despite how busy she is, she manages to stay in my life and has always been at every dance concert, mock-trial case or high-school dance.” The younger Zelickson also notes a phenomenon that might be termed “The Zelickson Effect.” “When I was younger, I would get frustrated when we were out together, because she would stop every 20 feet to talk to someone she knew. Later, I realized that’s part of the reason I love her so much. She treats everyone with so much respect and an open heart.” Zelickson’s friend of 16 years, Carolyn Dunne, has also seen the effect in action. “I’ve traveled with Sue many times, and it doesn’t matter where we are — New York, Chicago, Napa Valley, San Francisco — people will cross the street to see her and talk to her. Everyone she talks to feels like they’re her best friend.” Julie Kendrick is a contributing writer for many local publications. She lives in Minneapolis and blogs at kendrickworks.blogspot.com.

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My mother, who stayed in her home until the bitter end, left me a trove of precious jewels by leaving her ‘mess’ behind

Gift Long ye Goodb The of a

By Virginia Chase Sanderson

40 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


My 86-year-old sister lost her husband last year. We mulled over her options: Should she move out of the house to a retirement community to ease her children’s responsibility? Or should she just stay put until necessity strikes? My sister had some very good personal reasons for such a move.

Though she hadn’t amassed an unmanageable number of belongings over the years, the issue of accumulated stuff is often the primary concern of many families: Isn’t it just easier to preemptively dismantle one’s home and furnishings early to save family members the trouble later? On the other hand, if we start paring back and move to senior facilities before we either want or need to, some would argue that we’re hastening the process of dying. Should we get rid of our goods, have our coffins hewed and be all ready to lie down in them? Ah, just another everyday wrenching dilemma of aging — to which I’ll offer my mother’s eloquent answer: No.

One last remodeling project

▲▲The author and her mother in Chicago in 1941 (left) and with her parents in 1940 (right).

It was typical of my mother’s brave and stubborn stance toward life and death that, three weeks before she died at the age of 85, she insisted my sister take her to Menards so she could pick out new tile for the bathroom floor. My sister tried hard to talk her out of it, but there was no way Mom was about to start letting someone else pick out tile — or anything else — for her. By this time she could barely walk. We were grateful for shopping carts during Mom’s later years; they served as inconspicuous but substantial walkers. Mom wouldn’t be caught dead using a walker, and she wasn’t.

Minnesota Good Age / November 2016 / 41


The Gift of a Long Goodbye This last trip to Menards was, as my sister tells it, almost tragic. Mom couldn’t support herself on the cart anymore; she staggered and clutched and leaned on Sis — and got the tiles of her choice. In the second week before her death, she lay on the couch in the living room, supervising the operations of the bathroom remodel — which she could see from the couch when she craned her neck. Her son and son-in-law, two supremely confident and competent builders, were at work laying tiles according to her directives. Under her vigilant eye, they were boys again, meek and docile and heartbreakingly anxious to please and indulge this woman we all adored.

She knew she was dying and was none too happy about it. But she could shrug and, in her bittersweet way, tease about it. There was always a bit of the street-tough about Mom, and it never did her better service than in her dying. As the messy tile laying went on, my sister and I watched with her from the sofa. “I don’t know why I’m doing this,” she sighed. “I’ll never live to enjoy it.” And she didn’t. But hey, Mom was redecorating her beloved home, just days before her death! It gave me a bubbling joy in my chest, this crazy bathroom project, because we all knew it was entirely futile and wonderful, the final act of a woman who wouldn’t dream of giving up before the race was won, a fine last metaphor for her splendid engagement in life right up to the last gasp.

A sabbatical of mourning

▲▲The author’s mother and sister in 1990. 42 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

As I spent time with her during her last week on the sofa, I looked at my childhood home, full of the happy reminders of her well-lived life. Crochet books piled askew on the little stand beside her chair, boxes of yarn stuffed behind the sofa, every drawer and closet fully utilized. She sure didn’t look as if she was packing to go anywhere. I shuddered to think of the task of dismantling this life, all this stuff, three floors of it, after she died. The shudder wasn’t about the work involved, but over the queasy monstrous nightmarish unreality of making the evidence of my mom’s presence among us vanish, and my childhood with it — for we all knew that the house eventually had to be sold. Just as my sabbatical year began, Mom died. This was supposed to be a year during which I would spend a little of the quality time with Mom I had been so sparing of until then. I had envisioned being with her for garage sales, lunches at Perkins, happy cook-fests over her busy stove. Instead, I got a gray winter, a dull heart, a year in which to grieve unhurriedly. With the glad approval of my working brother and sister, I appointed myself as the person to slowly begin to pack up her stuff. Day after day for a monsoon of afternoons, I drove over to her house and did what was needed. I sorted and packed up her jewelry. I buried my face in her scarves, inhaling the last of her good scent, as I sorted and boxed her clothing.


I would soon be ready to supervise the distribution of her belongings to kids and grandkids, friends and charity. I had a lump in my throat with each new discovery. The fistfuls of crumpled greeting cards stuffed into the little desk in the living room! Her

⊳⊳ The author’s mother at graduation in 1931, Gilbert High School, Gilbert, Minn.

wonderful tangle of bobby pins and hairnets, curlers hard and soft, and bandannas to roll it all up onto her head — cute!

Mending left undone Then there was the condition of her wardrobe — not so cute. I thought of all the times she had gently hinted that I could come over and help her with her mending, after she stopped being able to use the sewing machine. I had helped her some, but with my killer teaching job, it hadn’t been much. Now, as I stared at the truth, the lump in my throat expanded. Hems gaping, pinned with all manner of stopgaps, torn seams safety-pinned together. My eyes filled with tears. The saddest discovery of all was that Mom hadn’t had the strength during her last weeks (or was it months?) to hang her clothes on hangers and lift them all the way to the closet rod. She had been draping them on the nearest shoulders of other clothes already hung in the closet. I sat on the bed and wept. We never knew.

Forgiveness and a final goodbye Now, if Mom had packed herself up ready to go on her final voyage, she could have spared me these days and weeks of intimacy with her as I went through her belongings. And it would have been my terrible loss. In those months, as I touched each thing that had touched her, I visited with her: I laughed, I squealed, I cried.

▲▲The author’s mother in 1986. She died in 1997.

I took my time and grieved thoroughly and elaborately. I came to know her better. I came to know myself better, where I’d failed her and how, and I arrived at self-forgiveness. Quality time with Mom after all. Mothers everywhere, know this: Your kids want to believe you’ll live forever, and you’ll enjoy life more if you think that way, too. Travel, be with friends and family, pack as much joy into your life as possible. And don’t be afraid to let others clean up the mess when you’re dead. Virginia Chase Sanderson is a longtime writer of personal essays. She has taught literature and writing at California State University in Los Angeles, at Cornell University, and at Anoka-Ramsey Community College in Coon Rapids, Minnesota. She received a bachelor in fine arts degree from the University of Minnesota in 2011, after her retirement from teaching. She lives with her husband in Minneapolis. Minnesota Good Age / November 2016 / 43


Housing resources • Memory care

• Assisted living

Auburn Homes & Services ••••

Auburn Homes and Services is a nonprofit organization serving seniors in the spirit of Christ’s love. 501 N Oak St, Chaska 591 Cherry Dr, Waconia 594 Cherry Dr, Waconia 952-227-0494 auburnhomes.org

Augustana Care of Minneapolis •••• Our full continuum of care offers everything from independent living to skilled nursing, all on one campus! We offer in-home care, restaurantstyle dining, a bank, pharmacy, grocery store, coffee shop, beauty shop, medical clinic, fitness center, and more! 1007 E 14th St, Minneapolis 1510 11th Ave S, Minneapolis 612-238-5555 minneapoliscampus.org

Benedictine Health System ••••

Benedictine Health System is a mission-based, non-profit health system headquartered in Minnesota, sponsored by the Benedictine sisters of St. Scholastica Monastery in Duluth. BHS provides a full continuum of care services for aging adults, including independent housing, assisted living, skilled nursing, memory care and rehabilitation services. Benedictine Health Center at Innsbruck 651-633-1686 / bhcinnsbruck.org Benedictine Health Center of Minneapolis 612-879-2800 / bhcminneapolis.org Benedictine Senior Living at Steeple Pointe 763-425-4440 / steeplepointe.org Cerenity Senior Care, St. Paul & White Bear Lake / cerenityseniorcare.org Interlude Restorative Suites, Fridley 763-230-3131 / interluderestorativesuites.org Regina Senior Living, Hastings 651-480-4333 / regina-seniorliving.com St. Gertrude’s Health and Rehabilitation Center 952-233-4400 / stgertrudesshakopee.org 1-800-833-7208 Bhshealth.org

City of South St. Paul, Housing Division •

The City of South St. Paul operates 296 one bedroom public housing apartments for residents aged 50+. Rent is based on 30% of tenant’s income. All utilities paid, on-site

44 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

• Independent housing

• Long term care

caretaker, security, after-hours answering service, community room, resident activities, laundry facilities. Call today for an appointment. 125 3rd Ave N, South St. Paul 651-554-3270 mostrow@sspmn.org

Colonial Acres Health Care Center at Covenant Village of Golden Valley ••••

With Colonial Acres Health Care Center’s convenient location right off Highway 100 and Duluth Street, we are the perfect location for all your health care needs. We have Skilled Nursing, Transitional Care/Rehab, Long Term Care, and Memory Care. Also on campus: Residential and Assisted Living options. 5825 St. Croix Ave N, Golden Valley 763-732-1422 colonialacreshealthcarecenter.org

CommonBond Communities ••

CommonBond builds stable homes, strong futures, and vibrant communities. As the largest nonprofit provider of affordable homes in the Upper Midwest, CommonBond has been building and sustaining homes with services to families, seniors, and individuals with disabilities since 1971. 1080 Montreal Ave, St. Paul 651-291-1750 commonbond.org/findhousing

Gramercy Park Cooperative of St. Paul • Gramercy 55+ cooperative housing combines the tax and equity advantages of home ownership with the convenience of community living. When you purchase a membership you have a vote and a voice in shaping your community. Everything at Gramercy is designed with you in mind. 5688 Brent Ave, Inver Grove Heights 651-450-9851 gramercyinvergrove.org

Oak Meadows •••

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• New construction

Salvation Army Booth Manor ••

Conveniently located across from Loring Park, this 21-story high rise, with 154 one-bedroom apartments is designed for seniors 62 years of age or better, offering many services and amenities. It also combines the convenience of being near downtown with the serenity of the great outdoors. 1421 Yale Place, Minneapolis 612-338-6313 salvationarmynorth.org/community/boothmanor

St. Benedict’s Senior Community ••• St. Benedict’s Senior Community is a leader in offering a wide range of housing options for those 55 and better. Whether speaking about the campus in St. Cloud, Monticello or Sartell, our philosophy remains the same; offer independence and choices for vital aging. Sartell: Chateau Waters NOW OPEN 960 19th St S, Sartell 320-654-2352 chateauwaters.com St. Cloud Senior Housing: 1810 Minnesota Blvd SE, St. Cloud 320-203-2747 centracare.com Monticello Senior Housing: 1301 East 7th St, Monticello 763-295-4051 centracare.com

The Residence at North Ridge ••••

We offer the perfect mix of care, services and living options to ensure wellness and enrichment. Assisted Living, Independent Living, Adult Day Programs, Comprehensive Rehab Programs, Outpatient Rehab Therapy, On-site Child Care Program. Memory Care coming in early 2017. To learn more, please give us a call! 5500 Boone Ave N, New Hope 763-592-3000 northridgehealthandrehab.com


November Can’t-Miss Calendar

A Beautiful Planet →→Made in cooperation with NASA, this Omnitheater film features stunning footage of our magnificent blue planet — and the effects humanity has had on it over time — captured by the astronauts aboard the International Space Station. Directed by acclaimed filmmaker Toni Myers and narrated by actress Jennifer Lawrence. When: Ongoing Where: Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul Cost: Film tickets cost $9.95 for adults and $8.95 for ages 4–12 and 60 and older. Info: smm.org

Gridiron Glory →→This exhibit — subtitled The Best of the Pro Football Hall of Fame — is the largest and most comprehensive traveling exhibit ever created in honor of America’s favorite sport. Organized by the Pro Football Hall of Fame, it features more than 200 artifacts, photos and rare documents, footage from the NFL Film archives and interactive experiences. A section of the exhibit is devoted to the Minnesota Vikings Training Camp, in which visitors can work on their kicking and passing games. Artifacts include the Vince Lombardi Trophy, Knute Rockne’s 1919 Massillon Tigers helmet and Jim Brown’s game-worn jersey, among others. When: Through Jan. 15 Where: Minnesota History Center, St. Paul Cost: $20 for adults, $10 for ages 5 to 17 Info: mnhs.org

Rise Up, O Men →→This brand-new musical comedy — the sixth production in the locally developed Church Basement Ladies series — features the men of the church and the women who serve them. As these hard-working farmers discuss their scrap lumber piles and the benefits of weld versus solder, they unintentionally disrupt the order of the kitchen. When: Through Nov. 13 and Jan. 5–April 8 Where: Plymouth Playhouse, Plymouth Cost: $29–$40 Info: plymouthplayhouse.com

Sundays at Landmark →→This annual fall-to-spring series of mostly free cultural and arts events is designed to entertain, enrich and educate all ages.

When: Events start at 1 p.m. and are free, except where noted: 4 p.m. Nov. 13 (Saint

Martin’s Day); Dec. 11 (Santa’s Workshop); 1 and 3:30 p.m. Jan. 8 (Minnesota Boychoir); 3 p.m. Jan. 29 (Saint Paul Civic Symphony); Feb. 19 (Carpathian Celebration, $4–$6); 11 a.m. March 19 (Day of Dance, $6); 11 a.m. April 1 (Scottish Ramble, $6); 3 p.m. May 7 (Rose Ensemble); May 14 (Saint Paul Civic Symphony Mother’s Day Concert). Where: Landmark Center, St. Paul Cost: Except where noted, admission is free. Info: landmarkcenter.org

Nov. 4–19

Chanhassen Concert Series →→Upcoming tribute shows include Bridge Over Troubled Water: An Album Tribute (Nov. 4–5) and Rainy Days and Mondays Rainy Days & Mondays: The Music of the Carpenters (Nov. 18–19). When: Dinner is at 6 p.m., followed by concerts at 8 p.m., except for Sunday events, which start earlier. Where: Chanhassen Dinner Theatres, Chanhassen Cost: $40 per person and $15 more for dinner Info: chanhassendt.com

Minnesota Good Age / November 2016 / 45


Can’t-Miss Calendar classic story of Cinderella’s transformation, including holiday carols, updated pop-culture references, physical comedy, audience participation and silly gags, plus grand sets and lavish costuming. When: Nov. 8–Jan. 8 Where: Children’s Theatre Company, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets start at $15. Info: childrenstheatre.org

Nov. 11–13

Minneapolis Holiday Boutique →→Hundreds of exhibitors featuring an array of product categories — such as apparel, home decor, food, stationary, garden items, toys and more — will fill the concourse at the U.S. Bank Stadium. This event was a hit in Kansas City, so the producers (the same as the Minneapolis Home and Garden Show) decided to bring it to Minnesota. Organizers advised: “This is not a craft show. Rather it is an event for serious shoppers who want to check off their gift list in one swoop.”

Faces and Fusing

→→Carol Hancuh — a newly emerging art quilter who traded paints for fabric five years ago — will showcase her work, thanks to sponsorship from Minnesota Quilters. Hancuh’s quilts are original in design, piecing and quilting (using no kits or patterns). Her Feed My People quilt won the President’s Award at the Minnesota Quilters 2015 show, was shown at the Houston Festival of Quilts 2015 and was published in Quilters Newsletter Magazine in 2016. When: Through Nov. 23 Where: Hennepin County Government Center, Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: mnquilt.org

Nov. 5–Feb. 25

Night Trains →→See dozens of model railroads decorated with snow and holiday lights at the Twin City Model Railroad Museum’s new location in St. Paul’s Midway neighborhood.

When: 6–9 p.m. Saturdays Nov. 5–Feb. 25. Santa will visit on Dec. 17. Where: Twin City Model Railroad Museum, 668 Transfer Road, Suite 8, St. Paul Cost: Admission is $15 for ages 5 and older. Info: tcmrm.org

Nov. 8–Jan. 8

Cinderella →→Back-by-popular-demand, this rambunctious musical — created by Minneapolis’ own Children’s Theatre Company — tells the heart-warming, 46 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

When: Nov. 11–13 Where: U.S. Bank Stadium, Minneapolis Cost: $12 for ages 13 and older ($10 online) Info: minneapolisholidayboutique.com

Nov. 11–Jan. 28

What the Elf? →→Bring out the family you’ve been violently disagreeing with on Facebook for a night of topical comedy with signature drinks and a very special version of The Twelve Days of Christmas.

When: Nov. 11–Jan. 28 Where: Brave New Workshop Theatre, 824 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis Cost: $20–$38 Info: bravenewworkshop.com

Nov. 12–April 9

Winter Light →→Acclaimed British artist Bruce Munro brings his first large-scale light installation to Minnesota with a series of outdoor and indoor exhibits, including thousands of radiant lights, pulsating animations and sounds. When: Nov. 12–April 9 Where: Minnesota Landscape


Arboretum, Chaska Cost: $12–$17 Info: munrowinterlightmn.org

Nov. 13–Dec. 23

Holidays at the American Swedish Institute →→Visit the historic Turnblad Mansion for variety of holiday events, seasonal displays and activities, including a free holiday open house on Dec. 14.

When: Celebrations of Light (Nov. 13), Let’s Talk Turkey (Nov. 18), Gingerbread House Workshop (Nov.Booth Manor GA 0114 12.indd 25), Making Traditions (Nov. 26), Julgladje (Nov. 26–27), Julmarknad/ Christmas Market (Dec. 3–4), Lucia’s Legend (Dec. 9), Tiny Tomtes (Dec. 16–17), Lucia Celebration (Dec. 10), Lucia in the Mansion (Dec. 13), Neighborhood Holiday Open House (Dec. 14), Winter Solstice (Dec. 21) and Little Christmas Eve/Lilla Julafton (Dec. 23) Where: American Swedish Institute, Minneapolis Cost: Various. Regular museum admission is $9 for adults, $7 for seniors, $5 for ages 6–18 and free for ages 5 and younger. Info: asimn.org

Booth Manor Residence For Seniors 62+ • 1 Bedrooms • Based on Income • Utilities Included • Service Coordinator • Resident Activities & Programs • Community Room • Smoke-Free Building

1421 Yale Place, Mpls

612-338-6313

1

MNSure or Medicare questions? • Need guidance navigating the MNSure program? • Looking for health insurance solutions for your business? • Seeking information about Medicare Supplement, Part D or Advantage options? Contact me for professional help and I would be happy to assist. Grant Rockwood, MBA, CRPC® Licensed Agent grant.rockwood@gmail.com 763-360-4879

12/6/13 10:14 Rockwood, AM Grant GA 1116 12.indd 1

10/17/16 10:11 AM

Nov. 16–April 30

Heyday →→Billed as “35 Years of Music in Minneapolis,” this new exhibit — featuring the work of First Avenue photographer Daniel Corrigan — chronicles the history of the Minneapolis music scene from vintage Prince to the indie hip-hop collective, Doomtree. When: Nov. 16–April 30 Where: Mill City Museum, Minneapolis Cost: FREE. Admission to the rest of the museum is $12 adults, $10 ages 65 and older and $6 for ages 5-17. Info: millcitymuseum.org

→→More online! Find more events on the new Minnesota Good Age website at mngoodage.com/cant-misscalendar. Send your events at least six weeks in advance (with photos) to calendar@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / November 2016 / 47


Brain teasers Sudoku

Word Search HOME LIFE ABODE APARTMENT BALCONY BASEMENT BEDROOMS CONDO DECORATING

GARAGE HANDYMAN HOUSE INSURANCE KITCHEN LANDLORD LANDSCAPING

LIFESTYLE MAINTENANCE OWNERSHIP PORCH PRIDE PROPERTY REMODELING

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Answers 48 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age


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CROSSWORD

Answers

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CRYTPOGRAM


Crossword

ACROSS 1 “Stay out of my affairs,” briefly 5 Briefly, e.g. 11 CFO’s degree 14 Window section 15 Like the sound of tall grass in the breeze 16 “__ the ramparts ... ” 17 Pizza topping veggie 19 Dusting cloth 20 Slugger __ Harper of the Nats 21 Stylish, clothes-wise 23 Remit 25 Traditional filled fare of Europe and West Asia 29 Preppy shirt brand 31 Japanese noodle 32 Replaceable joint 33 Much-photographed evening event 36 Showroom model 50 / November 2016 / Minnesota Good Age

38 Salad staples 43 Unexpected obstacle 44 Revealing, as a bikini 46 Eye care brand 50 Savings vehicles for later yrs. 52 Copied 53 Baked-in-their-shells seafood dish 57 NFL scores 58 Car body style 59 Saltwater candy 61 Covert __: secret missions 62 Down payment ... and what 17-, 25-, 38- and 53-Across have in common (besides being food) 68 Sara of baking 69 Band on the road 70 Franc replacement 71 Oral health org. 72 Emphasize 73 French state

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Your ticket to Twin Cities Culture If you have a library card from any of the eight public library systems in the Twin Cities 7-county metro (Anoka, Carver, Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey, Scott, and Washington counties, and the city of Saint Paul), you have the opportunity to reserve free and/or discounted admission to a wide range of arts experiences.

Ticket Use Library Card

To Get Tickets

To See Shows

smartpass.melsa.org

Or Visit Museums

November 2016  
November 2016  
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