Page 1

MAY 2018

JUMBO JET

DREAMS p. 12

Baking Queen

When to ditch your mortgage p. 28

‘THE SHAME OF MINNEAPOLIS’ p. 14

An eater’s guide to

PORTLAND, OREGON p. 20

it's our

How Kim Ode became the Twin Cities’ go-to authority on baked goods page 32

HOUSING

ISSUE!


Contents

GOOD START

MAY

EDITOR'S NOTE

8 Baking is a true delight — and can even improve your wellbeing.

MY TURN

20

10 I’ve learned a lot from young local immigrants in the Twin Cities.

This Northwest gem is worth exploring just for the food!

MINNESOTA HISTORY

PORTLAND!

MEMORIES

12 In the U.S., the last of the magnificent 747 jumbo jets have gone to rest. 14 Meet Albert Alonzo 'Doc' Ames — Minneapolis’ most scandalous mayor.

GOOD HEALTH WELLNESS

16 New blood pressure rules have redefined hypertension.

CAREGIVING ⊳ The Portlandia statue — a love-it-or-hate-it Portland icon — was loosely modeled after a woman depicted on the city’s official seal.

32

ON THE COVER Maker baker Kim Ode learned to make breads, pastries and cookies as a girl, but it wasn’t until midlife — when she built her own bread oven — that she became an expert. Photos by Tracy Walsh

→ Correction The cryptogram in the February 2018 issue of Good Age contained an incorrect clue. Z equals H (not E). Please find a corrected version of the cryptogram at tinyurl.com/crypto-ga.

6 / May 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

18 Downsizing can bring about serious challenges when it comes to clutter.

GOOD LIVING HOUSING

24 A brand new senior community is opening in Richfield next month.

FINANCE

28 Should you keep your mortgage in retirement? It really depends.

IN THE KITCHEN

30 You won’t believe the secret ingredient in this pudding.

26 CAN’T-MISS 38 CALENDAR BRAIN 40 TEASERS HOUSING LISTINGS


FROM THE EDITOR Volume 37 / Issue 5 PUBLISHER

Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER

Terry Gahan tgahan@mngoodage.com

GENERAL MANAGER

Zoe Gahan zgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR

Sarah Jackson editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Ed Dykhuizen, Carol Hall, Brandi Jewett Skip Johnson, Lynette Lamb, Dave Nimmer Lauren Peck, Kira Snedden Carla Waldemar, Tracy Walsh

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Micah Edel

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Kaitlin Ungs

CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER Haley Anderson

CLIENT SERVICES

Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION

Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2018 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $18 per year.

8 / May 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

Mix it up! BY SARAH JACKSON

Oh, how I love to bake! When I was little, my mother taught me how to make chocolate chip cookies — and I’ve loved it ever since! (I’m still using the same cookie recipe she gave me, photocopied many times over, though I now use butter instead of margarine.) Photo by Tracy Walsh Of course, I don’t bake at the expert level: tracywalshphoto.com Have you seen the things the amateurs make on the Great British Baking Show? But I always find the process therapeutic. Whisking the dry ingredients, prepping the wet elements and then mixing them together with a hand mixer — no Kitchen Aid stand mixer for me — feels meditative, satisfying and a bit creative, too. Bringing my experiments to my coworkers is the best part. It’s a way to show them affection, but it’s also a chance to find an audience. And, in fact, researchers have found that baking, especially when it’s done for others, can be accompanied by a host of lasting psychological benefits, including stress relief, mindfulness and a feeling of overall wellbeing. None of this is news, of course, for our very own Twin Cities guru of baking — and this month’s fascinating Cover Star — Kim Ode! In this issue, she shares not only one of her favorite recipes — as she’s done for so many years as the Star Tribune’s Baking Central writer — but also the tale of her midlife crisis in which she built a giant brick bread oven in her Edina backyard. Over the years, Ode, who also writes feature stories for the newspaper, has taken countless bakers on adventures in the kitchen as she’s explored different baked goods. Then, with her books, such as Baking with the St. Paul Bread Club and Rhubarb Renaissance, she’s gone ever deeper. Despite all her knowledge and skills, Ode is quite humble about the art of baking: “It’s my contention,” she argues, “that baking is just a series of steps.” As I watched her whip up a batch of breakfast scones in her beautiful but simple kitchen (all the ingredients were premeasured and ready to go), it really seemed to be true, too. This month Ode retires from the Star Tribune. But fear not, you’ll still find her stories in the Taste section, as she’ll be freelancing her Baking Central column. And she’ll be teaching classes to home cooks, too. (Stay tuned.) I, for one, can’t wait to see what she makes next!


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MY TURN

Embracing color and culture BY DAVE NIMMER

I

’ve never been graceful at accepting change. If left to my own devices, I’d be writing with a manual typewriter, calling on a rotary phone or looking up facts in an encyclopedia. I am, however, welcoming one big change to life in Minnesota and in the Twin Cities. That’s the increasingly diverse face of the community. When I got here in 1963, this place was so white, it’d make your teeth itch. It was the land of soda crackers and vanilla ice cream. Not so any more. Today Minneapolis’ population is more than 35 percent people of color — including Africans, Vietnamese, Hmong and Latinos. As a country, we’re divided over immigration — whether to open doors, close borders, establish quotas or offer sanctuary. I can understand why people are fearful and skeptical over the newcomers from different cultures, colors and classes. Who are they? What do they believe? How will they affect our schools and institutions? Do they pose any threats?

We’ve been here before More than a century ago, those newcomers were Swedish, Norwegian, Irish and German. They lived in enclaves (Swede Hollow in St. Paul was one). They weren’t wealthy, worked in menial jobs and voted with ballots printed in their native languages. Well, I’ve had a chance to know some of the new young immigrants — up close and personal — and my life has been 10 / May 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

⊳⊳ Dymanh Chhoun poses with his wife, Kimhai, and daughter, Prena. Chhoun participated in the ThreeSixty Journalism program, which led him to a career as a photographer for WCCOTV. Kimhai recently became a U.S. citizen.

enriched. They were a part of ThreeSixty Journalism, a St. Paul-based program designed to find high school students of color and help them into college and, eventually, into newsrooms. Ifrah Jimale and Dymanh Chhoun were, in effect, refugees — she from Somalia and he from Cambodia. They came to Minnesota hardly speaking a word of English. They both graduated from Roosevelt High School, overcame bullying and harassment from peers, earned college degrees, got jobs, got married and raised families. In the process, they showed enough courage, conviction, commitment and compassion to put to me to shame. And that’s before they reached the age of 30. Ifrah now works as a tax examiner for the

Internal Revenue Service in Atlanta and Dymanh is a photographer for WCCOTV. They got these jobs one step at a time.

Finding their way I remember Ifrah’s voicemail messages at 2:30 a.m., asking for help in understanding a history text or interpreting a Bible verse for a religion course. She was a student at the University of St. Thomas, where I was teaching journalism. I recall walking with Dymanh across the University of Minnesota campus on a sunny, summer afternoon, declaring his intention to major in journalism. What a courageous move, I thought, for a Cambodian refugee with English as a second language. I was more than a little overwhelmed. Dymanh appeared undaunted and undeterred.


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Recently Dymanh was talking about his experience as an immigrant in Minnesota with a couple of dozen guests at the Visitation Monastery in north Minneapolis. He said he had a lot of help from his teachers, mentors, parents, siblings and friends. And I know he’s returned the favors — to his parents at home, his buddies on the street and his colleagues in the newsroom. In the WCCO newsroom, he’s known for an ever-present smile and his always-abundant energy. He can help a reporter get a sound bite, comfort a crime victim and set up a live shot in below-zero temperatures. He told the Sisters and their friends he’s grateful to be an American citizen. “I love this country,” he said. “Some see the problems. What I see are the promises. They have changed my life and I never forget that.” He smiled and he paused. Then he told the group that tomorrow his wife, Kimhai, would officially become an American citizen. The room broke out in cheers. Dave Nimmer has had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / May 2018 / 11


MEMORIES

Farewell to the Queen BY CAROL HALL

A

irline pilots “fly west” when they die. Today, the same can be said of the biggest airplane any of them ever flew. On Jan. 3, 2018, Delta Flight 9771 touched down in Marana, Ariz., marking the very last flight of a Boeing 747 operated by a U.S. airline. (British Airways, KLM and Lufthansa said they plan to keep flying 747s, at least for now.) Just 48 people were on board that farewell flight, including a flight attendant and pilot who were married while in transit. After nearly a half-century of passenger service in the U.S. and an extended farewell tour, the last of Boeing’s famed “jumbo jets” were retired to the Pinal Airpark Airport, an airplane graveyard in the Arizona desert. (Boeing 777s and 787s and the Airbus A350 are taking their place.) Ron Kenmir, a local retired Northwest Airlines captain, shared his fond memories of the dearly departed magnificent 747. Carol: Ron, what went through your mind when you saw the 747 when Northwest first acquired it in 1970? Ron: It’s surreal! There it stands, weighing almost a million pounds, 12 / May 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

powered by 200,000 pounds of thrust. It’s gigantically overwhelming — and it flies! C: It’s no wonder we airline crewmembers dubbed the 747 “the whale,” “the aluminum overcast” and, affectionately, “the queen of the skies.” How has it earned this title? R: It simply performed magnificently. The approach to the old Hong Kong Kai Tak Airport was harrowing for a Piper Cub. Yet the 747 landed there almost incident-free for nearly half a century. (One ran off the runway during a typhoon in 1993.) Once, a KLM Royal Dutch 747 flew through an erupting volcano’s ash cloud and lost all four engines. The crew miraculously restarted them and landed safely in Anchorage. It was a queen in royal colors that saved many lives that day.

And as with royalty, people were awed by it. I recall seeing some young folks having dinner at a Cleveland airport patio restaurant at dusk, watching a United 747 prepare for takeoff. When all four engines spooled up — dramatically catching the rotating beacon’s flashing red light — dust and debris flew their way. They loved it! They stood up and applauded, just as if a queen had been passing by. C: What are some of the 747’s queensize dimensions? R: The main landing gear tires are waisthigh. Its tail is the height of a six-story building (64 feet) — which is, incidentally, half as high in the sky as the Wright brothers ascended on their first flight! Its 231-foot length is almost matched by its 195-foot wingspan. ⊳ Northwest Airlines added 747s to its fleet in 1970.


A KLM Royal Dutch 747 flew through an erupting volcano’s ash cloud and lost all four engines. The crew miraculously restarted them and landed safely in Anchorage. C: How did such a magnificent flying machine come into being? R: In 1965, Pan Am worked with Boeing to create a long-haul aircraft to accommodate 400 passengers with a range of 5,000-plus miles. Taking a chance it would be overshadowed by supersonic transport (commercial aircraft designed to travel faster than the speed of sound, such as the Concorde), Boeing designed it with the cockpit atop the body and an optional swing-up door underneath for loading so it also could be used as a cargo aircraft. But the supersonic transport (SST) never got off the ground in the U.S. — so the 747 took over. C: Ron, you obviously had a love affair with the 747. How do you feel about it being gone? R: The 747 was one of the great technological achievements of the 20th century. This Royal Lady of the Skies carried millions of people through the clouds to their destinations in grand style for nearly 50 years. It’s time for a rest, I’d reckon. Still, it brings a tear to my eye. All gone now.

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Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / May 2018 / 13


MINNESOTA HISTORY

A career of corruption BY LAUREN PECK

T

he story of Albert Alonzo “Doc” Ames is perhaps the greatest political scandal in Minnesota history. As mayor of Minneapolis, Ames exposed the city to humiliation in the early 1900s — and helped jumpstart an era of reform — due to a stunning level of corruption in multiple branches of city government. By January 1903, the city’s problems had made national headlines in Lincoln Steffens’ McClure’s Magazine story, The Shame of Minneapolis. The problems started when Ames, a beloved local doctor and Civil War veteran, started his fourth term as mayor in 1901. He promptly named his brother, Frederick, the police chief and fired half of the city’s police force, replacing them with more than 100 of his own men. With much of the local police in his control, Ames, according to the magazine story, “set out upon a career of corruption, which — for deliberateness, invention and avarice — has never been equaled.” Rather than crack down on the seedier parts of Minneapolis, such as gambling houses and brothels, many members of Ames’ administration decided they wanted a cut of the money these establishments earned. Brothels and gambling dens started regularly bribing officials to avoid prosecution and receive police protection. The city already attempted to regulate the local red-light districts by requiring madams to pay fees to keep operating. But additional brothels existed outside of the red-light districts, often disguised

14 / May 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

as fake storefronts, candy stores or bathhouses. So Ames named Irwin Gardner a “special” police officer, who was secretly charged with collecting payouts from fringe brothels. And those payments went into several local officials’ pockets.

The ‘big mitt’ game One rigged gambling scheme, known as a 'big mitt game,' was a key part of the Ames administration’s downfall. The plan involved luring some unsuspecting dupe into a poker game, dealing him a seemingly winning hand (or big mitt) and then guaranteeing another player — who was in on the scam — had an even better hand to win the pot. A police officer was paid to break up the game, and if the dupe claimed he’d been swindled, the officer threatened him with jail for gambling without a license. When a grand jury started investigating local corruption, they found two big-mitt men in jail who were eager to talk, feeling Ames’ men had double-crossed them. They ran a rigged game in Minneapolis for about a month and even had a ledger documenting their expenses, including weekly payoffs to Irwin Gardner, Chris Norbeck (a police detective hired to break up games) and the mayor himself. Charges started rolling in for several of Ames’ men, and Norbeck confessed, confirming details of the big-mitt scheme. He told the Minneapolis Tribune, “I used to be straight, and the records show it. When I got dead evidence that Mayor Ames was soaking down $16,000 a month from the

▲▲Albert Alonzo “Doc” Ames, who left the state in the middle of his fourth term as mayor, was arrested in February 1903, but never went to prison.

gamblers, houses of prostitution and other sources, I concluded to get my end of it.”

Mysteriously out of state Around the same time he was indicted, Ames was preparing to move to West Baden, Indiana, to take a job as surgeon-inchief at a hotel after his term was up. While he was in West Baden, reports swirled that the mayor was too ill to return to Minneapolis for his case. Ames eventually resigned as mayor — but didn’t come back to Minneapolis. Instead, in November 1902, his family moved to Louisville, Kentucky, to treat his “nervous disorders” — but didn’t inform Minneapolis authorities. He evaded authorities in Kentucky, but was eventually found in Hancock, New Hampshire, at his sister-in-law’s home. Ames' wife and doctor claimed he was still very ill and on the verge of mental collapse. Rumors suggested Ames might be playing up his illness, and he was arrested in February 1903.


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▲ A Minneapolis Tribune cartoon, published on July 13, 1902, tried to capture the scandal surrounding widespread corruption in the city.

Charges filed The mayor faced nine indictments, including receiving bribes, conspiracy and extortion. He pled not guilty. Ames’ first trial focused on accepting bribes from several madams, and many former cronies testified against him. His defense attorneys argued the mayor

LEARN MORE

Read the full story of the infamous Minneapolis mayor in Dirty Doc Ames and the Scandal That Shook Minneapolis by Erik Rivenes, new from the Minnesota Historical Society. Attend an author talk with Rivenes from 2–3 p.m. May 5 at Minneapolis Central Library. Learn more at mnhs.org.

had problems with memory loss and delusions and was taken advantage of by criminals. But when Ames testified, observers noted that his memory seemed to go from very detailed to suddenly unreliable at convenient times. After 24 hours, the jury declared Ames guilty, and he was sentenced to six years in prison. Several of Ames’ associates also found themselves convicted, including his brother, Frederick. But Ames appealed his case to the Minnesota Supreme Court, which overturned the verdict. Two more trials ended in mistrials with jurors deadlocked. County prosecutors decided it was unlikely they could seat another jury that would convict the former mayor. Ames never went to prison and maintained a medical practice in Minneapolis until his death in 1911. Lauren Peck is a media relations and social media associate for the Minnesota Historical Society. Minnesota Good Age / May 2018 / 15 Rileys Travel GA 0518 V4.indd 1

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WELLNESS

Redefining high blood pressure BY KIRA SNEDDEN

T

here’s a new threshold for how we define hypertension among Americans — and the numbers might surprise you. For the past 14 years, the diagnosis of hypertension, or high blood pressure, was used for blood pressures over 140/90. The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology, however, have recently introduced new guidelines to improve blood pressure control and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. These changes came about after studies showed a higher incidence of heart disease and strokes were due to hypertension. Under these new standards, a normal blood pressure is considered 120/80 or lower, and hypertension is defined as readings greater than 130/80, versus the previous 140/90. The change means that even more individuals, particularly seniors with other health conditions, will be diagnosed with hypertension. Some will receive recommendations for healthy lifestyle changes including dietary modifications and increased exercise. Others will also be prescribed medication to lower their pressure. Here’s a look at the new hypertension categories and stages and what they’ll mean for all patients: Having readings between 121–129/80 is considered an elevated blood pressure. In the past, an elevated blood pressure or pre-hypertension was considered 121–139/80–89. People with these read-

16 / May 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

ings will be instructed to adopt a series of lifestyle changes. Readings between 130–139/80–89 are now classified as Stage 1 hypertension. If your blood pressure is in this range, your physician will assess your 10-year risk for cardiovascular disease. This risk is calculated using your age, weight, whether you’re smoker and/or if other health conditions are present such as high cholesterol or diabetes. If your 10-year risk is less than 10 percent and you’re at Stage 1 hypertension, lifestyle changes will be recommended. If your risk is greater than 10 percent, medication will be prescribed to lower pressure. Normally, you’ll be reassessed after about a month. Stage 2 hypertension begins at 140/90 or higher. At this level, it’s recommended to start lifestyle changes as well as blood pressure-lowering medication. Individuals with readings higher than 180/120 will be classified as having a

hypertensive crisis/emergency and will need to be evaluated and given prompt antihypertensive drug treatment. There are several lifestyle modifications you can make to naturally lower your blood pressure. These include increasing exercise, losing weight, lowering salt in your diet, decreasing alcohol intake, quitting smoking and relieving stress. Always consult your primary care provider to develop a plan that works for you. Heart disease continues to be the leading cause of death in Americans. One in three adults have high blood pressure and many of them (an estimated one-third) don’t know it. By monitoring your blood pressure and getting it controlled at an early stage, you can improve your heart health and life outcomes. Kira Snedden is a physician’s assistant at CVS MinuteClinic inside the Target store in Edina where blood-pressure monitoring and treatment services are provided. Find a clinic near you at MinuteClinic.com


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CAREGIVING

Packing up: Are you ready? BY BRANDI JEWETT

A

ll the pictures, collectibles and decorative elements of a home tell the story of the people residing within its walls. Our homes, in many cases, reflect our identities. And yet our homes should also meet our needs for a quality life. And as we age, our needs change, and sometimes our homes can’t meet them as effectively. To remedy this, many older adults move to smaller living spaces, assisted living communities or skilled-nursing settings. Often family caregivers find themselves at the helm of the housing transition, looking at listings and touring senior living communities in search of the next place their loved ones will call home. Once those details are squared away, the focus shifts to the former home and all the memories it holds — and the possessions tied to them. 18 / May 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

Preparing a home for sale comes with a seemingly endless list of duties, including making repairs, sprucing up fixtures and cleaning carpets. Amid these tasks, there’s also the need to pack up belongings. And when older adults are downsizing, that means not everything has a place in the new home. Letting go of possessions is hard, and caregivers can play a vital role in helping older adults navigate the process.

Tackling clutter Time often isn’t a luxury caregivers and families have in times of emergencies, but experts say those who do have ample time should start planning a move as far out as possible. The Family Caregiver Alliance recommends planning housing transitions six months to a year out. As part of that process, caregivers and loved ones can start

taking small steps to let go of possessions. Decluttering a home takes time and is easier to do in small doses rather than a whirlwind weekend of cleaning and sorting.

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Patience is key as loved ones sort possessions and determine what they want to keep, donate or discard. Instead of pushing loved ones to fill up trash bags and donation boxes, caregivers should give them time to reminisce and talk about the memories some objects may stir. Professional organizers also caution that rushing a loved one to part with items can create resistance and an air of mistrust, which can add more stress to an already difficult process. Sometimes, if a loved one doesn’t think a caregiver understands how meaningful some items are, he or she may feel the caregiver doesn’t have his or her best interests at heart. For many people, belongings acquired over the course of a lifetime can’t be shed in one day, so taking time to let go can keep a decluttering process running smoothly.

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Preserving the past The reality is that no matter how dear the memory, not every belonging can accompany an older adult when moving to a smaller space. Boxes, bags and labels are the usual tools used to tackle clutter, but a camera can also play an important role in the process. Taking pictures of treasured collectibles helps preserve their memory, but in a form that takes up less space when printed — or even zero physical space if stored digitally. Decluttering can be exhausting for caregivers and their loved ones, but honoring the past during the process will help older adults reflect on the lives they’ve lived and ease them into the next part of their journey.

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Brandi Jewett is a writing specialist with Lyngblomsten, a Christian nonprofit organization that provides health care, housing and community resources to older adults in the Twin Cities. Lyngblomsten is a member of the Metropolitan Caregiver Service Collaborative (caregivercollaborative.org). Minnesota Good Age / May 2018 / 19


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Portlandia! Eat and drink your way through this Oregon city for a one-of-a-kind experience By Carla Waldemar

I

was misled. It doesn’t rain non-stop in Portland, and when it falls, the locals explain, it’s a quick and gentle misting, barely long enough for tourists to unfurl their umbrellas (locals don’t even bother). There was nary a drop during my four-day visit in early March, when cherry blossoms and budding daffodils embellished the city’s vibrant, diverse neighborhoods, all set against a backdrop of evergreen trees and — yes! — across the Willamette River, the regal silhouette of snow-capped Mt. Hood.

Diving into downtown Though the metro area (a nonstop flight from MSP) is growing and sprawling with 2.4 million folks, Portland’s downtown is a case study in smart urban planning, starting with Pioneer Square. It’s the city’s living room, home to food trucks (the city boasts 600), live performances and walking tours offered by the tourist office stationed right there. Since the 1970s, forward-thinking urban design — incorporating green values and light-rail transportation — has decreed façade setbacks to capture sunlight, unobstructed vistas down avenues, street-level windows, and more. One philanthropist even donated dozens of outdoor bubblers (aka drinking fountains) to hydrate the populace. The city’s art museum and historical museum face off across a park-like median that leavens its manmade borders. But all’s not mellow here. A vocal cadre hate-hate-hate the zany government building designed by po-mo architect Michael Graves that hosts a mammoth, 34-foot statue of Portlandia herself — not to be confused with the IFC sketch comedy TV series, which features the sculpture in its opening sequence. Portlandia? There’s no such Greek or Roman goddess. Rather, the trident-hoisting female was dreamed up in the 1980s to honor the city’s values of commerce, agriculture and the sea. She reportedly holds the title of “second-largest copper

repoussé statue in the U.S.,” after the Statue of Liberty, whose creation origin is similarly secular. Never mind: Just proceed to the nearby riverbank, where a tangle of freeways has been replaced by Waterfront Park, where bikers and strollers rule. On its north end, the city’s fabled Portland Saturday Market is held (nowadays, Sunday too) — showcasing multitudes of stalls offering clothing, art of all genres, prepared food and primo people-watching. It’s neighbor to walled Lan Su Chinese Garden — a city block converted from a bleak parking lot into an oasis of serenity dressed with evergreen trees, cherry blossoms, a pool where goldfish glide, stone-sculpted footpaths and graceful bridges, along with a tearoom and a replica of an artist’s studio.

Shop, learn and eat Continue west to the once-boho neighborhood that’s called The Pearl District — today, trading homespun edges for shinier storefronts, including familiar chains among the up-market galleries and indies (shoppers’ bonus: no sales tax). The pearl of the Pearl is Powell’s, the fabled three-floor bookstore, complete with maps to its 900 aisles. The nearby Oregon Jewish Museum details not only the state’s early arrivals, but also those fleeing Nazi and Soviet oppression. The city is divided into five quadrants (don’t ask; they can’t explain the math), each boasting a unique neighborhood that's easy to maneuver through, thanks to light-rail and Uber. Head across the Willamette to the Alberta Arts District to patrol its avenues of indie shops, cafes and galleries, aside the dog-walkers and stroller-pushers of this newly hip enclave. A nose-ringed, Bunyan-shirted resident advised me to try breakfast at Pine State Biscuits, and to order “anything with mushroom gravy.” I complied, adding it to the stack of fried chicken, bacon and cheese. Minnesota Good Age / May 2018 / 21


LEARN MORE!

Start exploring at travelportland.com

The Max light-rail tram carries travelers throughout Portland.

Sweets, sounds, suds Then, just when you think you’ll never be hungry again, there’s Bollywood Theater, as blissfully over-embellished as anything in Mumbai, with food to match. Still famished? Solve the problem at Random Order Pie Bar (cocktails, too), or Salt & Straw, with hand-crafted ice cream in flavors that bounce from pear/blue cheese to bone marrow and bourbon-smoked cherries. Slurp as you stroll from guitar store to sake bar, bike shop to artists’ collective, fabric boutique to Collage, a cache of locally produced embellishments for home and body. Tumbleweed offers chic ladies’ wear, while Shoe Shangri-La

accessories; Paxton Gate with eclectic treasures ranging from animal skulls to carnivorous plants; and The Meadow, whose gourmet goods include dark chocolates and finishing salts. Portland is a tour town. There are food cart tours, architecture tours and most enticing, brewery tours. The city boasts 80 breweries, and a Brewvana tour visits a revolving list of four, each offering samples along with intriguing history.

Broadside’s lager with cucumber and lime proved ultra-refreshing. Ex Novo Brewing Co.’s hazy IPA (plus pizza) hit the spot, as did Unicorn’s hibiscus pils and Cider Riot’s, well, everything. “If you didn’t like cider before,” instructed our tour leader, “you will now.” And, wouldn’t you know? Cider Riot's founder first practiced his cidermaking skills in his dorm room at Macalester College.

focuses on footwear. Ampersand Gallery & Fine Books delivers a fine mashup. A quick Uber away you’ll find Mississippi Avenue, a newer gentrification of modest houses now vying with high-style lofts and condos. Stop at Sweedeedee for brunch in a converted bungalow (my choice: chilaquiles with house-made tortillas). Don’t overlook the kitchen’s pies and muffins while listening to tunes from its stash of LPs. (Around the corner you’ll discover a source at Mississippi Records.) Then continue down the avenue to Tanner Goods, featuring classic, classy 22 / May 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

▲ Portland’s Heathman hotel includes Headwaters, a restaurant with a James Beard award-winning chef. Photo courtesy of Headwaters


Foodie-friendly hotels The food scene is equally homegrown — a locovore’s delight of Northwest seafood and ethnic kitchens newly defined by local produce. A fine place to start sat right in my hotel (the new, high-style Hi-Lo) — Alto Bajo ("high low" in Spanish), a modern Mexican restaurant. I feasted on empanadas plumped with locally foraged mushrooms, then pollo al carbon, accompanied by a trio of housemade moles (tamarindo, amarillo and rojo) to accompany my Alto margarita, fueled with anejo tequila. Dinner at Departure, high atop the The Nines hotel, provides a spectacular city view to match the stellar food that emerges from its Asian-influenced kitchen, which incorporates Northwest ingredients. My feast of small plates segued from crispy pork belly with cherry ginger to a sumptuous salad of roasted carrots in smoked cashew butter, curry and coconut cream. Next I was on to a mountain of Brussels sprouts dressed in lime, mint and chili, followed by scallops with chickpeas, carrot and squash. Room for dessert? Dumb question. Bring on the chocolate ash cake (from coconut husks), flecked with cherry and durian, aside a scoop of chocolate ice cream. Another night, another hotel (the Heathman) with a superior kitchen — Headwaters — whose James Beardwinning chef prepares Oregon rockfish and chips, paella, all manner of shellfish, and my messy-but-worth-it choice, a whole Dungeness crab in curry sauce. For dessert, I had brown butter ice cream with duck-fat caramel. I had more crab for lunch at Southpark Seafood via a Dungeness roll.

Dreamy desserts For my final dinner, I hit Tasty n Alder, boasting an informal, convivial atmosphere

▲▲611-foot Multomah Falls — just outside of Portland — drops in two different levels.

in which to savor small plates, such as my duo of grilled quail and farro risotto with wild mushrooms, poached egg and Parmesan. When I ogled a neighbor’s grilled octopus, he kindly shared bites with me. Yum. I couldn’t manage dessert after that, but on a saner day, I’d choose the chocolate malt, served with fries, along with the suggestion: “Dip ’em.” Attention pastry lovers: Portlanders support indie proprietors with fervor, right down to the donut wars between Voodoo Donuts (now a national chain), with its iconic pink boxes housing palate-testing

flavor combos, and Blue Star Donuts, where I overindulged in a blueberry bourbon basil creation, plus a chocolate buttermilk wonder incorporating rosewater and gold leaf. As one local advised, “It’s Voodoo for shock value (and vivid Instagrams) and Blue Star for gourmet quality.” Take your pick. Carla Waldemar is an award-winning food/travel/arts writer. She edits the annual Zagat Survey of Twin Cities restaurants and writes food and travel articles for publications around the world. She lives in Uptown. Minnesota Good Age / May 2018 / 23


HOUSING

A haven in the suburbs BY SARAH JACKSON

H

avenwood of Richfield — a new 88-unit senior living community — is opening in June on a relatively residential street, northeast of the I-494/I-35 interchange a block east of Lyndale Avenue. Construction began in August on the three-story 115,000-square-foot senior residence, which will offer apartments in 19 different floor plans, including studio, one- and two-bedroom layouts. Care options include independent living, assisted living and memory care, offered in 30 special suites. Apartments will feature full kitchens with stainless steel appliances and granite countertops, large windows, washers and dryers, in-unit climate controls and, in many cases, balconies. Assisted living and home-care services are available to residents in their chosen apartments, along with other community perks, including a full-service dining room, a fitness center, spiritual services and an active schedule of social and wellness programming.

24 / May 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

Kent Roers, principal at Roers Investments, said a boom in the senior population of Richfield and nearby cities in the next few years inspired the creation of the community, which allows folks to age in place, thanks to the continuum of care offered. Roers said all senior demographics are expected to grow in Richfield and the surrounding area in the years leading up to 2020. “Those 70 to 74 will grow at the greatest pace since the first baby boomers began retiring at 70 last year,” he said. “Those 75 and over — the age group most in need of full-service, senior-living options — will grow by 8.9 percent in the next four years alone.” Long Lake-based Roers Investments — which partnered with Mesaba Capital Partners of Edina, CBS Construction of Champlin and Avinity, a Richfield-based nonprofit seniorcare organization — expects to open a second Havenwood location in Minnetonka in January 2019.


Amenities ⊲⊲ Full-service dining room ⊲⊲ Chef-prepared meals ⊲⊲ Grab-and-go deli ⊲⊲ Beauty salon ⊲⊲ Four-season porch ⊲⊲ Theater ⊲⊲ Chapel / community room ⊲⊲ Craft room ⊲⊲ Fitness center featuring HUR equipment and Live2BHealthy training weekly ⊲⊲ Library and game room ⊲⊲ Guest suite ⊲⊲ Underground heated parking ⊲⊲ Chaplain ⊲⊲ Non-denominational worship services ⊲⊲ Dedicated activity coordinators for memory care as well as independent and assisted living residents ⊲⊲ Home care and assisted living services available to residents in their chosen apartments ⊲⊲ Smoke-free environment ⊲⊲ Small pets welcome Do you know of a new or interesting senior housing facility in the Twin Cities that might make a good Housing Spotlight? Write Minnesota Good Age editor Sarah Jackson at editor@mngoodage.com with the subject line HOUSING SPOTLIGHT.

HAVENWOOD WHERE: 245 76th St. W., Richfield OPENING DATE: June 2018 OPENINGS: Yes AGES WELCOME: 55 and older NUMBER OF UNITS: 88 apartments, including 30 apartments in two memory care neighborhoods COST RANGE FOR A SINGLE RESIDENT: Month-to-

month leases are available with rates starting at $1,258 for studio apartments, $1,523 for one-bedrooms, $1,814 for one-bedrooms with dens and $2,105 for two-bedrooms. Rent includes a DirecTV package, wi-fi, water, sewer and trash removal. Residents pay for electricity and optional services such as underground parking and phones.

CARE OPTIONS: Home-care services are available on an a la carte basis. Assisted living starts at $2,800 per month, which includes an emergency pendant system, meals and snacks, daily reassurance checks, monthly vital signs monitoring, daily room tidying, weekly housekeeping, weekly laundry and linen changes. PROPERTY OWNER: RM Senior

Living Richfield LLC, 1964 West Wayzata Blvd, Suite 200, Long Lake, MN 55326.

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Minnesota Good Age / May 2018 / 25

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HOUSING RESOURCES •MEMORY CARE •ASSISTED LIVING •INDEPENDENT HOUSING •LONG TERM CARE •NEW AUGUSTANA CARE OF MINNEAPOLIS ••••

Our full continuum of care includes everything from independent living to skilled nursing, all on one campus! We offer in-home care, restaurant-style dining, a bank, pharmacy, grocery store, coffee shop, beauty shop, medical clinic, fitness center, and more! 1007 E 14th St, Minneapolis 1510 11th Ave S, Minneapolis 612-238-5555 minneapoliscampus.org

CARVER COUNTY CDA •

Offers affordable independent living for adults 55 and better throughout Carver County, including Chanhassen, Chaska, Waconia, and Norwood Young America. We offer Carver County CDA’s HUD-subsidized Section 8 property for adults 62 and over, or those with a qualifying disability. All properties are smoke free. 705 N Walnut St Chaska 952-448-7715 carvercda.org

26 / May 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

CITY OF SOUTH ST. PAUL, HOUSING DIVISION •

The City of South St. Paul operates 296 one-bedroom public housing apartments for residents aged 50+. Rent is based on 30% of tenant’s income. All utilities paid, on-site caretaker, security, after-hours answering service, community room, resident activities, laundry facilities. Call today for an appointment. 125 3rd Ave N South St. Paul 651-554-3270 mostrow@sspmn.org

COMMONBOND COMMUNITIES ••

CommonBond builds stable homes, strong futures, and vibrant communities. As the largest nonprofit provider of affordable homes in the Upper Midwest, CommonBond has been building and sustaining homes with services to families, seniors, and individuals with disabilities since 1971. 1080 Montreal Ave St. Paul 651-291-1750 commonbond.org/find-a-home

LYNGBLOMSTEN •••

Lyngblomsten is a Christian nonprofit organization serving older adults and their families. A continuum of care includes: independent housing with assisted living services, a full range of 24-hour skilled nursing options including short and long-term care, and community services and resources. 1415 Almond Ave St. Paul 651-646-2941 lyngblomsten.org

NOKOMIS SQUARE COOPERATIVE •

Nokomis Square Cooperative is a member owned and operated housing and lifestyle choice for individuals 62 plus. We’re situated between Lake Nokomis and Minnehaha Park in South Minneapolis. Concrete and steel construction and experienced maintenance staff provide a carefree, well-kept environment. 5015 35th Ave S Minneapolis 612-721-5077 nokomissquare.com


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ST. BENEDICT’S SENIOR COMMUNITY •••

Convenience, independence and lifestyle are important aspects when choosing a senior community. Whether it's simplifying your life to make more time for activities, or needing assistance with everyday tasks, our campuses in St. Cloud, Monticello, and Sartell offer choices for vital aging. Sartell: Chateau Waters NOW OPEN   960 19th St S, Sartell   320-654-2352   chateauwaters.com St. Cloud:   1810 Minnesota Blvd SE, St. Cloud   320-203-2747   centracare.com/sbsc Monticello:   1301 E 7th St, Monticello   763-295-4051   centracare.com/sbscmont

Minnesota Good Age / May 2018 / 27


FINANCE

Mortgage in retirement? BY SKIP JOHNSON

O

ne of the most important financial decisions to consider at this stage of life is whether you should pay off your mortgage before you retire. Believe it or not, there isn’t a one-sizefits-all answer. Here are a few factors to consider before you make this decision.

REASONS TO KEEP YOUR MORTGAGE: • You’ll be strapped for cash: If paying off your mortgage is a stretch and will leave you with very little cash, then you’ll likely want to keep your homeowner’s loan. However, if you have money sitting in a low interest-bearing account, it may make sense to pay off your mortgage. • Your other assets are doing well: If the money you would use to pay off your mortgage is already in investments that generate income and appreciate over time at a greater rate than the interest rate 28 / May 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

on your mortgage, it may be beneficial to keep your mortgage. This will allow you to leave your money in investments that are performing well. • You have other debt: If you’re carrying other debt, especially from credit cards, you may want to consider paying these off first. More than likely, your mortgage carries a lower interest rate than most other loans. As far as debt goes, a mortgage is about the best loan you can have, especially since the interest on your mortgage can be tax deductible. • You have a job: If you’re still working and have a consistent income, there may be greater financial needs and opportunities to consider before paying off a mortgage, such as creating an emergency fund if you don’t already have one. Additionally, contributing to a retirement savings plan such as an IRA

or a 401(k) may be a better use of this money at this time, especially if there’s an employer match. • You’re thinking about moving: If you’re considering selling your home, it may be better to hold onto your cash to put toward your next purchase.

REASONS TO PAY OFF YOUR MORTGAGE: • You won’t save on taxes: If you don’t qualify for the mortgage-interest tax deduction, you may want to consider paying it off. Since you won’t receive the tax deduction, paying for the interest makes your mortgage more expensive. The new tax plan also has a higher deduction and limits the mortgage deduction, so it’s important to double check whether you still qualify for the deduction. If it no longer applies to you, paying off your loan may be the way to go.


As far as debt goes, a mortgage is about the best loan you can have, especially since the interest on your mortgage can be tax deductible.

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As seen on the History Channel “Secret Passages” • You need a clear head: Some people are just more comfortable without debt. If you find yourself in this category and you have the financial means to do so, you may find you’ll sleep better at night knowing you’ve paid off your debt. • You’ll free up future money: Depending on the length of your mortgage term and the size of your debt, you may pay tens of thousands of dollars in interest or more over the life of a loan. Paying off your mortgage frees up that future money, which can be especially beneficial in retirement.

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Deciding whether to pay off your mortgage depends on a number of factors, and though everyone dreams of getting rid of debt, it really might not be the best thing for you. Be sure to do your research so you can make a choice that fits your personal financial situation. Skip Johnson is an advisor and partner at Great Waters Financial, a financialplanning firm and insurance agency with locations in Minneapolis, Richfield, Minnetonka, White Bear Lake and Duluth. Johnson appears regularly on Fox 9’s morning news show. Learn more at greatwatersfinancial.com. Minnesota Good Age / May 2018 / 29


IN THE KITCHEN

COCOA WONDER Should you really eat chocolate for breakfast? Well, yes. Especially if it’s something you can make ahead, and especially if you’ve blended in potassium- and fiber-rich avocado and banana, plus protein-packed chia seeds. This inventive chocolate pudding recipe is pure yum — for you and the grandkids.

30 / May 2018 / Minnesota Good Age


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DIRECTIONS ⊲ Place avocados, banana, cocoa, chia seeds, maple syrup, salt and cinnamon in a blender and puree until smooth. ⊲ Scoop pudding into two bowls or glass containers with lids, such as mason jars. ⊲ Cover and refrigerate overnight to let the chia seeds plump up. ⊲ Serve topped with raspberries or blueberries.

Source: Adapted from The School Year Survival Cookbook by Laura Keogh and Ceri Marsh © Sweet Potato Chronicles. Photography © Maya Visnyei.

Minnesota Good Age / May 2018 / 31


Kim Ode of Edina will retire from the Star Tribune after many years as a food writer and columnist, but will continue her Baking Central column. Photos by Tracy Walsh 32 / May 2018 / Minnesota Good Age


An Ode to baking The Star Tribune’s Baking Central columnist shares her story, plus tips and tricks for step-by-step success by Lynette Lamb

F

or Kim Ode, becoming known as the baking guru of the Star Tribune was the result of a midlife crisis. Of course, as a South Dakota farm girl, she had grown up baking. “My dad farmed a thousand acres with his two brothers,” Ode said. “So there were always men to bake for — a cake or pie for the noon meal and something sweet for the mid-afternoon lunch. And the cookie jar was always full.” But life went on. And Ode found herself busy — with a career as a newspaper feature writer, plus two young children — and fell out of the habit of regular baking. Then, about 17 years ago, she was paging through a catalog for the North House Folk School in Grand Marais and saw a listing for a class on building a brick bread oven. “It was like a thunderbolt,” Ode said. “I thought, ‘This is what I want to do. I need something tangible and physical, and this is it.’”

Minnesota Good Age / May 2018 / 33


Ode, a longtime Edina resident, signed up and spent a weekend class building an oven with her North House classmates. She then purchased the instructor’s book explaining how to build her own — and proceeded to do just that, all by herself. “I mixed the cement, cut the rebar — did the whole damn thing,” she said. “I was determined to do it without help, which drove my husband — a furniture

builder (John Danicic) — crazy.” Once she had her 3,000-pound oven, of course, she realized, “It was time to get serious about bread baking.” So she joined the St. Paul Bread Baking Club, which at the time met monthly in the kitchens at Saint Agnes Baking Company in St. Paul. “I just wanted to know how home bakers baked. And it was fun to be

around other people who were deeply into bread,” she said of the now-defunct club. “They got all hepped up about it.” Because a wood-fired oven takes four to five hours to heat up, there was no point in baking just a few loaves. So Ode started mixing up dough for dozens of loaves, storing the extras in her basement freezer or giving them away to friends, coworkers and charitable organizations. Then came Ode’s first book, Baking With the St. Paul Bread Club: Recipes, Tips and Stories (Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2006), featuring 70 of the group’s favorite recipes for everything from baguettes to potica (a Slovenian bread with a sweet nutty filling).

Baking Central

Kim Ode built a large outdoor oven in her Edina backyard — all on her own — using bricks, mortar and rebar. Photo courtesy of Kim Ode

Next came the idea for the Baking Central column in the Star Tribune’s Taste section. Lee Dean, editor of Taste, wanted to encourage readers to bake more, but realized many younger readers hadn’t grown up at the oven with their parents and therefore lacked “the little techniques you get by doing it,” as Ode put it. “It’s my contention that baking is just a series of steps,” said Ode, adding that the main mission behind Baking Central is to lay out a step-by-step process anyone can follow.


Dean said readers love Ode’s recipes, which is saying something in a foodobsessed world dominated by extravagant reality baking shows, food blogs and over-the-top Instagram feeds. “Minnesota is full of bakers looking for a new project in the kitchen, and she offers them a challenge each month.” Dean said. “Kim adds the authority of an experienced baker with the clear, concise instructions of a wise teacher who helps the reader through the steps of a new recipe. There’s no one who can better explain a concept or task in the kitchen. She adds a great depth of knowledge to the pages of Taste.”

Then came strudel In the first few years of Baking Central, which began in 2010, Ode tackled relatively simple standbys such as baking powder biscuits, sponge cake and cupcakes. But more recently she’s segued into challenging delicacies such as Danish pastries, macarons and apple strudel (no store-bought phyllo dough allowed). Indeed strudel’s stretchy dough is Ode’s latest baking passion. In one Baking Central column, she anointed it “the coolest dough ever” and claimed that making apple strudel was “almost easier than making apple pie. She called the dough “a tender marvel of kitchen chemistry, an extraordinarily extendible sheet … you can read a love letter through.” Ode’s own love affair with strudel is much like the woman herself — creative passion tempered by rationality. Her go-to recipe didn’t come about until she’d done plenty of research, trying out various instructions and ingredients (yes, she uses an egg).

Kim's Baking Tips • LEAVE YOUR KITCHEN AID STAND MIXER ON THE COUNTER. “If you put it away, you’ll never use it.” • BUY A BENCH KNIFE. It’s Ode’s second favorite tool (pictured below), which she uses to chop, scrape and clean off the counter. • PARCHMENT PAPER RULES. “Nothing ever sticks if you use it; it ensures success.”

• TRY ALL-PURPOSE FLOUR from North Dakota Mill. “It’s a reliable flour, cheaper than King Arthur, and they prominently date when it was packed.” • DON’T BE TIMID. “When you knead, stir and beat dough, put your back into it and work up a sweat. Whip means whip! That’s why baking is therapeutic.”

LOOK FOR KIM ODE’S COOKING COURSES AT NORTHHOUSE.ORG.

There’s no one who can better explain a concept or task in the kitchen.

— Lee Dean, editor of Taste at the Star Tribune, of Kim Ode

Rhubarb days Between Ode’s bread-baking and strudel phases came her rhubarb era, which yielded a second cookbook, Minnesota Good Age / May 2018 / 35


Rhubarb Renaissance (Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2012). It includes 50 recipes using the controversial vegetable (love it or hate it) ranging from savory to sweet and appetizers to entrees. “Rhubarb custard pie may be one of nature’s more perfect foods,” Ode contends. “But rhubarb also has a savory side. Shrimp and rhubarb are a culinary marriage made in heaven.” Ode’s ode to rhubarb — which also includes the plant’s historical medicinal uses and preservation tips— is part of her growing interest in cooking and baking techniques that reflect the cultures of the Upper Midwest. It’s a philosophy she shares with North House Folk School, where she’s now a teacher. “We’re lucky because this region is steeped in baking,” she said, given the Scandinavian, German and Eastern European heritage of many Minnesotans.

Retirement What’s next? Retirement! Ode’s last day at the Star Tribune will be May 1. (Don’t worry, she’ll keep her Baking Central column going as a freelancer.) Ode’s once-young kids are, of course, grown now, including her son, Austin, who does polar services in Antarctica and Greenland, and her daughter, Mimi, an event planner in Minneapolis. 36 / May 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

So Ode plans to add to her teaching load, which already includes four annual classes at the Grand Marais folk school — Small Breads; Rhubarb; European Pastries; and Noodles to Strudels. Dean said Ode is a natural teacher. “Kim makes it all look easy,” Dean said. “But her work reflects an attention to detail — and a knowledge of what a fellow baker needs to know.” Ode said she’ll also keep trying out recipes, old and new, in her simple wood-

countered kitchen, where a forest green Kitchen Aid stand mixer (“my favorite tool”) is never put away. And she’ll keep encouraging other bakers, neophytes and veterans alike to tackle baked delights that before seemed impossible. After all, Ode argues, “Confidence is the most important ingredient in baking.” Lynette Lamb majored in home economics journalism and worked at Cuisine magazine, but you would never know it by her oven’s output.

Confidence is the most important ingredient in baking. — Kim Ode


KIM'S BREAKFAST SCONES 1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour 1 t baking powder 1/2 t baking soda 1/4 t salt 1/4 cup dark brown sugar, packed 4 T cold unsalted butter, cut in small pieces 4 T vegetable shortening such as Crisco 1 cup old-fashioned oatmeal 2/3 cup dried fruit, such as cherries, prunes or apricots, cut into small pieces 1/3 cup (plus 1 tablespoon) buttermilk Decorative sugar, optional

• Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. • Whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt and brown sugar. • Work in the butter and shortening (with your fingers or a pastry cutter) until it’s well distributed and few lumps remain. • Stir in the oatmeal and fruit, then add the buttermilk, stirring until just moistened. • Turn mixture out onto a lightly floured surface and knead several times, until the dough holds together. • Shape into a 9-inch circle, and cut into eight wedges.

Photos by Tracy Walsh

• Transfer the wedges to a baking sheet covered with parchment paper, leaving at least an inch between them. • Brush with buttermilk and sprinkle with decorative sugar, if desired. • Bake for 13 to 15 minutes or until light golden brown. • Cool briefly on a wire rack and serve warm.

Source: Kim Ode’s Baking With the St. Paul Bread Club: Recipes, Tips and Stories, adapted from The Book of Bread by Judith and Evan Jones

Minnesota Good Age / May 2018 / 37


CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR MAY

Image courtesy of the American Swedish Institute

THE FANTASTICAL WORLDS OF KIM SIMONSON

→ See 35 otherworldly works by the famed sculptor based in Fiskars, Finland, who combines stoneware, paint and green nylon fibers to create lifelike creatures that appear to be covered in a soft carpet of moss.

When: Through July 15 Where: American Swedish Institute, Minneapolis Cost: $10 for adults; $7 for ages 62+; $5 for ages 6–18 Info: asimn.org

CONTINUING

NEWSIES

→ Inspired by the real-life Newsboys Strike of 1899 in New York City, this Disney production (fit for ages 7 and older) tells the story of Jack Kelly, who hawks the headlines day-in and day-out with countless other newsboys. When: Through Sept. 29 Where: Chanhassen Dinner Theatres Cost: $51–$91 Info: chanhassendt.com

APRIL 26–MAY 20

INTO THE WOODS → Stephen Sondheim’s fairy tale musical masterpiece combines themes from Jack and the Beanstalk, Little Red Riding Hood, 38 / May 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

Rapunzel, and others, exploring what happens after they all lived happily ever after. When: April 26–May 20 Where: Lakeshore Players Theatre, White Bear Lake Cost: $19–$25 Info: lakeshoreplayers.org

APRIL 27–MAY 20

THE METROMANIACS → Plot twists, complications, and mistaken identities — all in rhymed verse — tumble to a happy ending in this new telling of a 1738 French farce. When: April 27–May 20 Where: Theatre in the Round, Minneapolis Cost: $22 ($18 on Fridays and Sundays for ages 62 and older) Info: theatreintheround.org

MAY 1 AND JUNE 5

SENIOR STROLLS → On the first Tuesday of each month, enjoy an hour in the zoo reserved for ages 55 and older with a leisurely walk and special activities — all before the doors open to the public. When: 9 a.m. May 1 and June 5 Where: Como Park Zoo & Conservatory, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: comozooconservatory.org

MAY 3–6

100 MILE GARAGE SALE → Residents and businesses in 15 historic river towns clean out their attics, garages and basements to create a sale that extends from Winona to Red Wing on the Minnesota


side of the Mississippi River Road and from Fountain City to Prescott on the Wisconsin side of the river. When: May 3–6 Where: Various Cost: FREE Info: 100milegaragesale.org

Celebrating 30 Years!

MAY 12

THE GREATEST GENERATION: AN AMERICAN ORATORIO → Featuring works of the great songwriters of the time (Cole Porter, Glenn Miller, Sammy Fain, Irving Berlin and the Gershwins, to name a few) — this world-premiere production — commissioned by Oratorio Society of Minnesota, the group that produced the Music of Downton Abbey — tells the story of one family’s experience during the war years. When: May 12 Where: Ordway Theatre, St. Paul Cost: $28–$48 Info: ordway.org

MAY 16

CANTUS AND STREETSONG → Join the singers of Cantus (an eight-member men’s professional vocal ensemble) and the members of StreetSong MN (a mixed-voice chorus of people experiencing homelessness and their supporters) for a concert crafted to inspire hope and a sense of community. When: 2:30–3:30 p.m. May 16 Where: George Latimer Central Library, St. Paul Cost: FREE; registration is required. Info: sppl.org

MAY 21

MICHAEL ONDAATJE → The internationally acclaimed author of The English Patient presents his latest work, Warlight, a mesmerizing new novel that tells a dramatic story set in the decade after World War II. Ondaatje will be in conversation with the Twin Cities’ own Louise Erdrich. When: May 21 Where: Plymouth Congregational Church, Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: raintaxi.com/michael-ondaatje Minnesota Good Age / May 2018 / 39


Brain teasers

WORD SEARCH

SUDOKU

Home is where the heart is

ACTIVITIES BEDROOM CAFETERIA CLASS FITNESS GARDEN HEALTHCARE

HOSPICE HOUSEKEEPING INDEPENDENT LIBRARY LOCATION MORTGAGE OUTING

PARKING PATIO PROPERTY RENT RESIDENT RESTAURANT THEATER

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Break the code to reveal a quote from a famous person. Each letter represents another letter.

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3. Roses, zinnias and lilacs 40 / May 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

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Clue: N = O

TRIVIA 1. Firewood

Source: Benjamin Franklin


TRIVIA Curb appeal 1. The term “housewarming party” comes from the days before electricity, when people would bring what to people’s new homes? 2. In 1973, the average single-family home constructed in the U.S. measured 1,660 square feet. Can you guess the average in 2007, within 100 square feet? 3. What three flowers proved the most popular in a poll of 30,000 American gardeners? Sources: pjfitz.com, census.gov, bombayoutdoors.com

Great Northern Union Presents “Heard It Through The Grapevine” An Evening For Barbershop and Soul

SUDOKU WORD SCRAMBLE Barber, Dining, Church

Featuring SIGNATURE!

Saturday, May 19, 7 pm Benson Great Hall, Bethel University Featuring BHS Silver Medalists: Signature! Plus: Students from our Sing With Our Ears Program #BarberSoul Go to GNUSings.com/tickets Great Northern Union GA 0418 S3.indd 1

3/22/18 2:52/PM Minnesota Good Age / May 2018 41

CROSSWORD

ANSWERS

CRYTPOGRAM A house is not a home unless it contains food and fire for the mind as well as the body.


Crossword

ACROSS 1 “I’m all __ it”: “Yes” 4 Pennies: Abbr. 7 “Later, dude” 10 Mil. strongholds 13 Long Island university 15 Demonic laugh 17 *Official emergency status 18 Month that once was eighth 19 Walked (on) 20 *Angler’s skill 22 One getting private lessons 24 Go down to defeat 25 __ Martin: Bond’s car 28 Garlicky sauce 32 Frozen over 33 *#1 hit 39 Venue for exercise swimming 42 / May 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

41 Old golf club named for its copper alloy-plated face 42 *One who rats to the cops 44 Spanish Mrs. 45 Selassie worshiper 46 Type in 48 Arduous journey 51 In style again 54 *Floater in a luxurious bath 58 “__ end up” 62 Existing independent of experience, in logic 63 List including nachos, sliders, wings, etc. ... and what the starts of the answers to starred clues comprise? 65 Another year of Time, say 66 “Canyon With Crows” artist Georgia 67 ’60s radical gp. 68 Antlered beast 69 Opposite of ENE 70 Birthday gift for a tot

DOWN 1 Almanac item 2 Smell often funky 3 Decorate anew 4 Basic technique in EMT training 5 Stealing 6 Move laterally 7 Coll. hotshot 8 Female leadership org. 9 Grub 10 One-named Milanese model 11 If-__: conditional statements 12 NCO nickname 14 Resulted in 16 “MASH” nickname 21 Wine label number 23 7-Up nickname 25 Afflicts 26 Ella’s style 27 Wrong-key error 29 Beatles’ “Let __” 30 Other, in Oaxaca 31 Car borrowed from a dealer 34 One-footed jumps 35 Landed 36 Whispered “Hey!” 37 The Auld Sod 38 Stern area 40 Trademark Buster Keaton hat with a culinary name 43 Clothing 47 “I didn’t do it” 48 Nicholas II was the last of them in Russia 49 Caught, as dogies 50 Gets by working 52 “Funny bone” spot 53 Hardwood trees 55 Boxer Riddick 56 It borders Siberia in the game of Risk 57 Defraud 59 Strain to lift 60 Recon collection 61 Chop __ 64 Remote button with left-pointing arrows: Abbr.


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