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MARCH 2018

The 1950s Minneapolis bar scene p. 10

Quebec City: The heart of French Canada p. 16

Minnesota's famed polar explorers p. 12

A home for seniors — and kids p. 20

Minnesota’s favorite Irishman talks life, business and the future of food p. 24


Contents

16

WHO NEEDS PARIS? Quebec City delivers the culture, food and feel of a European hotspot at a lower cost — and a shorter plane ride!

MARCH GOOD START FROM THE EDITOR

6 Meet the legendary Kieran Folliard, Minnesota's favorite Irishman.

MY TURN

8 A story of sexual harassment from 60 years ago resonates today.

MEMORIES

10 In the mid-1950s, Hennepin Avenue was quite the scene for a single woman.

MINNESOTA HISTORY

12 Hardy Minnesotans were among the earliest to reach the poles.

⊳⊳ The Chateau Frontenac grand hotel is one of many gorgeous sights in Quebec's capital city.

24

ON THE COVER Begorrah! Kieran Folliard first transformed the Minnesota food-and-drink scene. Then he changed the whiskey industry in the U.S. Now, at 62, he’s still coming up with cool, new ideas. Photos by Tracy Walsh

→→Correction St. Louis Park-based Saint Therese operates senior-living communities in New Hope, Shoreview, Woodbury, Robbinsdale and Brooklyn Park. The Housing Spotlight in the February issue of Good Age incorrectly listed Brooklyn Center, rather than Brooklyn Park, as a location. 4 / March 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

GOOD HEALTH CAREGIVING

14 Creative pursuits can work wonders for older adults, including caregivers.

GOOD LIVING HOUSING

20 At this retirement community, you could be a 'grandfriend' to toddlers.

FINANCE

22 People love to travel in retirement — but affording it takes careful planning.

30 34 CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR BRAIN TEASERS


FROM THE EDITOR Volume 37 / Issue 3 PUBLISHER

Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER

Terry Gahan tgahan@mngoodage.com

GENERAL MANAGER

Zoe Gahan zgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR

Sarah Jackson editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Ed Dykhuizen, Carol Hall, Brandi Jewett, Skip Johnson, Julie Kendrick, Dave Nimmer, Lauren Peck, Sandra Scott, Tracy Walsh

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Micah Edel

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Kaitlin Ungs

DESIGN INTERN Victoria Hein

CLIENT SERVICES

Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION

Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2018 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $18 per year.

6 / March 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

Erin go Bragh! BY SARAH JACKSON

I

had never been a big whiskey drinker. Give me vodka or gin before the brown and boozy spirits of Scotch, rye and bourbon. So who would’ve thought I’d discover a brand new favorite drink (made with Irish whiskey of all things), not in Kentucky, Scotland or Japan, but right here in Minnesota! And who do I (and so many others) have to thank for it? Longtime Minnesota entrepreneur and native Irishman Kieran Folliard — this month’s Cover Star and the man who came up with the idea of transforming Photo by Tracy Walsh whiskey “from a male-oriented, wintertime beverage tracywalshphoto.com into a year-round, gender-neutral one.” Named for Folliard’s redheaded mother and aunt, Mary and Delia, 2 Gingers whiskey — distilled in Ireland and distributed in the U.S. — is described as smooth, malty and slightly sweet to start, with notes of honey and citrus. If you think whiskey isn’t your thing, you might want to mix up the Big Ginger cocktail featured in this issue — ginger ale (regular or diet) and 2 Gingers whiskey (garnished with lemon and lime). Just about any bar in the Twin Cities can prepare one for you, too. In this issue, you’ll also find the story of Folliard’s early life and his 30 years in Minnesota. I was fascinated by his tale and hope you will be, too. In person, Folliard — whose latest venture is The Food Building in Northeast Minneapolis — is a delight with his playful but sharp wit and lilting Irish accent. Indeed, his comments in the article show off his self-deprecating sense of humor and humility, too. But I was perhaps most struck by a quote from his longtime friend, Jacquie Berglund, CEO of Finnegans Brew Co. of Minneapolis. She pointed out Folliard’s fun and friendly side, of course. But she added: “He’s the guy who always comes to the funeral. If your world is falling apart, he’s the one who calls to see how you’re doing. He’s one of my best friends, and he’s never not been there for me.” As I move into middle age — no, not yet the Good Age — I’m attending more funerals than my friends in their 20s and 30s. And I realized I’d sure like someone to say that (all of it) about me when I’m 62. I’d also like to say that I masterfully branded my very own Irish whiskey with its own trademarked drink. But I’ll leave that to Folliard. And instead I’ll raise a glass to him — and Ireland — this St. Patrick’s Day.


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MY TURN

A one-way street of abuse BY DAVE NIMMER

T

hroughout the recent months of accusations of sexual harassment against celebrities, politicians and corporate executives, I got the point: The culture has changed. From here on, relationships between men and women will not be the same — and that seems good. I did, however, have a lingering question. I understand why the victims were reluctant to come forward, fearing retaliation from their powerful abusers. But how, I wondered, could their memories of the abuse be so vivid, so powerful, so clear, after so many years — decades in some cases. Then I heard a woman in her 80s recently read a short story to a group of her fellow seniors about a night 60 years ago on a lonely country road in southern Minnesota. She was being driven home from a 8 / March 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

friend’s wedding, where she’d been the maid of honor. She remembered the night with detailed clarity: The wedding went off without a hitch and was followed by a reception where people talked, danced and drank. As the party waned, the bride’s brother offered to take his sister’s attendant home, a farmhouse about 20 miles away. He’d been drinking, but seemed all right to drive. On the way to her home, he pulled off on a side road and parked the car. He leaned over and put his hand under the 19-year-old’s dress. She shrieked. Her mind was racing, her head spinning, wondering what was happening — and why. She told him to stop. He didn’t. Then, in a moment of calm, clarity and courage, she ripped off the wedding corsage from her dress and drove the pin into her attacker’s thigh.

He let out a yelp, took his hand away and said he was sorry. He’d drive her straight home. On the way, he begged her not to tell anyone, especially her brothers. And she did not. She didn’t tell anyone. But here she was, six decades later, reading her short story to about a dozen of us sitting around a table in a “retirement village.” Her story of the evening and the unfolding event was as vivid as if it had happened a week ago. She read it slowly, softly, calmly and carefully. It was spellbinding. Now I truly understood. She hadn’t been raped. Or threatened. But she HAD been humiliated, traumatized. And that kind of experience does not go away. Her story shocked and surprised me. I don’t think any of the women sitting around the table felt that way. They knew at once why that night hung in


She hadn’t been raped. Or threatened. But she HAD been humiliated, traumatized. her memory forever. I think sometimes guys, including me, tend to think: What’s all the fuss about? Nothing much really happened — a wayward hand on the thigh, an unwanted kiss on the cheek. The truth is, women don’t do that to guys, at least in my experience. Oh, there was the sloppy kiss on the cheek when I went to my grandmother’s and she hadn’t seen me in awhile. That was merely embarrassing. The recent revelations, recollections and reactions are more than embarrassments. What’s encouraging is that our society has taken a step forward — toward respectful equality and soulful enlightenment. I can handle this new world, with its changing rules and rituals. It turns out that the 19-year-old girl, now a senior woman, could handle what happened to her on that country road. She finished her short story with this observation: Apparently I didn’t do any serious damage to him with that pin. He went on to get married, moved away and had five children. She smiled. The story was finished. Dave Nimmer has had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / March 2018 / 9


MEMORIES

Bright lights, big city BY CAROL HALL

W

e were bumpkins, green as grass, my girlfriends and I. Fresh from small towns, we’d come to the big city of Minneapolis following high-school graduation to find office jobs. We lived at Dunwoody Hall — a dormitory residence for working women located downtown at 10th and Harmon (long since demolished). Then, in the mid-1950s, Dunwoody was the place we called home. And then, downtown Minneapolis was the place people from all over town came on Friday and Saturday night to watch their 10 / March 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

pick of movies at half a dozen theaters. There were good restaurants where you could have a nice dinner, too. The sidewalks were brightly lit and crowded with folks enjoying perhaps their one night of entertainment for the month. Hennepin Avenue was Minneapolis’ main drag, and a place to go for a drink. The bars were generally well managed and the riff-raff weren’t allowed. The cops on the beat herded them back home to the skid row flop houses on Washington Avenue if they wandered too far west on Hennepin. The paddywagon was a familiar sight.

I, and some other Dunwoody girls, was drawn to Hennepin by the bright lights. The surge of colorful neon fronting the bars was something not found in the rural communities of Minnesota and Wisconsin we hailed from. Nor was the liquor served in these places available to the likes of us. We were “good girls,” mostly Lutheran and from teetotaling families, not to mention underage. But, hey, we were far from home. Our folks would never know; our ministers would never know. We just had to go inside one of those Hennepin Avenue bars and see if we could “get served.”


Traveling in a group of four or five, on a Friday night we’d walk there, wearing high-heeled pumps and 2-inches-belowthe-knee dresses, attempting to look sophisticated. Several bars were clustered on Hennepin at Sixth Street. We bypassed one called the 620 Club, “where turkey is king,” as it sounded more like an eating place. We wanted a real bar, and settled on Brady’s Pub, with its Irish coat of arms marquee. Obviously appearing too unworldly to be prostitutes — and too naive to even realize they hung out there — and yet attractive enough to draw male trade, we were not turned away. I distinctly remember sipping on one “7&7” all evening, and also (shame on me) inhaling several Pall Mall cigarettes, in another attempt at sophistication — and feeling deliciously wicked about it! Our extreme naiveté also kept us from realizing that all the bars along Hennepin were closely affiliated with local crime lords. Word about the connection eventually came to us from a very bold member of our “drinking group” — a boldness that somehow actually got one particular “Dunwoody girl” a luncheon date with the infamous Minneapolis mobster, Kid Cann! As for me, I quickly discovered the fare at Bridgeman’s Ice Cream parlor, which was also on Hennepin Avenue, to be more to my liking than that of Brady’s Pub. But I never missed a Friday night out with the girls!

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Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / March 2018 / 11


MINNESOTA HISTORY

Pioneering the poles BY LAUREN PECK

M

innesotans are known for their ability to brave the bitter cold every winter. But did you know our state also boasts a legacy of explorers who have taken on some the planet’s most extreme temperatures in the Arctic and Antarctica?

Via snowmobile Fifty years ago, on March 7, 1968, Ralph Plaisted, a St. Paul insurance agent, led an attempt to become the first team to reach the North Pole by mechanized means. Their journey relied on Minnesota’s popular new recreational vehicle — the snowmobile. Plaisted was a snowmobile enthusiast, and his polar trek got its start from his love for the vehicle, according to a 2008 New York Times article: “A friend, who was tired of hearing from him about the virtues of snowmobiles, suggested jokingly that if Mr. Plaisted thought they were so great, he should take one to the North Pole.” In the spring of 1967 Plaisted tried, but was deterred by storms and open water. The following year, however, he and his crew — traveling 474 miles and braving temperatures dropping to 60 below — reached the magnetic pole on April 19, 1968. When he returned to Minnesota, according to the St. Paul Pioneer Press, Plaisted said, “Boy, it’s cold up there. I don’t know why anyone would want to do it again.” 12 / March 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲Ann Bancroft wore seal-skin mukluks (with sheepskin over-booties) during the Steger International Polar Expedition to the North Pole in 1986. Photos courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

His expedition papers are now part of the Minnesota Historical Society’s collections.

By dogsled Nearly 20 years later, Will Steger and Paul Schurke of Ely led a crew, including St. Paul’s Ann Bancroft, to reach the North Pole by dogsled. The Steger International Polar Expedition, modeled after the trips of earlier

explorers, started in March 1986. They navigated by sextant and carried all of their own supplies. Fifty-five days later, six team members completed the journey without any outside resupply help. It was the first-ever undisputed dogsled journey to the North Pole, and Bancroft became the first woman to reach the North Pole by sled and on foot.


South St. Paul HRA In 1989, Steger led a team in an attempt to be the first people to dogsled across Antarctica. The 3,741-mile trip took seven months, and the team dealt with 90-mile-an-hour winds, whiteout conditions and temps dropping to 113 degrees below 0. They nearly lost Japanese team member Keizo Funatsu in a blizzard, a mere 16 miles from their finish line, finally finding him more than 12 hours later. “We wanted to prove that six men from six different nations, who had grown up with starkly different cultural backgrounds, could work together toward a common goal under some of the cruelest conditions on the planet,” Steger wrote in a National Geographic article. More than 100 artifacts from the International Trans-Antarctica Expedition are now preserved in the historical society’s collections, including cold-weather gear, cooking equipment and a dogsled.

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On skis In January 1993, Ann Bancroft became the first woman to reach both the North and South poles. She led the American Women’s Expedition (AWE), a team of four women, who skied 660 miles to the pole, raising awareness of women’s achievements and environmental issues in Antarctica while also contributing to scientific research about the effects of extreme conditions on women. The AWE’s original goal was to traverse all of Antarctica, but risky weather and funding issues caused the trip to end at the South Pole. Instead, Bancroft and Norwegian explorer Liv Arnesen went on to become the first women to ski and wind-sail across Antarctica, completing the trip in 94 days in 2001. Numerous items from all of Bancroft’s expeditions, such as skis, tents and even freeze-dried food, are now in the historical society’s collections. Lauren Peck is a media relations and social media associate for the Minnesota Historical Society.

▲▲Explorer Will Steger wore this parka during the International Trans-Antarctica Expedition in 1990. Minnesota Good Age / March 2018 / 13


CAREGIVING

Discovering creativity BY BRANDI JEWETT

C

ommunication, time management and planning are all key parts of the daily routine for a caregiver of an older adult, but it can be beneficial to add something else to the mix: Creativity. A variety of studies suggest that engaging seniors in creative outlets, such as art and movement activities, can improve quality of life and health for both older adults and their caregivers, according to the National Center for Creative Aging. Indeed, creative expression can spark opportunities for discovery and even bonding if completed together by a caregiver and a loved one. Solo creative activities for caregivers, of course, also can offer stress relief and self-reflection during essential time away from caregiving. 14 / March 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

Out and about Caregivers looking for activities to do with their loved ones can find a number of community programs for older adults that offer art, music, dance and other creative outlets for free or a fee. While these classes might not be explicitly marketed to include caregivers, they often welcome them to participate in the activities alongside their loved ones. Caregivers also can add creativity to their own self-care routines. Enrolling in classes such as dancing, scrapbooking or knitting can help not only relieve stress but also reaffirm passions and even one’s own identity — something that can get lost in the responsibilities of caring for another person. Participating in these types of programs alone may require a caregiver to seek out a

respite program to care for their loved one. Fortunately, online resources are available to help caregivers locate — and help pay for — local respite programs. (See Page 15.)

Staying home There are a number of free online activities that can be integrated into a home-care routine, too. Many websites are dedicated to providing these resources, including directions for simple activities caregivers and their loved ones can do together. Searchable video websites, such as YouTube and Vimeo, also can be a valuable resource. Fellow caregivers, senior experts and others share ideas and successes they’ve had when adding opportunities for creative expression into their care routines.


Projects and ideas can be customized to older adults’ abilities and preferences, which can help create more successful outcomes, too!

Getting started Check out these sites to learn how to introduce creative expression into care routines for your loved one and/or yourself: ⊲⊲ National Center for Creative Aging: This free online resource provides videos for in-home caregiving activities that include singing, call-and-response poetry reading and art projects. See creativecaregiving.creativeaging.org. ⊲⊲ ARCH National Respite Network and Resource Center: Learn how to locate respite providers as well as funding to lessen the financial burden of respite care. Visit archrespite.org/respitelocator. ⊲⊲ Minnesota’s Senior LinkAge Line: Older adults and caregivers can use this hotline to find respite programs and organizations that offer creative activities. Call 800-333-2433 or see mnaging.org. ⊲⊲ 2nd Half with Lyngblomsten: This enrichment center offers numerous activities for older adults, including respite services, caregiver resources, support groups and lifelong learning programs that include art, music, dance and other creative activities. See lyngblomsten.org/2ndHalf. ⊲⊲ Amherst H. Wilder Foundation: Discover a variety of caregiver services, including support groups and educational opportunities, at wilder.org. Brandi Jewett is a writing specialist with Lyngblomsten, a Christian nonprofit organization that provides health care, housing and community resources to older adults in the Twin Cities. Lyngblomsten is a member of the Metropolitan Caregiver Service Collaborative. Learn more at lyngblomsten.org and caregivercollaborative.org. Minnesota Good Age / March 2018 / 15


TRAVEL

Who needs

Paris?

Quebec Quebec City City — — the the heart heart and and soul soul of of French French Canada Canada — — feels feels like like aa European European getaway! getaway! By Sandra Scott

Montmorency Falls


Chateau Frontenac, Quebec City

C 1.

an’t make it to France? Then visit Quebec City, one of the oldest cities in North America — rich with history, adventure opportunities and culinary delights aplenty. Though it’s an all-season destination, peak travel times are May to September and December through February, due to the many festivals and events the city hosts every year. Yes, the Quebecois speak French. But they’re quick to switch to English as needed with a smile. Check out these top 10 reasons to visit!

Old Town: Accessible from the bustling Upper City from a funicular — a staircase-like railway — this historic, riverfront part of town is home to the Church Notre-Dame-des-Victoires, one of the oldest stone churches in Canada, built directly on the spot where Quebec began in 1608. A massive mural nearby (a UNESCO World Heritage site) depicts Old Quebec and many of the province’s famous writers and artists. Ferries can take you across the St. Lawrence River to the city of Levis, affording

high and wide views of the city, including the iconic, castle-like, utterly photogenic Chateau Frontenac grand hotel (above).

2.

Hop-on, hop-off tours: First-time visitors should consider these London-style double-decker buses that visit all the important sites in the city — with 12 stops in all. If you have time, take one tour around town to enjoy the informative commentary. Then decide which places you’d like to visit the most.

Minnesota Good Age / March 2018 / 17


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10:14 AM

3.

Savory dishes: Poutine may be all the

rage in comfort-food restaurants across the

for gifts for friends, be on the lookout for

U.S. these days, but it’s Quebec’s longtime

little bottles of Canadian maple syrup.

signature dish — French fries and cheese

5.

curds, topped with gravy. Tourtiere, meanwhile, is a Quebecois meat pie that can

Museum of Civilization: Dive

into the anthropology, art and culture

include minced pork, beef or wild game.

of Quebec, including native peoples, as

4.

well as traveling exhibits about biology,

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Sweets: If you’re going to save

zoology, religion and more, complete

money by visiting poor-man’s Paris, then

with topical guided tours and activities

don’t skimp when it comes to pastries.

for children, too.

Bakers here peddle not just gorgeous

6.

baguettes and other breads, but also

La Citadelle: Perched high above

authentic croissants made rich with sweet

the St. Lawrence River, this former

almond paste and, of course, pounds of

fortress (dating back to the 1750s) is an

butter. Made without preservatives, they

active military installation and the official

Basilica of Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupre. Photo by Andriy Blokhin Shutterstock.com

18 / March 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

don’t travel well, however: When shopping


residence of both the Canadian monarch and the Governor General of Canada. Green and parklike — and surrounded by sandstone curtain walls — it features changing-of-the-guard ceremonies daily at 10 a.m. in summer as well as retreat drumming every Friday at 7 p.m. Guided tours feature highlights of the citadel’s 24 buildings and 300 years of history.

7.

Plains of Abraham: This is where

the fight for supremacy between the French and British empires occurred — and the scene of the 1759 Conquest, which changed the fate of North America. With more than 250 acres of meadow and grassy knolls, Battlefields Park is the

Central Park of Quebec.

8.

Museum of Fine Arts: This stunning

gem holds art from around the world with a special focus on Quebec artists. During

La Citadelle, Quebec City

summer, walk through the gardens to view some 25 sculptures and monumental installations in beautiful outdoor spaces.

10.

Excursions: Montmorency Falls,

bucket-list worthy gothic architecture of

which is higher than Niagara Falls, is

the Basilica of Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupre,

often included in a Quebec City tour. It’s

credited with many miracles, including

of government is fronted by gorgeous

a 20-minute drive northeast from the

the curing of ills and disabilities.

gardens and statues of people and events

city center and pours grandly into the St.

important in Quebec history. There’s a

Lawrence. You can take a cable car ride

free tour of the building and it’s possible

to the top to view the falls from a special

to make prior arrangements for a reserved

platform. Another 30 minutes’ drive up

seat to observe the National Assembly.

the river sits the utterly amazing,

9.

Parliament: The 19th-century house

Sandra Scott is a longtime freelance travel writer based in Mexico, N.Y. Learn more at sanscott.com.

Minnesota Good Age / March 2018 / 19


HOUSING SPOTLIGHT

Connecting with kids BY SARAH JACKSON

T

owerLight Senior Living in St. Louis Park may seem like the typical retirement community. It offers independent living, assisted living, memory care and enhanced care (for anyone recovering from illness, injury or surgery). But this community of 115 apartments, located about three blocks west of the St. Louis Park Target off Highway 100, boasts a feature that represents a new (and growing) trend in housing for older adults — an on-site daycare center, TowerLight Childcare. Thanks to specially designed intergenerational programming, 124 lively and energetic children (age infant through preschool) are allowed to play a major role in residents’ daily lives. Seniors — known amongst the children as “grandfriends” — get together with kids for supervised activities, including art projects, MacPhail music classes, story times, stroller rides and even a Rockabye Baby Hour. Such programming has been proven to dramatically enhance not just the lives of seniors, but also the emotional development of children. “This program teaches toddlers to embrace others and make friends, even if they are different,” said TowerLight executive director Jake Schneider. “No longer is it ‘scary’ to see someone in a wheelchair. In today’s world, we all need to learn acceptance more than ever — acceptance of different genera-

20 / March 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲Founded in 2012, TowerLight Senior Living in St. Louis Park includes an on-site daycare center that hosts 124 children, who often interact with residents.

tions, acceptance of those who look different than us.” Seniors who participate in TowerLight Childcare activities often enjoy new meaningful experiences. Schneider cited the story of one gentleman who started participating in the programming when he was in the mid-stages of Alzheimer’s disease. “He told the same stories to the eager kids each day. Life became exciting,” he said. “As Alzheimer’s started to take effect, all he would remember is joining the kids at 3 p.m. Each day, he would get his dress shoes on to visit the kids. While there, he’d smile. His life had purpose.”

▲▲At TowerLight Senior Living in St. Louis Park, residents (known as “grandfriends”) get to spend time with children at the on-site daycare center.


Meredith Johnson, the adult daughter of a memory care resident at TowerLight, said she’s taken comfort in the community’s intergenerational culture. “TowerLight is a great match for my mom and my granddaughter,” Johnson said. “I have already told my own children that if I ever need similar care, they have to find me a place that has children in it.”

Amenities ⊲ Restaurant-style dining

TOWERLIGHT SENIOR LIVING

261 Ruth Street North St. Paul

AGES WELCOME: 55 and older

(651) 738-2102

Will: $40 OPENED: 2012 But selling a home shouldn’t be. PoWer of Attorney: $30 AVAILABILITY: There areto openWe are here help you & your HeAltH CAre DireCtive: $70 ings in assisted living, memory family with your next move. care and enhanced care.

NUMBER OF UNITS: 115 apart-

⊲ Large club room for daily activities and private family gatherings

COST RANGE FOR A SINGLE RESIDENT: $1,765 to

⊲ Fitness room with equipment, plus daily classes

$4,345; nursing care costs are separate and can range from $0 to $4,500 per month.

⊲ Beauty salon/barber

CARE OPTIONS: TowerLight

⊲ Reflection room for weekly church services and Bible study ⊲ Spa room with a walk-in tub ⊲ Bus for transportation to the grocery store, scheduled weekly outings, dining ⊲ Housekeeping ⊲ Underground heated parking ⊲ Outdoor patios ⊲ Care visits from Bluestone Physician Group ⊲ Partnerships with Fairview Home Care and Hospice ⊲ Pet friendly and smoke free. Do you know of a new or interesting senior housing facility in the Twin Cities that might make a good Housing Spotlight? Write Minnesota Good Age editor Sarah Jackson at editor@mngoodage.com with the subject line Housing Spotlight.

Attorney at Law

St. Louis Park

⊲ Movie theater with weekly movies and popcorn

⊲ Craft room

JAMES G. ROBAN

WHERE: 3601 Wooddale Ave. S.,

ments, including studio, 1 bedroom, 1 bedroom/den, 2 bedroom/2 bath

⊲ Library and billiards room

WILLS, ESTATE PLANNING

Where does your home stand in today’s market?

Roban, James GA 1116 12.indd 1

10/20/16 1:41 PM

Check your current home value and how it compares to your neighborhood. edinapropertysource.smarthomeprice.com

also offers a Continuum of Independence age-in-place model for residents. That means a resident can move into independent living and stay in the same unit, even when a higher level of service is required. Staff are trained regularly in Dimensions, a special technique for delivering innovative, handson, ongoing dementia care through person-centered, relationship-based interactions as well as purposeful, pleasurable, creative activities (including intergenerational programming with kids at the on-site daycare).

PROPERTY OWNER: TowerLight is privately owned and is managed by Ebenezer, which is part of the Fairview Health System in Minneapolis.

Mary Frances Miller mfmiller@cbburnet.com

952-300-7874

INFO: 952-881-6322,

towerlightsenior.com

Minnesota Good Age / March 2018 / 21

Miller M Frances GA 1017 V4.indd 1

9/6/17 12:22 PM


FINANCE

Traveling in retirement BY SKIP JOHNSON

T

he dream of being able to travel during retirement is one I’ve heard from many people throughout the years of my practice. In fact, the Aegon Center for Longevity and Retirement found that the top wish for many retired people around the world is to travel. Sixty-two percent of the respondents in a 2017 survey, in fact, ranked travel as a No. 1 priority. If you’re looking forward to traveling in your golden years, here are a few tips that can help you get there!

Figure out what you want What are your goals for retirement? You’ve established that you want to travel, but what will that travel look like? Do you want to backpack through Europe and camp out under the stars, or do you want to take an extended luxury cruise around the Mediterranean? The difference in price can be significant — and can impact your budget year round, especially if you’re trying to maintain a certain lifestyle at home as well.

out any weak spots or identify the potential for improvement based on your goals and timelines. If you’ve already realized that traveling in retirement is important to you, maybe downsizing your current lifestyle can help you get there? Moving to a smaller home or a less expensive one may provide you with the funds you need to stash away for your travel dreams.

Adjust your plans

Use rewards — wisely

If you already have a retirement plan in place, but haven’t budgeted for traveling as a goal, it may be time to remap your plan. If this is a real goal for you, make sure you’re planning for the cost of travel by setting up your retirement to accommodate the kind of travel you desire. A trusted financial consultant can help you analyze your investments to weed

I don’t advocate taking on debt to pay for discretionary purchases and activities such as vacations, but I will say — if you can pay off the balance at the end of the month — using a credit card rewards program can help fund your travel expenses. Paying for one trip with a credit card may earn enough points to partially pay for your next trip, which can quickly alle-

22 / March 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

viate some of the expense. Again, I must stress that the credit card balance should be paid in full immediately — something that’s easy to plan to do, but hard to follow through on when the bill comes due. So, what if travel isn’t your dream? After all, everyone’s goals for retirement are different; it’s a very personal thing. The bottom line is to figure out your goals and how you want to live your life in retirement so you can build a plan to help you meet those goals. Skip Johnson is an advisor and partner at Great Waters Financial, a financial-planning firm and insurance agency with locations in Minneapolis, Richfield, Minnetonka, White Bear Lake and Duluth. Johnson appears regularly on the Fox 9 morning news show. Learn more at greatwatersfinancial.com.


$1,595.00 (prepaid)

$4,995.00 (prepaid)

$ ,995.00 (prepaid)


Kieran Folliard is the driving force behind the establishment of The Food Building in Northeast Minneapolis, a hub for producers of authentic local products. Photo by Tracy Walsh

24 / March 2018 / Minnesota Good Age


The entire country of Ireland, population 4.7 million, has fewer citizens than the state of Minnesota, which has 5.5 million. And yet the island nation has played an outsized role on the world stage, contributing some of the planet’s highest achievements in drama and literature — not to mention humbler but truly beloved pleasures such as pints of Guinness and U2. By Julie Kendrick

HERE IN MINNESOTA, we have our own living illustration of the way the Irish can make surprisingly large contributions to a community. We have Kieran Folliard. Yes, that Kieran — of Kieran’s Irish Pub, The Local, The Liffey and Cooper. And the phenomenon of 2 Gingers Irish Whiskey. A born-and-bred resident of County Mayo, Ireland, Folliard has lived in the U.S. for 30 years. A serial entrepreneur with a prescient ability to look ahead to what Minnesotans will want to be eating and drinking next, Folliard has put his fingers in pies all over

the local food scene and has pulled out a plum just about every time. And Folliard, whose lilting brogue and clever wit make him many Minnesotans’ favorite Irishman, shows no signs of stopping anytime soon at age 62. “I’m a dreamer who gets himself in trouble by starting things and diving into them before I do enough planning,” he said with his characteristically self-deprecating humor and a smile in his Irish eyes. “I’ve learned lots of lessons, that’s for sure. And I get very passionate about new projects because I love ideas and learning the ‘why’ behind things.”


Coming to America Folliard’s hometown is Ballyhaunis, Ireland. “My father was 46 and my mother 43 when I was born,” he said. “It was just my older sister and myself, a small family.” His sister, who remained in Ireland, recently died after a battle with ovarian cancer, a loss he deeply mourns. He continues to make regular visits back home. “I still own the land that was the site of our family garden, where we grew all our own vegetables,” he said. “I always say if it all goes to hell in a handbasket, I’ll just pitch a tent and live there on that little plot.” After graduating from the Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology, Folliard worked in the Middle East for Masstock, an Irish-Saudi dairy company.

I’ve never been motivated by money, prestige or power. … What I’ve always valued is to be curious and to have a point of view. And I think I’ve accomplished that. — Kieran Folliard

26 / March 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

“There I was, flogging milk to the Arabs, and then many years later I turned around and started flogging whiskey to the Yanks,” he said. He came to Minnesota in 1987, working for Andcor Companies, Inc., where he was a consultant with startups such as Rollerblades and Select Comfort. He eventually became president of the business. Describing Minnesota as “the land of 10,000 opportunities,” Folliard said he appreciates the state’s “fantastic” combination of arts, sports, science and outdoor adventure. “I like the seasons, too. I don’t mind how cold it is, as long as the sky is blue,” he said. “I grew up with grey skies, and that’s depressing.”

Family life — with pauses Folliard is the father of four — Vienna, 37; Seamus, 35; Tyrone, 33; and India, 15 — and is a grandfather of three. He lives near downtown Minneapolis in what he describes as a “wee house, my cabin in the city,” with wife, Lisa Kane, a dietician who works part-time at the VA hospital. “Lisa has done a lot of creative work with me over the years,” he said. “She has scientific as well as creative talents.” They were married in 1996, then divorced 18 years ago.


After a five-year break, they reunited. “I told her, ‘That was a long time to go around the corner to the shop,’” he said. They’ve been remarried for 13 years, for a total of 21 years together. “I married the right side of her brain the first time and the left side the second,” he said, before confessing: “I was driving her crazy with starting businesses.”

A pub he wanted to visit Folliard has become known as a guy who always has a million ideas for new ventures — and who turns many of them into profitable enterprises. First, he started with pubs, which might seem like an unusual business choice for someone with no background in food service or hospitality. “The best entrepreneurial ideas come from solving your own problem,” Folliard said. “I wanted a community-focused Irish pub I could visit regularly, and there wasn’t an authentic one to be found in the Twin Cities. I thought, ‘I can do this.’” In 1992, he opened Molly Malone’s, followed in 1994 by Kieran’s Irish Pub, then The Local, The Liffey and Cooper. All except Molly Malone’s are still in business today. It turns out Folliard was right to be confident in his ability to create not just one successful public house, but a mini-empire of them, known today as Cara Irish Pubs. While some may attribute his golden touch to the luck of the Irish, it turns out Folliard had a talent for creating strong teams that worked hard at making people feel welcome and comfortable. “Put the right people on the bus,” he said, “and you’re halfway there.”

comes to the funeral. If your world is falling apart, he’s the one who calls to see how you’re doing. He’s one of my best friends, and he’s never not been there for me.” Steven Joel Brown, chef and owner of Tilia and St. Genevieve restaurants — and a former chef at The Local — said Folliard puts out a constantly positive energy. “He’s a true visionary, the kind of person who runs from idea to idea to idea,” Brown said. “Sometimes those people fail, but they always have courage and confidence.” Little known Folliard fact? “He never goes to the same hairdresser twice,” Brown said. “He just walks by a barbershop, decides he needs a haircut, and comes out looking handsome every time.”

Reinventing whiskey The pub business led Folliard to yet another entrepreneurial venture that solved a problem. “Our pubs had the single largest Jameson Irish Whiskey account in the world,” he said. “The price of the whiskey kept going up, so we hit upon the idea of creating our own brand.” It was an ambitious concept: Transform whiskey from a male-oriented, wintertime beverage into a year-round, gender-neutral one.

A true friend and visionary As he became a fixture in the food and drink scene, Folliard became something of a local legend for his captivating brogue, lively sense of humor and unfailing reserves of Gaelic charm. “Everybody thinks they know him and everybody thinks they’re his friend,” said Jacquie Berglund, a former director of marketing at The Local and a co-founder (and CEO) of Finnegans Brew Co., the first beer company in the world to donate 100 percent of profits to charity. Finnegans will open a public brewery and taproom in downtown Minneapolis on St. Patrick’s Day (March 17). “He’s great fun and he’s always got a happy-go-lucky attitude,” Berglund said, adding, however, that there’s more to the charming Irish lad than meets the eye: “He’s the guy who always

▲▲2 Gingers Irish whiskey is distilled at the Kilbeggan Distillery in Ireland. Photos by Tracy Walsh Minnesota Good Age / March 2018 / 27


“I took to the road and built the 2 Gingers brand,” he said. Five years ago, 2 Gingers was acquired by what is now Beam Suntory, the world’s third-largest premium spirits company. Folliard has stayed on as a Global Irish Whiskey Ambassador, perhaps one of the most enviable job titles imaginable.

The Food Building “We were aiming to convert vodka and beer drinkers,” Folliard said. Named for Kieran’s redheaded mother and aunt, Mary and Delia, 2 Gingers was an instant hit, helped along by the creation of cocktails such as the trademarked Big Ginger. The four-year-aged blend — distilled at the Kilbeggan Distillery in Ireland and distributed in the U.S. — is described as smooth, malty and slightly sweet to start, with notes of honey and citrus. With the pubs doing well, Folliard decided he was ready for his next adventure, so he sold his shares to those who had sweat equity in each of the locations.

Three years ago, Folliard took on his most ambitious project to date: He bought and renovated a dilapidated warehouse in Northeast Minneapolis, brought in artisan food producers and launched The Food Building, a food-production hub and event space. Why such a massive undertaking? “It’s a bit of the Irish in me that I have such an affinity for the underdog,” he said. “I’ve always been interested in food, and as I began to meet more farmers and makers, I saw their passion and dedication for the art and science of food production. I liked the idea of trying another scrappy startup and making it work.” Today the building is the full-time home of Red Table Meat Co. and Baker’s Field Flour & Bread. Another startup, coldbrew concentrate Bizzy Coffee, is currently renting space. Next door is the farm-to-table restaurant, The Draft Horse, which serves Food Building products. “There’s a tremendous pool of talent here in the Twin Cities,” Folliard said. “We have iconic food brands that attract plenty of talent, and we have a strong entrepreneurial culture to inspire them in new ventures.” What he’s hoping for now is greater recognition and support of the products his makers are creating. “When I go to places like Austin, Texas, or Boulder, Colorado, I see more support from the local community and more willingness to fight for their local food startups,” he said. “I wish there were a bit more of that attitude in the water here.” Folliard has faced some headwinds in getting brands up and running, as evidenced by the recent shuttering of one of the building’s tenants, cheese producer The Lone Grazer. “We just could not get our distribution and sales up to the level we needed,” he said. “I say, only half-jokingly, that The Lone Grazer will ride again.”

To Ireland and integrity

▲ Kieran Folliard's Food Building in Northeast Minneapolis, is home to Baker’s Field Flour & Bread, a commercial bakery that uses local grain. Photos by Tracy Walsh 28 / March 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

So how does Minnesota’s most famous Mayoman plan to spend March 17 this year? “I make sure that I go all around town to our 2 Gingers customers to thank them for their business, shake hands and buy drinks,” he said.


BIG GINGER

This iconic cocktail, which turned Irish whiskey into a year-round drink in Minnesota, combines the refreshing bite of ginger ale with the caramel, vanilla and citrus undertones of 2 Gingers Irish Whiskey.

INGREDIENTS: • 2 oz. of 2 Gingers Irish Whiskey • Ginger ale • Lemon wedge • Lime wedge

DIRECTIONS: Pour whiskey into a pint or Collins glass with ice. Top with ginger ale (or diet ginger ale), followed by wedges of lemon and lime. Find more recipes for 2 Gingers at 2gingerswhiskey.com.

He confesses that his real celebration usually comes on March 18: “That’s when I have a chance to sit down by the fire, open a bottle of 2 Gingers and raise a glass to Ireland.” As he looks to the year ahead, Folliard is hoping to push the Food Building brands to profitability. “We have to do it in a way that retains our integrity and purpose,” he said. Folliard couldn’t quite say what keeps him going and creating. “I do know that I’ve never been motivated by money, prestige or power, or my life would have turned out quite differently,” he said. “I know that what I’ve always valued is to be curious and to have a point of view. And I think I’ve accomplished that.” Julie Kendrick is a contributing writer for many local and national publications. She lives in Minneapolis. Follow her on Twitter @KendrickWorks.

Minnesota Good Age / March 2018 / 29


Brain teasers SUDOKU

WORD SEARCH Wish you were here!

ALASKA ARIZONA AUSTRALIA CALIFORNIA CARIBBEAN COSTA RICA FRANCE

GREECE IRELAND ITALY HAWAII KEY WEST LONDON MIAMI

NEVADA NEW YORK PORTUGAL SANTA FE SPAIN TANZANIA WILLIAMSBURG

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Break the code to reveal a quote from a famous person. Each letter represents another letter.

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WORD SCRAMBLE Complete the following words using each given letter once. U

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30 / March 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

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Clue: P = E

TRIVIA 1. Egypt (The Great Pyramid of Giza) 2. Monaco 3. Jesus Christ / Christ the Redeemer

Source: Oscar Wilde


TRIVIA Wanderlust 1. In what country can you find the only surviving member of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World? 2. What European gambling hotspot is the second-smallest country in the world? 3. Who towers over the city of Rio de Janeiro (in statue form)? Sources: ancient.eu, lonelyplanet.com, Britannica.com

SUDOKU WORD SCRAMBLE Quebec, Ozarks, Dublin CROSSWORD

ANSWERS Minnesota Good Age / March 2018 / 31

CRYTPOGRAM I never travel without my diary. One should have something sensational to read in the train.


Crossword

70 New England NFLers 71 Barnes & Noble reader

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1 Easy thing to do 5 Lobster serving 9 Great time 14 Skin opening 15 Tra-__: refrain syllables 16 Main artery 17 Snapchat co-founder Spiegel 18 Cyberzine 19 Parakeets’ quarters 20 Have things finally go one’s way 23 Photo __: media events 24 Charged particles 25 Intl. news broadcaster 27 Singer’s quavers 30 Recently 35 Harry’s pal Weasley 36 Mosquito-borne disease 38 Penne __ vodka 32 / March 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

40 Singer Damone 41 Trig ratio 42 Engage in hard-nosed negotiations 47 “Just a __!” 48 Dress-for-success accessory 49 New York Giants legend with 511 career home runs 51 Used a bench 52 Location 53 Sponsors’ spots 56 Make an annual clock adjustment ... and what the end of 20-, 36- and 42-Across may literally have 62 Georgia state fruit 64 Smell 65 Gold rush animal 66 “Orange” tea grade 67 Kind of pittance? 68 The “A” of NEA 69 Drive too fast

1 Job detail, for short 2 Old Chevy 3 “I smell __!” 4 Crossword solver’s choice 5 Remove dirt from 6 Petting zoo youngsters 7 Bygone apple spray 8 Regular pay 9 “Not so close!” 10 Extended pd. away from work 11 Golden Fleece ship 12 How-to instruction 13 Soviet news agency 21 Sanctified 22 Declare emphatically 26 Drinks in schooners 27 Maria von __, family singers’ matriarch 28 Rich boy in “Nancy” comics 29 Groom’s new relative 30 Author Hoffman 31 Foot cover 32 French dispatch boat 33 Guiding principle 34 Standing tall 37 Heinz varieties count, to Caesar? 39 Those in favor 43 Failed suddenly, as a laptop 44 URL letters 45 Political fugitives 46 __ profit: make money 50 __ Brothers: defunct financial firm 52 Equine outburst 53 iPhone downloads 54 __-sea diver 55 Drink with sushi 57 Frolic in a lively way 58 Thinking output 59 Currency named for a continent 60 Choir voice 61 Student’s workplace 63 Runner Sebastian


2018



2018

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In-depth visual inspection of the electrical panel for overheat and overload conditions, loose circuit breakers, loose terminations; verification of proper grounding and bonding systems. • Visual inspection of exterior electrical service, including meter socket • Check ground fault circuit interrupter receptacles (GFCI) • Check Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters (AFCI) if installed • Operations check of Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Detectors • Operations check of bath exhaust fans *May not be combined with other offers. Expires March 31, 2018.


MARCH 8

CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR MARCH

MUSIC AND MEMORY → Charlie Maguire, noted songwriter and performer (Prairie Home Companion, On the Road with Jason Davis), brings his unique songwriting workshop to those with dementia and memory loss and their care partners. In this special workshop, Maguire will present songs written by those with dementia and then work with participants to collectively write a song. When: March 8 Where: Roseville Library Cost: FREE. Space is limited. Please call 651-724-6090 to register. Info: rclreads.org

MARCH 9

GAELIC STORM

EMMA

In this lively adaptation of her famed novel, Jane Austen herself steps on stage to shepherd her delightful comic characters through the pitfalls and surprises that await them.

MARCH 1–3

A ROCK BALLET → Twin Cities Ballet of Minnesota performs the world premiere of its all-new original full-length rock ballet of Pink Floyd’s The Wall, with live music by the band Run Like Hell! When: March 1–3 Where: The Cowles Center, Minneapolis Cost: $30–$38 Info: thecowlescenter.org

MARCH 2–JUNE 16

GUYS AND DOLLS → Set in Damon Runyon’s mythical New York City, this beloved oddball romantic comedy first opened on Broadway in 1950. 34 / March 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

→ After nearly two decades and more than 3,000 live shows, this chart-topping, multi-national Celtic band returns with a new release, Go Climb a Tree, mixing traditional Irish music with modern influences. When: Friday, Saturdays and Sundays through March 4 Where: Theatre in the Round, Minneapolis Cost: $22 Info: theatreintheround.org

When: March 2–June 16 Where: Old Log Theatre, Excelsior Cost: $30–$40 Info: oldlog.com

MARCH 3–4

HEALTHY LIFE EXPO → One of the largest health, wellness and fitness shows in the upper Midwest returns with 200 local and national exhibitors, featuring doctors, clinics, nutritionists, chefs, in-home fitness products, authors, fitness gurus and more. When: March 3–4 Where: Minneapolis Convention Center Cost: $6 at the door Info: mediamaxevents.com

When: March 9 Where: Fitzgerald Theatre, St. Paul Cost: $37.50 Info: fitzgeraldtheater.publicradio.org

MARCH 30–APRIL 8

MINNEAPOLIS HOME AND GARDEN SHOW → Special guests will include Paige Davis of TLC’s Trading Spaces, Sarah Bendrick of the DIY Network’s I Hate My Yard and Jason Cameron of Sledgehammer, Desperate Landscapes and Man Caves. When: March 30–April 8 Where: Minneapolis Convention Center, Minneapolis Cost: $4–$14 Info: homeandgardenshow.com

MUCH MORE ONLINE! Find many more local events in our newly expanded calendar at mngoodage.com.


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