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Cremation Society of Minnesota

ABOUT CREMATION Q. How does the Cremation Society of Minnesota work? A. The Cremation Society is notified immediately

at the time of death. The member’s body is taken to the Society’s crematory. It is held until proper medical authorization and a cremation permit is secured. It is then cremated.

Q. What happens to the ashes after cremation? A. The member’s remains are handled according to their written instructions. They may be picked up by survivors or delivered for a fee.

Q. What is the cost for cremation? A. “Our current cost for our basic direct cremation service is $1,595.00.” It includes removal of the body from the place of death, cremation, filing of necessary papers, and a cardboard container suitable for burial. The charge for non-members, who we also serve, is more.

Q. How do I become a member? A. Fill out the registration form and mail it to our

near-est location. Enclose a one-time membership fee of $15.00 per person. The fee covers setting up and maintaining records. It is not refundable nor an offset to final service costs. We will register you and send you a wallet-sized membership card, and a certificate of registration.

Q. What are the benefits of prepaying for services? A. Prepayment provides two benefits – it removes a

stress from survivors and guarantees that services will be performed at today’s cost.

Q. Where can I learn more? A. You may call or visit any one of our locations, or

visit us at cremationsocietyofmn.com or email us at csminnesota@aol.com

REGISTRATION FORM

Name Address Telephone (

)

INFORMATION REQUIRED ON THE DEATH CERTIFICATE Date of Birth

(will remain confidential)

Place of Birth

Sex ❏ M ❏ F

Race

Hispanic ❏ Yes ❏ No

Father’s Name

Social Security #

Mother’s Name

Marital Status ❏ Married ❏ Never Married ❏ Widowed ❏ Divorced If married, spouse’s full legal name, including maiden Are you a Veteran? ❏ Yes ❏ No

If Yes, enclose a copy of your discharge paper.

AUTHORIZATION FOR CREMATION I, the undersigned, authorize and request the Cremation Society of Minnesota or its assigns to cremate the remains of , and further authorize and request that the following disposition of the cremated remains be made: . I will indemnify and hold harmless the Cremation Society of Minnesota and the crematory from any claims to the contrary including all liability and claims related to the shipment and storage of the cremated remains. Signature

Date

Witness Signature

Date

Address Telephone (

)

Email address

NEXT OF KIN – Please list at least one. Name

Relationship

Address Telephone (

)

PAYMENT PLAN – You are not a member until this form is on file and your registration fee is received. “Our current cost for our basic direct cremation service is $1,595.00.” ❏ I wish to preregister with the Cremation Society of Minnesota

Registration Fee:

❏ I wish to prepay for my Basic Cremation, I understand my pre-payment will be placed in an insurance policy to be used at time of death ❏ I wish to register at this time but not prepay

$15.00 $

Total Paid: $ GA 03/17

PLEASE MAIL FORM TO THE NEAREST CHAPEL LISTED BELOW

Complete Cremation Services PROFESSIONAL · DIGNIFIED · ECONOMICAL

CremationSocietyOfMN.com


Contents Mozart was baptized in Salzburg’s ornate Baroque cathedral, where he also later played the organ. Photo by Anibal Trejo / Shutterstock, Inc.

20 32

→ On the cover World travelers: Sam and Far Navab of Minneapolis have made a life — and a living — out of cleaning and selling beautiful, one-of-akind rugs. Photos by Tracy Walsh tracywalshphoto.com

Stunning Salzburg Palaces, castles and classical concerts galore await visitors in this scenic city.

Subscribe! Want to receive Good Age at your home? Our magazine is free at more than 1,000 rack sites around the Twin Cities, including most senior centers, libraries and metro-area Walgreens. But if you'd like to get the magazine mailed to your home, send a $12 check for a one-year subscription to Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis, MN 55403. Write “Good Age magazine” on the memo line.

38 Can’t-Miss Calendar 40 Brain Teasers 6 / March 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


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This Month in MN History 14 Minnesota executed a woman only once. Was it the right call?

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Good Health House Call 16 Mental health is perhaps best understood as a spectrum. Caregiving 18 You can leave town overnight, even if you’re a full-time caregiver.

Good Living Housing 26 Let the objects go and keep the memories when decluttering. Finance 28 Retirement planning and saving are almost entirely up to you. In the Kitchen 30 Make a chocolate chip cookie in a mug in a just a few minutes.

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Good Start / From the Editor / By Sarah Jackson Volume 36 / Issue 3 Publisher Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com Co-Publisher and Sales Manager Terry Gahan 612-436-4360 tgahan@mngoodage.com Editor Sarah Jackson 612-436-4385 editor@mngoodage.com Contributors Todd Archbold, Jamie Crowson Carol Hall, Julie Kendrick, Mike Kojonen Sam Patet, Lauren Peck, Dave Nimmer Carla Waldemar, Tracy Walsh DeeDee Welles Creative Director Sarah Karnas Senior Graphic Designer Valerie Moe Graphic Designer Dani Cunningham Client Services Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com Circulation Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2017 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $12 per year.

8 / March 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Not from around here Today, as I write this, thousands

of Americans are taking part in a A Day Without Immigrants, in which business leaders are closing their doors in solidarity with U.S. non-natives. The movement, as NPR described it, is a response to President Trump’s immigration agenda, which includes a pledge to seal the U.S. border with Mexico and a (now on-hold) travel ban on citizens of seven majority-Muslim countries. This gesture, I’d argue, is a big deal, even if it is highly symbolic. This day, of course, would be an even bigger deal if literally all immigrants were removed from not just the labor force, but also our communities. Our economy, our so-called American way of life, would surely — in just a few seconds — crumble without immigrants. Do we need some reasonable regulation when it comes to immigration? Of course we do. But I’m of the mind that some folks could do with a little reality check. (Side note: If you’re a Christian, ask yourself what Christ would think of Trump’s wall.) Aren’t we all (Native Americans notwithstanding) immigrants or decedents of immigrants? How many families in Minnesota alone can trace their roots to so-called unskilled immigrant farmers whose way of life was to work off the land? Where does your ancestry take you? In my case, it’s France, by way of Quebec, at least on my mom’s side. My American-born mother, who grew up in Rolla, N.D., spoke only French until she attended first grade. Should she have been sent home or banned or walled off for not being American enough and not speaking English as her first language? If my mother were from Iran — or Juarez — would you feel differently? This month, I’m proud that our Cover Stars — two longtime Minneapolis entrepreneurs — are former immigrants. The story of Sam and Far Navab, the founders of the Navab Brothers Oriental Rug Company in St. Louis Park, isn’t just one of escape from persecution in their native country, Iran. It’s the tale of two trustworthy, hardworking men, who at one point were penniless, but who found a way — in a span of 30 years — to achieve the American Dream. In fact, their businesses have created jobs for 16 people. They’re Minnesotans. They’re immigrants. They’re also U.S. citizens. And I’m beyond glad they’re in our community — and on the cover of Good Age.


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Good Start / My Turn / By Dave Nimmer ⊳⊳ U.S. Bank Stadium. Photo by Sarah McKenzie

What I’ll do this year →→Amid promises to Make America Great Again, here’s my program to Keep Minnesota Pretty Good

Now that we’re well into 2017, I fully understand that we — and the admin-

istration of President Donald Trump — are all about Making America Great Again. Meanwhile, I’ve also embarked on my own program to Keep Minnesota Pretty Good. To that end, I’ve got a short version of what I’ve done and plan to do: ⊲⊲ I paid $18 to tour the U.S. Bank Stadium, a palace we taxpayers spent a halfbillion dollars on, mostly for the benefit of Vikings’ owners, near as I can tell. But, hey: It’s the only way I can afford to see the place. The building itself is an architectural and engineering marvel. But I didn’t see many public drinking fountains, perhaps explaining why water sells for five bucks a bottle. My $18 tour didn’t include any protesters hanging from the rafters. ⊲⊲ I will practice more on my keyboard. I’ve discovered I lack dexterity and musicality, but I can offer a passable rendition of Amazing Grace. And I figure we’re going to need it before the year is over. 10 / March 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

⊲⊲ I’m going to walk down the Nicollet Mall this spring and badger the crews to “get ‘er done.” It seems to me the Mall has been torn up forever, longer than it took to tear down the Metrodome and replace it with the Bankdome. ⊲⊲ I will continue to support the Star Tribune, home of the best newsroom in Minnesota. More than ever, we need responsible, thoughtful and helpful media, with real reporters and editors who graduated from schools of journalism and mass communication. I spent 15 years in the newsroom of The Minneapolis Star and I know how lucky the staff is to have Glen Taylor as the Strib’s owner. I believe the former state senator, and owner of the Timberwolves, is truly committed to having an enlightened citizenship in Minnesota. ⊲⊲ I will say a prayer that another public-spirited Minnesotan (or two) would consider buying the St. Paul Pioneer Press, so it can return to winning Pulitzers. ⊲⊲ I’ll consider taking a portable GPS device into the new grocery stores opening in the suburbs, such as Jerry’s in Woodbury or HyVee in Eagan. I don’t want anyone to send a search party if I find myself meandering, wandering or even staggering among the aisles and miles of condiments, candy, cotton and crackers. A buddy of mine reports that the staff members at the Eagan HyVee escort


Booth Manor Residence him all the way to the item he asks about, apparently unsure that verbal directions to the right aisle would be adequate. ⊲ My friend, Cindy Lamont, and I will head to the canyon lands of Utah for a Road Scholar (formerly Elderhostel) trip. It’s 13 days for those who can hike at a “moderate pace.” We won’t be setting any endurance records, but we’ll be walking and doing what we can to keep from sucking up those healthcare dollars. ⊲ To help keep my mind and spirit in tune with my well-toned body, I’ll keep fishing on a little lake about five miles from my townhouse. I’ll be in a 38-year-old, 14-foot AlumaCraft, a parting gift from the staff of The Minneapolis Star. The boat doesn’t leak a drop. My fishing buddy, Jim, and I leak occasionally and slightly.

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▲ The Minnesota Orchestra. Photo by Jake Armour

⊲ Cindy and I will continue to attend the senior-rate concerts ($29 for groups) with the Minnesota Orchestra, a truly world-class musical group. I’m always impressed and buoyed by the parade of wheelchairs, walkers and canes on Thursday mornings. And we enjoy the free coffee and donuts, too. ⊲ I’ll probably buy a couple of tickets to a Twins’ game. Right now, they’re tied with the Cleveland Indians and Kansas City Royals for first place in American League Central Division. Smart-aleck comments aside, I do feel lucky to live in Minnesota, where citizens still value honesty, humility and human kindness.

▲ Monument Valley, Navajo Tribal Park, Utah.

Dave Nimmer has had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@ mngoodage.com.

Minnesota Good Age / March 2017 / 11

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Good Start / Memories / By Carol Hall

⊳⊳ Glenda Farrell starred in numerous Torchy Blane movies, including Torchy Runs for Mayor (left) and Torchy Blane in Chinatown (above). Photos courtesy of Warner Home Video

Charmed by Torchy →→A wisecracking, beautiful newswoman, Ms. Blane was a B-movie winner

“Gahagan, I wantcha to go out

and rent me a bloodhound,” Torchy Blane snaps at the dim-witted New York cop. As usual, Torchy, the beautiful, wisecracking Manhattan newspaper reporter, is going after a scoop for the Daily Star, which involves using a bloodhound to track a gang of counterfeiters to their hideout in the country. Also as usual, Torchy is well ahead of her gruff detective boyfriend, Steve MacBride, and his sidekick-driver, Gahagan, in solving the crime. This episode of the 1930s Torchy Blane B-movie series, Torchy Gets Her Man, recently aired on Turner Classic Movies (TCM). The comic-mystery caper involves fake money being passed at a racetrack and thugs posing as Secret Service men. The “bloodhound” turns out to be a German shepherd that understands only German commands! Now I suppose you have to be a classic movie nut like to me to appreciate such humor. But I make no apologies. It’s a carryover from my youthful movie-going days in the late-1940s and early ’50s watching The Bowery Boys and Charlie Chan series, which were equally inane. But beyond nostalgia, I have a penchant for the witty, fast-paced dialogue of that era. Sashaying into the Star newsroom — passing reporters banging on typewriters, the 12 / March 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

teletype machine clackety-clacking in the background — Torchy approaches her editor and pitches her story about the counterfeit ring. Having been warned by the police to keep it out of the news, he turns it down. Torchy blasts back: “So they got you muzzled, have they, Big Boy? But they’re not gonna muzzle me. I’m gonna crack this case wide open. … I’m an oldfashioned newspaper woman with an obligation to my readers. … And if you don’t print the story, I’ll take it to a paper that will!” The series was a surprise hit for Warner Brothers. Nine Torchy Blane films were made from 1937 to 1939, Torchy Gets Her Man, being the sixth. Considered “B movies” — running just 90 minutes — they were usually one-half of a double feature. Leading the cast as Torchy, actress Glenda Farrell portrays her not as a comic character, but a full-blown intelligent woman, like the actual reporters who interviewed Farrell during her stage and movie career. Legend has it, Torchy was the model for Superman’s Lois Lane of the Daily Planet.


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Glenda Farrell portrays Torchy not as a comic character, but a full-blown intelligent woman. Stern-faced Barton MacLane as Torchy’s perennial fiancee, perfectly complements her sassy wisecracking personality. Fans so objected when the two were replaced by other actors, Warner Brothers brought them back together again. Character actor Tom Kennedy plays Gahagan. Big, dark-haired and rumple-faced, Gahagan smokes cigars, bumbles along, stealing every scene he’s in — and often “feels a poem coming on”: “When your head is all amuddle and your words are all ajar and you got no one to cuddle, you’ll find joy in a cigar.” All of this begs the question: What makes each of us laugh? A point to ponder. But for now, I’m grateful TCM revived the Torchy series. Laughter is something we all need more of these days. Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@ mngoodage.com.

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Good Start / This Month in Minnesota History / By Lauren Peck ⊳⊳ This was the view from the roof of the courthouse in St. Paul in 1857, two years before Ann Bilansky was accused of murdering her husband. Photo courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

Dead, buried, exhumed

Wrongly convicted? →→The widow Ann Bilansky was hanged in St. Paul for allegedly poisoning her husband in 1859

On March 23, 1860, Ann Bilansky was hanged in St. Paul for the

murder of her husband. It was the first-ever legal execution after Minnesota gained statehood in 1858. (Bilansky was, indeed, the first and only woman ever executed in Minnesota.) However, today — some 150 years later — questions still remain about whether she was guilty. A widow, originally from North Carolina, she first moved to St. Paul in April 1858 to be with her nephew, John Walker, who was sick with typhoid in Minnesota. In September, she married Stanislaus Bilansky, a Polish settler, whose wife had divorced him a few years earlier. He had a reputation for being a drinker who was abusive, melancholy and often ill. Bilansky took charge of the household and Bilansky’s three young children, and her nephew eventually moved into a two-room shanty behind the Bilansky home.

14 / March 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

In late February 1859, Stanislaus became sick with a fever and vomiting. A doctor who visited during his illness later testified that Stanislaus “did not seem then to be in any danger.” Stanislaus died on March 11 and was quickly buried. On the night of March 12, however, a neighbor — Lucinda Kilpatrick — told police she remembered Bilansky buying 10 cents worth of arsenic a few weeks before, supposedly to rid the house of rats. Stanislaus’ body was exhumed, and testing found a trace of something that resembled arsenic. Bilansky was arrested for murder, accused of poisoning her husband. At Bilansky’s trial, John Brisbin, a Yale-educated lawyer who’d served in the state House of Representatives and as mayor of St. Paul, represented Bilansky. Prosecutor Isaac Heard argued that Bilansky had murdered her husband

→→Attend an event Learn more about Ann Bilansky and her case during Ramsey After Dark: Crime and Justice on March 24 at the historic Alexander Ramsey House in St. Paul. Ramsey After Dark is a monthly program that explores the darker side of Minnesota’s past, with topics from mental illness to superstitions. See mnhs.org.


because she was having an affair with Walker, who Heard claimed wasn’t actually her nephew.

‘Improper’ relationship? Kilpatrick was a star witness. She testified that, along with purchasing arsenic, Bilansky had made comments about her husband suddenly dying while he was ill. She also claimed that Stanislaus disapproved of his wife’s relationship with her nephew and that Bilansky hadn’t seemed grief-stricken at the funeral. On cross-examination, Brisbin argued that Kilpatrick herself had an improper relationship with Walker, and she refused to answer questions about it. When a doctor testified that Stanislaus’ stomach had inflammation indicating arsenic poisoning, he admitted under questioning that it could also be caused by alcohol abuse or chronic illness. The defense also pointed out that only one out of six chemical tests done indicated the presence of arsenic.

Appeals, pleas denied Despite this mixed evidence and testimony, the jury convicted Bilansky of murder. An appeal for a new trial went to the state Supreme Court, but it was eventually denied. After learning her appeal was denied, Bilansky escaped the Ramsey County jail on July 25, squeezing through a window when her jailer left her unattended. She hid near Lake Como and eventually got word to Walker to help her. They were caught about a week later a few miles from St. Anthony. In December, a judge sentenced her to death.

Bilansky’s case was a leading story in St. Paul’s Pioneer and Democrat for many months, but the paper often focused on the more sensational details. By early 1860, the newspaper applauded the decision to execute her: “There is no doubt of her guilt, and we can conceive of no sufficient reason why the law should not be allowed to take its course, or why anyone should desire for a commutation of the sentence.” But many people did campaign for her sentence to be changed to life in prison. Bilansky’s new attorney, Willis Gorman, Minnesota’s former territorial governor, petitioned Gov. Alexander Ramsey, pointing out irregularities in her trial. Even Heard, the prosecutor, wrote his own plea: He had “grave and serious doubts as to whether the defendant has had a fair trial,” including the fact that the jury hadn’t been sequestered. The state legislature also made several attempts to help Bilansky’s case, including introducing bills to ban capital punishment and the execution of women. In March 1860, it passed a bill commuting Bilansky’s sentence to life in prison, but Ramsey vetoed the effort.

Justice ‘in heaven’ It’s not entirely clear why Ramsey was so unreceptive, but his brother, Justus, was a member of the jury that convicted Bilansky; and her two attorneys, Brisbin and Gorman, were Democrat politicians, at odds with Ramsey’s own politics. On March 23, officials attempted to make Bilansky’s hanging private by building a fence around the gallows at Fifth and Cedar in St. Paul.

The defense also pointed out that only one out of six chemical tests done indicated the presence of arsenic. A hundred or so people crowded inside the fence, and thousands more viewed the proceedings from roofs, windows and on top of carriages. Bilansky prayed for five minutes and then spoke, professing her innocence, “Your courts of justice are not courts of justice — but I will yet get justice in heaven.” After she was hanged, Bilansky was buried in an unmarked grave. Today, it’s still not clear whether Bilansky was actually guilty, especially given the conflicting evidence of her case and the unorthodox methods used during her trial. The Pioneer and Democrat, however, remained utterly convinced of her guilt until the end, publishing a jailhouse interview with Bilansky the day after her execution, where it editorialized, “Probably no jail ever contained a criminal, either male or female, under imprisonment for a crime, who exhibited such a complete want of decency or propriety.” Lauren Peck is a media relations and social media associate for the Minnesota Historical Society. Minnesota Good Age / March 2017 / 15


Good Health / House Call / By Todd Archbold two far ends, where most of the population exists. Your mental health is impacted by the overall physical state of your body, your hormones, neurochemistry, nutrition and more. Indeed, the state of one’s mental health is surprisingly interrelated with one’s overall physical health. (After all, your brain is an organ just like your lungs and kidneys.)

What is mental health? →→Perceptions about psychiatric illness often ignore the fact that it’s common (and treatable)

The topic of mental health has been getting a lot of attention lately — and it

seems to be one of growing popularity, concern and misunderstanding. Discussions on this topic vary a great deal, ranging from scientific to casual conversations and with attitudes ranging from empathetic to judgmental. People often question the state of one’s mental health in the context of egregious behaviors, violence and acts of criminality seen on the news. But they also reference it quite casually when discussing one’s ability to achieve success through a healthy work-life balance. In many cases, our perceived understanding of mental health often projects judgment on one’s personality or character traits, which — while not actually an attribute of one’s mental health — are certainly aspects that may shape one’s behavior. The fact is, nearly 1 out of every 4 people will experience diagnosable symptoms of a mental illness at some point in life, which makes mental illness about as common as seeing silver cars on the road.

Envisioning a spectrum So what is mental illness, really? The broadness of the topic may be best understood by placing it on a spectrum: On one far end, you have mental wellness, which is highlighted by resiliency, well-regulated emotions, healthy relationships and a thriving social life. On the other end, you have mental illness, which may include dysregulated emotions, detrimental social functioning and the need for treatments to function autonomously, or to function at all. It’s most important to acknowledge the vastness of the spectrum between those 16 / March 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Emotions and empathy Mental wellness may refer to one’s ability to thrive, adapt or grow, resulting in a state of overall success and wellbeing. Symptoms may qualify as an illness when the frequency, duration or severity of them impact a person’s ability to function regularly on a consistent basis. Everybody, at some point, will experience the symptoms of a mental illness, which — it’s worth noting — isn’t true of most physical health conditions. We will all feel sad, anxious and even question our own reality, at times. In most cases, however, these feelings won’t have the frequency, severity or duration to impact our ability to function in daily life and aren’t diagnostic in nature. However, by virtue of understanding those feelings, we may have a glimpse of what it may feel like to suffer from a major depressive disorder or social anxiety. In contrast, most of us will never feel the symptoms of other chronic physical health conditions such as diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma, unless we’re


actually diagnosed with such conditions. This means that — although mental illness may be difficult to talk about — we all have a better understanding of these categorical symptoms than of any other condition.

Open and honest While mental health needs can be complicated and diverse, there are well-trained and wonderful practitioners in the field. In many cases of physical illness, health-care providers can rely on certain lab tests, X-rays and scans to accurately and consistently diagnose medical conditions, and then follow evidence-based treatment protocols. Unfortunately, there are few reliable lab tests for helping determine a diagnosis of mental illness. Though physicians can measure certain hormone levels and neurochemicals — which can contribute to a diagnostician’s evaluation — it’s just not the same. We’ve made significant progress on decreasing the stigma that can make the topics surrounding mental illnesses uncomfortable to discuss. We should encourage individuals to be open and transparent about their understanding on the topic, and help educate the public on the full spectrum of mental health — illness to wellness.

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Todd Archbold is a licensed social worker and the chief operating officer at PrairieCare and PrairieCare Medical Group, including eight metro-area locations and more than 100 clinicians, offering mental health care for adults, adolescents and young children in the Twin Cities. Send your questions to tarchbold@prairie-care.com.

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Good Health / Caregiving / By Sam Patet

Need a breather? →→Consider overnight respite for a brief getaway from your caregiving duties

Life as a caregiver can be exhausting. You’re scheduling and driving to

appointments, helping with personal care, picking up medications, keeping on top of household chores and much more. It all adds up. According to the U.S. Office of Women’s Health, the high levels of stress caregivers experience can increase their risk for developing chronic health problems, such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes and arthritis. That’s why it’s so important for caregivers to schedule time for themselves, so they can rest and rejuvenate. Many times, all a caregiver needs is a morning or an afternoon off. But sometimes caregivers may require a longer period of time — an entire day or even a weekend — away. One such way to get a break from the demands of 24/7 caregiving is for your loved one to stay a night or two in a facility-based overnight respite program.

Choosing a program Many organizations offer overnight respite services, including adult daycare centers, adult foster-care homes, assisted living facilities and other care centers.

18 / March 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Call the Senior LinkAge Line at 800-333-2433 or see mnaging.org/ advisor/SLL for a list of programs in your area. Before you choose a program, be sure to visit the physical site and speak with staff members in person. If possible, bring the person you’re caring for along. If it doesn’t feel like a good fit for either of you, keep looking. Take your time and find a place that both of you feel comfortable with for overnight care. Trusting someone else to care for your loved one can be difficult, especially if you’ve never done it before. That’s why — for your first getaway — you might consider travelling to a location nearby for greater peace of mind. Then, if something does come up, you’ll be able to return fairly quickly. Fortunately, Minnesota is a beautiful state, full of gorgeous scenery, rich history, interesting attractions and fascinating communities.


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⊳ Lake Pepin in Lake City, Minnesota, offers a quaint getaway just 80 miles southeast of the Twin Cities.

Here are some special spots outside of the Twin Cities to consider: ⊲ New Ulm: This farming community is rich with German heritage. Listen to the chimes of the Glockenspiel clock tower, take a tour of Schell’s Brewery and visit a 32-foottall Hermann the German statue. ⊲ St. Cloud: There’s lots to do in Minnesota’s 10th-largest city. Enjoy a production put on by GREAT Theatre, check out the Stearns History Museum or, this summer, take some time to smell the roses (and other flowers) at Munsinger Clemens Gardens. ⊲ Lake City: Looking for a smaller town? This village of 5,000 features nearby attractions such as Pepin Heights apple orchard, bird watching at Frontenac State Park and boat tours on Lake Pepin and the Mississippi River. ⊲ Duluth: Stroll through Canal Park and along the Lakewalk and see the ships come in. Visit the Great Lakes Aquarium and grab a burger at Grandma’s Saloon & Grill. You could also take a trip to nearby Gooseberry Falls State Park and countless other destinations on Lake Superior’s stunning North Shore. ⊲ B&Bs: Not interested in sightseeing? Then you might consider finding a quaint bed-and-breakfast to visit in any number of small Minnesota towns. Spend your time eating, sleeping, reading and just

Trusting someone else to care for your loved one can be difficult, especially if you’ve never done it before. That’s why — for your first getaway — you might consider travelling to a location nearby for greater peace of mind.

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relaxing. You might even schedule a professional massage. Pamper yourself! Visit the Minnesota Bed & Breakfast Association at minnesotabedandbreakfasts.org for a list of options. Explore Minnesota is another top resource at exploreminnesota.com. No matter where you end up, plan a trip that will help you return to caregiving well rested. With a refreshed heart and spirit, you’ll be able to care for your loved one with greater joy and a renewed sense of purpose. Sam Patet is a writing specialist with Lyngblomsten, a Christian nonprofit organization that provides health care, housing and community resources to older adults in the Twin Cities. Lyngblomsten is a member of the Metropolitan Caregiver Service Collaborative. Learn more at lyngblomsten.org and caregivercollaborative.org.

Minnesota Good Age / March 2017 / 19


Good Living / Travel

M

s ’ t r a z o

Sal


lzburg Palaces, castles, lovely restaurants — and classical concerts galore — await visitors in this scenic, historic city BY CARLA WALDEMAR

Minnesota Good Age / March 2017 / 21


Mozart’s Salzburg

S

alzburg, Austria’s cozy Capital of Quaint, crouches in a river valley framed by lofty mountains. Those rocks, studded with a castle here, a monastery there, are amazing. But I came here to pay homage to the rock star who lived below them — Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. (The hills are alive, too, with the sound of music from his modern-day rival, Maria von Trapp, whose trail tour buses also follow.) On Mozartplatz, honoring the composer’s 260th birthday, hordes of tourists posed before his statue with their selfie sticks. It’s near Salzburg Cathedral (Dom zu Salzburg), fancifully refurbished in 1628, where Mozart’s parents were married, their baby boy was baptized and, not much later, played the organ. A short walk takes you to his birth house on Getreidegasse, where you can spy his infant violin, a lock of hair, his silken wallet and the most authentic portrait of all those bewigged lookalikes. Across the river, you’ll find the family’s later residence, housing the piano upon which the 5-yearold composed, along with employment contracts, manuscripts and Daddy Leopold’s vast book collection, which he used to tutor his talented kids. In the gift shop, Wolfgang’s portrait enhances every possible surface — golf balls, T-shirts, tissue packets and rubber duckies, to name just a few.

⊳ The large courtyard of Mozartplatz in Salzburg, Austria, includes the oft-photographed memorial statue of famed composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Photo by Botond Horvath / Shutterstock, Inc.


→→Plan your trip Learn more at austria.info or salsburg.info.

▲▲The gardens at Mirabell Palace in Salzburg feature geometrical forms typical of the Baroque style of the 1600s.

Music everywhere

You can hear his music all around this town of 145,000, including concerts at grand palaces such as Residenz and Mirabell as well as the oldest restaurant in town, the palace-like St. Peter Stiftskeller. Between courses served in candle-lit chambers, Stiftskeller employs musicians in velveteen waistcoats who back lusty singers performing operatic arias. Salzburg’s history museum, facing the composer’s statue, includes exhibits devoted to Mozart Mania, which didn’t erupt (poor kid) until decades after his pauper’s death. (Michael Haydn stole all the glory while Wolfgang was alive.) Around the corner, you’ll find a shop featuring authentic artisanal crafts — dirndl dresses, chocolates, ceramics and woodcarvings. It adjoins the DomQuartier, which interconnects a slew of ornate Baroque buildings — including 180 rooms framing three courtyards — once solely the domain of rulers, but now wandered by mere mortals. Minnesota Good Age / March 2017 / 23


Mozart’s Salzburg

In the ruler’s former Residenz palace, “the political heart of Salzburg,” Mozart made his court debut. A passage leads to the organ loft of the grand Dom, then the art gallery (lots of rosy Rubens); the Panorama Terrace, capturing the view from above the street; and treasures from St. Peter Monastery, the oldest in German-speaking lands.

Modern twists, eats

▲ Gift shops in Salzburg are filled with items — including chocolate confections — adorned with portraits of the city’s native son, Mozart. Photo by Steiner Wolfgang / Shutterstock, Inc. 24 / March 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

But Salzburg isn’t frozen in its pretty past. To tune into current thoughts, explore its pair of contemporary art museums — one in old town (Rupertinum) presenting visual art as social critique (think Hogarth, Goya), climaxing in walls covered with graffiti manifestos such as “Brexit, You Brex My Heart” and “Trump, Don’t Push the Button.” The second (Monchsberg) — perched on a mountaintop that visitors ascend via elevator — pays tribute to exiles such


⊳⊳ The Museum der Moderne atop Monchsberg mountain is home to M32, a restaurant that offers stunning views of Salzburg and Mediterranean-influenced Austrian cuisine.

as Arnold Schoenberg (a composer, music theorist and painter) and Oskar Kokoschka (a poet, playwright and expressionist painter), along with the story of the city’s notorious book burnings of 1938. That mountaintop is home, too, to the museum’s restaurant, M32, showcasing classic fare with modern touches — sweetbreads with mushrooms; a salad of duck liver, apples and bacon; and roast deer. Oh, and dessert! The city’s namesake threepeaked soufflé called Salzberger Nockerln is a must. Speaking of fine eats, a lunch at K&K, amid the town’s movers and shakers — especially on Lederhosen Thursdays (dirndl dresses, too; they’re no longer just for holidays) — pays homage to tradition, too, with venison carpaccio, rack of deer and, my choice, a classic composition of veal liver with potato-celery puree and apples. Cross the river to Zum fidelen Affen — the Merry Monkey — housed in a building from 1417, serving vast portions of food almost as venerable, including tafelspitz (boiled beef) with roast potatoes, plus goulash, schnitzel and a dessert made of apples and almonds baked with bits of pancake. For coffee — not just your hometown brew, but an almost-sacred art form — stop at Café Tomaselli of 1708, where Mozart enjoyed eine kleine brauner long before I.

The story behind the salz in Salzburg

Long before Mozart came the Romans. You can spot remains underneath the Panorama Museum, which flaunts a 360-degree painted view of the town, circa 1828, virtually unchanged today. (Yes, that’s Maria’s convent in the distance.) That picturesquebeyond-belief shopping street, Getreidegasse (once the Roman road), today is densely packed with 15th-century facades bearing iron signs depicting the trade each practiced — an apothecary, a goldsmith and (what’s that?) a McDonald’s. Called the Rome of the North, Salzburg was named for its claim to fame and riches, salz (salt, aka white gold). Archbishop Wolf Dieter used his salt-mining fortunes to transform the town from a muddled medieval backwater into an inviting Baroque landscape. In the 1600s, he bought, then tore down, blocks of houses to create the open, social plazas that link the town today. (He also built the ornate Mirabell Palace, now a concert site, to house his mistress and scads of kids.)

▲▲Mozart’s quaint birthplace — No. 9 Getreidegasse in the heart of Salzburg, Austria — is a huge draw for tourists. Photo by Tatiana Volgutova / Shutterstock, Inc.

When to visit? Any time!

In the square behind the cathedral, with a giant chessboard and a colossal golden orb topped by a life-size sculpted man, a narrow lane leads past an antique millwheel and the best (and oldest) bakery in town. Around the corner hides St. Peter’s Cemetery, a pocket of welltended gardens and ornate memorials. Then step into St. Peter’s itself, whose intimate Romanesque interior has been gilded with Rococo luster. You’re now close to the Festival Hall, Salzburg’s world-famous concert scene. And close to more good eats. The Festival’s glitterati head to Triangle to feast on regional fare such as the kitchen’s signature fish soup, lush with salmon and fennel in tomato broth, then wiener schnitzel with warm, sweet-sour potato salad. When to visit? Maybe during winter’s Christmas Market, or the Easter Market each spring. Or summer’s music festival. Or — oh, let’s face it — Salzburg is extra-special any time of the year. Carla Waldemar is an award-winning food/travel/arts writer. She edits the annual Zagat Survey of Twin Cities restaurants and writes food and travel articles for publications around the world. She lives in Uptown. Minnesota Good Age / March 2017 / 25


Good Living / Housing / By DeeDee Welles

LET GO AND LIGHTEN UP! → Discover a new-found freedom by purging household items — without regret or guilt

If you’re over 50, you’re likely past your accumulation phase of life and

no longer need the volume of stuff you once did. As our lives transition into a new phase, we usually require fewer things, because we’re not raising, housing, feeding and entertaining as many family, friends and business associates. When was the last time you hosted a dinner for 40? It’s time to let those ’70s-era chip-and-dip trays go. It’s time to shed some of the other stuff, too — kid’s art and schoolwork; photos; sets of china, kitchenware and gadgets; small appliances; sentimental items; unfinished craft projects; things you might need someday and much more. Whether you’re pondering moving into a smaller home, or not, reducing the number of your belongings will give you a feeling of freedom and lightness, as you transition to a different lifestyle. Now it’s time to decide what else is leaving your home along with those spacehogging chips and dips!

Set ground rules Before you begin clearing out items, it’s important to create some simple guidelines for yourself. Decluttering experts find it’s best to go through one room at a time, one item at a time. Once you touch an item, you should decide its destiny. This strategy has been made hugely popular recently thanks to Marie Kondo’s bestselling book — The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing. However, if you just can’t make a decision in the moment, you can place it in a “sell” or “donate” pile for 24 hours. If you haven’t thought about it during that time, then get rid of it. Focusing on one room or area at a time permits you from allowing yourself to drift to another room to avoid making decisions. 26 / March 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

Should I keep great-grandmother’s soup tureen? I can’t decide. I think I’ll work on the basement! Also keep in mind that the two biggest stumbling blocks to letting go of belongings are emotional attachment and the hope of recouping money spent. Here’s how to tackle those factors:

Emotional attachment Try to stay in the present when making decisions about what to keep and what to shed. Separate the emotion from the item as best you can. Belongings with sentimental value are hard to part with: When you look at them, you relive their stories. There's the sweater you wore on a special evening with someone you loved; the bathing suit you wore on a memorable island vacation (but haven’t worn


Stay in the home you love! since); your children’s artwork from various stages. Gifts and inheritances from relatives and friends are hard to let go of, too. If you’ve never really liked your grandmother’s porcelain figurine of Empress Josephine, it’s time to let it go. She wouldn’t want you to hang on to something you don’t love just because it’s associated with warm memories of her. Take a photo of it, and let it move on to someone who will likely enjoy it more than you. The key to parting with something is to concentrate on how it serves you now. Does it bring you joy or drag you down with guilt and clutter? Is it even in a place where you can appreciate it? Or is it stored in a box?

Recouping money Focusing on what something once cost can unnecessarily put the brakes on the decluttering process. It’s always challenging to give away something you bought, especially if you rarely or never used it. Donating a perfectly good set of dinner plates you no longer need is hard. Often the idea of selling something takes the sting out of letting go. However, selling things takes lots of time, and the payoff is often far less than expected. It’s hard, time-consuming work, not to be taken lightly. Garage sales require days or weeks of work. Selling items online necessitates photographing items, writing descriptions, researching value (to determine a reasonable price) and answering queries. All are labor intensive. Even if you take

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Decluttering experts find it’s best to go through one room at a time, one item at a time. Once you touch an item, you should decide its destiny.

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Change your water, change your life. the stuff to a consignment store, it involves packing and transporting and, sometimes, returning to pick up unsold items. Selling online and consigning can become a hobby in its own right. Is that a hobby you’d choose willingly? Just the thought of the decisions and effort involved in doing any of these things stops many people from decluttering. If you have the time and the will to host a garage sale or sell items locally or online, then, by all means, have at it. However, give yourself a deadline. If your sales plan doesn’t come to fruition in the allotted time, give the items away or donate them and take the tax deduction. You will breathe a sigh of relief when they’re gone. When you finish decluttering, your home will be in alignment with the way you want to live now — light and free!

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Minnesota Good Age / March 2017 / 27


Good Living / Finance / By Mike Kojonen

THE RETIREMENT SHIFT → Disappearing employer and government plans have left retirees to fend for themselves

In 1985, a ticket to the movies cost $2.75. The average price of a gallon of gas

was $1.09. And a loaf of bread cost 55 cents. A lot’s changed since 1985. And it’s not just prices that have gone up: Retirement planning has seen a major shift in the past 30 years. There are several factors that have significantly changed the way Americans are preparing for their golden years:

Less Social Security Retirees these days can’t count on Social Security and pension plans like they could 30 years ago. In 1985, Social Security made up nearly two-thirds of a retiree’s income. Today, that number is closer to a quarter of his or her income, according to a report by MarketWatch. In addition, pension plans are disappearing, with only 19 percent of companies even offering them. That’s why it’s so important for workers to take control of their retirement savings by investing in a retirement plan like a 401(k), IRA or Roth IRA. I recommend my clients save 10 to 15 percent of their salary in their retirement accounts.

Living longer In 1985, men were expected to live 14 years after retiring, while women were expected to live 19. Today, men are expected to live 26 years in retirement and women 29 years. That’s an extra decade or more that retirees need to prepare for financially. Those extra years can really add up: The average retired household spends more than $40,000 a year, according to U.S. News and World Report. A good rule of thumb is to plan as if you’re going to live to be 100.

Retiring solo With marriage rates steadily declining over the past 30 years, many people are retiring

28 / March 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

single. It’s an additional challenge, because married couples are eligible for certain benefits that singles are not. For instance, surviving spouses can get up to 100 percent of their partner’s Social Security payments. I recommend singles save as much as 20 percent more than they would if they were married. This is especially important for single women, because women generally earn less and live longer. Married couples also have someone to lean on during a financial crisis. As a single, think about creating a financial team. A trusted attorney and financial professional are both important players to have on your side.

Rising debt Whether it’s in the form of mortgages, auto loans, student debt or credit card debt, debt is plaguing retirees at a much higher rate than in past years. One of the best ways to wipe out debt is by setting a budget and sticking to it. Remember, if you’re living outside your means, you may not be able to afford the lifestyle you want come retirement time.

Cost of care Health care costs in retirement continue to rise. Fidelity Investments estimates that a 65-year-old couple will pay $260,000 for health


In 1985, men were expected to live 14 years after retiring, while women were expected to live 19. Today, men are expected to live 26 years in retirement and women 29 years. care during retirement. Instead of employers picking up much of the tab like they did 30 years ago, most retirees are responsible for their own health care. Although you can’t see into the future, you can take a look at your family history to give you an indication of what kind of care you’ll need. Use that as a guide when determining what kind of coverage you want. Over the past three decades, the responsibility of planning, preparing and saving for retirement has shifted. Instead of relying on employers and the government, individuals are increasingly taking on that obligation. Bottom line: You’re in the driver’s seat for your own financial future. Mike Kojonen is a licensed insurance professional and the owner of Principal Preservation Services, a full-service financial planning firm with offices in Woodbury, Minn., and Hudson, Wis. Learn more at preserveyourdollars.com.

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Good Living / In the Kitchen / By Sarah Jackson / Photo by Sarah Karnas

Smart cookie Virtually everyone loves a warm chocolate chip cookie. But hauling out the electric mixer, cleaning messy bowls and dealing with baking sheet after baking sheet of cookies? That’s a lot of fussing. Hence this miracle — a chocolate chip cookie mixed in a mug and cooked in the microwave.

FIVE-MINUTE CHOCOLATE CHIP MUG COOKIE 1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon white sugar 1 tablespoon packed brown sugar Pinch salt 1 egg yolk ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1 to 2 tablespoons chocolate chips Vanilla ice cream (optional, but almost essential)

30 / March 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


RECIPE INSTRUCTIONS ⊲ Melt the butter in a mug in the microwave for about 30 seconds. ⊲ Add the sugars and salt and stir with a fork. ⊲ Stir in the egg yolk and vanilla. ⊲ Add the flour and stir. ⊲ Stir in the chocolate chips. ⊲ Microwave the mug for 45 seconds. Your cookie top should appear almost wet and sheeny. You’ll think it’s not done, but it is. ⊲ Add a scoop of ice cream and consume immediately.

Source: This recipe was adapted from Mike Adamick’s Dad’s Book of Awesome Recipes.


D

espite mounting evidence to the contrary, there are still gentlemen in this world — men who dress conservatively, speak softly and are impeccably courteous and well mannered. Well, there are two of them, anyway, and they can be found in St. Louis Park, at Navab Brothers Oriental Rug Company. On a recent chilly winter morning, brothers Sam, 63, and Farzan, 60 (who goes by “Far”), settled into chairs in the showroom of their 29-year-old enterprise. They sat surrounded by stacks of gorgeous, colorful rugs, gathered on buying trips to exotic cities like Istanbul, Jaipur, Lahore and Kathmandu. During a wide-ranging interview that touched on environmentalism, globalization and even tribal rug patterns, the soft-spoken, globetrotting brothers shared a story of revolution, dislocation, perseverance and eventual commercial and artistic success. In the early morning stillness of their showroom, they demonstrated an old-world sensibility about art, culture and fine decor, but also evidenced wisdom about how to succeed in a business that might seem to have been made obsolete by polyester wall-to-wall carpeting, but which has persisted, and even thrived.

Coming to America Indeed, the brothers have become astute at acquiring and selling handmade, traditional products in a machine-made age, dominated by discount stores — online and throughout the Twin Cities. In Iran, where the brothers grew up, handmade rugs have always been a valuable commodity.

⊳⊳ Sam and Farzan Navab, owners of Navab Brothers Oriental Rug Company, started their enterprise in 1988. Photo by Tracy Walsh Minnesota Good Age / March 2017 / 33


Traveling the world “When you get married, part of your dowry is rugs, and they are passed on to you through inheritance,” Sam said. “They’re a hedge against inflation, like a savings account under your feet.” While the two brothers grew up in a home in which all the rooms were covered with rugs, they never paid attention to how they were made, the intricacy of the craftsmanship or the meaning of specific colors or designs. Oriental rugs, in fact, weren’t at all part of their life plans. Sam was interested in hotel and restaurant management, a profession he studied at the University of Wisconsin, Stout. Sam first studied political science in the U.K., followed by more studies in New Delhi, India. In 1977, he came to the U.S., following his brother, who arrived in 1976. Far had planned to study art in Chicago and New York City. But a friend in Chicago, who had gone to Macalester College, insisted he’d love Minnesota. So Far ended up graduating with a bachelor’s in filmmaking from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design.

‘Rugs are in your blood’ Then came the Islamic Revolution of 1979. The Navab brothers’ father, Esmail Navab Safa, one of Iran’s most renowned poets and lyricists, lost his government position and his work was

banned by the new regime, led by the religious and political leader who became known as Ayatollah Khomeini. Sam and Far, who were both in the U.S. at the time, had planned to eventually return home. But they suddenly found themselves refugees. Their father feared they would be persecuted if they came home, just as he was. “Our dad told us: ‘Don’t come back,’” Sam said. “We had no country to return to, and no money.” It was time to earn a living. Sam took a job as a busboy at Nicollet Island Inn and, within six months, had been promoted to a managerial position. As he moved up and around some of the most popular restaurants in the Twin Cities, he was approached by a customer, a fellow Iranian, who asked him to join his team at a new Oriental rug business in International Market Square. “But I don’t know anything about rugs,” Sam protested. “You’re Iranian,” the customer replied, “they’re in your blood.” After accepting the job and working on that team for four years, Sam realized the truth of this statement, and asked Far, who had been working at the Minneapolis Institute of Art, to join him in creating their own enterprise. They spent many years running their business at 50th and

→ Navab Brothers Oriental Rug Company 4409 Excelsior Blvd. St Louis Park 952-920-9597 navabbrothers.com

The Navab brothers sell traditional, contemporary, tribal and even antique rugs, made of wool or silk and woven by hand in rug-producing countries such as Nepal, India, Pakistan, Turkey and their native country, Iran. Photo by Tracy Walsh 34 / March 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


We worked hard, and we were penniless at times, but we persevered. As most immigrants do, we wanted to make a better life for ourselves and our families. — Sam Navab

▲▲Rug-procurement trips for the Navab brothers sometimes include side trips. On one occasion, Farzan and his wife, Azadeh (left), and Sam and his wife, Ramesh, visited the Taj Mahal in Agra, India.

Bryant in southwest Minneapolis. For years, the business was what the brothers describe as “a two-man show,” with Sam cleaning rugs and Far repairing them. Gradually, they began to include rug sales in their business. Along the way, they acquired American Rug Laundry, and opened a custom rug business, Legacy Looms, which caters to the design community and is based in International Market Square. In 2001, the brothers set up their current flagship store on Excelsior Boulevard, which has become something of design district in St. Louis Park with a variety of shops specializing in home interiors. Rugs sales now account for about half the brothers’ business with other services making up the rest. They employ a team of 16 people to keep all their operations running.

The American Dream, realized Today, the two brothers live on opposite sides of Lake Harriet in Minneapolis, Sam in Tangletown and Far in Linden Hills. Sam and his wife, Ramesh, married for 21 years, have two grown daughters, one at DePaul University in Chicago and one at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Far and his wife, Azadeh, married for 33 years, have an adult daughter living in New York and a son who’s a junior at St. Olaf College in Northfield. Along with all their many other travels, the brothers travel back

to Iran frequently. But they feel most at home in Minnesota. “I’ve lived most of my life here, so this is more my home than anywhere I travel,” Far said. “We have built our lives around the community here.” Sam added: “We were refugees, but we’ve both been U.S. citizens for decades now. We worked hard, and we were penniless at times, but we persevered. As most immigrants do, we wanted to make a better life for ourselves and our families. Luckily, we were able to start our new lives in the United States, where we had so many opportunities. We’ve realized the American Dream.” None of the Navab children, so far, have shown a desire to join the in running of the family business. “It’s not of interest to them right now,” Far said. “We try to make it exciting by talking about how it’s an international business, mentioning all the countries we visit. But we try not to push.”

The appeal of handmade products All these many years later, the brothers are ready to admit that rugs are in their blood, and their appreciation for handmade oriental rugs has only grown over time, as have their connections to rug-producing countries. “I think Americans are beginning to see the value of having a handmade natural product — versus a machine-made synthetic,” Far said. The brothers, of course, acknowledge that “handmade” is not Minnesota Good Age / March 2017 / 35


Traveling the world in New York or the Victoria and Albert in London: You’ll see rugs from the 16th century, still hanging beautifully.” All of the Navab brothers’ rugs are made from wool, silk or a combination of the two. “They reflect our personal taste that, in turn, reflects our clients’ preference for design and color,” Far said. In addition to new rugs, the Navab brothers also sell antique rugs, which are at least 60 years old. “Antique rugs tell us the story of how designs and patterns have evolved over time. They also have a different texture and patina,” Far said. “All rugs that are made today, even the ones with very contemporary patterns, take their inspiration from older rugs, from colors drawn from vegetal dyes, or from handspun wool, which give rugs a totally different feel and texture.”

Building on trust

▲ Farzan Navab visits with a group of shoeshine boys in Aksaray, Turkey.

synonymous with “inexpensive.” Their rug prices start at a couple hundred dollars and go up to $50,000 for very large coverings. Though an 8-foot-by-10-foot rug can be made in two to three hours by a machine in Europe, a handmade Persian-style rug can take six to eight months to create and can involve as many as 40 people, all the way down to the sheep shearers, who produce the raw wool, Far said. “Our customer base is made up of people who appreciate the value of handmade objects,” Far said. “They tend to be people who have an appreciation for finer products, and who, through their families’ travels or academic education, have acquired a taste for well-made things.” Local customers, who come from throughout the metro area, seem to value the idea of supporting artisans from all over the world, Far said. “The American consumer has huge amount of power in shaping the kind of world we live in,” Far said. “Handmade rug making is the ultimate green process, and these rugs are used over and over. Look at museums like the Metropolitan Museum 36 / March 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

David Heide and Michael Crull, of the David Heide Design Studio of Minneapolis, have worked with Navab brothers for many years, mostly with Far. “The remarkable thing about Far is that not only is he incredibly knowledgeable about our business and his business, but he’s one of those people who shares his knowledge and information freely,” Heide said. “He’s been incredibly generous in educating Michael and me about rugs, so we can serve our clients better.” Michal Crosby, another local interior designer, met Sam more than 30 years ago and has worked with both brothers over the years. “The rug business can be misleading, but I trust them when they tell me what a rug is worth,” Crosby said. “They are so diligent in helping me find what I need, and they do a beautiful job buying.” Independent interior designer Jeanne Blankush said the brothers are known for their ethical business principles. They were the first merchants to tell her about Rugmark, a labeling program that highlights products made without the use of child labor. “They have a reputation for being an honest, stable company,” Blankush said. “And not only are they nice guys, they’re interesting people. I’ve always enjoyed hearing about their buying trips and their relationships with suppliers.”

Still trotting the globe The Navab brothers travel extensively to the rug-producing countries of the world at least once a year, sometimes twice.


▲▲The Navab brothers’ rugs — shown here in their St. Louis Park showroom — start at a couple hundred dollars each, but can cost up to $50,000. Photo by Tracy Walsh

That includes Nepal, India, Pakistan, Iran and Turkey. “We just got back from India and Pakistan,” Sam said. “And Far is leaving soon for a big show in Germany.” While some businesspeople make it a point to get their work done quickly and then leave, the brothers take time to mingle with the local people, see famous monuments and soak up a bit of local culture in each city they visit. “We love to eat local cuisine and enjoy what the city or village has to offer,” Sam said.

When asked for recommendations on places to visit, Sam professed his fondness for Italy, but then added: “Istanbul, or really anyplace in Turkey, is great.” Far said a trip to Katmandu is guaranteed to be an extremely rewarding experience. And both brothers touted the wonders of India’s Golden Triangle — Delhi, Agra and Jaipur. “We look forward to traveling,” Far said. “It can sometimes be tiresome, but when the work is peppered with enjoyment, it’s a lot more rewarding.” Julie Kendrick is a contributing writer for many local publications. She lives in Minneapolis and blogs at kendrickworks.blogspot.com. Minnesota Good Age / March 2017 / 37


March Can’t-Miss Calendar

Orchids!

→ Break out of winter’s doldrums by attending a flower show, featuring more than 500 fragrant orchids, including two towers of orchids in stunning mass arrangements. Visitors can receive care tips on orchids and Master Gardeners will be available on the weekend to answer questions on how to keep orchids healthy. When: Through March 12 Where: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Chaska Cost: Free with gate admission, which is $12 for ages 13 and older Info: arboretum.umn.edu

ONGOING

March 3–Oct. 28

Talking Threads

Grease

→ This exhibition features the art of Truly Unruly, a collective of fiber artists whose work incorporates traditional and modern quilting stitchery with unique fabric treatments such as fiber dying, mono-printing, screen printing, painting and improvisational piecing and stitching.

→ This hugely popular Broadway-style production, also featuring tunes made popular by the 1978 film, is back for the first time in more than a decade. The show, first staged at Chanhassen Dinner Theatres in 2006, became the venue’s best-selling show of all time and it has remained so since.

When: Through March 26 Where: Landmark Center, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: landmarkcenter.org

March 3–May 20

The Savannah Sipping Society → From the writers behind episodes of Dixie Swim Club and Golden Girls, comes a new comedy that follows four Southern women, drawn together by fate — and weekly happy hours — and into a mission to renew their lost enthusiasm for life. When: March 3–May 20 Where: Old Log Theatre, Excelsior Cost: $25–$35 Info: oldlog.com

38 / March 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

When: March 3–Oct. 28 Where: Chanhassen Dinner Theatres, Chanhassen Cost: $65–$89 Info: chanhassendt.com

March 5

Music Under Glass → This final music series installment will put the spotlight on Jelloslave, a new quartet, featuring two cellos, tablas and


Can’t-Miss Calendar forces to defend the Queen against the most dangerous man in all of Europe. When: March 24–April 16 Where: Theatre in the Round, Minneapolis Cost: $22 with senior discounts on Fridays and Sundays ($18) Info: theatreintheround.org.

March 25–April 30

Farm Babies

George Thorogood

→ An American rock icon and his band, The Destroyers, will play hits such as Who Do You Love, I Drink Alone, Move It On Over and his ultimate rock anthem, Bad to The Bone. When: 7 p.m. March 26 Where: State Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: Tickets start at $54.50. Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

drums. Beer, wine, soda and light snacks will be available for purchase. When: 4:30–6:30 p.m. March 5. Where: Como Park Zoo & Conservatory, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: comozooconservatory.org

March 5–May 7

Bob DeFlores’ Classic Film Series

→ Take the grandkids to meet animal babies of all kinds — chicks, piglets, lambs, calves, goat kids and bunnies — at the Wells Fargo Family Farm at the zoo. When: March 25–April 30 Where: Minnesota Zoo, Apple Valley Cost: Free with zoo admission of $12 for ages 3–12 and 65 and older, $18 for ages 13–64 Info: mnzoo.org

COMING UP

WW1 America → Experience the extraordinary stories of Americans (both the legendary and the unsung) during this turbulent time. After its opening run, the exhibit — including original artifacts, images, voices, music, hands-on exploration and multimedia presentations — will begin a three-year tour to premier historical museums around the country. 

Classical Connections

When: Opening April 8, on the 100th anniversary of America’s entry into the first world war, showing through Sept. 4 Where: Minnesota History Center, St. Paul Cost: Included with regular admission of $12 for adults, $10 for ages 65 and older and college students, $6 for ages 5 to 17; and free age 4 and younger; admission is free on Tuesdays from 3 to 8 p.m. Info: mnhs.org

→ Enjoy an all-ages evening of approachable works performed by Twin Cities Ballet dancers, drawing connections to classical music, literature, Americana and iconic ballets.

→ More online!

→ See rare film compilations and hear stories of their origin from a renowned local film historian and archivist. When: Remaining events, held in the afternoon, include The Great Tap Dancers (1929–1970s) on March 5, Vaudeville of Yesteryear (1922–1950s) on April 2 and The Big Bands (1923-1950s) on May 7. Where: Chanhassen Dinner Theatres, Chanhassen Cost: $12 per show. Dinner, offered after the film, can be added for an additional $15. Info: chanhassendt.com

March 10–11

When: 7:30 p.m. March 10–11 Where: The Cowles Center, Minneapolis, Cost: $25–$35 Info: twincitiesballet.org or bit.ly/ClassicalConnections

March 24–April 16

The Three Musketeers → In 1625, d’Artagnan sets off for Paris accompanied by his sister, Sabine, posing as his young male servant. They encounter the famous musketeers — and join

Find more events on the new Minnesota Good Age website at mngoodage.com/cant-misscalendar. Send your events at least six weeks in advance (with photos) to calendar@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / March 2017 / 39


Brain teasers Sudoku

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TRIVIA

Answers 40 / March 2017 / Minnesota Good Age


Thank You

Trivia TRAVEL 1. According to Travel + Leisure, what country is the top travel destination for 2017?

For Helping Us Achieve These Awards

2. An estimated 8 percent of households ages 65 and older spend what percentage of their income on travel? 3. What is the top travel destination in Minnesota? Sources: planetware.com, travelandleisure.com, fool.com

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CROSSWORD

Answers

The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.

CRYTPOGRAM


Crossword

ACROSS 1 Seaweed wrap resorts 5 Peaceful 9 Dozed 14 Small chess piece 15 Baseball’s Moises 16 Flooring specialist 17 Filled light pastry 19 Like good gossip 20 Expand, as a collection 21 San __, California 23 Comic Margaret 25 Gronk’s position on football’s Patriots 30 Spiro ran with him 34 Baby’s bodysuit 35 Comm. system with hand motions 36 Slowly withdraws 39 Tablet downloads 42 / March 2017 / Minnesota Good Age

40 Magician’s hand movement 44 RPM gauge 45 Unifying idea 46 Pierced body part 47 Moral values 50 Mob witness’ request 52 Like some pizzas and apple pies 55 Purported UFO fliers 56 Bond portrayer Daniel 58 “__ directed”: medication warning 62 Magna __ 66 Medical adhesive strip ... and a hint to what can precede the first word of 17-, 25-, 40- and 52-Across 68 Graceland idol 69 Military medal earner 70 Ivy League school 71 Hosiery thread 72 Hullabaloos 73 Upright wall timber

DOWN 1 Pet lovers’ org. 2 Western chum 3 Left dumbstruck 4 Grab quickly 5 Bottle topper 6 University supporter, briefly 7 Lite, dietwise 8 Civilian attire 9 Virgin Islands isl. 10 Lucy of “Elementary” 11 70-Across collegian 12 Ab neighbor 13 Give it a whirl 18 Mostly shaved-head style 22 Bigheadedness 24 Double Delight cookie 26 Hazmat suit problem 27 Glimpses 28 Tries to bite, puppy-style 29 “__ Rides Again”: 1939 Western 30 Shot the rapids, say 31 Arrives after the bell 32 Overused expression 33 Bonkers 37 To the __ degree 38 Mets’ old stadium 41 Greenside golf shot 42 Plus-size supermodel 43 Ascended 48 Jewel box 49 Title for Connery 51 Emerson works 53 Recent White House daughter 54 Walked in the woods 57 Early whirlybird, for short 59 Coup d’__ 60 Bill of Rights-defending org. 61 Lawn mower holder 62 Animation still 63 “Aladdin” prince 64 Homes on wheels: Abbr. 65 Shop __ you drop 67 Discouraging words


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