Page 1

FEBRUARY 2018

WOODBURY’S NEWEST SENIOR APARTMENTS PAGE 20

A BOOK CLUB THAT’S LASTED 50 YEARS PAGE 8

SUN, SAND, SEA IN N.C. PAGE 16

IRA MYTHS PAGE 22

a local gem PAGE 24

ROBYNE ROBINSON


Cremation Society of Minnesota

ABOUT CREMATION Q. How does the Cremation Society of Minnesota work? A. The Cremation Society is notified immediately

at the time of death. The member’s body is taken to the Society’s crematory. It is held until proper medical authorization and a cremation permit is secured. It is then cremated.

Q. What happens to the ashes after cremation? A. The member’s remains are handled according to their written instructions. They may be picked up by survivors or delivered for a fee.

Q. What is the cost for cremation? A. “Our current cost for our basic direct cremation

service is $1,795.00.” It includes removal of the body from the place of death, cremation, filing of necessary papers, and a cardboard container suitable for burial. The charge for non-members, who we also serve, is more.

Q. How do I become a member? A. Fill out the registration form and mail it to our

near-est location. Enclose a one-time membership fee of $15.00 per person. The fee covers setting up and maintaining records. It is not refundable nor an offset to final service costs. We will register you and send you a wallet-sized membership card, and a certificate of registration.

Q. What are the benefits of prepaying for services? A. Prepayment provides two benefits – it removes a

stress from survivors and guarantees that services will be performed at today’s cost.

Q. Where can I learn more? A. You may call or visit any one of our locations, or

visit us at cremationsocietyofmn.com or email us at info@csmcremation.com.

REGISTRATION FORM

Name Address Telephone (

)

INFORMATION REQUIRED ON THE DEATH CERTIFICATE Date of Birth

(will remain confidential)

Place of Birth

Sex ❏ M ❏ F

Race

Hispanic ❏ Yes ❏ No

Father’s Name

Social Security #

Mother’s Name

Marital Status ❏ Married ❏ Never Married ❏ Widowed ❏ Divorced If married, spouse’s full legal name, including maiden Are you a Veteran? ❏ Yes ❏ No

If Yes, enclose a copy of your discharge paper.

AUTHORIZATION FOR CREMATION I, the undersigned, authorize and request the Cremation Society of Minnesota or its assigns to cremate the remains of , and further authorize and request that the following disposition of the cremated remains be made: . I will indemnify and hold harmless the Cremation Society of Minnesota and the crematory from any claims to the contrary including all liability and claims related to the shipment and storage of the cremated remains. Signature

Date

Witness Signature

Date

Address Telephone (

)

Email address

NEXT OF KIN – Please list at least one. Name

Relationship

Address Telephone (

)

PAYMENT PLAN – You are not a member until this form is on file and your registration fee is received. “Our current cost for our basic direct cremation service is $1,795.00.” ❏ I wish to preregister with the Cremation Society of Minnesota

Registration Fee:

❏ I wish to prepay for my Basic Cremation, I understand my pre-payment will be placed in an insurance policy to be used at time of death ❏ I wish to register at this time but not prepay

$15.00 $

Total Paid: $ GA 02/18

PLEASE MAIL FORM TO THE NEAREST CHAPEL LISTED BELOW

Complete Cremation Services PROFESSIONAL · DIGNIFIED · ECONOMICAL

CremationSocietyOfMN.com


Contents

16

BEACHY WITH A TWIST North Carolina's Outer Banks are known for their sun, sand and surf, but they're also home to historic lighthouses, shipwrecks and even wild horses.

FEBRUARY GOOD START FROM THE EDITOR

6 When you've had more than a few years on earth, you have to constantly evolve.

MY TURN

8 Members of this all-female book club have read 400 books over the years.

MEMORIES

10 I know our language has to change, but why does it have to change so much?

MINNESOTA HISTORY

12 Minnesota athletes made their mark during the 1968 winter Olympics.

⊳⊳ The picturesque Roanoke Marshes lighthouse sits on Roanoke Sound in the Outer Banks town of Manteo, N.C.

24

ON THE COVER The art of reinvention: Robyne Robinson might be best known for her two decades as a broadcast journalist for Fox 9, but she has since struck out on her own to create an exciting new career in the world of art.

GOOD HEALTH CAREGIVING

14 You may qualify for public assistance, depending on your income and assets.

GOOD LIVING HOUSING

20 A new senior campus in Woodbury offers a continuum of care for residents.

FINANCE

22 Most folks don't know how useful IRAs can be for retirement savings.

Photos by Tracy Walsh Dress by Alice Riot Necklaces by Robyne Robinson Paintings in background by Drew Peterson

4 / February 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

30 BRAIN 32 TEASERS

CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR


FROM THE EDITOR Volume 37 / Issue 2 PUBLISHER

Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER

Terry Gahan tgahan@mngoodage.com

GENERAL MANAGER

Zoe Gahan zgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR

Sarah Jackson editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Victor Block, Ed Dykhuizen, Carol Hall, Larry Kallevig, Dave Nimmer, Lauren Peck, Sheila Regan, David Sherman, Tracy Walsh

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Micah Edel

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Kaitlin Ungs

DESIGN INTERN Victoria Hein

CLIENT SERVICES

Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION

Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2018 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $18 per year.

6 / February 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

The art of evolving BY SARAH JACKSON

W

ell, look at that! It’s Robyne Robinson, who many of you may remember from her broadcast career at Minnesota 9, or FOX 9, as it’s now known. Yes, she’s still as smart, creative and glamorous as she was eight years ago, when she left her TV career. But what you might not necessarily know is that Robinson’s role as anchor and producer was only the beginning of her incredible career. Indeed, since her departure from FOX, Robinson’s taken on numerous other roles in the Twin Cities, including a post as director of the MSP Arts and Culture Program with the MSP International Photo by Tracy Walsh tracywalshphoto.com Airport Foundation. Robinson, for the past four years, has been one of the people bringing in the gorgeous installations you may have seen in the airport’s two terminals. (I, for one, have been absolutely awed by the mosaics in the restrooms, of all places! As someone who dreads airports, I’m increasingly enjoying flying out of our ever-changing MSP.) What qualified Robinson for such a job? Well, for starters, Robinson is an international artist herself, thanks to her Rox Minneapolis Jewelry line, once sold around the world and still sold locally today. (In fact, she made the stunning necklaces she’s wearing in this very issue.) But before she even left her TV job, Robinson had been busy cultivating other avenues, including her own PR agency (serving Prince, Outkast and other big names) and her own art space (the former flatland gallery) — plus board and volunteer positions with many local arts organizations. And now, as of 2018, she’s taking on a new position as a part-time arts consultant with Minneapolis-based Alliiance Architects. (Yes, those two Is are intentional.) Kind of amazing, don’t you think? Robinson says she wouldn’t have it any other way: “As you get older, you really have to think about: ‘What’s the next step for me?’ You’re constantly reinventing yourself.” Even as a kid, Robinson enjoyed art. It was just a matter of picking up that interest where she’d left off. It makes me think: Couldn’t we all explore our other interests, our other dimensions, whether it’s in the name of a second-act career or as part of taking on a life-changing, enriching hobby? Check out the full interview with Robinson and see what you think. You never know what you might find!


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MY TURN

A book club with a gourmet twist I BY DAVE NIMMER

felt honored recently to attend the 50th-anniversary celebration of The Gourmet Book Club at the home of Joan Moffatt, one of its original members, in Minneapolis. It all began with a well-deserved champagne toast to five decades of reading 400 books, celebrating birthdays and anniversaries, mourning deaths and losses and honoring lifelong friendships. The group, now 14 members, meets monthly. Members range in age from their 50s to 90. They come from all over the Twin Cities — from Hopkins to St. Paul, Inver Grove Heights to St. Louis Park. Over the years, the format has remained the same: They gather at the home of one of the members, chat for a bit, eat a delicious desert (hence the name The Gourmet Book Club) and then begin discussion of the book of the month. The leader for the evening gives some background about the author and then steers the discussion with questions about the book’s plot, its characters, strengths

8 / February 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

and weaknesses. The book banter is usually enlightening and entertaining. “Amazingly, almost everyone reads the books,” Moffatt said. “And each of us has strong opinions and willingly shares them. The discussions are not dull. And one of the reasons is that we read books we probably would not have otherwise read.”

Taking leadership roles Seeing that the discussions stay lively is partly up to the evening’s leader, a role the women take seriously. Bea Kleiner said when she’s the leader, she reads the book three times. “I always feel a little pressure,” she said. “I want to be prepared and keep the discussion on point.” I’ll admit I felt a little pressure at their celebration, being a literary piker compared to the group and the only man in the room — the way it’s been for 50 years. It’s not that they actively exclude men; it’s just that the group was formed around the needs of women.

During the earlier days, many of the members had recently left the work force to become stay-at-home moms, Moffatt said. “Our concern was our minds would turn to mush being at home all day,” Moffatt said. “And we wanted to have the mental stimulation of reading and discussing good books.” They often brought their children, who played or slept as they discussed the book of the month. Those books of the month have included novels, biographies, plays and works by local fiction writers. The women’s first book was The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand; they’ve read biographies of FDR, Teddy Roosevelt, Harry Truman and Katharine Graham. One book they all remember fondly is Giants of the Earth by Ole Edvart Rolvaag, a novel that follows a Norwegian immigrant’s struggles with the country and climate of the Dakota Territory.


Friendships old and new While the books have been memorable, the club’s friendships are enduring. Corrine Durkin, who moved back to the Twin Cities a few years ago from Rhinelander, Wis., believes club members handle different opinions with grace. “We are civil,” she said, “And I believe we really love each other.” That’s demonstrated by one Carol Huttner, a retired nursing supervisor and the newest member of the club, who picks up Faye Miller of Inver Grove Heights, who is 90 years old and one of the original members of The Gourmet Book Club. She was no longer able to drive and couldn’t get to meetings. “It’s good to be back with my old friends,” Miller said, “and with my new friend.” Book clubs like this one play a valuable role among older adults because of their powerful impact on members’ overall well-being. The Hennepin County library system, in fact, is launching book clubs for seniors in retirement communities, senior centers and libraries — with nine established to far, according to a December 2017 story in the Star Tribune. (Learn more by calling 612-543-5669 or go to tinyurl.com/book-club-seniors.) After spending a couple of hours with The Gourmet Book Club, I think I’d feel comfortable at one of their regular monthly meetings. But I’d want to make sure I wasn’t making dessert — and I’d be darn sure that I’d read the book. Dave Nimmer has had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@mngoodage.com.

Minnesota Good Age / February 2018 / 9


MEMORIES

Come on, you guys BY CAROL HALL

“W

ould you guys like to start with a beverage?” queried our server in the upscale restaurant where a friend and I were ordering dinner. When did “you guys” replace the plural “you” in our culture? It must be an age thing, but I dislike the expression and can’t get used to it, even though I hear it all the time, uttered by people of every age, economic status and educational background. Indeed, TV’s Madame Secretary actor Téa Leoni, portraying the U. S. Secretary of State, often refers to foreign power brokers as “you guys.” Oh, well. Whatever. Now there’s a word (that became a sentence) that also unsettles me. And another: “Product.” My hair stylist always asks, “Do you need ‘product’ (hair spray, mousse or pomade) today?” at the end of our session. Not a product, as seems correct, just “product.”

Leaning in Is it just me? Are there others out there who find our overly slangy language annoying? Some of it pertains only to the much younger generation. “Hi,” among high schoolers is “Hey.” “Of course” comes out as “totally.” I’m told that most of these expressions can be traced back to the Valley Girl vernacular from that popular 1980s film, along with “like,” as in, “Justin Bieber is, like, cool, and, like, like, gorgeous.” 10 / February 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

Now, I admit I do like — in the old-fashioned sense — a couple of contemporary phrases. One, which means “to show keen interest” or “to assert oneself,” is “lean in.” That has merit for its brevity. The other is “work it.” I strongly believe if you have a skill of any kind that could enrich your life, you should “work it.” Make the most of it. Parlay a talent for sketching, for example,

into a job with a small newsletter: Work it. Move it forward. Don’t let it lie fallow.

A moving target Another aspect of today’s language that recently came to my attention is the changing meanings of certain words. To a woman of my age, a “wedgie” is a woman’s shoe with a wedge-shaped heel. To teenage boys of today, it means something dramatically different — or


To a woman of my age, a ‘wedgie’ is a woman’s shoe with a wedge-shaped heel. To teenage boys of today, it means something dramatically different. maybe as they would say — radically different, which involves underwear and inflicting pain! Of course, today’s casual-speak (hey, did I just invent a word that adds to it?), is here to stay, and I’ll have to get used to it. But adjusting to any kind of change is difficult, to which I defer to the sage advice of Nebraska community activist and historian, Bertha Calloway: We cannot direct the wind, but we can adjust our sails. And also to the 1960s philosopher and spiritual teacher, Alan Watts: The only way to make sense out of change is to plunge into it, move with it and join the dance. OK, here goes: “Well, alright you guys. If you don’t want to play bridge after the pickleball game, that’s fine. Whatever. We could stay here at the YMCA and check out all the product for sale at the front counter. That would be awesome!” Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@mngoodage.com.

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MINNESOTA HISTORY

Striking gold at the Olympics BY LAUREN PECK

T

he 23rd Winter Olympic Games kick off in Pyeongchang, South Korea, this February. But did you know 2018 also marks the 50th anniversary of two previous games — the 1968 Winter Olympic Games and Summer Olympic Games. (It wasn’t until the early 1990s that the two games started alternating on even years.) February 1968 kicked off the 10th winter games in Grenoble, France, with 35 events and athletes from 37 countries. By comparison, Pyeongchang will have 102 events and more than 80 countries represented.

Minnesota’s stars It’s probably no surprise that Minnesota boasted a strong contingent of winter athletes in 1968. The U.S. men’s hockey team was full of Minnesotans, including future North Stars player Lou Nanne and Herb Brooks, who went on to coach the U.S. to win the gold in 1980. Minnesotans also were part of the U.S. ski, figure-skating and speedskating teams. The Grenoble games marked a few firsts in Olympic history: It was the first Winter Games ever broadcast in color and the first time doping testing was required for athletes. The International Olympic Committee is still dealing with the latter issue today, as evidenced by Russia’s ban from the 2018 Winter Games for widespread doping. 12 / February 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲The 1968 Exhibit in St. Paul includes a panel with an Olympic torch and other memorabilia, plus the iconic image of Tommie Smith and John Carlos, who took home the gold and bronze medals in the 200-meter sprint for the U.S. in 1968. Photo by the Minnesota Historical Society

At the games’ end in 1968, the U.S. medal count was disappointing. Figure skater Peggy Fleming brought home the only gold medal. But Minnesotan Mary Meyers enjoyed a three-way tie for silver with two of her U.S. speedskating teammates in the women’s 500-meter event.

LEARN MORE

Discover more stories behind the 1968 Olympic Games in The 1968 Exhibit at the Minnesota History Center in St. Paul through Jan. 21, 2019.


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Protest in Mexico In October, the U.S. did much better in the Summer Games in Mexico City, winning 45 gold medals and 107 medals overall. More than 5,000 athletes from 112 countries competed. Unlike in the Winter Games, Minnesotans were not heavily representated in any one sport. However, the Minnesota Training Center sent three wrestlers to compete, and local athletes also represented the U.S. in sports such as rowing and marathon running. Even now, 50 years later, one of the most memorable moments is the men’s 200-meter sprint medal ceremony. U.S. athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos took home the gold and bronze medals. As they stood on the podium, they each bowed their heads and raised a closed, black-gloved fist, a Black Power symbol, as the national anthem played. They were protesting against the racial inequality going on the U.S., where there had been division over the Civil Rights movement throughout the 1960s. The duo also took off their shoes and wore scarves and beads as symbols of their protest against lynching and poverty among African Americans. Australian silver medalist Peter Norman showed his solidarity by wearing a badge for the Olympic Project for Human Rights, an organization against racism in sports. “We were just human beings who saw a need to bring attention to the inequality in our country,” Smith later said in an HBO documentary.

An iconic scene The moment was a lightning rod and became front-page news. While some

Even now, 50 years later, one of the most memorable moments is still the men’s 200-meter sprint medal ceremony.

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people saw the men as heroes, many were outraged by their behavior, not unlike the fallout from the recent #takeaknee campaign in the NFL. Olympic officials ordered Carlos and Smith to leave the Olympic Village. Norman received no punishment, though his career suffered. Carlos and Smith kept their Olympic medals, but received death threats. The photo of the podium protest is now one of the most famous sports images of all time. John Carlos’s later career included playing football for the Philadelphia Eagles and working as a school counselor and track-and-field coach. Smith also briefly played for the NFL and became a sociology professor at Oberlin College and Santa Monica College. Today statues commemorate their iconic protest moment at San Jose State University, the men’s alma mater, and at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. Lauren Peck is a media relations and social media associate for the Minnesota Historical Society.

Minnesota Good Age / February 2018 / 13

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CAREGIVING

Navigating the public-benefits maze BY DAVID SHERMAN

F

or many individuals — and their families — the onset or progression of a disability or chronic illness can be overwhelming. People often experience anxiety over not just the new challenges but also the uncertainty of the future. A sense of overall confusion is also common during this transition phase. Essential decisions need to be made for the well-being of everyone involved. Where or whom do families turn to at this point? It’s first necessary to identify the difficulties that people face when dealing with a physical or cognitive impairment. Medical and financial concerns are typically the predominant issues that need to be addressed. Financial challenges alone instigate short- and long-term stress, which can affect the entire family. A disability resulting from an accident or illness usually results in loss of employment. This leads to a significant reduction in household income and health-care benefits. Financial strain is increased when the primary caregiver needs to reduce his or her work hours to handle added responsibilities. If additional health insurance and/or income is lacking, out-of-pocket medical expenses can exhaust one’s resources. Exploring publically funded programs can mitigate the risk of depleting one’s financial reserves. If total income and assets 14 / February 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

meet certain criteria, families can sometimes be eligible for specific programs. These five strategies may help you navigate those special services and benefits: Apply for SSDI: Complete an online

application for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). (Learn more at ssa.gov/ disability.) An individual can qualify for benefits if he or she has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities. It’s important to provide all required documentation when requested. This will expedite the process in determining eligibility. Calculate income: Many public services

and benefits have specific income and asset restrictions, so it’s important to determine monthly income and total assets to verify eligibility for certain programs. It’s a waste of time and energy to apply for programs if a person doesn’t qualify. You may want to consult with a financial planner for guidance. Research other programs: Outside

of SSDI, there are other publicly funded programs that you can consider. People who qualify for Medical Assistance may also be eligible for other waivered programs to support their health and safety. Veterans may be eligible for financial and/or medical benefits through the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Enlist the support of others: Navigating

the maze of public resources can be both confusing and frustrating. Indeed, it requires a lot of time and energy. Delegate some of these tasks to friends or family members who want to help. Utilizing a professional who has expertise regarding public resources is another option to help ease the burden. Maintain detailed records: Careful

documentation of all conversations and information is vital for acquiring accurate knowledge. It’s important to keep records of emails, phone calls and other data collected. Navigating “the system” for services and benefits in the public sector can be a source of confusion, frustration and irritation. However, choosing appropriate programs can significantly minimize the financial burden that a family has to carry. Adhering to these five suggestions will, I hope, facilitate the research process, resulting in greater peace of mind. David Sherman is the owner of Disability Consulting Solutions in Minnetonka, which offers support services to seniors, people with disabilities and their families/ caregivers. Learn more at disabilityconsultingsolutions.com.


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TRAVEL

Chill on the beach and explore historical destinations on North Carolina’s coast by Victor Block


orth Carolina’s Outer Banks — the chain of narrow barrier islands that parallels the state’s coastline — is so much more than just another sun-and-sand vacation destination. But let’s start with the sun and sand (and amazing sand dunes), because those beaches are some of the best in the country. And these Atlantic shores aren’t short on historical significance either: Starting in the 1830s, wealthy North Carolina planters seeking refuge from the summer heat made the Outer Banks a popular vacation spot. They were followed by sportsmen drawn by outstanding fishing and hunting that Native Americans had discovered centuries earlier. Today beaches along the 130-milelong Outer Banks, starting about an hour south of Norfolk, Virginia, remain the major draw for many visitors. Cape Hatteras National Seashore, which covers much of the Banks, encompasses some of the largest undeveloped beaches in the country. Nestled between those stretches of sand is a string of villages, each with its own distinctive characteristics, that provide added appeal for visitors.

▲ Currituck Beach Light Station, built in 1873, towers over the landscape in the historic village of Corolla, N.C.

Sights and flights Many visitors rank the two northernmost towns, Corolla (pronounced coh-RAH-luh and famous for wild horses on the beach) and Duck, as the prettiest. In addition to a smattering of interesting shops, Duck boasts a wooden boardwalk along a bay, skirting pockets of woods where bird calls are the only sounds. Kitty Hawk, Kill Devil Hills and Nags Head form the commercial hub of the Outer Banks — complete with a beachy strip-mall stretch, including many attractions that are worth a stop. It was at Kitty Hawk where, on Dec. 17, 1903, Wilbur and Orville Wright made history with the first controlled power flight. People often are surprised to learn

that the longest journey lasted only 59 seconds and covered just 852 feet. A museum houses a full-scale replica of their rickety aircraft and other memorabilia that tell the story.

▲ The First Flight Centennial sculpture in Kill Devil Hills, N.C., is a full-scale replica of the plane and people who made aviation history in 1903.

Minnesota Good Age / February 2018 / 17


Pirates, shipwrecks, lighthouses

Nearby Jockey’s Ridge State Park makes its claim to fame as the site of the tallest sand dune on the East Coast. In this mini-desert setting, winds constantly reshape the ridge, causing the main dune to vary in height from 80 to 100 feet. Some dunes are even available for sandboarding (snowboarding on sand) for adventure enthusiasts. South of this commercial section is Roanoke Island, which became the site of the first English colony in 1587, 22 years before settlement of Jamestown, Virginia. A good place to begin an exploration is Festival Park, where the life of Native Americans who originally inhabited the area is recreated. You’ll find longhouses, a dance circle, planting and harvesting areas and interactive exhibits.

To relive another chapter of the story, climb aboard the Elizabeth II, a sailing ship representative of seven British vessels that arrived during the 16th century. Costumed interpreters describe the small craft and entertain landlubbers with dramatic tales of the perilous voyage, speaking in a thick brogue that echoes the dialect of the time. The most famous attraction on Roanoke Island is Lost Colony, a drama production that entertains with special effects, daring action, comedy, music and dance. It relates the true story of the mysterious disappearance of the 116 men, women and children who settled in the New World in 1587. Further south in Hatteras Village, the aptly named Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum features exhibits that chronicle the tragic stories of more than 2,000 ships that met their fate on the treacherous offshore shoals. Many were sailing vessels that went down during the 18th and 19th centuries. (Parts of several shipwrecks are visible today along beaches or in shallow water at low tide.)

▲ Visitors can climb 220 steps to the top of the Currituck Beach Light Station in North Carolina.

This eclectic museum also tells the grisly legend of Blackbeard, whose favorite hideout, home and even place of death was the North Carolina coast — from Ocracoke Island to the small inland town of Bath. You’ll also find vivid exhibits about the Civil War-era, the ironclad USS Monitor ⊳ Gorgeous boardwalks lead to a restored Bodie Island Lighthouse on the Outer Banks.

18 / February 2018 / Minnesota Good Age


▲ Special tours give tourists glimpses of wild Spanish mustangs, which have called the Outer Banks home for centuries.

and Gen. Billy Mitchell, who proved in the 1920s that battleships were vulnerable to bombing attacks by aircraft. Lighthouse buffs will think they’ve gone to heaven when they spot the three towers that mark this stretch of the Outer

Banks, all of which were first lit in the 1870s. The Cape Hatteras light, the tallest brick beacon in the country, and the Currituck Beach lighthouse are open for climbing from spring to fall. If mounting the 257 steps of the Cape

Hatteras Lighthouse isn’t your idea of enjoyable exercise, there’s a list of other pursuits that may be to your liking — hiking, hang gliding, kayaking, kiteboarding, sailing, fishing and crabbing. And then there’s my favorite beach pastime — relaxing on the sand with a good book. Victor Block is a veteran travel writer and has contributed to numerous national publications.

PLAN YOUR TRIP ▲ Nags Head, N.C., was established in the 1830s as the Outer Banks' first tourist destination, thanks to its gorgeous sandy beaches. Photo by travelview / Shutterstock.com

Learn more at outerbanks.org, outerbanksvacations.com or call 877-629-4386

Minnesota Good Age / February 2018 / 19


HOUSING SPOTLIGHT

A tradition of caring BY SARAH JACKSON

F

ifty years ago this year, Saint Therese — a local Catholic senior-focused organization — welcomed its first resident to its first-ever senior-living facility in New Hope. (It was the winter of 1968, and her name was Mary Zepp.) Today the nonprofit organization is still offering faith-based senior-living options, but it has expanded dramatically over the years to include new locations and modern services in Shoreview, Robbinsdale, Brooklyn Center and most recently, Woodbury.

Saint Therese’s new Woodbury location, established in February 2016, includes 102 senior apartments on its main campus. And now — as of this past November — it also includes 64 more independent living apartments known as Redwoods Senior Apartments. Located a short walk from the main campus, Redwoods offers access to the amenities of the main campus as well as its own facilities, including a fitness center with strength-building equipment, a community and club room for ⊳ Common areas at Saint Therese’s Redwoods feature contemporary finishes and decor. Photos courtesy of Saint Therese

20 / February 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

social events and guest suites to host family and friends. Restaurant- and bistro-style meals are served on the main campus, where numerous activities are offered for seniors to encourage physical wellness as well as spiritual and social connections. Saint Therese also offers accommodations for residents in need of assisted living, memory care and skilled nursing, plus neighborhood-like settings for transitional care, long-term care and hospice/ palliative care. But what makes Saint Therese really stand out is its mission: “Do ordinary things with extraordinary love,” said Katie Saleum, Saint Therese’s director of communications. “For 50 years,” she said, “we have supported Twin Cities’ seniors and their families with innovative programs designed to provide ample opportunities for physical wellness, spiritual connection and lasting friendships.”


SAINT THERESE WOODBURY WHERE: 7555 Bailey Road

(main campus) and 4200 Benjamin Drive (Redwoods Senior Apartments), about 2 miles east of the Highway 10 / I-494 interchange, southeast of St. Paul

OPENING DATE: February 2016 for the main campus and November 2017 for Redwoods OPENINGS: Redwoods

has openings. The main campus has a waiting list that’s updated regularly and includes special event invitations and other campus perks for wait-listed prospective residents.

AGES: 55 and older NUMBER OF UNITS: There

are 102 senior apartments (known as Alpine) at Saint Therese’s main Woodbury campus and 64 senior apartments at Redwoods with 1- and 2-bedroom floor plans with optional sunrooms, dens and balconies.

COST RANGE FOR A SINGLE RESIDENT: Main

campus apartments (Alpine) cost $1,645 (780 square feet) to $3,740 (1,791 square feet) per month. Redwoods apartments cost $2,400 (1,068 square feet) to $4,178 (1,857 square feet) per month.

PROPERTY OWNER: Saint

Therese is based in St. Louis Park and operates facilities in New Hope, Shoreview, Woodbury, Robbinsdale and Brooklyn Center.

INFO: 651-209-9100 or sttheresemn.org

Amenities

South St. Paul HRA

Chapel with services • 50+ Community Bistro- and restaurant-style dining Beauty and barber services • Income Based Rent Woodshop • All Utilities Paid Art studio • Newly Remodeled Theater • Elevators Library • Controlled Entries Club room But selling a home shouldn’t be. • On Site Caretaker Gift shop We are here to help you & your Call for an appointment 651-554-3270 Guest suites family with your next move. Outdoor gardens Walking paths South St Paul HRA GA 0218 12.indd 1 1/22/18 12:11 PM Therapeutic labyrinth Transportation Adjacent to Bielenberg Gardens retail center, anchored by Jerry’s Foods ⊲ Close proximity to medical services, Check your current home value and how restaurants and shopping. it compares to your neighborhood. ⊲ ⊲ ⊲ ⊲ ⊲ ⊲ ⊲ ⊲ ⊲ ⊲ ⊲ ⊲ ⊲ ⊲ ⊲

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Wellness features ⊲ Rehab therapy clinic ⊲ Physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy ⊲ Fitness center ⊲ Fitness classes ⊲ Warmwater therapy pool ⊲ Hot tub ⊲ Aquatic therapy ⊲ One-on-one personal training ⊲ Balance programming and falls assessments ⊲ Home-safety assessments ⊲ Massage therapy ⊲ Neurological rehab and cognitive care ⊲ Swallow therapy ⊲ Functional improvement ⊲ Continence improvement ⊲ Parkinson’s programming ⊲ Pain management. Do you know of a new or interesting senior housing facility in the Twin Cities that might make a good Housing Spotlight? Write Minnesota Good Age editor Sarah Jackson at editor@ mngoodage.com with the subject line HOUSING SPOTLIGHT.

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952-300-7874

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IRAs: Fact or fiction? BY LARRY KALLEVIG

W

hen it comes to saving for retirement, what you don’t know can cost you. Nearly 3 in 10 Americans say they don’t have an Individual Retirement Account (IRA) because they don’t know enough about them, according to the 2017 TIAA IRA survey. If you’re considering an IRA in 2018, let me clear up a few IRA myths.

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Myth: All IRAs are the same. Actually, the main difference between a traditional IRA and a Roth IRA is in how they’re taxed. Similar to a 401(k), the contributions you make to a traditional IRA are fully or partially tax deductible. However, the money will be taxed when you withdraw it. With a Roth IRA, the taxes work in the opposite way. Your contributions are made after tax, but the money that grows in a Roth IRA is withdrawn tax-free. Myth: IRAs are for rich people. There’s no minimum for most IRAs, either traditional or Roth. Even if you can contribute only a little bit every month, it can make a huge difference in your savings — especially if you start early and give your money time to grow.


Myth: I should have only one type of retirement account. You can open an IRA if you have an employer-sponsored retirement plan, such as a 401(k). You can also open more than one IRA, such as a traditional IRA and a Roth IRA. Just remember that the contribution limits apply to both IRA accounts combined. That means workers younger than 50 can contribute $5,500 in total to both accounts for 2018 — not $5,500 in each. (Plus you can contribute an additional $1,000 in catch-up contributions if you’re 50 or older.) There are different rules regarding other types of IRAs, such as SEP-IRAs and SIMPLE IRAs. I recommend talking to a tax professional about those situations. Myth: I can leave money in an IRA indefinitely. Traditional IRAs involve Minimum Required Distributions that start the year after the calendar year in which you turn 70 1/2. If you don’t follow your RMDs, you face penalties from the IRS. You might have to pay a 50 percent excise tax on the amount you were required to distribute but did not.

Roth IRAs don’t involve Required Minimum Distributions until after the death of the owner.

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Myth: I can’t touch my money until retirement. With a Roth IRA, you can withdraw the money you’ve contributed at any time without penalties. (However, the same does not apply to the gains.) With a traditional IRA, you will face a 10 percent early withdrawal penalty if you take money out before age 59 1/2 in most cases. However, there are a few exceptions to the rule. Both the Roth IRA and the traditional IRA will waive the early withdrawal penalty for qualified higher-education expenses, as well as for first-time homebuyers. With that said, remember what IRA stands for — Individual Retirement Account. You’ll need the money when you retire, so I don’t recommend withdrawing early.

If you have Alzheimer’s disease and are 66 years of age or older, you might be able to take part in a 1-year exercise study. An exercise specialist will work with you to exercise 3 times a week for 6 months, and monitor your response to exercise to ensure your safety. You will be followed for another 6 months for additional assessments. You will receive compensation and some participants will receive a free gym membership.

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MORE INFO

According to the IRS, individuals may be able to take a tax credit — a “saver’s credit” — of up to $1,000 if they make eligible contributions to an IRA. The amount of the credit is 50 percent, 20 percent or 10 percent of your retirement plan or IRA contributions up to $2,000 ($4,000 if married filing jointly), depending on the individual’s adjusted gross income. Also of note: As of 2015, you can make only one rollover from an IRA to another (or the same) IRA in any 12-month period, regardless of the number of IRAs you own. For purposes of the limit, all of an individual’s IRAs, including SEP and SIMPLE IRAs as well as traditional and Roth IRAs are effectively treated one IRA. Rollovers from traditional to Roth IRAs (“conversions”) aren’t limited. Learn more at tinyurl.com/iras-iras.

Serving people of all ages, abilities and backgrounds, HOBT collaborates with SCHOOLS and COMMUNITIES on unique, interactive ART RESIDENCIES that nurture the creative spirit and encourage a sense of joy and wonder. Visit hobt.org or call 612.721.2535 for more information. Minnesota Good Age / February 2018 / 23

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Robyne Robinson, a longtime supporter of the arts, poses in front of a painting by Drew Peterson at the Public Functionary art space in Minneapolis, where she serves on the board.


Change maker

Robyne Robinson has mastered the art of reinvention with her new and exciting career in the arts BY SHEILA REGAN

M

any Twin Cities residents remember Robyne Robinson as a former Fox 9 news anchor and producer. Though her longtime tenure as a news leader ended in 2010, her other passions, ambitions, adventures — and successes — haven’t waned in the slightest. In fact, her trajectory as an artist, curator, promoter and even candidate for lieutenant governor started taking shape 10 years before she left the TV business. She made sure of that. “Many women in TV don’t have long careers,” Robinson said, adding that the arrival of high-definition TV made it even harder for broadcasters to escape scrutiny over even the slightest of wrinkles, especially women. “You have to constantly evolve,” she said. “As you get older, you really have to think about: ‘What’s the next step for me?’ You’re constantly reinventing yourself.”

Photo by Tracy Walsh

Minnesota Good Age / February 2018 / 25


Change maker Since her departure from Fox, Robinson has taken on numerous other roles in the Twin Cities, including most recently a post as director of the MSP Arts and Culture Program with the MSP International Airport Foundation for the past four years. Robinson’s been a jewelry designer, a PR guru, a board member for many arts organizations and a sought-after emcee, too. And now, as of this past January, she’s moving into yet another time of metamorphosis with a new position as a part-time arts consultant with Minneapolis-based Alliiance Architects. (She’ll continue her role with the airport foundation part time, too, through her new consulting company— five x five — named for a radio term used in airport towers for full-strength signals and clarity.) “I’m lucky enough to always have the opportunity to say: ‘What else?’ There’s always something else we have to do,” Robinson said. “I’m just in a really surprising, but very happy, time in my life.”

A Midwest upbringing Born and raised in Chicago, Robinson came of age during the Watergate scandal. Her mother taught second grade in Chicago’s projects. Her dad worked as a principal and later served as an alderman after becoming the first black sergeant at arms at City Hall in Chicago. “They were very political at a time when black people had their voices being heard,” Robinson said. “It was fascinating to be young and black in Chicago.” Her parents were friends with the lawyers for the Chicago Seven protestors and other artist/activists such as Oscar Brown Jr. When she was in high school, Robinson remembers watching Carole Simpson, the African-American weekend anchor at ABC News. With interest, she observed the rise of congresswomen Shirley Chisholm and Barbara Jordan, and even the fictional newsproducer character of Mary Tyler Moore, thinking, “I can do that.” Robinson had an artistic side, too. She loved to sketch, and was fond of her uncle who travelled the world playing the piano for choreographer Agnes DeMille. But she convinced herself that newscasting was her path, thinking, “I could do art on the side.” “My parents weren’t big on art as a career,” Robinson said. Robinson’s first job was working in finance for NBC News while 26 / February 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

still attending school at Loyola University in Chicago. There weren’t many women around in the industry at the time, so most of her coworkers were men, including Max Robinson, one of the first black network news anchors. “I was their mascot,” she said. “I was so starry-eyed.” Once, she announced she’d acquired her first credit card, so her colleagues ran up a huge tab at the bar. She looked at the bill in awe: “My jaw dropped,” she said. “They looked after me sometimes — and sometimes not.” Robinson also noticed that the few women who were working in news at the time had it tough. She recalls observing one female producer — on the road during political coverage — talking on the phone with her daughter, saying how much she loved and missed her. “It struck me how hard it is for women in this field,” Robinson said. “That moment really let me know the choice women make between family and career.”

On TV in Minnesota Robinson moved to Minneapolis by bus in 1990, to be with her then-fiancé. “I followed him here with no job and no money,” she said. Robinson landed a gig for the local Fox affiliate KMSP, then called Minnesota 9. She would become the first black prime-time news anchor in Minnesota and ended up working as an anchor and producer for 20 years. Robinson covered tragedies like the 35W bridge collapse and big political events such as the RNC National Convention. “Those are things you never forget,” she said. Robinson sometimes misses the exhilarating feeling of breaking news — and the camaraderie that comes with being a co-anchor. “You can count on each other,” she said. “I miss the partnership.” On the other hand, “I don’t miss the politics,” Robinson said, relieved to be free of the endless pressure over her weight, makeup and hair. “There were management meetings about the length of my hair,” she said.

An evolving career As the years progressed, Robinson experimented with creative projects outside her role as an anchor, in part because she knew TV wouldn’t last forever. “Women get replaced,” she remembers thinking. “You get old, you get replaced.” While still working in news, Robinson opened a contemporary art gallery called flatland in Northeast Minneapolis in 2000.


As you get older, you really have to think about: ‘What’s the next step for me?’ You’re constantly reinventing yourself. — Robyne Robinson of Minneapolis

Photo by Tracy Walsh. Dress by Alice Riot. Painting in background by Drew Peterson. Necklace by Robyne Robinson.


Change maker Anne-Marie Wagener, the former director of press and public relations at the Minneapolis Institute of Art, met Robinson during those flatland years. Wagener had just moved to the Twin Cities from Scotland, and didn’t know the anchor was a local celebrity. About a week after she arrived, Wagener was out with her husband’s friends and the gallery caught her eye. She told the group she’d catch up with them, so she could pop into the space. “I go in — and there was Robyne,” Wagener said. “Because I’m not from here, I didn’t know her from Adam.” The two women started talking, and Robinson struck Wagener as passionate, kind and generous. “We had a great chat,” she said. A month later, Wagener was working at Mia and — while going over a list of press contacts —realized Robinson was a big-name local news anchor. “I thought, ‘How great for someone in that position to open a gallery,’” Wagener said. “What a brilliant thing for the community and for the artists.” During that same time, Robinson founded her own part-time boutique PR firm, RRPR, and worked with a variety of local and national clients, including Outkast (assisting with PR for the group’s 2003 album, Speakerboxxx: The Love Below) and Prince (working PR for shows and other appearances).

Jewelry and politics It was also during those broadcast years, that Robinson’s own artistic endeavors began to blossom. She started out making jewelry for friends as gifts. But she quickly realized she had a product that people would buy and founded Rox Minneapolis Jewelry. Robinson lived part-time in Greece for about eight years and found herself inspired by the multicultural influences and exotic materials all around her at fascinating international marketplaces. One day, Robinson was out with friends at a fund-raiser and was introduced — by local food philanthropist Sue Zelickson — to a man named Frank. They were talking about how Macy’s was taking over Marshall Fields. Robinson quipped: “So long as they don’t mess with my Frango mints, I don’t care.”

28 / February 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

Frank asked if she would ever consider selling her art jewelry line in a department store like Macy’s. That’s when she learned “Frank” was actually Frank Guzzetta, the president of Macy’s North. Guzzetta later sent her a massive box of Frango mints, marking the beginning of a working relationship, including a multi-year run for her jewelry line at Macy’s North locations. Her globally inspired jewelry — worn by actresses and big-name musicians — was featured on national TV and in major magazines, and was eventually sold in stores in Santa Fe, Chicago, New York City and Atlanta, plus in Greece, Vietnam, Kenya, the UK and the British Virgin Islands. Today Robinson’s jewelry is still winning hearts in boutiques such as Atelier957 in St. Paul and Mia in Minneapolis. She’ll also be selling her work at the Walker Art Center’s annual Jewelry & Accessory Makers Mart this spring. And yet jewelry is but one facet of Robinson’s eventful past few decades. In 2010, attorney and former Minnesota DFL Rep. Matt Entenza asked her to be his running mate for governor. Robinson accepted. “I wanted to honor my father,” she said. “And I wanted to find out what Minnesota politics was all about.” Entenza’s run for governor wasn’t successful, but Robinson said she’s glad to have had the opportunity to hear the thoughts and perspectives from Minnesotans all around the state. ⊳⊳ Globally inspired and custom designed, Robyne Robinson’s Rox Minneapolis Jewelry line features stones, gems and metal accents collected from around the world. Photos by Tracy Walsh


“It made me love Minnesota all the more,” Robinson said. “Minnesotans truly believe in the good life — the promise of Minnesota that they can pass on to their children.”

step at a time, as well as her unique handle on collaborative partnerships, Robinson has been instrumental in transforming how the airport looks and feels.

A legacy of art

Supporting local artists

Since 2014, Robinson has been immersed in the work of transforming the arts program at the Minneapolis-St. Paul airport into an internationally renowned success. “The changes that Robyne brought about have been tremendous,” said Alan Howell, the senior architect for the airport. “Robyne’s background and skill in the arts — and amazing industry contacts — have provided us with a different level of interest in the arts program as well as the right level of skill with other organizations. It’s just been a joy and a treat to work with her.” The Metropolitan Airports Commission, Howell said, is a rather conservative organization and hadn’t had an arts program since the 1990s. That’s all changed now, with the airport’s new mosaics, signature commissions, a film-screening room and a new art park planned for the future. Other components of the program, founded in 2008 and known as ARTS@MSP, include music, dance and theatrical performances at both terminals; employee exhibitions; a Super Bowl performing arts spectacular; and, coming 2020, the largest public art installation ever for the state. “Robyne will have a thousand ideas for us — and we’ll be scared of half of them,” Howell said. However, with her focus on taking one

And that’s just her day job. Behind the scenes as a board member and volunteer for various other Twin Cities causes, Robinson is working just as hard. “She’s hugely supportive of art spaces and women,” said Carolyn Payne, the executive director of the Soo Visual Arts Center in Minneapolis, where Robinson has served on the board. “She’s always willing to show up and help out when asked,” Payne said. “I feel fortunate to count her as a friend.” Another of Robinson’s friends, arts publicist Kate Iverson, said Robinson brings a unique grace where ever she goes. “She has a natural warmth with strangers that not many people have,” Iverson said. “She’s like that as a friend, too — non-judgmental, sincere and very chill.” Iverson said Robinson is just as ambitious as she was back when she became the first black female news anchor in the Twin Cities. “She has more big ideas and creative vision than most people have in a lifetime,” Iverson said. “So I’m excited to see what her future brings.” Sheila Regan lives in Minneapolis and writes about art and life for numerous publications, including The Journal, Southwest Journal, City Pages and Twin Cities Daily Planet. Minnesota Good Age / February 2018 / 29


CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR FEBRUARY

manager Joe “Yussel the Muscle” Jacobs, German boxing champion Max Schmeling and boxing great Joe Louis — form a singular bond in a dangerous world. This world-premiere production, written by David Feldshuh and starring Broadway/film/ TV star Tovah Feldshuh, is a cautionary tale inspired by actual events. When: Feb. 8–Feb. 24 Where: Illusion Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: $25–$48; Sunday shows are pay-what-you-want. Info: illusiontheater.org

FEB. 10

INTRODUCTION TO DNA → This class is geared toward family historians and DNA beginners, including those thinking about DNA testing or wanting to better understand their results.

Photo by Suzanne Fiore Photography

THE BROADWAY BOYS

→ See six of the top male voices currently working on Broadway today. Through their dynamic vocals and redefining arrangements, this sextet adds in elements of pop, funk, gospel, jazz, and folk to show tunes and classic pop songs, including numbers from Wicked, Mary Poppins and Hair! When: Feb. 9–10 Where: Ordway Center for the Performing Arts, St. Paul

Cost: $36 Info: ordway.org

ONGOING

FEB. 6

→ Explore more than 75 winter-themed events, including ice carving, snow sculpting, a torchlight parade and — a special feature this year — a seven-story, $800,000 ice palace in Rice Park, the first walk-thru palace at the event since 2004.

→ People with dementia and their caregivers are invited to engage in creative activities. This month’s theme is music.

ST. PAUL WINTER CARNIVAL

When: Jan. 25–Feb. 10 Where: Downtown Saint Paul, near Rice Park and Landmark Center, as well as the Minnesota State Fairgrounds Cost: Most events are FREE. Info: wintercarnival.com 30 / February 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

CREATIVE MEMORY CAFE

When: 1:30–3 p.m. Feb. 6 Where: Shoreview Library Cost: FREE Info: rclreads.org

FEB. 8–FEB. 24

DANCING WITH GIANTS → In the years leading up to World War II, three very different men — New York boxing

When: 10–11:30 a.m. Feb. 10 Where: Minnesota History Center, St. Paul Cost: $32 Info: mnhs.org

FEB. 10–MARCH 4

A CRACK IN THE SKY → In this world-premiere drama, a young shepherd boy has had enough of the nomadic life and is leaving to seek out a better life. With that, he sets off on an adventure that takes him on the road less traveled — from Somalia to Minnesota. When: Feb. 10–March 4 Where: History Theatre, St. Paul Cost: $15–$40 Info: historytheatre.com

FEB. 11

MEDITATION → Learn simple, powerful techniques to reduce stress and relax in this presentation by Arvind Naik, a Twin Cities professional who has been studying a practical form of meditation for more than 12 years.   When: Feb. 11 Where: George Latimer Central Library, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: sppl.org


FEB. 11–MARCH 11

MUSIC UNDER GLASS →→Beat the winter blahs by boogying to blues, bluegrass and ballads in the tropical two-acre Marjorie McNeely Conservatory with Twin Cities musicians. When: 4:30–6:30 p.m. Feb. 11, 18, 25 and March 4 and 11. Where: Como Park Zoo & Conservatory, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: comozooconservatory.org

FEB. 14

VICTORIAN POETRY SLAM →→Actors wearing 1890s eveningwear will perform a wide range of humorous and stirring poems — by Dickinson, Poe, Longfellow, Browning and more — about love, romance, temperance, sports and war. When: 7–8 p.m. Feb. 14 Where: James J. Hill House, St. Paul Cost: $12 Info: mnhs.org

FEB. 16­–18

MINNEAPOLIS HOME + REMODELING SHOW →→Get inspired with the latest ideas in the design world, plus celebrity appearances, including Madcap Cottage designers John Loecke and Jason Oliver Nixon and famed master builder Karl Champley. When: Feb. 16­–18 Where: U.S. Bank Stadium, Minneapolis Cost: $12 at the door, $10 online Info: tinyurl.com/remodel-show

FEB. 22

ACT OUT FOR ADULTS →→Delve into Shakespeare with an experienced Guthrie Theater teaching artist. Learn about his plays, speak his language and comprehend the poetry. No experience is necessary. When: 6–7:30 p.m. Feb. 22 Where: Southeast Library, Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: hclib.org Minnesota Good Age / February 2018 / 31


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A

U

A

S

T

L

G

N

C

L

E

O

S

Q

E

O

T

S

Y

S

Q

CRYPTOGRAM

S

Z

Z

V

Break the code to reveal a quote from a famous person. Each letter represents another letter.

R

E

D

A

A

S

G

Clue: Z = H

S P R G P D P

I Z J A K X Z

I Z W I

C Q A Y R P U X P

W Q U

, U G O T G M R G Q P ,

Y

H

W R

T

K

L

O

U

N

H

I

S

C

T

E

J

G

S

N

T

S

M D

I

T

X

G

L

T

S

M N

W R

B

S

S

Y

O

L

C

C

W O

X

E

T

R

B

A

O

O

E

R

M V

R

P

S

U

Z

D

C

T

R

R

N

E

N

E

L

P

C

L

B

H

O

J

I

P

N

N

U

I

T

I

E

S

R

W L

T

O

H

T

L

G

G

I

D

I

P

H

E

I

T

R

P

E

N

S

I

O

N

I

Y

K

U

R

V

L

P

L

F

W J

U

M L

O

R

R

P

I

C

J

L

F

I

C

T

G

U

P

P

Y

O

R

R

F

Complete the following words using each given letter once.

L G Q W Q T G W R

T

W R R

I

S Q

OS K

N N

G

A S

DA C

S

M A O O G S R P .

L A J

C

A L

K O .

32 / February 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

TRIVIA: 1. Roth 2. Benjamin Franklin ($100 bill), Alexander Hamilton ($10 bill) and Sacagawea (dollar coin) 3. Equifax

G O

F

I

WORD SCRAMBLE

O M P W T P

O

N

ANSWERS

Source: Dave Ramsey

T


Thank you for another great year!

TRIVIA You can bank on it 1. What name is associated with an IRA that allows tax-free withdrawals? 2. Name one person depicted on American currency who never served as President of the United States. 3. The three credit bureaus are TransUnion, Experian and ____? Sources: vanguard.com, uscurrency.gov, myfico.com

2018

SUDOKU 

WORD SCRAMBLE Stocks, Cosign, NASDAQ

2018

24/7 Emergency Service Call Anytime (Really)

©2014 Harrison Electric Inc. All Rights Reserved.

HARRISON-ELECTRIC.COM • 763-544-3300 Harrison Electric GA 0218 2-3.indd 2

1/19/18 9:51/ AM Minnesota Good Age / February 2018 33

CROSSWORD

ANSWERS

CRYTPOGRAM I believe that through knowledge and discipline, financial peace is possible for all of us.


Crossword

3 Russian Revolution leader 4 Diving seabirds 5 Fellows 6 Busy __ bee 7 Bill with Hamilton on it 8 NYC summer hrs. 9 Be a nuisance to 10 Goes in 11 Promote big-time 12 North Pole worker 13 U.K. flying squad 17 East, to 48-Down 21 “__ there, done that” 22 “I’ve got this round” 23 Prickling with excitement 24 Tokyo’s country 25 Tequila source 26 Color again, as hair 27 TV forensic series 28 __ Pan Alley 29 Rascal 30 Ramshackle home 31 Hostile force 35 In addition

ACROSS

1 Send (to), as an inferior place 9 Partner of Paul and Mary 14 Trite 15 WWII bomber __ Gay 16 Trifling matters 18 Iroquois enemies 19 Editor’s “never mind” 20 IRS form IDs 21 One out on the lake, e.g. 24 Cookie holder 27 Focal point in a theater 29 That girl 32 18-wheeler 33 Tablet with Mini and Pro versions 34 John Paul Jones was a commander in it 39 Chevy subcompact 40 Rowlands of “The Notebook” 34 / February 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

41 Originally named 42 May observance for those who died in military service 46 Two-__ tissue 47 Troubled state 48 Has a midnight snack, say 52 __ upon a time ... 53 Kate’s TV sidekick 54 Statesman born 2/12/1809 whose surname can precede the starts of four long puzzle answers 59 Señor’s squiggle 60 Schemed 61 Bottomless chasm 62 Ones storming the castle, say

36 Kennedy and Koppel

DOWN

56 1101, to Romans

1 Lassos 2 Activist Medgar

37 Gray’s subj. 38 Dismiss from work temporarily, with “off” 43 Put spots in magazines 44 Foot’s 12 45 Side squared, for a square 48 Legendary Spanish hero 49 “__ like ours / Could never die ... ”: Beatles 50 Flooring specialist 51 Mails 52 Paris airport 53 Kendrick of “Twilight” 54 One step __ time 55 Baby’s spilled food protector 57 Chaney of horror 58 Bill for mdse.


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February 2018  
February 2018  
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