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OCTOBER 2018

MAN of NOTE Meet Dave Fielding, the unsung hero of choral music in Minnesota

Exploring Wisconsin’s

GREAT RIVER ROAD

The deadly

FIRE OF 1918 An

ANTI-CANCER

diet

Sunbutter cookies!

How to get

FINANCIALLY FIT


Contents 20 UP THE RIVER

Take a scenic south-to-north road trip in Wisconsin, starting from Prairie du Chien and ending at Maiden Rock.

⊳⊳ Boats gently bobble at the Pepin Marina, one of many stops of the Great River Road.

OCTOBER GOOD START FROM THE EDITOR

8 Dave Fielding should be applauded for his dedication to choral music.

MY TURN

10 On a trip to Oregon, three men learn unexpected life lessons.

MEMORIES

12 Sounds evoke powerful emotions, recollections from days gone by.

MINNESOTA HISTORY

14 More than 1,500 square miles burned in the fire of 1918.

GOOD HEALTH WELLNESS

16 How much do our diets contribute to — or fight against — cancer?

30

ON THE COVER Dave Fielding’s latest production with the Oratorio Society of Minnesota on Nov. 11 is a celebration of veterans. Photos by Tracy Walsh

CAREGIVING

18 Fitness trackers can benefit caregivers and their loved ones.

GOOD LIVING FINANCE

26 Getting your budget in shape can be as hard as losing weight.

IN THE KITCHEN

28 Break out of your baking rut with these tasty oatmeal cookies.

37 CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR BRAIN 40 TEASERS 6 / October 2018 / Minnesota Good Age


FROM THE EDITOR Volume 37 / Issue 10 PUBLISHER

Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER

Terry Gahan tgahan@mngoodage.com

GENERAL MANAGER

Zoe Gahan zgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR

Sarah Jackson editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Ed Dykhuizen, Wendell Fowler Carol Hall, Brandi Jewett, Larry Kallevig Julie Kendrick, Dave Nimmer, Lauren Peck Carla Waldemar, Tracy Walsh

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Micah Edel

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Kaitlin Ungs

CLIENT SERVICES

Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION

Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2018 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. Subscriptions are $18 per year.

8 / October 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

Listening up! BY SARAH JACKSON

I

f you want to firm up your body, head to the gym. If you want to exercise your brain, listen to music. That’s the prevailing wisdom from the docs at John Hopkins University. “There are few things that stimulate the brain the way music does,” said one Johns Hopkins MD in the article Keep Your Brain Young With Photo by Tracy Walsh • tracywalshphoto.com Music. “If you want to keep your brain engaged throughout the aging process, listening to or playing music is a great tool. It provides a total brain workout.” Indeed, research has shown that listening to music can reduce anxiety, blood pressure and even pain as well as improve sleep quality, mood, mental alertness and memory. Dave Fielding of Apple Valley — this month’s Cover Star — doesn’t need to be convinced of the power of music. Get him talking about music — especially historic choral music — and he gets a mighty twinkle in his eye. Fielding has adored music his whole life. As a youth, he yearned for a career in music, but instead worked as an executive in the airline industry for 30 years, singing in choirs wherever he could. After retirement, however, finally he was able to devote himself to music full time, and in doing so, discovered a one-of-a-kind calling as a musical archaeologist for the nonprofit Oratorio Society of Minnesota. During the past few years, Fielding has shaped the choral music scene in the Twin Cities by bringing lesser-known works to audiences, including the 2014 world premieres of The Music of Downton Abbey and A Downton Abbey Christmas, to name a few. What’s so amazing to me about Fielding isn’t just that he finds old or lessersung choral works. It’s that he then converts the hieroglyphic-like scratchings into modern-day sheet music using the digital software known as Finale. “It’s resurrecting the music so that others in the future can take it to whatever level they want,” Fielding said. “This is my legacy.” And what a legacy it is, and continues to be: Fielding’s latest effort — Lest We Forget: World War I Armistice Centenary Concert — is a co-production of the Oratorio Society and the University of Minnesota School of Music. I hope you can go see this performance, set for Nov. 11. And I hope you enjoy reading the full story of the man behind the music!


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MY TURN

A wilderness discovery BY DAVE NIMMER

T

he three of us — former DNR Commissioner Rod Sando, WCCO anchorman Don Shelby and I — were heading east along the Rogue River Gorge from the Oregon Coast late this past summer. We’d just finished two fine days of fishing salmon and hiking in an old-growth forest with lush ferns and giant redwoods. The most memorable part of the trip, however, was still ahead of us. The 32-mile trip along the Rogue to the tiny town of Agness made me sit up and take notice: I saw the silver ribbon of the river at the bottom of the gorge and, on the canyon walls, the emerald greens of Ponderosa pines, Douglas firs and white ash trees. This was a wilderness road, with narrow shoulders, one-lane bridges and dozens of S-curves punctuated by an occasional 90-degree corner. By the time we got to Agness, we were famished. We’d had no breakfast and were desperate for a café or a bar and grill. We found neither, but we did spot an old wooden sign on a post that advertised a ranch and fishing lodge. It was about a quarter-mile down a gravel road, past a grass landing strip. The first look at the place took me back about 60 years. The main lodge had a sitting room, hardwood floors, an upright piano and a front desk with a guest registry. Some of the cabins had names, all had numbers and some had curtains and a stove.

10 / October 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

▲▲Dave Nimmer, Don Shelby and Rod Sando pose in front of a fishing lodge near Agness, Oregon.

The dining room had long tables and featured home cooking. We were standing next to a table when the owner/operator, a fifth-generation family member, walked up. She’d make us breakfast, she said, but lunch was ready right away — cold fried chicken, fresh biscuits, coleslaw, iced lemonade and hot coffee. That’d do, we said, and the food was fine. The waitress who served it was very fine — quick and efficient, solicitous and generous. As she cleared the table, she spotted a tattoo on Shelby’s wrist. “An Army insignia?” she asked.

She’d make us breakfast, she said, but lunch was ready right away — cold fried chicken, fresh biscuits, coleslaw, iced lemonade and hot coffee.


“No,” he said, “my wife’s name, but I was in the Air Force.” She said her son had been in the Marine Corps, serving two tours in Iraq as a chopper mechanic. She was obviously proud of his service and subsequent college education. But he came back changed, she said, and estranged from her. She’d never seen her two young grandchildren. She started to cry as she recalled that, in her family tradition, the children always came to see the parents. Not the case with her son. She apologized for the tears, and we told her it was OK. We were no strangers to pain. Sando gently told her perhaps she ought to initiate the visit. And Shelby added how he thought she probably wasn’t part of the problem, but could be part of the solution. I gave her a hug. She thanked us for listening, wiped her eyes with the back of her hand and cleared the dishes. We paid the bill, left a tip and, on the way out, Shelby left another twenty with the owner to give to our waitress. He said to tell her this was a down payment on a plane ticket to go see her son. The gift she’d given us was the sense that we could be trusted. We left feeling wiser than we used to be: We listened better, talked less and shared more. As we pulled out on the gravel road to head back to Portland, it was clear that what we paid for, and what we got, was a lot more than lunch. Dave Nimmer had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@mngoodage.com.

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Minnesota Good Age / October 2018 / 11


MEMORIES

Sounds of summer’s end BY CAROL HALL

D

usk is just settling over the schoolyard on this warm June evening. We’re lining up — two by two — my high school classmates and me, preparing to begin our march into the auditorium for the final ritual of our young lives together. The diploma each of us is about to receive is our passport to the world — beyond the small Minnesota town where we’ve grown up — and to whatever lies ahead. As the solemn strains of Pomp and Circumstance waft from inside, signaling the procession to begin, I think back to what we’re leaving behind.

There were other summer nights like this one with music of their own:

The merry-go-round It’s the end of August and the last night of the county fair with its livestock exhibits and carnival rides and the gypsy-camp followers who so fascinate me at age 12. Gaudy, exotic, the fair eclipses the boredom of small-town routine. I love it. But the fair also signals the end of summer. It means soon there will be school; our glorious vacation will come to an end. The merry-go-round’s tinny, high-pitched tunes carry faintly

from the fairgrounds to the screened porch of our house, where my parents and I listen in the dark.

The radio It’s a Saturday night in July. Ardie, Harriet, Joanie and me are cruising around town with farm boys. We’re squeezed in the back seat of Roger’s dad’s car — a 1953 Hudson sedan, low slung — flat looking. Smart-alecky Roger and Neal are in front, windows wide open, elbows jammed out. The radio is blaring Sh-boom, Sh-boom by The Crew Cuts until Roger fiddles with

The radio is blaring Sh-boom, Sh-boom by The Crew Cuts until Roger fiddles with the dial.

12 / October 2018 / Minnesota Good Age


The mourning dove Sounds of all kinds trigger memories, emotions. When I hear mourning doves calling, I drift back to I know not when. Perhaps my infancy? Their soft cooing is the first sound I remember ever hearing. Another mystery: Why does a train whistle late at night make me sad? It’s wailing somewhere off in the distance… then it’s gone. Quiet returns, and with it melancholy. Could it be because a train whistle evokes the wistful enchantment of travel’s exotic nature? This large behemoth is thundering across the plains — and it’s leaving me behind.

History Theatre GA 1018 H6.indd 1

rain taxi

the dial. “Whiskey, rye whiskey, I cry, If I don’t get rye whiskey, well, I think I will die,” explodes onto the airwaves. Roger has hit on Radio Del Rio — Country Station XERA-AM! All 500,000 watts are beaming the twangy voice of Tex Ritter north to Minnesota from Del Rio, Texas, near the Mexican border! A sophisticated gearhead-techie friend explains that the “border blaster” Radio Station XERA-AM could reach Minnesota because it transmitted a high-powered signal that bounced off the ionosphere, high above the earth, and reflected back to earth a great distance away from its Texas broadcast tower. This same friend so loved his childhood cat’s purr that he recorded it. He also loves hearing a well-tuned boat engine, so he recorded that, too! Waves slapping the shore of Lake Minnetonka remind him faintly and pleasantly of the beaches of Hawaii where he once lived.

TWIN CITIES

9/17/18 10:52 AM

BOOK FESTIVAL Saturday, October 13, 2018

Minnesota State Fairgrounds 10am - 5pm • free admission & parking

All-Day Book Fair • Author Readings & Signings • Giveaways & Raffles Spectacular Used Book & Record Sale • Children’s, Teen & Tween Events

plus a celebratory Book Bash on Friday, October 12!

schedule and more info at www.raintaxi.org This activity is made possible by the voters of Minnesota through a grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board and the Metropolitan Regional Arts Council, thanks to a legislative appropriation from the arts and cultural heritage fund. Rain Taxi GA 1018 H4.indd 1

festival partners:

9/20/18 11:04 AM

Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / October 2018 / 13


MINNESOTA HISTORY

When fire ravaged our state BY LAUREN PECK

After the fires died down, more than 30 towns were totally or partially destroyed with some 1,500 square miles of northern Minnesota burned. Moose Lake devastated

O

ctober 2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the worst natural disaster in Minnesota’s history. Starting as mere sparks in northern Minnesota, the Cloquet-Duluth and Moose Lake Fires of 1918 ultimately killed more than 450 people and caused $25 million in damage — the equivalent of $400 million in 2018 dollars. Wildfires continue to be a concern for the state today. October 1918 offered a perfect storm of conditions for a disaster. The summer had been the driest in more than 40 years, and the booming lumber industry boasted depots full of drying lumber and leftover wood waste scattered across the countryside. At the same time, the local railroads often ignored safety practices to keep their engines from spitting out sparks and hot coals along their routes.

Escaping by train In early October, trains started small fires along railroad tracks northwest of 14 / October 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

▲ The Red Cross served meals to fire survivors in Minnesota. Photos courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

Cloquet and near Tamarack in Aitkin County. By Oct. 12, a cool front brought a sharp drop in humidity and high winds as well, just the combination to whip those small fires into major blazes. The Cloquet fire first destroyed the village of Brookston. As it loomed closer to Cloquet, the mayor organized four trains to evacuate people. With winds recorded at more than 60 mph — and the town’s Northern Lumber Company’s 65 million board feet of lumber adding massive fuel to the fire — the danger was real. Within a short time, Cloquet was totally destroyed. Thanks, however, to the successful evacuation of more than 7,000 inhabitants who escaped on the train to Duluth and Superior, the city suffered only half a dozen fatalities. The fire went on to reach the northeast edge of Duluth, but the winds mercifully died down before it reached the main part of the city.

The small towns in the Moose Lake area were hit much harder by fatalities. On the afternoon of Oct. 12, high winds sent fire racing through the lumber town of Automba, killing 25. Aina Jokimaki, the daughter of Finnish immigrants from a farmstead nearby, remembered: “The fires was spreading so fast…no human could possibly run and hope to escape.” Her family tried to flee, but only she and her father survived; her mother and six younger siblings were killed. Jokimaki, who was 17 at the time, recalled nearly 60 years later, “It just seemed like in a few minutes, the terrifying inferno was over and above and all around us.” Throughout the countryside, people barely outran the fire by sheltering in plowed fields, down wells and in bodies of water. In the town of Moose Lake, a few hundred people managed to escape by train, but most survived by taking refuge in Moosehead Lake, including those who drove their cars into the lake. Others hid in their sod root cellars, which proved deadly as whole families died from exposure to the smoke.


LEARN MORE

Hear more stories of the Moose Lake and Cloquet fires in the new Minnesota Historical Society Press book Minnesota 1918: When Flu, Fire and War Ravaged the State by Curt Brown. Meet the author during a statewide book tour Oct. 8–17. Learn more at mnhs.org/calendar.

‘Entire county burned’ The town of Kettle River lost as many as 100 citizens, including many who’d tried to escape by automobile. One main culprit was the dirt road outside of town — known as Dead Man’s Curve — which took a sharp turn and became a death trap as vehicles piled up in the thick smoke. After spending the night in the Kettle River, the mayor of Moose Lake walked six miles to the town of Sturgeon Lake to telegram the governor, writing in all caps with many typos: “We must have food and clothing for 3,000 people and 300 caskets at Moose Lake at once. Entire county burned and people suffering.” After the fires died down, more than 30 towns were totally or partially destroyed with some 1,500 square miles of northern Minnesota burned.

Recovery — and lawsuits Help soon arrived for the more than 50,000 people affected by the fire. Red Cross volunteers turned the Duluth Armory into a refugee center, providing clothing, food and shelter. Everywhere schools, churches and private homes became temporary shelters. The National Guard arrived and worked to provide medical care and rescue operations, while also clearing roads and recovering bodies. Local newspapers published lists of survivors and the identified dead so that family and friends could find each other. As towns began to rebuild, by early 1919, lawsuits had been filed against the railroad companies, alleging they were responsible for starting the fires. A 1920 case ruled that the Great Northern Railway was responsible for the Cloquet fire, but the legal battles dragged on. In 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt finally signed a bill stating the victims should be fully compensated. Lauren Peck is a public relations specialist for the Minnesota Historical Society.

A damaged car sat on a roadside after the fire of 1918, which burned 1,500 square miles of northern Minnesota.

Minnesota Good Age / October 2018 / 15

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9/12/18 4:24 PM


WELLNESS

The cancer diet BY WENDELL FOWLER

C

ancer happens due to a constellation of genetic situations and environmental conditions. Then, of course, there’s our unholy processed American diet of nutritional nothingness, which can make us particularly susceptible due to a lack of basic vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients. Fortunately, God has gifted each of us amazing healing mechanisms that, when fed proper nutrition, have an astonishing, persistent capacity to keep us alive — and even heal us. Our trillions of cells are programed to recognize the carbon-based nutrition they require from God’s apothecary, not corporate-sponsored food scientists. Sadly, we’ve wandered — led astray from nature, disconnected from earth. We often sleepwalk through our nutritional choices, even when our lives hang in the balance. My every cell squirmed uneasily when a close friend, renewing himself in remission from cancer, recently told me his doctor stated, “Eat anything you like.” But this ignores our miraculous, built-in healing system’s requirements for nutrients to endure and recover. Eating a well-balanced, plant-based diet and staying nourished during cancer treatment helps the body recover and stay 16 / October 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

strong. The stronger, more nourished the body, the faster it heals. The National Cancer Institute recommends avoiding processed foods and ingredients because they may encourage the self-renewal of cancer stem cells. Doctors say, as always, we should avoid all refined foods — white bread, white-flour pasta, hydrogenated oils and so on. Don’t put it in your mouth if it’s not from nature. The MD Anderson Cancer Center in Texas recommends an anti-inflammatory/ anti-cancer diet high in phytonutrients from plants, fermented foods and omega

STUDY UP! ANTICANCER: A NEW WAY OF LIFE — by Dr. David

Servan-Schreiber, an MD who fended off brain cancer for 20 years — explains how people living with cancer can fight it (and how healthy people can prevent it) through diet and wellness.

THE CANCER-FIGHTING KITCHEN

— by Rebecca Katz, a chef who has taught patients and doctors at leading cancer centers about the powerful role of food in cancer care — offers “nourishing, big-flavor recipes for cancer treatment and recovery.”

3 oils — but low in red meat, processed foods and omega-6 fatty acids. Chemo patients often have trouble getting enough calories, so well-meaning friends and family may urge Grandma’s fried chicken, cookies, cakes and French fries. But they may do more harm than good. Instead, offer baked or grilled foods as tolerated. Nausea and lack of appetite can be exacerbated by fried foods anyway. Then there’s sugar. The CancerActive website reported: “More than six studies in three years show glucose — simple sugar — feeds cancer cells; the site also notes that high fructose corn syrup (think fizzy soft drinks and hundreds of other processed products) can have the same effect on cancer cells. Mainstream authorities such as the Mayo Clinic and MD Anderson don’t support the idea that the presence of sugar can fuel — or stop — a cancer’s growth. But both recommend restricting sugar since it has no nutritional value or cancer-fighting benefit (and can cause poor health overall). There's little we can control about genetics. But one thing we can change is how we eat. Wendell Fowler is a chef, a syndicated food columnist and the author of Eat Right Now: The End of Mindless Eating.


CAREGIVING

RESOURCES

Finding time for fitness BY BRANDI JEWETT

T

he benefits of exercise are well documented. Regular physical activity leads to better sleep and reduces stress while also increasing energy and alertness — all upsides for someone in a family caregiving role. But for time-strapped caregivers, finding a few moments for their care partners — much less themselves — to exercise can seem impossible. Filling those gaps doesn’t have to include gym memberships or complicated fitness routines, however. Caregivers can take simple steps to incorporate — and track — physical activity in their lives and the lives of their care partners to improve the health of both parties.

Take small steps Physical activity is important for adults of any age, but that doesn’t mean you have to run 10 miles every day. Low-impact activities such as walking, stretching and seated exercise can make a big difference. The Family Caregiver Alliance recommends incorporating it into daily activities and inviting care partners to join if they’re able, such as taking a walk around the block. Another tip for trying to work fitness into a packed schedule is doing frequent short exercises instead of ones that require long periods of time. An easy exercise to start with is walking for 20 minutes a day a few times a week. If you can’t be away from your care partner for that amount of time, try walking as frequently as your schedule allows. 18 / October 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

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SENIOR CARE CORNER: Read a blog

Low-impact activities such as walking, stretching and seated exercise can make a big difference. It’s important to avoid having an all-ornothing attitude about physical activity: Even taking a walk around the yard, an extra lap around the grocery store or a few passes through a nearby park or mall are better than doing nothing at all. You also could consider asking family, friends or neighbors to sit with your care partner while you take a few minutes for yourself — or you might consider finding more formal forms of respite care that would give you a break from your caregiving duties.

Tools to help Caregivers don’t need to go it alone when it comes to managing their physical health. Technology such as wearable fitness trackers can be incorporated into caregiving routines and help caregivers track their care partner’s physical activity and key health indicators, such as blood pressure, heart rate and calories burned daily. While the technology initially was geared toward young adults, more and

post on the benefits of wearable fitness devices for seniors. tinyurl.com/caregiving-tech

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Explore extensive statistics about the effects of caregiving on one’s physical health. tinyurl.com/health-tolls

more people age 65 and older are jumping on the tech trend. Wearable fitness tracker manufacturers have taken note and now are creating senior-friendly models. These devices also can be incorporated into caregivers’ self-care routines, which often may take a back seat to his or her care partner’s needs. According to the Family Caregiver Alliance, that’s important because 11 percent of family caregivers report their caregiving responsibilities have caused their physical health to deteriorate. Remember: Even small changes can make a world of difference in the physical health of caregivers and their care partners. Brandi Jewett is a writing specialist with Lyngblomsten, a Christian nonprofit organization that provides health care, housing and community resources to older adults in the Twin Cities. Lyngblomsten is a member of the Metropolitan Caregiver Service Collaborative.


TRAVEL

BLUFF

Perrot State Park sits at the confluence of the Mississippi and Trempealeau rivers, just a short side trip off the Great River Road. Photos courtesy of TravelWisconsin.com

20 / October 2018 / Minnesota Good Age


FING IT Explore Wisconsin on the Great River Road for scenic views, history, shopping and tasty food by

I JUST GOT BACK FROM THE WEST COAST.

The west coast of Wisconsin, that is — a drive along Highway 35, aka the Great River Road — voted by mapmaker Rand McNally (and me) as one of the most scenic in the land. The route on the Wisconsin side of the Mississippi — prettier than the one on the Minnesota border, gotta admit — meanders between the river and forests that climb stunning limestone bluffs. Lucky us: They were missed by an Ice Age glacier which flattened every last molehill in its path. Today charming

small towns with roots in the 1800s beckon visitors to pull over and savor life along Main Street. The full Great River Road National Scenic Byway — which starts near Lake Itasca in northern Minnesota and runs all the way to the Gulf of Mexico in Louisiana — is a whopping 3,000 miles long and takes 36 hours (or 10 days) to drive. We explored just a small (three-hour) section of the route from south to north, starting in Prairie du Chien and ending in Maiden Rock. Get there by traveling four hours southeast on Minnesota Highway 52 from the Twin Cities.

Carla Waldemar

You can do this route in reverse if you like, of course. Either way, do it soon and you’ll spot fall colors galore on those hovering, rocky bluffs.

Prairie du Chien

Real-estate speculator Hercules Louis Dousman arrived here in 1820 and became the wealthiest man in town. (He’s often called Wisconsin’s first millionaire.) His son inherited his ultra-ornate Italianate mansion, Villa Louis, and added a racetrack and stables to fuel his horseracing passion.

Minnesota Good Age / October 2018 / 21


Plan your trip!

See travelwisconsin.com or call 800-432-8747. To learn more about the Great River Road National Scenic Byway, see experiencemississippiriver.com.

Today the home is a historical site with every last inch of the interior decorated in intricate patterns, and it boasts heating by an ultra-modern device — the radiator! Those ornate trappings are nearly all original, unfolding the upstairs versus downstairs drama via guided tours (villalouis.wisconsinhistory.org). But history started even earlier in this town of 6,000 folks: Fort Crawford

was designed by explorer William Clark (of Lewis and Clark fame) to house the Missouri volunteers called into action in the War of 1812, when soon-to-be-president Zachary Taylor led troops against the British here. Reenactments occur every July. Pete’s Hamburger Stand came along a little later. Since 1909, the Main Street shack has sported lines down the block

— or head to Rowdy’s D&D Bar & Grill, whose sign promises the “2nd-Best Burger in Town.” Continue to Valley Fish & Cheese, run for 40 years by Mike Valley, who does most of the fishing and all of the smoking of catfish, gator, turtle and more. Valley says he cleans 1,000 pounds of fish per day, checks turtle traps and lines for mussels, whose shells provide “pearl”

▲ Stockholm Pie Company offers hearty sandwiches, plus dozens of handmade pies by the slice, plus espresso drinks. 22 / October 2018 / Minnesota Good Age


buttons, and still has time to create cheeky signs like “Approved by the Sturgeon General.” Shelves of impulse purchases contain treasures such as muskrat skulls. Fun fact: Though Prairie du Chien translates in French to mean “prairie of the dog,” the name isn’t referring to prairie dogs, but rather the name of a Native American chief who lived in the area.

Genoa

Continue north to the brand-new — started in 2013 and completed in 2018! — Great River Road Interpretive Center at the at Genoa National Fish Hatchery. It’s not only an aquarium where you can view prehistoric-looking sturgeons, but it also details the cruel story of the Battle of Bad Axe after white settlers chased Natives off their land, and the surrender of Black Hawk to save his tribe’s women and children. (It didn’t work: They were all

slaughtered.) Other exhibits describe the Mississippi as a trading route since preColumbian times, the locks and dams that tame the river and conservation efforts.

La Crosse

This vibrant river town, driven by three colleges and a major medical institution, is worth a visit, too. Navigate the corkscrew road to Grandad Bluff for a dramatic overview, then visit the historic, brick-clad downtown, featuring intricate architectural details. Primed by a jolt of caffeine at Grounded Patio Café (wine bar, too), pop into Finnottes Nuts & Chocolate Shop to satisfy those two basic food groups. Best seller? Turtle-like alligators and “anything with sea salt,” says its proprietor of 37 years. If it’s cold and sweet you’re craving, head to The Pearl Ice Cream Parlor and join the line, longer than airport security, for one

of its two dozen flavors. Step into Painted Porch for contemporary twists on furnishings, such as a kitchen scale painted baby blue. The nearby Antique Center of La Crosse boasts finds such as beaded moccasins, a bandolier complete with bullets and Kennedy campaign buttons. Pump House Regional Arts Center welcomes visitors to its galleries. Continue to the Dahl Auto Museum for lustful glances at shined-up Chevys and more. To troll the city’s streets, hop aboard a trolley at the riverside visitors center for a narrated tour of La Crosse’s many opulent mansions, with styles ranging from Queen Anne to Prairie and beyond. The La Crosse Queen beckons with paddleboat tours of the Mississippi to spy wildlife, beaches and locks. Sunset is the time to linger at the riverside promenade, watching the sun sink into Minnesota.

Minnesota Good Age / October 2018 / 23


Eats? Hackberry’s Bistro calls on local growers to fuel its menu with creative wonders like ratatouille toast, an heirloom tomato plate built upon a cheddar biscuit and its famed beet salad, starring watermelon and mint crème fraiche. The city’s new Charmant Hotel — a lavishly refurbished candy factory — serves wood-fired pizzas on its seeand-be-seen rooftop. Across the street, the brand-new La Crosse Distilling Co. has partnered with Minneapolis James Beard chef Jorge Guzman, formerly with Surly Brewing Co., to run the show, which includes lunch and dinner served in the tasting room. A longtime D’Amico chef, Jay Sparks, moved here to open Lovechild, a destination dining spot for the fare he loves to cook and eat — lamb spiedini with harissa yogurt, watermelon and feta salad and a hearty pozole verde, to name a few. Pasta favorites include pappardelle in savory gorgonzola cream, and maltagliati topped with carnitas, poblano crème and Manchego. Continue (if still upright) with the Catalan halibut or Moroccan lamb shank. Or revisit the speakeasy era at Digger's Sting, all dark and cushy, for steak or ribs and hooch. Speaking of alcohol, the city now boasts half a dozen craft breweries. One of the leaders is Pearl Street Brewery, offering tours of its converted-factory site.

Alma

▲▲Maiden Rock Apples, Winery & Cidery includes the option to pick your own eating apples. Photo by Sarah Jackson 24 / October 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

Continuing our drive, we entered the stretch known as the artists’ region, according to Daniel Kordiak, who owns the mittel-European coffeehouse called Fire & Ice, dominated by a behemoth brass machine. Out back is a walled garden, featuring fountains, topiaries, a reproduction Prague clock and more.


Kordiak also owns the Hotel de Ville across the street, determined to outdo the Grand Hotel Budapest in décor. Alma boasts 14 galleries, according to Kordiak, along with the newly reopened Big River Theatre.

Pepin

Steer next to this little burg, where the Laura Ingalls Wilder Museum stands on the side of the road. A country road leads to a reproduction of the log cabin where she was born in 1837, site of the Little House in the Big Woods. As we peeked in, we were joined by visitors from Amsterdam. Folks swarm to Pepin for the iconic Harbor View Café, going on 38 years serving frikadeller (Swedish meatballs), cassoulet, halibut and a lot more. No reservations are taken, so follow the drill and grab a glass of wine to sit outdoors and watch the trains streak by as sailboats bob in the waterfront marina.

Swedish), Abode Gallery & Design (outfit your home) and Northern Oak Amish Furniture (cutting boards, too). Then take a break at the waterfront for a bit of eagle-spotting.

Stockholm

Maiden Rock

Seven miles away, this hamlet (population 62, mostly artists) explodes with visitors on the weekends. The town’s sole crossroad holds eateries like the Stockholm Pie Company, offering hearty sandwiches plus dozens of pies by the slice — a life-changing butterscotch meringue to tangy triple berry. Lena’s Lucky Star (under the sign of a former Texaco station) features burgers, beer and music. Bogus Creek Café & Bakery, with a garden setting, is all about locavore fare. Peer into the tiny museum, to see “Mabel Johnson’s rolling pin” and a map bristling with pins marking hometowns of Swedish visitors, then hit the top shops, including The Purple Turtle Artisan Collective (elite crafts), Ingebretsen’s Nordic Marketplace (all things

Galleries and shops in Stockholm (above) and Riverside Park in La Crosse (below).

Our grand tour finished in this village (population 119), where a quartet of classy shops await — Smiling Pelican Bakeshop, Cultural Cloth (imports from 25 countries), Green Queen (accessories) and Sacred Heart Gallery (Mexican tin). Got extra time? Enjoy a two-for-one trip to Maiden Rock Apples, Winery & Cidery (5 miles inland), where this time of year you can taste wine and/or cider AND pick your own eating apples in a picture-perfect orchard. Carla Waldemar is an award-winning food/travel/arts writer. She edits the annual Zagat Survey of Twin Cities restaurants and writes food and travel articles for publications around the world. She lives in Uptown.

Minnesota Good Age / October 2018 / 25


FINANCE

Feeling fit — financially! BY LARRY KALLEVIG

G

etting into shape isn’t easy, and it doesn’t happen overnight. It takes dedication and education — and often a commitment to converting bad habits into good ones. The same is true for anyone who wants to get their finances in shape. Of course, the journey to financial fitness can seem daunting, so let’s break it down into steps:

Step 1: Set a realistic goal. Looking like a supermodel might not be a realistic goal, and neither is achieving all of your financial desires right away. When it comes to money, there are three things most people wish they could accomplish — spending less, saving more and paying off debt. There’s likely room for improvement in all three areas, but ask yourself which is the most pressing to your personal financial situation. That’s a great place to start.

Step 2: Build a routine. A good workout ethic is built on a commitment to a routine. When you’re getting your finances in order, you need a budget. Make sure you know how much money is coming in and going out. You can use the old fashioned pen and paper or utilize some of the handy apps you can download for free. Refer to your budget often. Keeping your budget and your finances top of mind will help you stick to your routine. 26 / October 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

Step 3: Start at a slow pace. You can take off in a dead sprint, but you’ll likely get tired very quickly. In the same way, slow and steady wins the race with your finances. If you’re trying to save money, start small by making your lunches at home or skipping your morning trip to the coffee shop two or three times a week. Continue to look for areas to save and slowly incorporate them into your budget. You will see the savings add up in the long run!

Step 4: Hit the gym regularly. We all wish we could start seeing a difference right away, but it’ll take more than one trip to the gym for changes to appear. You also won’t see big changes after one

Going to the gym is much easier when you pack your bag the day before. In the same way, don’t wait until the last minute to start planning your retirement.


week of sticking to your budget. Write down your financial goals and refer to them often to stay motivated. The more you visualize yourself reaching your goals, the less elusive they’ll seem.

Step 5: Burn off fat. Fat is the excess weight that’s holding us back, much like debt. Make a plan to pay down your high-interest debt. A good plan of action is called the snowball method: Keep paying all your bills, but be sure to make larger payments on your smallest debt, which is the easiest to pay off quickly. Once you’ve paid off that debt, dedicate as much money as you can to your nextsmallest debt. Tackling these smallest debts first allows you to attain modest successes to keep your momentum and motivation going, creating a virtual snowball effect.

Step 6: Plan ahead. Going to the gym is much easier when you pack your bag the day or night before. In the same way, don’t wait until the last minute to start planning your retirement. Be sure to take advantage of 401(k) plans your employer offers. You may also consider contributing to an IRA or Roth IRA account. If you can, contribute 10 to 15 percent of your salary to your retirement accounts. You can even increase your contributions gradually to help you — and your budget — adjust. Be patient! Getting financially fit takes time. If you find yourself struggling, get a trainer — or in this case, a financial professional — to help coach you along. Larry Kallevig is the owner of Haven Financial Group in Burnsville, Minn. For more than 15 years, Larry has been helping his clients create financial plans that ensure dependable and comfortable income in retirement. Learn more at havenfinancialgroup.com.

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NOTES

Sun butter is sold at most grocery stores. You can find chocolate-covered sunflower seeds at Trader Joe’s, which also carries sun butter. The chlorogenic acid (chlorophyll) in sunflower seeds can react with baking soda/ powder during baking, which can cause a green color when the cookies cool. Though the off hue is harmless, it’s a good idea to reduce the baking soda/powder by about a third when substituting sun butter in existing recipes. Find tried-and-true sun butter recipes at sunbutter.com. Sources: Adapted from Bakerita.com Photo by Bakerita.com

Minnesota Good Age / October 2018 / 29


NOW HEAR THIS Dave Fielding delights in bringing historically rich choir performances to Minnesota audiences

By Julie Kendrick Photos by Tracy Walsh

30 / October 2018 / Minnesota Good Age


SINGING TOGETHER — IN CELEBRATION, IN WORSHIP AND IN GRIEF — IS AN ESSENTIAL PART OF THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE. FOR AS LONG AS WE’VE GATHERED TOGETHER, WE’VE FOUND WAYS TO BLEND OUR INDIVIDUAL VOICES INTO SOMETHING BIGGER THAN ANY SINGLE ONE OF US. For Dave Fielding, 72, a self-described musical archaeologist and programming administrator for the nonprofit Oratorio Society of Minnesota, the joy of bringing choral voices together has led to a new calling — the discovery and preservation of music that might otherwise have been forgotten. “I love the quote from Hans Christian Andersen that says, ‘When words fail, music speaks,’” Fielding said. “Music has spoken to me all my life, and it has been that voice that has drawn me to perform and study the craft.”

Minnesota Good Age / October 2018 / 31


I’M GIVING A NEW VOICE TO COMPOSERS, AND THAT’S WHAT GETS MY ADRENALINE GOING. Devoted to music Fielding spent 30 years working for Eastern and Northwest airlines in executive-level service positions. But his avocation has always been music. “My dad was an amateur musician, but he wisely counseled me that I would struggle to make a living as a musician and needed to find something else to do,” Fielding said. “I was always good at math and science.” So Fielding, who grew up in Summit, New Jersey, about 25 miles west of Manhattan, earned a bachelor’s degree in engineering from the University of Michigan and an MBA from the New York Institute of Technology. Even as he was rising in the ranks at the airlines, Fielding never lost his deep love of music. An amateur singer and

Detail of the organ in the main sanctuary at St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral in Minneapolis, a frequent performance space for the Oratorio Society of Minnesota.

organist, he sang in several local choirs in the Twin Cities, including the Minnesota Chorale, St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral Choral Society and the Oratorio Society, a 90-voice, auditionbased choral ensemble that’s now in its 39th season. After retiring from his day job in 2011, Fielding was able to devote himself to music full time. His first move was to attend music theory and composition classes at Augsburg College. It was an enlightening experience. “[It] showed me that while I would not be successful as a composer of music, my interest in the art — and the time that retirement affords me — could allow me to help composers’ music be heard again,” he said.

Creating a repertoire Though Fielding’s name might not be familiar to many — except to diligent program readers — many of the productions with which he’s been involved stand out as major events in the Twin Cities classical music scene, including the 2014 world premieres of The Music of Downton Abbey and A Downton Abbey Christmas. Earlier this year was the world premiere of a commissioned work by composer Roger Ames, The Greatest Generation: An American Oratorio, which tells the story of a soldier and his family on the home front during World War II through the familiar music of the 1940s.


“We always start from the point of view of the story,” Fielding said. “There has to be a reason to put the concert together, a story to tell.” Working with the Oratorio Society’s artistic director, Matthew Mehaffey, Fielding helps conceptualize concert ideas by researching music that directly supports the story and its historical events. Performances by the society often include visuals, such as films and slideshows, alongside the music. For the 2016 performance Voices of Light: The Passion of Joan of Arc, for example, the society’s volunteer singers, along with its paid orchestra and conductor, performed entirely behind a giant screen showing a silent film. “That was a huge risk for us financially,” Fielding said. “We believed in what we were doing.”

The Great War Fielding’s latest effort goes beyond the usual reaches of the Oratorio Society with a 150-voice production — Lest We Forget: World War I Armistice Centenary Concert — on the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Armistice, which ended World War I on Nov. 11, 1918, at the “11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month.” This co-production of the Oratorio Society of Minnesota, the University of Minnesota School of Music and Northrop will be on Veterans Day (Nov. 11) at Northrop at the University of Minnesota. In addition to historic compositions from the era, the concert will include the U.S. premiere of renowned British composer Patrick Hawes’ The Great War Symphony, which will premiere on the same day at New York’s Carnegie Hall as part of a joint premiere agreement. As an organist himself, Fielding notes with pride that the concert will include Northrop’s newly restored, historic AeolianSkinner pipe organ. World War I, Fielding said, has become a forgotten war of sorts, lumped in with Veterans Day with little recognition of how catastrophic it was for the world, Europe and even Minnesota. More than 886,000 British military personnel died during World War I, more than 15 times the number of U.S. lives lost during the Vietnam War (about 58,000). In Minnesota, 118,500 people served in the first world war, including 57,413 who went overseas at a time when the state’s population was around 2 million. Of the 3,607 Minnesota war deaths, 1,432 were killed in combat or died of wounds. The others died of complications from the Spanish influenza outbreak in the fall of 1918.

Dave Fielding has made a hobby out of converting handwritten manuscripts like this one (left) into fully notated versions (below), using the musicnotation software known as Finale. Images courtesy of Dave Fielding

Minnesota Good Age / October 2018 / 33


Dave Fielding at St. Mark's Episcopal Cathedral.

LEST WE FORGET In this centenary concert — a co-production of the Oratorio Society of Minnesota and University of Minnesota School of Music and Northrop — audience members will experience a variety of classical works related to wartime, including the U.S. premiere of renowned British composer Patrick Hawes’ The Great War Symphony, a four movement, hour-long work for soloists, chorus and orchestra. WHEN: 4 p.m. Nov. 11 WHERE: Northrup Auditorium, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis COST: $18–$58 INFO: northrop.umn.edu/events/lest-we-forget

34 / October 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

Fielding is working with the governor’s office to issue a Bells of Peace proclamation as part of a national effort to encourage churches to ring bells at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11 in remembrance of the war. He also hopes to raise awareness about The Great War with the Veterans Day concert. “Maybe we can challenge people to go learn more,” he said.

Finding lost works Over the years, Fielding has discovered a passion for finding unpublished or rarely performed works and giving them new life through performances by the local groups. John Nuechterlein, president of the American Composers Forum, which is based in St. Paul, has seen Fielding’s research skills in action. “Dave gets a special thrill from uncovering little-known pieces that have been neglected,” Nuechterlein said. More than 10 years ago, Fielding discovered an exceptionally early work by the prominent 20th century British composer Ralph Vaughan Williams, written when the composer was just a student. Through “dogged communication” with the Ralph Vaughan Williams Society in England, Fielding managed to get permission to present the world premiere of a piece called Vexilla Regis in 2009 at St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral in Minneapolis.


MUSIC HAS SPOKEN TO ME ALL MY LIFE, AND IT HAS BEEN THAT VOICE THAT HAS DRAWN ME TO PERFORM AND STUDY THE CRAFT. The Oratorio Society, a volunteer, audition-based choir, routinely performs concerts with a paid orchestra and conductor at venues around the Twin Cities. Photo courtesy of Dave Fielding

If you’re wondering how big a deal this is, the answer is — very. prominent English composer, who lived from 1848 until 1918. “World premieres of music by dead composers are a rare thing,” It will take Fielding almost a year to do the musical notation, Nuechterlein said. which will include creating sheet music for all the necesNuechterlein, who earlier this year announced his own retiresary orchestral and choral parts for each piece, including the ment, said Fielding represents an example of how one can lead a conductor’s score. productive and useful life in retirement. “I’ve done two works so far,” Fielding said, who has 10 to go. Nuechterlein said: “He has an innate curiosity that leads him “I’m just taking them one at a time.” naturally toward learning new things and accomplishing new goals.” Fielding does scoring in Finale, the gold standard of musicnotation software in the U.S. Keeping score Finale isn’t the only software Fielding’s taught himself to But Fielding doesn’t just find old works, he also — in some cases use. In preparing for other Oratorio Society productions, he’s — painstakingly converts the raw autographed manuscripts from also picked up graphic design skills, graduating from Publisher the composers into sheet music that professional musicians can to InDesign over the years, to spearhead concert promotions, use for performances. advertising and programs. He made a particularly big splash in developing the two “He works so hard,” said his wife of 42 years, Heidi Fielding. Downton Abbey shows with the Oratorio Society, finding pieces “It’s all day long at the computer. And all of it is just for pure love beloved among fans of the TV series, including the music that and not for any profit at all.” played during Matthew’s proposal to Mary at Christmastime. Indeed, all of Fielding’s work is volunteer/unpaid. “Every single one of those pieces I found through various Mehaffey said it’s fitting that Fielding calls himself a sources in the U.K.,” he said. “I then assembled them and musical archaeologist. created the scores.” “He finds something that was lost — carefully extracts and Today Fielding is in the midst of a new challenge he’s cleans it up — and presents it to the world,” he said. “The only dubbed 'The Parry Project,' his personal quest to find and difference between Dave and someone who digs up dinosaurs is bring to life large-scale works for chorus and orchestra by that Dave’s goal is to get what he finds out of the museum and Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry, a prolific and onceinto our musical lives.” Minnesota Good Age / October 2018 / 35


LOOKING BACK

Dave Fielding sits at the organ in the main sanctuary at St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral in Minneapolis

Thanks to digital resources like Finale, Fielding’s work could become virtually immortal. “Music that would previously have gone unheard will be available 100 years from now, thanks to him,” Mehaffey said. Though 'The Parry Project' could turn into a performance for the Oratorio Society, Fielding’s first goal is to get the digital musical notation into university libraries. “It’s resurrecting the music so that others in the future can take it to whatever level they want,” Fielding said. “This is my legacy. I’m not looking to sell it. It’s just what I do.”

Stepping up strategy Mehaffey said Fielding’s business acumen has helped the Oratorio Society become better positioned to attract funding and build audiences. “He encouraged us to develop a three-year programming plan and a marketing strategy that included building extra-musical partnerships within the community,” he said. “There is no way we could have presented the creative projects of the last five years without his work.” Fielding is currently in the planning stages for an Oratorio Society concert in April 2019 — Victoria: A Life in Music, celebrating the story of Queen Victoria on the bicentennial of her birth in 1819. “I set out to find music that was either composed for the Queen or which was used in major events, such as her coronation,” Fielding said. 36 / October 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

Some the projects Dave Fielding has been involved with include The Music of Downton Abbey (March 2014), A Downton Abbey Christmas (December 2014), To Fly Unbounded: A Musical Celebration of the Joy of Flight (March 2015), Voices of Light: The Passion of Joan of Arc (April 2016), The Greatest Generation: An American Oratorio (May 2018), Lest We Forget: World War I Armistice Centenary Concert (November 2018) and Victoria: A Life in Music (April 2019).

Next fall, Word Over All will celebrate the choral legacy of Walt Whitman on the 200th anniversary of his birth. “My excitement comes from finding a piece of music that’s maybe never been published or has been out of print, getting it onto a program and turning it into a performance,” Fielding said. “I’m giving a new voice to composers, and that’s what gets my adrenaline going.”

Committed to Minnesota The Fieldings have lived in Apple Valley for 27 years. Their son and daughter-in-law, who live in the metro area, recently welcomed the Fieldings’ first grandchild. “He’s only 6 months old, but he’s already showing a strong affinity for choral music,” Fielding said. The Fieldings met by chance when they were seated next to each other on a flight from Chicago to Miami, where they both were living and working for Eastern Air Lines. As they talked during the trip, they discovered their apartments were across the street from one another. And the rest is history. (They met in September and were married by March.) They lived all around the U.S. before choosing to make the Twin Cities their home. “You really can’t find a better location in terms of the arts, education, access to quality medical care and proximity to a major airport,” Fielding said. “We love it here, and we take full advantage of everything the area has to offer.” Julie Kendrick is a contributing writer for many local and national publications. She lives in Minneapolis. Follow her on Twitter @KendrickWorks.


Photo by Matthew Murphy

CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR OCTOBER

BEAUTIFUL: THE CAROLE KING MUSICAL

→ Long before she was a chart-topping music legend, she was Carol Klein, a Brooklyn girl with passion and chutzpah. Experience her legacy in this Tony- and Grammy award-winning hit musical. When: Oct. 22–27 Where: Orpheum Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: $39–$149 Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

ONGOING

YOU SMELL BARN → Celebrates rural life in the 1950s with the Church Basement Ladies, who are getting busy with life on the farm, where there are chores to be done and brandnew, original songs to be sung. When: Through Feb. 14 Where: Ames Center, Burnsville Cost: $32–$42 Info: ames-center.com

LITTLE WOMEN → See the world premiere of Kate Hamill’s adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s groundbreaking novel — first published 150 years ago — following the lives of four sisters.

When: Through Oct. 21 Where: Jungle Theater, Minneapolis Cost: $40–$50 Info: jungletheater.com

LIFE GOES ON → In this new musical, a surgeon, a Ukrainian immigrant, a foster child, a home-schooling mom and a widow all try to find their way through their loss and, ultimately, toward one another. When: Through Oct. 13 Where: Art House North, St. Paul Cost: $22–$27 Info: bucketbrigadetheater.com

OCT. 1–3

WORKSHOPS ON SEX AND AGING → Joan Price calls herself an advocate for ageless sexuality. She’s been called other things by the media — “senior sexpert” and (her favorite) “wrinkly sex kitten.” Events are non-explicit and non-sexual and include educational learning tools, images and props. When: Oct. 1: 7 Steps to Reclaiming Your Sexual Pleasure; Oct. 2: Great Sex Without Penetration; Oct. 3: How the Heck Do I Date at this Age? Where: Smitten Kitten, Uptown Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: smittenkittenonline.com Minnesota Good Age / October 2018 / 37


OCT. 2

SENIOR STROLL → → On the first Tuesday of every month, ages 55 and older are invited explore a part of the zoo and learn a bit, too — all before the venue opens to the public. When: 9–10 a.m. Oct. 2 Where: Como Zoo and Conservatory, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: comozooconservatory.org

OCT. 4–NOV. 15

RADIO GALS

→→Set in the 1920s when radio ruled the airwaves and small stations thrived, this razzamatazz musical comedy follows Hazel Hunt from Cedar Ridge, Arkansas, who broadcasts from her front parlor with her “all-girl” orchestra, The Hazelnuts. When: Oct. 4–Nov. 15 Where: Minnesota Masonic Heritage Center, Bloomington Cost: $27–$36 Info: masonicheritagecenter.org

OCT. 5–6

TEXTILE GARAGE SALE POP UP →→Artists, crafters, church groups, guilds doing charity work and bargain hunters can pick up fabric, yarn, thread, notions, kits, patterns, magazines, books, beads, buttons and tools, all at garage-sale prices. When: Oct. 5–6 Where: Textile Center, Minneapolis Cost: $15 in advance, $20 at the door on Oct. 5, and only $1 on Oct. 6 Info: textilecentermn.org

HEALTH & FITNESS EXPO →→Explore more than 100 vendors with the latest in running and fitness gear. While you’re there, learn more about the most recent equipment and nutrition tips. When: Oct. 5–6 Where: St. Paul RiverCentre Cost: FREE Info: rivercentre.org 38 / October 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

OCT. 6

FALL FLOWER SHOW OPENING DAY →→While many Minnesota gardens are winding down for the winter season, the Sunken Garden at the Marjorie McNeely Conservatory will be in full bloom with colorful chrysanthemums and more. When: Oct. 6. Where: Como Park Zoo & Conservatory, St. Paul Cost: FREE. Donations are encouraged. Info: comozooconservatory.org

OCT. 12

VICTORIAN SUPERSTITIONS →→Discover how and why superstitions captivated the Victorian imagination through excerpts from Ramsey family letters and journals. Then play Victorian fortune-telling games in the parlor. When: Oct. 12. This program is intended for ages 18 and up and is offered at 7 and 8:30 p.m. Where: Alexander Ramsey House, St. Paul Cost: $10–$11 Info: mnhs.org/event/6163

OCT. 12–NOV. 11

OLEANNA

→→Written by Pulitzer-winning playwright, David Mamet, this seething investigation of political correctness takes on a new context amid today’s high-profile accusations of sexual harassment. When: Oct. 12–Nov. 11 Where: Matchbox Theater, Minneapolis Cost: $10–$25 Info: thematchboxtheater.com

OCT. 13

TWIN CITIES BOOK FESTIVAL →→Acclaimed authors, local literary heroes, kids’ activities and a used-book sale are at the heart of this daylong festival. When: 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Oct. 13 Where: Minnesota State Fairgrounds, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: raintaxi.com

TPT TOURS →→Get a behind-the-scenes look at the newly redesigned station, including the new sets for Almanac and Street Space.


When: Oct. 13, Nov. 10 and Dec. 8 Where: TPT Studios, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: eventbrite.com

OCT. 13–14

RED WING ART FESTIVAL → Celebrating its 52nd year, this juried event draws more than 16,000 visitors to bluff country during fall color season. When: Oct. 13–14 Where: Downtown Red Wing Cost: FREE Info: redwingarts.org

OCT. 17–18

MASTER OF ILLUSION → See a live reenactment of the Selbit Sawing, a trick invented by a small-time magician in 1920s London. When: Oct. 17–18. This program is presented at 7, 8 and 9 p.m. and is suitable for ages 18 and older. Where: James J. Hill House, St. Paul Cost: $18–$20 Info: mnhs.org/event/6286

OCT. 18–27

SHADOWS & SPIRITS OF THE CAPITOL → Join a one-hour guided tour of the restored Capitol through the shadowy rotunda, hallways and chambers, lit with original early 1900s lighting. Visitors will encounter historical “spirits” — including a night watchman, a Civil War veteran and a suffragist — who will tell stories of the Capitol’s early history. When: Oct. 18, 19, 20, 25, 26 and 27 Where: Minnesota State Capitol, St. Paul Cost: $12–$15; this tour is appropriate for ages 7 and up. Info: mnhs.org/event/5457

OCT. 21–MAY 19

SUNDAYS AT LANDMARK → This annual fall-to-spring series of cultural events kicks off with a free Saint Paul Civic Symphony performance.

When: 1 p.m. Oct. 21 Where: Landmark Center, St. Paul Cost: Most events are FREE. Info: landmarkcenter.org

South St. Paul HRA • 50+ Community • Income Based Rent • All Utilities Paid

OCT. 21

BAKING WORKSHOP FOR PEOPLE WITH MEMORY LOSS → Whip up a delicious treat in this baking experience tailored for people living with dementia and their caregivers as part of Spark!, an alliance of cultural institutions that offer programming for people with memory loss.

• Newly Remodeled • Elevators • Controlled Entries • On Site Caretaker Call for an appointment 651-554-3270

South St Paul HRA GA 1018 12.indd When: Oct. 21 Where: Mill City Museum, Minneapolis Cost: FREE, but reservations are required. Info: mnhs.org/event/6311

2

8/24/18 1:57 PM

OCT. 23

AN EVENING WITH WALTER MONDALE → The former vice president — in a conversation with Professor Larry Jacobs of the Humphrey School of Public Affairs — reflects on America as it was 50 years ago in light of today’s current political climate. When: Oct. 23 Where: Minnesota History Center, St. Paul Cost: $30 Info: mnhs.org/event/6379

Visit hobt.org or call 612.721.2535 for more info.

Aging-in-Place Specialists

OCT. 25–28

SAGE-ING INTERNATIONAL 2018 GLOBAL CONFERENCE → Explore the many facets of conscious aging through a wide spectrum of cultures and traditions with presentations, workshops, keynote speakers, rituals, interactive sessions, fireside chats, walks in nature, music and dance. Learn how to call on stories from the past, live fully into an insightful present and activate a transformative new narrative. When: Oct. 25–28 Where: Oak Ridge Hotel and Conference Center, Chaska Cost: Single-day admission starts at $175. Info: sage-ing.org

STAIRLIFTS • CUSTOM RAMPS • SAFETY RAILS AUTOMATIC DOORS • BATHROOM MODIFICATIONS

Maintain your independence by making your home safe & accessible

Slightly-used stairlifts available Guaranteed buyback program

651.403.3038 BC590012

OcelBuilders.com Minnesota Good Age / October 2018 / 39


Brain teasers SUDOKU

WORD SEARCH MINNESOTA MUSIC

ANDREWS APOLLONIA ATMOSPHERE CABOOZE CHAMBER DOOMTREE GARLAND

Source: Prince

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2. Whoopee John

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40 / October 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

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ANSWERS

Break the code to reveal a quote from a famous person. Each letter represents another letter.

ORPHEUM OSTROUSHKO REPLACEMENTS SEMISONIC SUBURBS VOCALESSENCE WESTERBERG

TRIVIA 1. Duluth (He lived in Hibbing from age 6 to 18.) 3. The World War I Armistice

CRYPTOGRAM

JAYHAWKS KAMMAN KEILLOR MACPHAIL NORTHROP ORCHESTRA ORFIELD


HELP US BRING JOY TO ISOLATED SENIORS WITH YOUR GIFT!

TRIVIA LAND OF 10,000 TUNES 1. Bob Dylan was born in what Minnesota city? 2. John Wilfahrt is the real name of what 1940s and ’50s Minnesota polka star? 3. The Oratorio Society of Minnesota will honor what historical event in a Nov. 11 concert called Lest We Forget? Sources: biography.com, ipapolkas.com and the cover story in this issue!

Gifts for Seniors provides donated gifts and life-affirming personal contact during the winter holidays and year round to isolated seniors in the Twin Cities metro area with the critical support of volunteers, donors, and community partners – people like you.

HOW TO HELP Host a Gift Barrel • Organize a Gift Drive Individual Shopping • Find us on AmazonSmile

SUDOKU WORD SCRAMBLE Vanska, Ordway, Gospel

GIFT IDEAS Cardigans • Slacks • Shirts • Blouses • Sweats • Fleece Nightwear • Robes • Socks • No-skid slippers • Hats • Scarves Mittens • Towel sets • Small appliances • Clocks (big numbers) Sheet sets • Blankets • Pillows • Dishes • Flatware CD or DVD players • Books • Music • Movies • Puzzles Personal care sets • Grocery gift cards • Cash donations Feel free to use this list for shopping ideas! We only accept new, unwrapped gift items.

giftsforseniors.org | 612-379-3205 info@giftsforseniors.org Minnesota Good Age / October 2018 / 41

CROSSWORD

ANSWERS

CRYTPOGRAM People say I’m wearing heels because I’m short. I wear heels because the women like ‘em.


Crossword

68 Not e’en once 69 Wall Street’s Standard & __

DOWN

ACROSS

1 “We Create Music” org. 6 “You’re a riot” 10 Sportscaster Albert 14 Diner counter alternative 15 Hasn’t paid yet 16 Jai __ 17 Job 19 Govt. crash investigator 20 Weather-affecting current 21 Give up all expectations 23 __ Strauss, female touring guitarist for Alice Cooper 25 Greek “i” 26 BB-shaped legume 29 Switching from cable TV to streaming, say 34 Relaxing time in the chalet 36 Skin ink 42 / October 2018 / Minnesota Good Age

37 Four-time ’60s-’70s A.L. All-Star __ Powell 38 42-yr.-old skit show 40 Regarding 41 Not at all abundant 44 Totally loses it 47 Bedsheet buyer’s concern 49 Observe 50 Pop’s Lady __ 51 1982 Disney sci-fi film 53 Most ordinary 57 Hydrocodone, e.g. 61 Like un maníaco 62 Composition for violin, viola and cello… and what the starts of 17-, 29- and 47-Across comprise 64 Color of raw silk 65 Sights from la mer 66 Longtime senator Specter 67 Vintage Jags

1 Having the skills 2 Window box dirt 3 Hartford’s st. 4 Had food delivered 5 “Hooked on” language teaching method 6 In what way 7 GI on the run 8 Valiant 9 Invites to the prom, say 10 Borough across the Harlem River from the Bronx 11 Voice above tenor 12 Abrasive tool 13 Hard-to-explain feeling 18 Pics 22 Bluesy James 24 Boats like Noah’s 26 Brew brand with a blue-ribbon logo 27 Pleistocene period 28 Cheering and yelling, as a crowd 30 Down Under dog 31 “Who’s there?” response from a couple 32 Naples night 33 Golden-egg layer 35 Flagrant 39 Rude dude 42 Actor Scott or his dad James 43 Enters sneakily 45 2001 scandal company 46 Temporary solution 48 Structure protected by a moat 52 The “N” in “TNT” 53 Theater suffix 54 What a key opens 55 Farmland measure 56 One in a forest 58 Woody Guthrie’s son 59 Stadium section 60 Many millennia 63 Dead Sea country: Abbr.


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Profile for Minnesota Good Age

October 2018  

October 2018  

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