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JUNE 2019

When Dayton’s was a big deal

Your favorite finance tips Old-fashioned rhubarb crunch!

A houseboat vacation in MN! at Voyageurs National Park

Dave Dahl

KSTP-TV’s longtime weatherman celebrates four decades on the air


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Contents

JUNE

18 BEST-KEPT SECRET

GOOD START

One of the most popular ways of visiting Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota is aboard a houseboat, with access to the open water and views of the Northern Lights.

FROM THE EDITOR

6 Weatherman Dave Dahl is a Twin Cities treasure.

MY TURN

8 Thriving at 85: Yes, that’s a thing.

Courtesy of Voyagaire Houseboats

MEMORIES

10 Dayton’s wasn’t our state’s first big department store.

MINNESOTA HISTORY

12 Activist Nellie Stone Johnson was a leader in Minnesota.

GOOD HEALTH WELLNESS

32

ON THE COVER Dave Dahl became a meteorologist to help Minnesotans stay safe during extreme weather events. But in his free time, he and his wife, Julie, like to ride Harleys. Photos by Tracy Walsh

14 Dr. Michael Spilane wrote for Good Age for 35 years.

CAREGIVING

16 Don’t underestimate the power of time outside.

GOOD LIVING HOUSING SPOTLIGHT

24 The Legends of Woodbury features low rents for some.

FINANCE

26 Setting up your retirement requires mastering balance.

FINANCE TIPS

28 Check out our readers’ top personal finance tips.

IN THE KITCHEN

30 Celebrate rhubarb season with an old-fashioned treat.

38 40 BRAIN TEASERS

CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR

4 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age


FROM THE EDITOR

Six degrees of Dave Dahl Volume 38 / Issue 6 PUBLISHER

Janis Hall / jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER

Terry Gahan / tgahan@mngoodage.com

GENERAL MANAGER

Zoe Gahan / zgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR

Sarah Jackson / editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Sarah Adams, Megan Devine, Ed Dykhuizen Carol Hall, Skip Johnson, Julie Kendrick Dave Nimmer, Lauren Peck, Tracy Walsh

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Micah Edel

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Brenda Taylor

AD COORDINATOR

Hannah Dittberner / 612-436-4389 hdittberner@mngoodage.com

OFFICE MANAGER

Amy Rash / 612-436-5081 arash@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION

Marlo Johnson / distribution@mngoodage.com

37,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2019 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. To receive Good Age by mail, send a check for $18 with “Good Age subscription” in the memo.

6 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

W

BY SARAH JACKSON

hat a difference the weather makes! Just a few degrees change in temperature can turn a cleansing spring rain into a most unwelcome accumulation of treacherous spring snow. Precipitation of any kind can snarl a commute, making us late for engagements large and small — or leaving us in a ditch. On the other hand, an afternoon of sunshine, especially after a morning of grey, can lift our spirits, boost our gardens and even benefit our local farmers. Such meteorological nuances affect us in subtle—and not so subtle—ways every day. This is especially true in Minnesota, where our temps can swing 50 degrees in a 24-hour period — and where true catastrophe can strike when tornadoes touch down. This makes our radio and TV weather forecasters hugely important. Sure, weather apps are there for us every second, but meteorologists’ frequent updates — and knowledgeable interpretation of weather data — can ensure our safety when done right. Perhaps no one knows this better than this month’s well-known cover star — the tornado-chasing, Harley-riding, father/grandfather, philanthropist-educator and all-around charming guy who is Dave Dahl. For more than 40 years, Dahl has guided us through our state’s bizarre Midwestern weather, telling us what to expect and how to prepare, while also uniting us in the universal experience of dealing with the elements. Meeting Dahl, who is still going strong at 5 Eyewitness News, was a treat for me — not just because I got to see him in his element, wearing a one-of-a-kind leather jacket, riding his Harley-Davidson Screaming Eagle 103 down the streets of Stillwater. It was also because he’s just a down-to-earth kind of guy. Despite his success, he’s been through struggles in his life, too, including multiple bouts of skin cancer and a gnarly motorcycle accident that left him hospitalized. While we were on the sidewalk in Stillwater taking pictures, excited passersby all noticed him immediately. And the way he responded — so genuinely with his trademarked warm smile, without a hint of vanity — you’d have thought he was the mayor of the town. Dahl, 65, told me he’s not ready to retire from broadcasting just yet, but he’s excited to eventually ride his motorcycle more often with his wife, Julie, (she has her own) and to enjoy their soon-to-be-newly renovated home in Stillwater. For now, Dave will keep his forecasts coming in what he calls our state’s fully developed “theater of seasons.” “To me, Minnesota is one of the greatest spots in the world to get a variety of weather situations,” he said. “Honestly, I’d be bored doing weather in Los Angeles.” We understand, Dave. But could you do us a favor and bring a little of that L.A. weather our way?


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MY TURN

Thriving at 85

When you’re in your 70s, they think of you as just getting older. When you’re in your 80s, they start giving you respect.

Courtesy of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota

W

hen she first spoke up — at a meeting of the writers’ group at a senior residence where I volunteer — her remark surprised me: When you’re in your 70s, she said, they think of you as just getting older. When you’re in your 80s, they start giving you respect. Now that I think about it, it makes sense. I react differently when I learn that someone is in their 80s. It’s kind of like a magic marker, with a special meaning. I just figure they know more, they’ve survived more and, if they’re wise, they’ve ignored more and laughed more. Besides, I’m hanging around with more 80-yearolds these days. They’re my fishing buddies, my coffee mates, my concert companions. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota, celebrating its 85th birthday, is turning 8 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

BY DAVE NIMMER

— Arlene Leyden

a spotlight on men and women in their 80s, featuring them on a special webpage with short stories, pictures and videos. They range in age from 80 to 89. They sing, dance, act, garden, referee, exercise and volunteer. Judging from their pictures, they’re a joyous lot: on the move, in the mix and of the moment. And none moreso than Arlene Leyden, who’ll turn 90 this year. I know Leyden from my days teaching journalism at the University of St. Thomas. Her husband, Don, really started the department in the late 1950s and, for 15 years, Leyden was the college’s event planner. “I was kind of its Perle Mesta,” she said of the infamous American socialite. Leyden clearly shares Mesta’s grace and grit: Her husband died at age 57,

after their four children were out of high school, so Leyden stayed in the family house in St. Paul’s Mac-Groveland neighborhood, went to work and kept the faith. When she retired from St. Thomas, she started to travel regularly and volunteer frequently. Over the years, she’s been a tutor at Catholic schools, a food server at Dorothy Day, a driver for Meals on Wheels and a volunteer for Little Sisters of the Poor. And these days, she’s more involved than ever with her family, now including eight grandchildren. “Three of my children live in the Twin Cities,” she said. “I have my iPhone — and you can bet I am a texting grandmother.” The grandkids have seen the story about Leyden on the Blue Cross website, describing her love for acting and performing.


LEARN MORE

Blue Cross Blue Shield is shining the spotlight on Minnesota 80-somethings who are living life to the fullest and showing just how vibrant life can be at any age. To nominate a friend or even yourself, go to blog.bluecrossmn.com/ thriveat85.

She began as a student at White Bear Lake High School, playing the role of a Russian countess in You Can’t Take It With You. “I think my grandchildren were more impressed by the 82-year-old woman who could still do the splits,” she said of another thriver from St. Louis Park. Leyden can still act and perform. She’s been in several commercials including two for Best Buy and Grand Casino, and she performed an “impromptu monologue” for the folks at Blue Cross, poking fun at her kids for even suggesting she think about “an old folks’ home.” Judging from her talk and actions, Leyden has no intention of slowing down, leaving her home or restricting her outlook. “My parents both lived to be well over 100,” she said, “and were married for 83 years.” If Blue Cross keeps its “thriving in their 80s” program through next year, I’ll be eligible. That depends, however, on how they define “thriving.” I don’t water ski, jitterbug or pole vault. And a few months ago, I started going to a podiatrist to get my toenails trimmed. But I take the stairs instead of the elevator. I can find my car in the parking lot. And I haven’t sat on my glasses for at least a month.

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Dave Nimmer had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / June 2019 / 9


MEMORIES

When Dayton’s was a big deal BY CAROL HALL

I

’d always assumed Dayton’s was the first large department store in downtown Minneapolis. Wrong! Thank You for Shopping: The Golden Age of Minnesota Department Stores (which came out this past November) set me straight: “Donaldson’s set up shop along Nicollet Avenue in grand fashion with its ‘Glass Block’ structure in 1889. Dayton’s didn’t come along until 1902, and then as Goodfellow’s Dry Goods." Author Kristal Leebrick’s book also gives an account of the “Dayton’s Delivery” airplane: In a publicity stunt from 1919, a light aircraft, its wings removed, unloaded merchandise tagged, “By airplane from New York to Minneapolis for The Dayton Company,” street-side in front of the store

Focusing largely on Minneapolis department stores, Thank You for Shopping also presents the stories behind those in St. Paul and several other cities, including Fandel’s in St. Cloud, Choate’s in Winona and Freimuth’s in Duluth. The coffee-table-size book is lavishly illustrated with vintage advertisements, postcards, menus, sales slips and scads of photos. A couple of black and white shots immediately caught my eye. One depicts a gorgeous model showing off a Nettie Rosenstein gown in a Dayton’s 1959

▲ A postcard view of the Dayton Dry Goods Company, 1912 10 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

fashion show — similar to one I had in the 1960s for a formal occasion. Another black and white full-pager is of a street scene in front of St. Paul’s Emporium Department Store from November 1952. Christmas decorations are up. Women shoppers are bundled in winter coats and babushkas. A Chevy sedan — like the one I used to have — is waiting for the light to change. Perusing the book rekindled my memories of those days when shopping at these places was something of an event. Every September during my youth (in the late 1940s and early 1950s), my parents and I (then living in rural southwestern Minnesota) would jump in the car and take a much-anticipated drive to Mankato. We’d spend all afternoon at Brett’s Department Store on Front Street picking out my school clothes and maybe a new hat for my mother. A decade later, grown up and moved to Minneapolis, I’d ride the bus downtown,


⊳ In October 1958, Dayton’s transformed the main floor of its Minneapolis store into a Boulevard International, featuring small shops made to replicate those of a European village. Images courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society Press

Small-town girls, fresh out of high school and working in ʻthe Cities,’ we relished the cosmopolitan charm of the big department stores. and hit Dayton’s, Donaldson’s and Powers, in that order, comparison shopping for outfits for my secretarial job, and maybe slip over to Young Quinlan for a peek at their current (too pricy) high-fashion collection. Next, I’d meet up with fellow-shopper girlfriends at Dayton’s Sky Room for lunch. With its crystal chandeliers, city view and white tablecloths, dining there on wild rice soup and Mandarin chicken was a huge deal to us. Small-town girls, fresh out of high school and working in "the Cities," we relished the cosmopolitan charm of the big department stores: the smartly dressed mannequins, the elegant ladies rooms, the white-gloved elevator operators, viewing sparkly Christmas windows at night, with snow gently falling. Who’dathunk all of this one day would go away and be replaced by ordering from a computer screen? Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@mngoodage.com.

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Minnesota Good Age / June 2019 / 11


MINNESOTA HISTORY

The life of an activist BY LAUREN PECK

O

n June 11, 1945, Nellie Stone Johnson earned a seat on the Minneapolis library board, becoming the first-ever AfricanAmerican elected to a citywide post in Minneapolis. However, this political milestone was only one of many for Johnson during her lifetime. Born Nellie Saunders Allen in 1905, Johnson grew up the oldest of seven on family farms in Dakota County and Pine County. In both communities, she and her family were some of the only AfricanAmericans around, but she remembered experiencing little discrimination. “In our small towns, it was hard to be exclusionary to one family,” she noted. 12 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

Instead, her father, William, became incredibly involved in the community, including serving on the school board, organizing fellow farmers into dairy cooperatives and rallying for the Nonpartisan League, a political organization created to protect farming interests. He was also appointed to the Rural Electrification Association for Pine County, a government program to install electricity in isolated areas. “In our Pine County kitchen, there was always a coffee pot on the stove. I heard a lot there through my father talking to everyone in the community at our kitchen table over a cup of coffee,” Johnson remembered in her 2001 autobiography,

Nellie Stone Johnson: The Life of an Activist. In 1922, Johnson moved to Minneapolis to work and finish high school through the University of Minnesota. At the university, she met socialist union organizer Swan Assarson and began to get involved in labor and union issues. While she was working at the Minneapolis Athletic Club, a prestigious social club, the staff received a pay cut in 1934; the club claimed it couldn’t afford to pay its workers. In response, the employees, including Johnson, unionized, creating Local #665 of the Hotel Employees Union. Johnson went on to become one of the first women to serve on her local union’s contract negotiating committee, and she


⊳ Nellie Stone Johnson — pictured, far right, with members of the NAACP in 1954 — was instrumental in Minnesota politics as well as in national causes.

worked on issues such as ending segregated eating and locker room facilities for Minneapolis Athletic Club employees. By 1936, she was the first female vice president of her local union and sat on the statewide hotel and restaurant workers’ council. She also became increasingly involved in local and statewide politics, befriending people like Hubert Humphrey, whom she advised on union and civil rights issues. By 1944, Humphrey and Johnson both served on a committee that oversaw the merger of Minnesota’s Farmer-Labor and Democratic parties, creating the DFL. With Humphrey’s encouragement and support from the DFL, Johnson soon ran for a seat on the Minneapolis library board. The Minneapolis Tribune described her philosophy: “To her, books and education are the greatest forces in bringing about an understanding of all human relationships and in providing equality of opportunity.” Despite some pushback, such as the city’s head librarian writing a letter questioning a black woman’s ability to handle money, Johnson won her seat by 20,000 votes. The day after the election, she had a meeting to discuss the lack of black employees working at the library. After serving on the library board for six years, Johnson decided she was better at putting people into political office than working in one, so she never held a political job again, despite efforts from friends such as former Minneapolis mayor Don Fraser. But she stayed very involved in politics, including successfully lobbying for Minnesota to pass the Fair Housing Act in the 1960s, which outlawed racial discrimination in housing around the state.

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City Council. White asked her to become his chief aide, but she turned him down. In the 1980s, she served on the Minnesota State University Board and as a Minnesota member of the Democratic National Committee. Johnson finally retired from Nellie’s Alterations at age 91 and passed away at age 96 in April 2002. Nellie Stone Johnson Community School in the Hawthorne neighborhood of Minneapolis is named for her, and since 1989, the Nellie Stone Johnson Scholarship Program has worked to offer college scholarships to minority union members and their families in Minnesota. Lauren Peck is a public relations specialist for the Minnesota Historical Society.

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WELLNESS

Farewell, Dr. Spilane BY SARAH JACKSON

W

e have some sad news, Good Age readers. Dr. Michael Spilane — who wrote for Minnesota Good Age for 35 years — died peacefully at his home in Shoreview on May 13, 2019, after a battle with cancer. He was 77 years old. Spilane wrote a column for this magazine starting in 1982, just a few months after the publication launched in late 1981 as a St. Paul-based broadsheet newspaper. Spilane continued to write under titles such as Good Health, House Call and Your Health — through multiple ownership changes — until January 2017. He tackled myriad health challenges that pertained to seniors such as hearing loss, hair loss, bone density, cataracts, dry eyes, vascular health/cholesterol, tremors, dry skin, thyroid problems and incontinence as well as diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and cancer. His tone was direct. He voice was fact-based. And yet a current of kindness and wisdom seemed to run though his columns every month. “His column in Good Age was the first I’d turn to (after mine, that is),” said Good Age’s Memories columnist Carol Hall of Woodbury. “I really missed it when it stopped. I found it so interesting to read his take on illnesses afflicting seniors — always useful information one way or the other.” Bill Kosfeld, the former general manager/ publisher of Good Age, said Spilane’s advice and observations were “always practical, helpful and down-to-earth.”

14 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

“One could always tell that he cared a lot about improving the health of older people,” Kosfeld said. At times, Spilane waxed poetic as well as practical. He was open about the trials of aging on the human body. In a 2016 column titled War of attrition, he said: “The wear-and-tear theory of human aging puts much of the blame on our physical environment: Like tires that wear out because of continued friction against the road, humans wear out by continued exposure to innumerable physical and environmental forces.” Spilane was a lifelong Minnesotan, graduating from DeLaSalle High School, Saint John’s University and the University of Minnesota Medical School. After interning at Parkland Memorial Hospital in Texas, he returned to the University of Minnesota Medical School for a fellowship in internal medicine, including one year as chief resident. Board certified in internal medicine and geriatrics, Spilane was an assistant professor of medicine from 1973 until retirement in 2014. He spent his entire career at Saint Paul Ramsey/Regions Hospital, where he focused on the treatment of older adults. Spilane started the Seniors Comprehensive Care Clinic, a pioneering, team-based care delivery model. He initiated and was the director of the Department of Internal Medicine’s Fellowship in Geriatric Medicine from 1988 to 2011.

He was a beloved educator and mentor for hundreds of medical students, residents and fellows, as well as his devoted staff. In addition to his Good Age column, Spilane shared his enthusiasm for geriatrics and knowledge of medical care by giving numerous lectures to medical professionals as well as non-medical community groups. He served for 19 years on the board of directors for Volunteers of America, a national nonprofit dedicated to helping those in need. Beyond his love of medicine, he enjoyed running, biking, skiing, cooking for friends, his home in Shoreview and the Spilane family lake cottage in central Minnesota. He was greatly appreciated by his family for his loving and generous support.  He was preceded in death by parents, Jack and Lorraine, and sisters Patricia and Jacquelyn. He is survived by sisters Jeanne, Diane and Kathleen, brother John and many nieces and nephews —  and his special friends, Alice Connelly and Dr. David J. Griffin. Remembrances can be directed to Catholic Charities, Saint John’s University, the Union Gospel Mission or Little Brothers–Friends of the Elderly.   Thank you, Dr. Spilane, for bringing guidance, awareness, peace of mind, comfort and wisdom to the readers of Good Age for more than three decades. Special thanks to the family and friends of Dr. Michael Spilane, who shared his obituary information with us for this short tribute.


6

Dr. Michael Spilane addressed myriad health topics as an expert health writer for Good Age for 35 years. Read a selection of his columns at mngoodage.com. 6 | MINNESOTA

GOOD AGE

» LIFE: HEALTH

| JULY 2009

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Minnesota Good Age / June 2019 / 15


CAREGIVING

Making time for the outdoors BY SARAH ADAMS

I

t’s 70 degrees, the sun warms your face and radiates down through the rest of your body. You hear birds chirping, rustling leaves and feel a gentle breeze. Your shoes are off and the grass is cool and crisp beneath your feet. The outdoors have a special power — lifting spirits, bringing focus and improving health. However, routines can all too easily take over and before we know it, entire weeks can go by without us spending any quality time outside. Reaping the benefits of the outdoors can be especially difficult for caregivers due

to their many responsibilities. Caregivers experience higher levels of stress, depression, poor sleep and various chronic health conditions than their non-caregiving peers. Stress impacts our ability to sleep, focus, problem-solve and more. As caregivers, we want to combat those effects. Recent studies indicate that just 20 to 30 minutes outdoors can significantly decrease cortisol, your body’s stress hormone. Ultimately, the environment around us is important to our overall health and wellbeing, for both caregivers and care receivers. Fortunately, there are many

ways busy caregivers can seek out or enhance outdoor experiences:

Getting outside ⊲ Start a container garden. ⊲ Write outdoor time into your schedule — even if it’s just 15 minutes. ⊲ Many local and state parks have accessible spaces and/or designated times when they’re less busy, making it easier to bring the person you care for along with you. ⊲ Join a formal walking group — or start your own!

Hiking trails at Gooseberry Falls State Park in northern Minnesota

Recent studies indicate that just 20 to 30 minutes outdoors can significantly decrease cortisol, your body’s stress hormone.

16 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age


⊲ Do deep breathing outdoors — even if just for a minute or two. It may help you reset and move forward. ⊲ Adjust outdoor activities as needed using simple things like chairs, cushions or other adaptive equipment. ⊲ Seek support from others in achieving your outdoor goals whether in the form of encouragement, someone who can join you in the activity or someone to provide respite care.

LIVE MUSIC BY LOCAL MUSICIANS D E L I C I O U S F O O D T R U C K E AT S

L O C A L , C O O P E R AT I V E LY B R E W E D B E E R

Saturday, June 15 • 3:00–7:00 p.m. • West 7th Store 1500 West 7th Street, St. Paul 55102 • msmarket.coop Mississippi Market GA 0619 H6.indd 1

5/20/19 10:28 AM

Bringing the outdoors in ⊲ Keep indoor plants. ⊲ Look into the possibility of a sun lamp during winter months. Some insurance providers may cover the cost with a qualifying diagnosis. ⊲ Consider indoor parks and gardens to visit. Again, there may be adaptations that can be made for the person you care for or designated hours that are less busy if you would like to bring your loved one with you. ⊲ Consider listening to guided imagery or engage in virtual reality programs that “transport” you or the person you’re caring for to another place. Remember: Being outside can be rejuvenating, even in the winter months! Feel the crunch of snow, the tiny snowflakes dotting your nose, the cool air in your nose and lungs. Breathe in and out, be mindful of the moment and the connection to all that surrounds you. Sarah Adams is a licensed social worker with FamilyMeans’ Caregiving & Aging program in Stillwater and is a member of the Metropolitan Caregiver Services Collaborative (caregivercollaborative.org).

VOYAGEURS NATIONAL PARK

Crane Lake, Minnesota 1-800-882-6287 HouseboatVacation.com

Gifts for Seniors provides donated gifts and life-affirming personal contact during the winter holidays and year round to isolated seniors in the Twin Cities metro area with the critical support of volunteers, donors, and community partners – people like you.

giftsforseniors.org | 612-379-3205 info@giftsforseniors.org Minnesota Good Age / June 2019 / 17


TRAVEL

Voyagaire Houseboats’ 44-foot Sportcruiser sleeps up to 8 people with two private bedrooms and includes a full kitchen and bath, gas grill and a swim slide. It rents for $495 a day or $2,495 a week in Minnesota’s Voyageurs National Park. Photo courtesy of Voyagaire Houseboats


Bon Voyageurs! Beloved for its houseboat vacations, wildlife viewing and pure beauty, Voyageurs National Park is a far-north gem! By Megan Devine

Minnesota Good Age / June 2019 / 19


A waterfall runs through a dense forest at Voyageurs National Park

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id you know Minnesota is home to a national park? On the Canadian border, just west of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, sits one of Minnesota’s best-kept secrets — the vast and beautiful Voyageurs National Park! Its name comes from the French-Canadian fur voyageurs who came to our state in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. They paddled large — 26 feet long and 4 feet wide — “north canoes” made of birch bark and cedar and journeyed through the waterways, trading goods with Native Americans in exchange for animal pelts, which were in high demand in Europe. Voyageurs National Park consists of four large lakes — Rainy Lake, Sand Point Lake, Namakan Lake and Kabetogama Lake — as well as 26 smaller interior lakes. Encompassing more than 218,000 acres (far smaller than the BWCAW’s 1 million

20 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

acres), the park offers 134,000 acres of woodlands, 500 islands and 27 miles of hiking trails. But here’s the most interesting part: Though the park’s visitor centers are accessible by car, the rest is accessible only by boat. All of the park’s 240 well-mapped overnight and day-use sites require a water vessel of some sort for transportation. But that needn’t stop you from visiting. You can bring your own motorboat, canoe or kayak or simply rent a variety of watercraft. One of the most popular ways to see the park is by renting a houseboat. Several vendors rent these unique vessels for vacations in the park. And the reasonable fees typically include training in how to pilot your chosen vessel, plus a radio to connect to services, such as grocery and gas deliveries (and help in case of emergencies).

If you bring your own vessel, you can launch for free at all public boat launches at the park’s three visitor centers — Rainy Lake Visitor Center, Kabetogama Lake Visitor Center and the Ash River Visitor Center. Many commercial services also provide gear, guided adventures and water-taxi/ shuttle services for hikers and others wanting to explore the park. (Learn more at tinyurl.com/vnp-services.) If you’d like a simplified introduction to the park, check out the ranger-led programs offered from mid-June through mid-September, including guided boat tours. (See the sidebar with this article for some of the offerings. Reservations are recommended.) In the winter, you can explore the park by cross-country skiing, snowshoeing or snowmobiling on more than 100 miles of groomed trails.


Visitors to Voyageurs National Park often take advantage of local houseboat rental services, but there are also many tent-camping sites in the 218,000-acre park, which is home to ruffed grouse (pictured), loons and eagles, among other wildlife. Boat photos courtesy of Voyagaire Houseboats


Take a tour!

Get a taste of Voyageurs National Park with a guided tour. Here’s a look at few on the schedule for this summer. Reservations for all tours are made at recreation.gov or by calling the national call center at 877-444-6777. Reservations are available until midnight the night before a tour departs. Tours with asterisks are accessible.*

Rainy Lake Grand Tour* | Board the Voyageur tour boat and navigate Rainy Lake in search of active eagle nests, view a commercial fishing camp and watch for abundant wildlife. A short stop at Little American Island explores the 1890s Rainy Lake gold rush. Kettle Falls Cruise* | Voyage to the historic Kettle Falls Hotel and Dam on the Voyageur tour boat. North Canoe | Paddle back in history aboard a 26-foot north canoe. Learn the voyageur paddle salute and explore the life of a voyageur fur trader. Black Bay by Canoe | Get a close-up view of a beaver lodge while paddling the waters of Black Bay. Ethno-Botanical Garden Tour* | Join park staff and walk through Voyageurs’ diverse ecosystem. A short hike leads to an Ojibwe camp that sits at the heart of a native plant garden.

Kabetogama Lake Kettle Falls Cruise* | Voyage to the historic Kettle Falls Hotel and Dam on the Amik tour boat. Ellsworth Rock Gardens Cruise | Search for active eagle nests on the way to the gardens located within the park. Then take a short guided hike to explore unique rock sculptures and building remnants. North Canoe | Paddle back in history aboard a 26-foot north canoe. Learn the voyageur paddle salute and explore the life of a fur trader. Become a Voyageur | Join park staff for an inland program and learn about the life of a voyageur, featuring interactive, hands-on activities geared toward the adventurous and young at heart.

Crane Lake Northern Lights & Solar Flares | Learn from park staff about these mysterious lights and see their source from a solar viewing scope during this recurring midnight program.

Learn more at nps.gov/voya and exploreminnesota.com

22 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

Making memories As a child, I spent time with my family fishing and camping on Kabetogama and Namakan. When I was a teenager, my parents purchased an island cabin on Crane Lake near the park. I spent summers and spring and fall weekends through high school and college working at Voyagaire Houseboats — where I met my husband — and exploring the area any free chance I had. Today my husband and I enjoy sharing experiences in Voyageurs National Park with our four children. In fact, this July we reserved an island campsite for a week on Sand Point Lake. We look forward to this adventure with plans for tent camping, fishing, berry picking, swimming, paddle-boarding and enjoying the beauty of this incredible wilderness area. Though the BWCAW is probably the most famous backcountry retreat in our state, Voyageurs offers another way to appreciate the serenity of a remote lake, complete with the mournful calls of loons at dawn and dusk and, if you’re lucky, the playful dancing of the Northern Lights. Despite the fact that watercraft is the only mode of summer transportation in the park, quiet and serenity are still easy to come by in Voyageurs, due to its huge lakes offering 84,000 acres of water and 655 miles of wild shoreline.  In such big waters, tubing and waterskiing aren’t all that common and use of motorized personal watercraft (jet skis and wave runners) is prohibited.


Where to start? Cabins, lodges, hotels: Gateway communities near the park — which is, by car, about 5 hours north of the Twin Cities or 2.5 hours from Duluth — are all just off Highway 53 and include Crane Lake (visitcranelake.com), Orr (orrpelicanlake. com), Ash River (ashriver.com), Kabetogama (kabetogama. com), International Falls and Ranier (rainylake.org). Car camping: State forest drive-up camping is available just outside the park at Woodenfrog State Forest Campground (tinyurl.com/wooden-frog), Ash River Campground (tinyurl.com/ashrivcamp) and Echo Lake Campground south of Crane Lake (tinyurl.com/echolakecamp). Boats: Voyageurs National Park has hundreds of campsites that can be reached by boat or houseboat. Reservations are required and can be made at recreation.gov.

There is no fee to enter the park, but if you want to stay there overnight, you’ll need a free permit, available at the visitor centers and boat launches. Houseboats: A variety of companies rent these watercraft — which sleep two to 12 people and sometimes include slides, hot tubs and more — such as Ebels (ebels.com), Northernaire (northernairehouseboats.com) Rainy Lake Houseboats (rainylakehouseboats.com) and Voyagaire Houseboats (houseboatvacation.com). Learn more at tinyurl.com/vnp-services. Megan Devine lives with her husband and four children in Northeastern Minnesota. Follow her blog — Kids, Lakes, Loons and Pines — at megdevine.com and her School Days column in Minnesota Parent magazine.

Fun facts

Resources

Voyageurs National Park nps.gov/voya

Voyageurs National Park is home to the largest Jack pine tree in the U.S. The 73-foot-tall tree is on the shores of Moose Bay on Namakan Lake was added to American Forests’ National Register of Champion Trees in 2018. On June 11, 2018 the America the Beautiful Quarters Program released a quarter honoring Voyageurs National Park. Learn more at parkquarters.com.

Voyageurs National Park Association voyageurs.org Voyageurs National Park Rendezvous Visitor Guide tinyurl.com/vnp-guide Explore Minnesota exploreminnesota.com Voyageurs National Park Facebook facebook.com/VoyageursNPS: Check this page for park information, event schedules, wildlife sightings, seasonal conditions and interactive resources.

Minnesota Good Age / June 2019 / 23


HOUSING SPOTLIGHT

Filling a niche in Woodbury BY SARAH JACKSON

T

he Legends of Woodbury — a new independent senior apartment community with affordable rents beginning in the low $1,000s — is now open about a five-minute drive from the intersection of Woodbury Drive and I-94. Yes, of course, there is a bit of a hitch: The Legends of Woodbury is an affordable housing program participant, which means the gross annual income of residents must meet limits set by the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development. Very generally speaking, total household income must be below the following limits based on all types of gross income — $42,000 for one occupant, $48,000 for two, $54,000 for three and $60,000 for four. (You’d have to call for details to confirm your eligibility.) But for those who meet the requirements, there’s a lot to like here. 24 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

This four-story community, which opened in March and will expand in July, is two-thirds full so far with one-, two- and three-bedroom floor-plan options, all watched over by a full-time community manager and maintenance team. Amenities include a two-story clubhouse with a community kitchen, pub room, theater room, library, beauty salon, a card and crafts room, a three-season porch and other gathering spaces where residents get together for a variety of activities. It also features a lovely patio and landscaped grounds connected to walking trails. There’s even an outdoor exercise area for residents’ four-legged friends. Do you know of a new or interesting senior housing facility in the Twin Cities that might make a good Housing Spotlight? Write Minnesota Good Age editor Sarah Jackson at editor@mngoodage.com with the subject line Housing Spotlight.


THE LEGENDS OF WOODBURY WHERE: 570 Settlers Ridge Parkway, Woodbury OPENING DATE: Phase 1 opened in March 2019. Phase 2 opens in July 2019. AGES WELCOME: 55 and older SIZE OPTIONS: This four-story community

includes 216 apartments in a mix of one-, two- and three-bedroom floor plans.

COST RANGE FOR A SINGLE RESIDENT: As an affordable housing program participant, this property is able to offer prices far below market-rate rents: $1,047 a month for a one-bedroom apartment; $1,255 for a two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment; $1,447 for a three-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment (including some units with over 1,400 square feet). Apartments here include amenities typically found only in luxury apartments, including a full-size, in-home washer and dryer, 9-foot ceilings, walk-in closets, granite counters, solid wood cabinets, a bar or island (for extra counter space and informal dining), satin finish hardware/ fixtures and new Energy Star appliances. FOOD & HEALTHCARE SERVICES: This is an active, independent senior community so no meals or health-care services are provided. PROPERTY OWNER: Founded in 1972, Domi-

nium is headquartered in Plymouth, Minnesota, and is one of the largest private developers and managers of multifamily apartment homes in the country. More than 50,000 people in over 30,000 homes live in Dominium communities.

OTHER FACILITIES IN MINNESOTA: Dominium

owns and manages a large number of multifamily and senior communities in the state. Among its more noteworthy developments are the historic renovations of the Pillsbury A-Mill Artist Lofts in Minneapolis and the Schmidt Artist Lofts in St. Paul. The company’s senior housing is located throughout the seven-county metro area in communities such as Apple Valley, Cottage Grove, Champlin, Coon Rapids, Columbia Heights, Prior Lake, Spring Lake Park and St. Paul. There are several more in the planning phase or under construction.

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FINANCE

Balancing act A common fear I’ve seen among pre-retirees is not having enough money to get through the retirement years comfortably. While this anxiety is common, I’ve also come to find that many pre-retirees — who have saved enough for their golden years — choose to live below their means. Don’t get me wrong. Frugality plays a key role in personal-financial success. However, with the right proactive planning, many retirees can enjoy the hard-earned fruits of their labor without sacrificing their financial security. When I sit down with someone who is five to 10 years from retiring, I take them through a process that helps ensure they have their basic expenses and sources of income identified for their retirement years. But I also evaluate their retirement wish list — whether it’s a cabin, a boat or traveling the world — and create a realistic plan to help achieve each goal. After all, you’ve spent decades saving for your retirement; you deserve to enjoy it!

26 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

BY SKIP JOHNSON

Here are the steps you can take to help create a plan that protects your financial security while also giving you the flexibility to live greatly during your golden years.

Evaluate expenses No matter what kind of retirement dreams you have (big or small), it’s crucial that you understand — and don’t underestimate — your expenses. A common misconception among many Americans is that their expenses will decrease once they quit working. Yes, you may pay off your mortgage by retirement and maybe your transportation costs will drop as well (many retirees find they need only one car since they no longer commute to work daily), but costs such as health care, taxes and leisure will likely increase. While it can be difficult to come up with an exact number for your expenses, it’s crucial that you plan in advance to at least get a ballpark estimate so you can better understand your financial situation before those regular paychecks stop.

Assess income The next best step is to identify your various sources of income so that you have a full understanding of where, when and just how much money you’ll have coming into your accounts. Along with Social Security, pensions and savings like a 401(k) or IRA, you’ll also want to take into account investment income you may have. Other sources of income may include rental properties, annuities or insurance, part-time work and even an inheritance. It’s also important to plan for the potential timing of these various sources of income. This includes determining the best age to start drawing your Social Security benefits and taking your required minimum distributions from your retirement accounts. Creating a strategic income plan for your retirement years can not only help ensure your expenses are covered, but also help you avoid unnecessary taxes and penalties that could hurt your savings.


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Create your bucket list Now comes the fun part. What are your retirement dreams? Aside from the average day-to-day lifestyle you plan to live, what else do you hope to do once you’re done working? Perhaps you envision yourself at the nearby lake, so your dream may consist of purchasing a cabin or buying a boat. Maybe you see yourself traveling the country to visit all your grandchildren or traveling internationally to see the world. Identifying your retirement dreams now can help them become a reality later in life.

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Now that you know how you want to spend your retirement years, it’s time to figure just how much money it will cost you. Items like a boat or cabin are fairly easy to estimate while a travel budget may take a bit more research to determine. Once you have an idea how much your retirement dreams will cost you, it’s time to cross-reference them with your budget. Keeping your expenses and income in mind, you should have a pretty good idea just how much flexibility you have to spend on your bucket list. After spending 30 to 40 years of your life saving your retirement, it may feel odd adjusting to the idea that you can now enjoy some of that money you worked so hard to set aside. And while your basic needs and expenses should always be prioritized, it’s also important to realize that memories built during your retirement will hold more value than your bank account. It’s your choice to live greatly!

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Skip Johnson is an advisor and partner at Great Waters Financial, a financialplanning firm and insurance agency with five Minnesota locations. Learn more at greatwatersfinancial.com. Minnesota Good Age / June 2019 / 27


FINANCE TIPS

Your financial wisdom revealed! I n our February issue — featuring the finance expert and life force that is Dan Stoltz, CEO of SPIRE Credit Union — we asked you, our dear readers, to provide your favorite personal finance tips for a chance to win a model of SPIRE’s Archie truck based off a 1950s Ford. Here’s just some of what you had to say. Congrats to our winners, including grand-prize winner, Joan Peterson, who will receive a 7-inch model truck — and our five second-place winners of mini trucks also featured here!

28 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

Joan Peterson, 67, of Minneapolis: Giving

is getting because it makes you feel good and useful. First: Donate to a nonprofit you wouldn’t want to be without, maybe public radio or TV, or the Animal Humane Society or American Cancer Society. If you’re already a member of the nonprofit you cherish, give a membership to a neighbor or friend. Many of us on a limited income (I’m on Social Security) can give up something (the cost of a pizza) for the greater good.

We also have too much stuff. Instead of renting storage rooms, think of truly cleaning out. Have a free or bargain garage sale and invest the proceeds in an organization that helps people.

Wayne Christiansen, 71, of Maplewood: When I was 55, I got a raise of $20 a week. I didn’t need the money, so I saved it for 10 years. It came to over $10,000, plus the interest!

Joanne Segner of Crystal: I put $50 from my retirement pension into a Christmas


savings each month. When my charge card is payable in January, I use this to pay it off. As a result, Christmas is less stressful. I use my tax return each year for a vacation. This also is less stressful as it feels like a gift from Uncle Sam. When my checking account has extra money, I put that in a CD (certificate of deposit). If an unforeseen expense arrives, I can use savings or look for an interest-free loan. When the CD is due, I can use that to pay off the loan. I’m retired, but have a part-time job, which funds my monthly entertainment expenses. I recommend a job for extra money and for mingling with fellow employees and clientele.

Bill Huntzicker, 72, of Minneapolis: If you’re receiving employer-supported health care, purchase hearing aids before you retire because they’re expensive and may not be covered by Medicare. Look into other medical needs you may be putting off that you can get now with more financial support. Other examples could include CPAP.

Gary Cohen, 66, of Golden Valley: Keep your medical house in order — from regular doctor visits to the best insurance coverage you can afford, particularly once you hit Medicare age. Medical issues will cause your financial well-being to spiral down quickly as you age no matter how good a job you’ve done with your planning. Take advantage of independent medical brokers who can assist you as needed for your health-care coverages. And, if you can, work with a reputable financial planner, rather than trying to do all the work yourself on the personal-finance side of your life.

Wayne Pederson, 71, of Colorado Springs: It was 1972. I was working as a young (modestly paid) radio announcer at KTIS at the University of Northwestern in Minneapolis. I had just graduated from seminary and we had our first child. Mr. Harold Alford was business manager at the college at the time. One day Mr. Alford pulled me aside and suggested I begin setting aside a small amount each month for retirement. I wondered aloud: “I’m 25 years old and on a very tight budget.” Harold persisted: “Just start with half a percent.” I took his advice and soon was able to increase to 1%. Then 2%. My tiny contribution triggered Northwestern’s contribution. Eventually, I was able to set aside 6% each month. That advice from Mr. Alford was the best financial advice I’ve ever received. I’ve worked for Chris-

tian colleges and nonprofit ministries all my career. I’ve never made a lot of money. But investing a modest amount each month over a span of 45 years, together with the long term rise in the markets, has provided a way for me to comfortably retire. We’re not wealthy, but we’re comfortably able to serve on ministry boards, to continue to do ministry work and to enjoy amazing travel experiences without worrying about money. I’m amazed that even with a lifetime of modest income, we’re able to do what we want to do, not what we have to do. My advice to young workers: Start small, start early, be consistent. And you will enjoy deferred freedom and security decades later. Thank you to all the Good Age readers who shared their wisdom for this article. Learn more about personal finance for older adults at mngoodage.com/finance.

Thanks to the St. Paul-based SPIRE Credit Union for sponsoring our Archie truck contest. Pictured here are our prizes — miniature models of the credit union’s mascot, a restored 1952 Ford truck that travels around town and in parades in homage to SPIRE’s humble founder, Edgar Archer.

Minnesota Good Age / June 2019 / 29


IN THE KITCHEN

Sweet Tart! by Sarah Jackson

Rhubarb is one of the first plants to emerge during our oft-delayed Minnesota springs. This year, I harvested some light-red stalks on a cold, rainy day. And I made — for the first time — my mother’s recipe for rhubarb crisp. It was sweet, but perfectly tart, too — even beer than I remembered. Thanks, Mom! 30 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age


RHUBARB CRUNCH 4 cups rhubarb (rinsed and cut into 1�4-inch pieces) 3�4 cup sugar 2 tablespoons cornstarch 1 cup water 1 teaspoon vanilla 1 cup flour 3�4 cup quick cooking oats* 1 cup brown sugar  2 teaspoons cinnamon 1�2 cup butter, melted *If you don’t have quick-cooking oats, you can make some by pulsing regular rolled oats in a food processor to cut them down to about one-third of their original size.

DIRECTIONS ⊲ Preheat oven to 350 degrees. ⊲ Place rhubarb in a greased 9x13 baking dish. ⊲ Combine 3�4 cup white sugar, water and cornstarch and cook over medium-high to high heat until thick, stirring constantly. ⊲ Stir in vanilla while it’s still hot and pour over the rhubarb. ⊲ Stir together the flour, oats, brown sugar, cinnamon and melted butter and sprinkle the mixture over the rhubarb. ⊲ Bake for 40 to 50 minutes. ⊲ Cool for 20 minutes. ⊲ Serve with ice cream or whipped cream. Sarah Jackson’s mother, Lucy Jackson, gleaned this recipe — credited to Mrs. Edward J. Mikota — from an old cookbook from Saint Wenceslaus Catholic Church in Spillville, Iowa, which is billed as the oldest Czech Catholic church in the country, dating back to 1860.

Serving people of all ages, abilities and backgrounds, HOBT collaborates with SCHOOLS and COMMUNITIES on unique, interactive ART RESIDENCIES that nurture the creative spirit and encourage a sense of joy and wonder. If you are interested in an art residency for your school or organization, visit hobt.org or call 612.721.2535 for more information. Minnesota Good Age / June 2019 / 31


Minnesota is one of the greatest spots in the world to get a variety of weather situations. Honestly, I’d be bored doing weather in Los Angeles. Dave Dahl poses outside his home in Stillwater — a 135-year-old church converted into condos. Photo by Tracy Walsh

32 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age


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Meteorologist Dave Dahl has been guiding Minnesotans through our state’s crazy climate for more than four decades By Julie Kendrick

sure, it ’ s easy to love dave dahl now,

when the weather is warm and the sun is shining. But being a meteorologist in Minnesota means that sometimes you have to deliver bad news. And often, you’re the one who takes the blame. “Especially in the winter, people tell me, ‘Do your job! Fix this weather,’” Dahl said. “We get the heat and humidity in the summer and the cold and snow in the winter. But the reason to live here is because of what I call our ‘theater of seasons.’ To me, Minnesota

is one of the greatest spots in the world to get a variety of weather situations. Honestly, I’d be bored doing weather in Los Angeles.” If you think you’ve been watching Dahl, 65, deliver weather news — good and bad — for quite a while now, you’re right. Next month, he’ll celebrate 42 years with KSTP-TV. He delivers his weather forecasts on 5 Eyewitness News weeknights at 5, 6, 6:30 and 10 p.m. He also appears weekdays on KS95’s morning and afternoon shows.

Minnesota Good Age / June 2019 / 33


When I was 10 years old, we had the largest outbreak of tornadoes ever to hit the metro area — six in all. It had a huge impact on my life.

Recognize that voice? As well known as his face has become, Dahl said it’s his voice most people usually recognize first. “I get recognized almost every day, but people are ‘Minnesota Nice’ about it and will wait until I’m done eating at a restaurant or until I’m getting ready to leave before they come up to me,” he said. “It was a harder transition for my older kids to get used to me getting recognized in public, but the younger ones are used to it by now.” Speaking of kids, Dahl is a father of seven children and grandfather to six grandchildren. His children range from middle-aged to pre-teen — Ali, 46; Andy, 44; Kayla, 26; Allyssa, 25; Brittani, 24; Jace, 17; and Jax Anna, 11.

Time to downsize With his older kids launched and just the younger ones at home, Dahl and his wife of 17 years, Julie, have downsized from their longtime 15-acre property in Afton. They’re now living in downtown Stillwater, in a building that was erected as a church in 1884 and has been converted to condominiums. “I was tired of cutting the grass and plowing the driveway,” he said. “This building is beautiful and still feels like 34 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

a church on the inside, in some ways. We have a big pew in the common hallway, and a 12-foot-diameter stained-glass window in our living room. It faces north, and when it lights up in the afternoon, it’s spectacular.”

Early start Dahl grew up in Circle Pines, Minnesota. His older brother, Marshall, who now lives in Florida, said they’ve always been close. “In our younger days, we would play childhood games and laugh, laugh, laugh until our stomachs hurt,” he said. “When Dave was in high school and played sports, we’d go to all his games, both home and away.”

Dahl showed an early interest in weather. “I started doing weather forecasts when I was a little kid, from age 4 or 5, delivering the forecasts to my mom,” he said. It took a calamitous weather event to seal his fate as a future meteorologist. “When I was 10 years old, we had the largest outbreak of tornadoes ever to hit the metro area — six in all. It had a huge impact on my life. I was afraid of storms then and thought I was going to die. The tornado missed our home only by a quarter mile. From then on, I wanted to more accurately predict the weather so people would not be hurt. Now, I live and breathe weather of all kinds.”

Minnesota native Dave Dahl, shown in a station photo from the mid-1980s, started at KSTPTV more than four decades ago.


Hair-raising weather Joe Schmit, KSTP-TV’s sports director, has worked with Dahl for more than 31 years. “There’s a reason Dave has been doing the weather for so long — he’s a pro,” he said. “You don’t survive in this business or this market unless you are professional on and off the air. Just like I get excited covering a major sporting event, Dave gets excited when bad weather is coming in. He feels a huge responsibility to the audience and he really wants to make sure his forecast is correct.” Schmit and Dahl have accumulated quite a few stories working together in the public eye for three decades, but Schmit shared one memory: “We used to have a hair salon in the KSTP building, and the stylist talked Dave into getting a perm. He loved it. He thought it was hip,” Schmit said. “He did the 6 p.m. news that night with his new ‘do.’ Management saw him on air and made him change it by the 10 p.m. news. I would pay $1,000 to have a tape of that show.”

Dave Dahl poses with his custom Harley overlooking the St. Croix River— sporting a leather jacket signed by Willie G. Davidson, grandson of HarleyDavidson co-founder William A. Davidson. Photos by Tracy Walsh

Tips for staying safe during a tornado “It’s good to respect the weather, not fear it. Fear leads to panic, and panic is not safe,” said Minnesota meteorologist Dave Dahl. “In the event of a tornado or severe storm, don’t run — you don’t want to fall — but walk quickly to a safe spot.” Remember, Dahl said, there’s always a safe place to be: At home: Go to the basement, if possible. Get under a table, workbench or sturdy furniture to shield yourself from falling debris. With no basement: Go to an interior closet, bathroom or interior hall. Get under something sturdy or cover yourself with blankets. Stay away from windows. In a car: Get out of the vehicle and look for a sturdy shelter or lie down in a ditch. Avoid bridges, since they can act as wind tunnels.

Minnesota Good Age / June 2019 / 35


Giving back

Dave and Julie Dahl ride custom-made Harley-Davidson motorcycles in the summer, including trips to Prescott, Wisconsin, and annual trips to Sturgis, South Dakota, among others. But Dave Dahl doesn’t just chase tornadoes, ride Harleys and cruise on the St. Croix River — he’s also a father to seven children (pictured below) and six grandchildren.

36 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

While Dahl is a well-known broadcaster, he also sees himself as an educator. Over the years, he’s made hundreds of presentations at area schools. “I’ve promoted fun, hands-on science experiences by showing how tornadoes form, how lightning forms or how barometric pressure works,” he said. “I think kids are getting much smarter than they used to be, and they’re learning much faster.” Despite that, there are still a few kids in any class who are terrified of storms. “I let them know I used to be afraid, too,” he said. “I hope that by learning more, they can have respect, not fear, for the weather.” Dahl is frequently is asked to make appearances at charity events. “My oldest daughter had open-heart surgery when she was a little over 2 years old, so two of my favorites are the American Heart Association and the Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota,” he said.


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“I participate in the Down Syndrome Association of Minnesota’s annual walk, Step Up for Down Syndrome. It brings a smile to my face and is one of my biggest pleasures.” (This year’s walk will be Sept. 22 at Como Park in St. Paul.) He’s also involved with the American Diabetes Association and the Highland Friendship Club, which offers people with disabilities the chance to make new friends, connect with the community and learn life skills.

Off duty In his rare moments of free time, Dahl and his family enjoy spending time on the St. Croix River in their 41-foot cruiser. “It’s a great waterway,” he said. “Our boat is an express yacht that can sleep six to eight, and the kids love that they have their own bedrooms.” When the children aren’t around, Dahl and his wife enjoy riding their custommade Harley-Davidson motorcycles. Hers is all pink and chrome and custom-painted with clouds. His is a chopper version with a tornado painted on the gas tank and lightning and clouds on the fenders. “They don’t usually make choppers, but they made one for me,” he said.

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Julie Kendrick is a contributing writer for many local and national publications. She lives in Minneapolis. Follow her on Twitter @KendrickWorks.

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CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR JUNE

TWIN CITIES JAZZ FESTIVAL → This 21st-annual free event will include acts such as vocalist José James, vocalist Nnenna Freelon, the James Carter Organ Trio, saxophonist Grace Kelly and bandleader and multi-instrumentalist Aurora Nealand with Tom McDermott. When: June 20–22 Where: Mears Park and Union Depot, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: twincitiesjazzfestival.com

MAY 31–JUNE 23

THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE → In 1890, young Ransome Foster leaves New York City for a new life in the Wild West, where he ends up beaten and halfdead on the dusty streets of Twotrees. When: May 31–June 23 Where: Theatre in the Round, Minneapolis Cost: $22, $18 for ages 62 and up (except Saturdays) Info: theatreintheround.org

MAY 31–JUNE 8

COVERS: A POP CONCERT → Cantus will arrange and perform Joni Mitchell’s iconic album Blue in its entirety. When: May 31–June 8 Where: The Cowles Center, Minneapolis Cost: $6–$33 Info: cantussings.org

JUNE–AUGUST

TWIN CITIES RIVER RATS → This 100-member, nationally ranked team puts on themed water ski shows all summer long on the Mississippi River in the heart of Minneapolis. 38 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

When: June–August Where: 1758 West River Road N., Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: tcriverrats.com

JUNE 7

PAULA POUNDSTONE → See the accomplished comedian, author, lecturer, actress and frequent panelist on NPR’s Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me! — deliver her trademark smart, observational humor. When: June 7 Where: Fitzgerald Theater, St. Paul Cost: $36.50–$52.50 Info: fitzgeraldtheater.publicradio.org

OPENING JUNE 7

THE ART OF LIVING WITH DEMENTIA → This traveling exhibit shares the work of seniors living with memory loss who participated in a popular program launched by the city of Minnetonka. Participants took classes in watercolor, ceramics, charcoal drawing and more. When: Opening June 7 Where: Minnetonka Center for the Arts Cost: FREE Info: minnetonkaarts.org

JUNE 8

MINNESOTA CIDER FESTIVAL → This sixth-annual event will offer unlimited samples from 100 local, national and international cider brands. When: June 8 Where: Como Lakeside Pavilion, St. Paul Cost: Early entry tickets are $60 and general admission tickets are $50. Designated driver tickets are $10. If still available, tickets will be sold at the door for $70 (early entry) and $60 (general admission). Info: eventbrite.com

PRINT MATTERS → This one-day show of vintage books, comics, records, posters and more also offers handmade items from the book-arts world. Admission includes a raffle ticket, swag, live music and more, plus food and drink will be available for purchase. When: June 8 Where: Hook and Ladder Theater, Minneapolis Cost: $2 Info: raintaxi.com


JUNE 12–SEPT. 25

ST. PAUL WALKING TOURS →→Three tours— Rice Park Tour (centering on the newly refurbished park), Heart of the City Tour and Great River Tour — operate on a rotating schedule, Wednesdays at 10 a.m. When: June 12–Sept. 25 Where: St. Paul Cost: FREE, but reservations are required Info: landmarkcenter.org

JUNE 13–JULY 25

WHITE BEAR LAKE MARKETFEST →→More than 130 local businesses and vendors offer a wide variety of food, art, merchandise and handcrafted goods. When: Thursdays June 13–July 25 Where: Downtown White Bear Lake Cost: FREE Info: marketfestwbl.com

JUNE 15

KID FEST →→Ring in summer with the grandkids and celebrate the debut of the 2019-20 Family Directory, your guide to more than 200 destinations and activities for kids in the Twin Cities. Entertainment will include live family-friendly music from the Teddy Bear Band, The Bazillions, Davey Doodle and Wendy’s Wiggle, Jiggle and Jam. Every booth will feature an activity with vendors

such as ARTrageous Adventures, the Minnesota Historical Society, the Minnesota Vikings, the Minnesota Wild, Children’s Theatre Company and many more. When: 10 a.m.–1 p.m. June 15 Where: Lake Harriet Bandshell, Minneapolis Cost: FREE Info: mnparent.com/kidfest

JUNE 21–23

BACK TO THE ’50s WEEKEND →→The Minnesota Street Rod Association’s 46th-annual event will fill the State Fairgrounds with more than 12,000 street rods and restored vehicles, all dating from 1964 and earlier, as well as 350 vendors and kids activities. When: June 21–23 Where: Minnesota State Fairgrounds, St. Paul Cost: $12; FREE for ages 12 and younger with each paid adult Info: msrabacktothe50s.com

JUNE 24–30

MINNEAPOLIS COMEDY FESTIVAL →→This first-ever festival features Bob Newhart, Seth Meyers, George Lopez, Cedric The Entertainer, D.L. Hughley, John Crist and many more. When: June 24–30 Where: Venues in downtown Minneapolis Cost: Various Info: mplscomedyfest.com

JUNE 27

SINATRA AND COMPANY →→Colleen Raye, Tim Patrick, Debbie O’Keefe and the 10-piece Blue Eyes Band present an evening of music and tales from ‘50s and ‘60s crooners — guys and gals — from the legendary Rat Pack. When: June 27 Where: Ames Center, Burnsville Cost: $28 Info: ames-center.com

JUNE 23

JUNE 29–30

→→Join in the celebration of the patron saint of French Canadians with music, games, a bonfire and more.

→→See a juried art show of 100 artists, an artist demonstration and get creative with the annual community art project in the Art Experience tent.

FETE DE ST. JEAN BAPTISTE RENDEZVOUS

When: June 23 Where: Sibley Historic Site, Mendota Cost: FREE Info: mnhs.org

EAGAN ART FESTIVAL

When: June 29–30 Where: 1501 Central Parkway, Eagan Cost: FREE Info: eaganartfestival.org

CARS AND CAVES

→→Collector, classic and exotic cars and motorcycles are displayed throughout the AutoPlex’s 120 garage condominiums. When: June 29 Where: Chanhassen AutoPlex Cost: FREE Info: chanhassenautoplex.com/ cars-and-caves Minnesota Good Age / June 2019 / 39


Brain teasers SUDOKU

WORD SEARCH TOP TWINS

ALLISON BLYLEVEN BUXTON CAREW DOZIER GAETTI HRBEK

Source: Yogi Berra

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WORD SCRAMBLE Complete the following words using each given letter once.

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40 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

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ANSWERS

Break the code to reveal a quote from a famous person. Each letter represents another letter.

POLANCO PUCKETT RADKE ROSARIO SANTANA SMALLEY VIOLA

TRIVIA 1. Two, in 1987 and 1991 2. Jim Kaat 3. Bloomington (The Mall of America now occupies the site.)

CRYPTOGRAM

HUNTER KILLEBREW MAUER MOLITOR MORNEAU OLIVA PASCUAL


1. How many World Series titles have the Twins won since moving from Washington, D.C., to Minnesota in 1961?

CRYTPOGRAM Love is the most important thing in the world, but baseball is pretty good too.

WHO'S ON FIRST?

WORD SCRAMBLE Double, Relief, Clutch

TRIVIA

2. Who pitched for the Twins from 1961 to 1973, compiling a team record 189 wins? 3. The Twins’ first home park, Metropolitan Stadium, was located in what city?

CROSSWORD

SUDOKU

ANSWERS

Sources: minnesota.twins.mlb.com, baseball-reference.com, ballparksofbaseball.com

LIVE MUSIC

Sponsored by:

Live performances by

The Bazillions, Davey Doodle, The Teddy Bear Band and Wendy’s Wiggle Jiggle & Jam

LEARN MORE AT MNPARENT.COM/KIDFEST

GAMES

CRAFTS

PRIZES

& MORE!

Minnesota Good Age / June 2019 / 41


Crossword

68 From __: all-inclusive 69 Take care of

DOWN

ACROSS

1 Like some private communities 6 Really dull 10 Second-year student 14 Ex-Yankee manager Joe 15 Goldberg who drew complex “machines” 16 Make healthy 17 *Bread with a schmear 19 __ Ant: tiny toon superhero 20 Therapy visit 21 “Honor Thy Father” author Gay 23 Parody 26 Fire engine signal 27 “Bad, Bad Leroy Brown” singer Jim 31 Can opener 33 Chief Greek god 34 Mono successor 36 __ Lingus 42 / June 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

39 Somewhat 40 Hint of color 41 Escape key function 42 Friend of TV’s Sheldon and Leonard 43 “For my next __ ... ”: singer’s intro 44 Pass over 45 “Lawrence of __” 47 “Beau __” 48 Scheming group 50 Serious play 53 Roberto or Sandy of baseball 55 Deep regret 60 Line through the middle of a circle: Abbr. 61 *Annual Florida football game 64 To be, to Balzac 65 Mexican’s zilch 66 Primary foe 67 Lincoln in-law

1 Classic Pontiac muscle cars 2 Top-notch 3 “Divergent” films heroine 4 Greek god of love 5 Actress Richards 6 Clog-busting brand 7 “Area” floor covering 8 Prez on a fiver 9 Pants holder-upper 10 Justice replaced by Gorsuch 11 *Coastal North Carolina resort area 12 It’s not poetry 13 Macho guys 18 Jazz genre 22 Regarding 24 *Source of free drinks 25 Valley __, Pa. 27 Business magnate 28 Country star McEntire 29 *Séance prop 30 Ill. winter hours 32 Equal 34 Ticket remnant 35 Shy 37 Polish a manuscript 38 Dogie catcher 41 Take advantage of 43 Simba’s mate 46 Smashed into 47 Online players 48 Military academy student 49 Samuel of the Supreme Court 51 Desi of “I Love Lucy” 52 Bit of computer RAM 54 Gossip columnist Barrett 56 Theater award ... and a phonetic hint to the answers to starred clues 57 Roam 58 Smack, as a fly 59 Cockney greeting 62 Stool pigeon 63 Big fuss


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