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Contents 24

ON THE COVER Ecumen’s new president, Shelley Kendrick, has always looked up to her elders. Photos by Tracy Walsh

FEBRUARY FROM THE EDITOR 6 Honoring your elders is an under-appreciated form of future self-respect.

MY TURN 8 ‘Reds and blues’ are finding their ‘better angels’ with help from a new organization.

MEMORIES 10 Why have flag wavers replaced the majorettes in today’s marching bands?

19

MINNESOTA HISTORY

The enchanting town of Taos, New Mexico — population 6,000 — offers so much more than you’d expect.

IN THE KITCHEN

DESERT CHARM

12 A love affair, a murder and a botched execution ended the death penalty in Minnesota in 1911.

14 Make this easy steak dinner recipe for your Valentine.

NANA & MAMA 16 I really wanted to provide daycare for my grandkids, but it didn’t come easy.

22

BIG NEWS Frank Bartocci of Rochester met his goal of running 1,000 marathons.

4 / February 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

30 32

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Minnesota Good Age / February 2020 / 5


FROM THE EDITOR Volume 39 / Issue 2

Out with ageism BY SARAH JACKSON

H PUBLISHER Janis Hall / jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER Terry Gahan / tgahan@mngoodage.com

GENERAL MANAGER Zoe Gahan / zgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR Sarah Jackson / editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS Victor Block, Ed Dykhuizen, Carol Hall, Julie Kendrick, Laura Groenjes Mitchell, Dave Nimmer, Mary Rose Remington, Abigail Thompson, Tracy Walsh

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

ART DIRECTOR Dani Cunningham

AD COORDINATOR AND OFFICE MANAGER Amy Rash / 612-436-5081 arash@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION Marlo Johnson / distribution@mngoodage.com

37,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2020 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. To receive Good Age by mail, send a check for $18 with “Good Age subscription” in the memo.

6 / February 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

ave you heard of Ashton Applewhite? She’s an anti-ageism activist who blew my mind recently with her TED talk (tinyurl. com/ageism-applewhite) about the ugly truth of ageism: It's nothing more than a prejudice against our future selves. “All prejudice relies on othering — seeing a group of people as other than ourselves,” she says. “The strange thing about ageism? That ‘other,’ is us. Ageism feeds on denial — our reluctance to acknowledge that we are going to become that older person.” Last year, Applewhite published her latest book: This Chair Rocks: A Manifesto Against Ageism. She’s also a co-founder of Old School (a vetted clearinghouse of anti-ageism resources) and the voice of the new blog: Yo, Is This Ageist?  Aging, Applewhite explains, is a normal, natural process, and our language around it needs to change: No longer calling seniors “cute” or “sweetie” would be a nice start, don’t you think? We even do it to ourselves, Applewhite says, arguing that it’s time to stop using the term “senior moment.” “I stopped blaming my sore knee on being 64,” she says in her TED talk. “My other knee doesn’t hurt — and it’s just as old.” Whatever differences we may have with those who are older than we are (or younger), we ought to remember we’re all on the same path. Though Applewhite is based in New York City, she isn’t the only one who’s figured out how to respect one’s elders, no matter where they are on the spectrum. Our cover star this month — Shelley Kendrick, CEO of Ecumen, a nonprofit senior housing and services provider based in Shoreview — reveres and respects seniors. Even as a kid, she sought time with her elders. “I was always attracted to the company of older adults,” she says. “I remember how much I loved talking with my great-grandmother. … She really encouraged me, and she was a huge influence on me.” And it’s not just lip service. Nonprofit Ecumen is innovating to make sure seniors don’t end up isolated in our modern world: Its Abiitan Mill City property opened in 2016 as the first senior services community in the core of downtown Minneapolis. Yes, older folks want the vitality and life that an urban core can provide. Ecumen’s Zvago Cooperative Living properties are another example of new options that make sense for older adult health and wellness, including financial. It all fits with Ecumen’s mission to innovate, empower and honor seniors to “change how our society views aging.” Honor for older adults? Now that’s something I can get behind.


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MY TURN

‘Reds and blues’ coming together BY DAVE NIMMER

F

or the past several years, I have struggled to talk freely with some friends with opposing views about politics and the president. The divide is wider, the feelings stronger and the silence louder. I finally did something about it a couple of months ago — by attending a session of the local chapter of the Better Angels, a national alliance holding workshops to “depolarize” the country. The problem is obvious to me, but also supported by the Pew Research Center, which finds the partisan gap in American politics has more than doubled since 1994. The effort by the Better Angels began a few days after the election in 2016. Ten Trump supporters and 11 Clinton supporters met over the weekend in South Lebanon, Ohio. They discovered they could respectfully disagree, find some common ground — and even like each other. The workshop I attended — at 9 a.m. on a Saturday at the Ramsey County Library in Maplewood — was called Families and Politics: How to Talk with Loved Ones on the Other Side. To my surprise, I found 35 others joining me. There were parents feeling estranged from their grown children, siblings fearing dinner-table arguments over the holidays and several wives avoiding conversations with their husbands.

A local connection The ringmaster for our three-hour workshop was none other than one of the 8 / February 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

founders of Better Angels, University of Minnesota professor Bill Doherty. He’s the author of more than a dozen books, both scholarly and popular, and a family therapist, so he’s no stranger to conflict and chaos. At the workshop, I found him charming, disarming and enlightening. “Keep in mind there may be people here,” he told us, “who agree with your family members’ views. So, let’s try to avoid lumping everyone into stereotyped categories like ‘a typical arrogant liberal’ or ‘one of those crazy Trump supporters.’” Doherty explained the name Better Angels came from President Abraham Lincoln’s first inaugural address, just before the start of the Civil War. “Though passion may have strained,” Lincoln wrote, “it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.”

How it worked With Lincoln’s words and professor Doherty’s admonitions, we managed to stay away from stereotypes and practice skills that could help us engage, rather than argue with, an opponent. We tried them with a partner, on the issue of gun control; I favored more regulations and she wanted none. We began by listening and then trying to CLARIFY what we heard the person saying: “Did I hear you right that you think any

Photos courtesy of Better Angels

They discovered they could respectfully disagree, find some common ground — and even like each other. more gun regulations tamper with the intent of the Second Amendment?” Then we find something we can AGREE with in the opponent’s argument: “I, too, believe the Constitution is not a document to be ignored, and I also believe people should have the right to own guns.” Next comes the PIVOT: “It probably won’t surprise you that I think this country has too many guns in circulation.” Then we offer our PERSPECTIVE: “I believe assault rifles ought to be banned, that they are weapons of war.” Finally we EXIT the conversation: “I’m glad we agreed that assault rifles should at least be regulated,” or, “Maybe for the time being, we can agree to disagree.”


This may seem a little too pat or simple, but I found it amazingly subtle and substantive in my practice session. We kept our voices down and we smiled at each other occasionally. The session left me feeling more hopeful — and peaceful — and ready to be more engaging. I can’t spend the rest of my life being either tight-lipped or loud-mouthed.

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And I’m not alone; many Minnesotans feel this way. Booth Manor GA 0114 12.indd 1 12/6/13 10:14 Sandberg AM Funeral GA 0513 12.indd 1 Our state has the second-highest Better Angels membership rate in the country (behind California). Of Minnesota's members, 84% are within the sevencounty metro area and 16% are dispersed throughout the state, said Pat DeVries, a Better Angels Minnesota coordinator. Citizens have needed groups like this for more than just the past four years, according to organizers. “Political polarization did not start with the 2016 election — it’s been gaining momentum for over 20 years,” says the Better Angels website. “But with the * rancor and divisiveness that has been on display in recent years, polarization may have reached its worst level in the United States since the Civil War.” The U.S. is “disuniting,” says the site. “We’re becoming two Americas — angry with the other and distrusting our opposites’ basic humanity and good intentions. This degree of civic rancor threatens our democracy — and it’s a trend we must reverse.” Find an event near you and local leaders’ contact information at *Offer valid to persons with no prior checking relationship with SPIRE in the last 12 months. $100 minimum deposit required to open Free checking account. $50 minimum deposit required to open a Saints or Teen better-angels.org. checking account. To qualify for $100 offer, account holder must set up an Automatic Payment or Direct Deposit

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MEMORIES

Bring back the majorettes! BY CAROL HALL

W

ill somebody tell me please what has happened to drum majorettes? I’m talking about the high-stepping, baton-twirling girls who once led everyone’s high school band. When did they become obsolete? And why? Our school, in rural southwestern Minnesota, had a squad of four majorettes who performed in local parades and during the shows the band put on during football game halftimes. When I was a grade-school kid, they thrilled me to no end. Tossing a baton way high while marching, then catching it without a hitch, was — OH, BOY! — cool. It was especially so when the band was playing a stirring Sousa march, like The Stars and Stripes Forever, with its piccolo solo and trills, and high, then low, notes.

Dressed to thrill And then there were the uniforms. They were always colorful and shiny. They took my breath away. “I had a big white fur hat and white boots,” said my longtime friend, Maripat, of her majorette uniform of the 1950s. “The batons then were quite heavy (now they’re much lighter). Our uniforms were satin, and uncomfortably hot, but so beautiful.” 10 / February 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

I loved the whole majorette outfit, but the white boots always got me. They were the same style — short with a tassel in front — worn by cowgirls in the cowboy movies of the day. (Roy Rogers’ girlfriend, Dale Evans, comes to mind.) I longed for a pair, but girls my age were relegated to saddle shoes. Male drum majors have been leading bands since the late 1800s. But legend has it that majorettes came into being in 1927 when Ed Clark of Elkhart, Indiana, made a baton out of a pool cue for his daughter Katie Clark to twirl with the Elkhart High School band. Yet, for the past several decades, whenever I’ve seen a parade in the Midwest, majorettes aren’t leading any bands, not just high school. (The annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade on TV showed a few who were from southern states, such as Texas and Georgia.)

Girls with flags Majorettes seem to have been replaced by flag spinners, usually a large group of girls dressed in short sequined outfits, flourishing flags of various colors. But there’s just no comparison.


Strutting ahead, setting the pace, with batons flying in the air, and show-off stunts, like rolling batons around their necks and elbows, provided the necessary snappy touch.

Majorettes were unique. Their dash and excitement is lost with the flags. Strutting ahead, setting the pace, with batons flying in the air, and show-off stunts, like rolling batons around their necks and elbows, provided the necessary snappy touch. Actually, the entire bit of pageantry of uniformed, brass-buttoned, plumedhat band musicians and majorettes performing together generated the most vibrant colors of the day in any parade. Baton twirling, by itself, has developed into a serious international sport. Twirlers are trained as athletes in gymnastics and dancing. They pursue their skill in competition, and earn medals by performing tricky maneuvers such as handling two or three batons at a time, or one baton while doing splits, backbends or cartwheels. This still doesn’t explain why majorettes are absent from high school bands. I say bring them back! The world could stand a few more OH BOY! moments. Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@mngoodage.com.

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MINNESOTA HISTORY

A botched midnight execution BY ABIGAIL THOMPSON

“G

entlemen, you are witnessing an illegal hanging. I am accused of killing Johnny Keller. He was the best friend I ever had.” These were the last words spoken by William Williams, a man who was convicted of murder and sentenced to hang for killing Keller, who was his lover. Williams was indeed executed in February 1906. But his punishment wasn’t swift and successful. It was horribly botched and set off a flurry of coverage in St. Paul newspapers. Williams’ gruesome death didn’t just ignite public outrage at the time, however. It ultimately led to the abolishment of the death penalty in Minnesota.

On trial for murder In 1903, Williams, a steamfitter originally from Cornwall, England, was working in Minnesota when he was hospitalized in St. Paul with diphtheria. While recovering, Williams — who was in his mid-20s — met 16-year-old Johnny Keller, and they soon became romantically involved. A relationship between two male laborers of differing ages wasn’t that unusual in the early 20th century, and

when Williams began to travel around Minnesota and Manitoba looking for work, Keller followed him. Keller’s parents, however, weren’t so happy with the relationship. After the pair’s third trip to Winnipeg together, Keller’s parents become extremely concerned and demanded Keller return home to St. Paul. Keller eventually did return to his parents in 1905, and that’s when further trouble began. Williams — upset, enraged and drunk — confronted Keller and his mother, Mary, with a gun, wounding them both. Johnny Keller died at the scene. Mary Keller passed a few days later. Williams immediately turned himself in to the police and pleaded emotional insanity in court. But he was unsuccessful. He was convicted and sentenced to death for first-degree murder. Every attempt at an appeal was denied, and Williams was set to hang on Feb. 13, 1906.

A gruesome execution In 1889, the Minnesota State Legislature had passed the John Day Smith Law, which stated that all executions would happen at night, away from the public eye. The law also banned the press from

▲ William Williams’ execution rope — a fragment shown here — was too long to result in a swift and successful hanging. Photos courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society 12 / February 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

▲ A newspaper clipping from April 13, 1905, included a mugshot of Williams.

printing any details of the executions. The law was passed swiftly in an attempt to promote morality. Newspaper editors were outraged and deemed it the “midnight assassination law.” Under the law, Williams would hang at midnight in the basement of the Ramsey County courthouse, without the public, and absolutely no journalists. Despite this, 35 people, including two journalists, were present for Williams’ execution, and they all witnessed the fateful mistake by Ramsey County Sheriff Anton Miesen that changed the course of Minnesota history. According to onlookers, Miesen miscalculated the length of the rope by about 6 inches. When the floor fell out from under Williams and he dropped, the


▲ A photo collage and illustration about Williams’ execution covered the front page of the St. Paul Dispatch on Feb. 12, 1906.

rope stretched, but his neck didn’t break due to the too-long rope. Williams was still alive. What happened next horrified those in attendance: Three deputies pulled the rope for 14½ excruciating minutes until Williams was pronounced dead by strangulation.

An illegal hanging Three newspapers — the St. Paul Pioneer Press, St. Paul Dispatch and St. Paul Daily News — broke the law and published the gruesome events in detail. The Minnesota Supreme Court later indicted the newspaper outlets for breaking the law, and each newspaper was found guilty and fined $25. By the early 20th century, the public was generally against the death penalty, and not surprisingly, people were shocked and horrified by the botched execution. Williams’ death renewed public outcry against capital punishment. Furthermore, the public was

sympathetic to Williams because his story was one of love and heartbreak. Then-Gov. John A. Johnson was against capital punishment. Mary Lochren, wife of U.S. district judge William Lochren, had attempted to save Williams’ life by publicly pleading with her husband, but to no avail. As a result of the botched execution, plus a sympathetic and angry public — and weak support for the death penalty — Williams was the last person to be legally executed in Minnesota. After the execution, Gov. Johnson and his successor, Adolph O. Eberhart, deferred all death penalty sentences to life sentences. A few years later on April 22, 1911, the state legislature and Eberhart abolished Minnesota’s death penalty for good. Abigail Thompson is a public relations intern with the Minnesota Historical Society. Minnesota Good Age / February 2020 / 13


IN THE KITCHEN

Steak for your sweetie BY SARAH JACKSON

Need a stay-at-home Valentine’s Day meal? Splurge on some ribeye or filet. And get ready to fall in love with this recipe. No grill required — though you do need a cast-iron skillet!


INGREDIENTS 1 cast-iron skillet 1 pound or more ribeye or filet mignon steaks, ideally 1½-inch-thick cuts 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 tablespoon kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon butter DIRECTIONS ⊲ Unwrap the steak, pat it dry with paper towels and rub it with oil and salt on all sides. ⊲ Season the steak with freshly ground pepper and let it come up to room temperature on the counter for 30–60 minutes. ⊲ Set the oven to broil at 500–550 degrees and place an oven rack 4–6 inches below the broiler’s heating element. ⊲ Place the empty skillet under the broiler to preheat, about 20 minutes before you’re ready to cook. ⊲ Remove the hot skillet from the oven — using potholders — and place it on the cooktop with the heat turned to high. ⊲ Turn on your kitchen vent — you’ll need it — and sear the steak for no more than 1 minute on each side.

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⊲ Transfer the skillet to the oven (using potholders) and broil the steak for 1–2 minutes on each side for rare, 3–4 minutes on each side for medium, more for well done. Note: Cook times apply to a 1½-inch thick steak. Reduce cook times for thinner steaks. Your oven/kitchen may get a bit smoky at this stage in cooking. Stick with it. ⊲ Rest the steak on a clean plate. Top with butter and leave it alone, covered, for 5 minutes.  ⊲ Serve with butter and bread (a French baguette warmed in that hot oven) and a side salad. Find a killer balsamic-maple dressing and recipe ideas for greens at tinyurl.com/goodage-greens.

Source: Adapted from How To Cook Perfect Steak in the Oven at thekitchn.com. Minnesota Good Age / February 2020 / 15


NANA & MAMA

Doing daycare

BY MARY ROSE REMINGTON AND LAURA GROENJES MITCHELL

NANA When my daughter announced that her family would be moving back to Minneapolis from Denver, I contemplated the possibility of doing daycare one day a week for our two young grandkids. The theme song that best represents what it took to make that happen is It Don’t Come Easy by Ringo Starr. The easiest part was getting my daughter to agree. She saw the numerous benefits to the proposed arrangement, but first had to make sure her chosen daycare provider would be flexible. Once that was settled, my daughter and I started hashing out the specifics. I wanted more time at my home. And since both she and her wife work from their home, we settled on my house for the daycare location. But since it’s a little more than a half-hour drive, we agreed to split the driving: She’d drop them off in the morning and I’d drive them home at the end of the day. Battling rush hour with two little ones wouldn’t be fun. It don’t come easy. Next I discussed the proposed arrangement with my husband, and said the magic words to win his support: “You will lose no money in this deal if I get my way at work.” I would propose four 10-hour days to keep my current salary. I knew they’d be long days and I’d miss out on time with my husband at night. And you know it don’t come easy. Now it was time to pitch the new 16 / February 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

schedule to my boss — four 10-hour days with every Wednesday off. I described the plan as a pilot program, and said we could reassess after a few months. She gave the green light, but added a new assignment to my duties: Clean out the office shared drive. Yuck! I also told my co-worker, who would be carrying the workload in my absence, that I’d be willing to stay late every Friday to pay her back for covering my Wednesdays. You know it don’t come easy. After stocking up on young-child necessities such as diapers, wipes, extra clothes, electrical outlet covers, baby food and toys, I was ready; and so we began the Wednesday daycare schedule. No sooner had we started, when up popped a Wednesday work conflict, followed by another conflict created by my vacation. With a bit of hustle, we arranged substitutes who did not come easy or cheap. Then, after several months of the pilot program, it was time for my manager and me to reassess. The theme song that best describes the outcome is, unfortunately, You Can’t Always Get What You Want by the Rolling Stones. After two intense discussions, I came away with only every other Wednesday off, and wasn’t given the option to work four 10s moving forward.

Since this new arrangement would involve a slight pay cut, I had to renegotiate with my husband. While he wasn’t thrilled, he still agreed to the revised plan, as he understood how much joy these Wednesdays with the kids brought me. Putting the daycare plan in place for my two grandchildren did not come easy, but the payoff of getting to spend more time with them has been worth the effort.

MAMA When our family moved back to Minnesota we were all eager to have more time together — especially for my kids and my parents, Nana and Papa. Nana pitched the idea of watching them one day a week, which sounded like a great balance: They’d still get lots of socialization with other kids at the daycare center we’d picked out, and they’d get quality time with Nana as well. Whenever I’d heard friends talking about having their parents provide care for their kids, I always thought those families had it so easy. I would’ve loved having my kids watched by someone I know and trust, to not navigate 12-plusmonths-long childcare wait lists and to


not have to pay sky-high daycare tuition. I’ve come to realize, however, that navigating family-provided daycare comes with its own set of unique challenges. It requires thorough planning and open communication on both ends to ensure a positive experience for everyone. Overall, the most important question to consider is: Why are you choosing to have family watch the kids? Is it financial, relational (to give your kids and their grandparents time together), logistical (maybe you can’t find care during the days/hours you need)? What are your nonnegotiables and where can you be flexible? Knowing the answers to these questions and being as honest as possible with your family — without offending — will help ensure everyone is on the same page. After that, there are logistical questions: • Where does the care happen? What days/ hours? Is this consistent or will it vary? • Is the care arrangement indefinite or for a shorter period of time? • What will you do if the grandparent has a scheduling conflict? How far in advance do you need to know about such

scheduling issues? • What if the weather makes the roads dangerous? • 50+ Community • What will you do if someone is sick? • Income Based Rent Grandparent? Kid(s)? Mildly or severely? • All Utilities Paid • Is the grandparent aware of — and on • Newly Remodeled board with — any specific parenting prac• Elevators tices that are important to you (including • Controlled Entries behavior management, nutrition, etc.)? • On Site Caretaker • Is the grandparent aware of any Call for an appointment 651-288-8159 changes in safety practices since you were a child (babies sleep on their backs, cribs shouldn’t have blankets or toys untilSouth St Paul HRA GA 0519 12.indd 3 4/11/19 2:54 PM babies are 12 months old, etc.)? • Is the grandparent well enough (physically, mentally) to keep up with young kids? Is there anything you don’t feel comfortable with the grandparent doing with the kids (such as driving)? What if there’s an emergency? • What is the grandparent giving up to be able to provide care? Is this sacrifice reasonable/fair? Are there ways to ease the sacrifice? • Will you compensate the grandparent financially, by helping them in other ways, by providing meals or simply by expressing gratitude regularly?

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The benefits of having Nana watch the children have FAR outweighed the negatives. Nana is even closer with the kids now and our oldest, Kellan, actually refers to her as his “best friend.” We also get to enjoy dinner as a family (including Papa) each week the kids are with her. I’m so thankful to have the support of our family, and I’m glad we’ve been able to find an arrangement that works well for everyone! Mary Rose Remington, a baby boomer grandmother, and her daughter, Laura Groenjes Mitchell, a millennial mother of two, are documenting their parenting/grandparenting experiences in the Twin Cities. Minnesota Good Age / February 2020 / 17


TRAVEL

The Taos Pueblo village is a living Native American community designated as both a National Historic Landmark and a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.


Uniquely beautiful and classically Southwest, Taos, New Mexico, beckons with history, atmosphere and art aplenty BY VICTOR BLOCK

T

aos, New Mexico, would be worth a visit for its setting alone. It’s surrounded by high-country plains interrupted by towering peaks. The Rio Grande River cuts a jagged gash through the desert-like terrain. And its local, earthen adobe architecture gives it a unique sense of place that’s superbly — quintessentially — Southwest. Those soaring mountains are home to the world-class skiing spots that have made the town famous as a snowy getaway. Equally famous, if not more, however, is its thriving art scene and rich history, including the World Heritage Site that is the historic Taos Pueblo village (pictured). Population 6,000, elevation 6,969, Taos deserves at least a weekend visit, but if you’re already planning to visit Santa Fe (1.5 hours to the south by car) or Albuquerque (2.5 hours to the south), you owe it to yourself to see the town — at least as a daytrip. Plus the desert drive up from either city — the former is another art mecca and the latter is the hot air ballooning capital of the world — is a bucket-list experience on its own.

Minnesota Good Age / February 2020 / 19


▲ Sculpture is one of numerous art forms visitors will discover in Taos, New Mexico.

But back to Taos: If you prefer modern structures sheathed in glass, you won’t find them here. Instead the scene is soft, and the ochre color of the Pueblo-style architecture blends naturally with that of the surrounding desert. Galleries line many streets of the tiny town and the culture of art permeates public spaces as well. Reminders of its past as a Spanish colonial outpost and frontier settlement are everywhere, and the historic remnants of pueblos offer evidence of the rich and lasting influence of Native American culture, too. But let’s pick up the story in 1540, when a Spanish expedition arrived in the area to find magnificent pueblo structures in which the Tiwa (pronounced TEE-wah) Indians lived. The Spaniards officially established Taos in 1615 with a walled square, enclosed by adobe buildings. Today the Plaza, like the rest of Taos, reveals a blending of Native American, Spanish and Anglo-American influences that have together created a 20 / February 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

rich cultural tapestry, along with colorful threads added by fur traders, mountain men and countless artists. The Plaza continues to serve as the core of town and is the logical place to begin an exploration. Four rooms in the Ernest L. Blumenschein Home and Museum formed part of the defensive walls that surrounded the original settlement. Later they were incorporated into a home where the artist and his painter wife lived and worked during the first decades of the 20th century.

works by outstanding 18th- to 21stcentury painters. The story of the Millicent Rogers Museum involves the high-society scion of a wealthy industrialist who came to Taos to recover from a failed romantic affair with Hollywood actor Clark Gable. Her collection includes textiles, pottery and other arts and crafts endemic to the area. Taos is also home to one of the most photographed and iconic churches in the country — San Francisco de Asis — built in the early 1800s. Famed artists such as Georgia O’Keeffe, Ansel Adams

In addition to paintings by its former occupants, the collection includes works by members of the Taos Society of Artists. In the early 20th century, they earned the town worldwide recognition as a major art colony. Paintings by society members also hang in the Taos Art Museum at Fechin House, named for the Russian emigre who came to town in 1927 and became a leading portrait artist. Other museums, some located in homes of former residents, also relate chapters of the intriguing history of Taos. The Harwood Museum displays

and others captured its adobe architecture and made the “Ranchos Church” nationally famous. But it’s not just a historic site; it’s also a working parish. Every June, parishioners and volunteers replaster its exterior adobe by mixing clay, sand, straw and water into a thick mud that’s applied layer upon layer. Taos, along with its claim to fame as a center for a fascinating fusion of artistic genres, is also a shopping mecca. You’ll find an overwhelming selection of well-made cowboy and cowgirl paraphernalia, covetable Native American items and a long list of other goods.

The Kit Carson Home & Museum is a short walk from Taos Plaza.


Vibrant murals brighten many of the buildings’ adobe exterior walls in Taos.

If that’s not enough to give you shopper’s overload, some museums offer unusual and often unique merchandise in their gift shops and stores. For example, a museum-quality collection of Native American art and handicrafts echoes that which is exhibited in the Millicent Rogers house. In keeping with the nationality of Nicolai Fechin, Russian art and crafts share shelf space with local offerings in his former home. A very different, but equally important, experience greets visitors to the Taos Pueblo. This historical monument, just a few miles north of town, is one of 19 pueblos (Spanish for towns or villages) in northern New Mexico. The complex of multi-storied earthen structures is considered to be the oldest continuously inhabited place in the country, and life there astonishingly goes on much as it has for some 2,000 years.

While many of the pueblo’s residents live in modern dwellings scattered about the expanse, about 150 continue to cling to the old ways in the original apartments. They make do without electricity or running water, and bake bread in outdoor beehive-shaped ovens called hornos (pictured below). Some rooms of ground-floor apartments function as shops for tourists,

offering handmade jewelry and paintings by Native American artists. If you love Old West history, make time for a stop at the Kit Carson Home and Museum, right in the middle of Taos. This multitasking frontiersman, trapper, scout, Indian agent and Army officer became a legend due to stories about him in news articles and dime novels. The low-slung adobe house where he lived for almost a quarter-century is a repository of artifacts that illustrate the various phases and accomplishments of his career. Iconic Carson and his house typify the captivating tales, historical tidbits and cultural melange that to this day draw visitors to Taos. For more information, call 800-732-8267 or go to taos.org. Victor Block is a veteran travel writer and has contributed to numerous publications nationwide. Minnesota Good Age / February 2020 / 21


A GRAND achievement

JAN UAR Y 2019

Frank Bartocci (right) poses with Chuck Savage after finishing his 1,000th marathon on Day 3 of the Savage Seven (Dec. 28), a sequence of seven marathons on seven consecutive days, which Bartocci has now completed seven times.

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A Rochester runner finishes his 1,000th marathon — early! BY SARAH JACKSON

H

e did it. Frank Bartocci — the Rochester runner who was our Good Age cover star in January 2019 — completed his 1,000th marathon on Dec. 28, 2019. When we published our story a year ago, Bartocci had run a total of 918 marathons and ultramarathons. His goal was to hit 1,000 sometime in the middle of 2020. He actually finished months ahead of time at age 72. And that 1,000th race wasn’t even his last of the week. He hit the 1,000 mark on Day 3 of the Savage Seven — a race in which die-hard distance athletes like Bartocci run seven marathons in seven consecutive days in Ocala, Florida. (Bartocci cofounded the event in 2010 with his friend, Chuck Savage of Florida.) “I accelerated my schedule,” Bartocci said in an email. “My goal — maybe frosting on the cake — was to go for the finish in all seven.” And he did, finishing seven consecutive marathons Dec. 26 through New Year’s Day for a total of 1,004 completed marathons. “In the 10 years that Savage Seven has been in existence, I was able to complete all seven, seven times — significant to me because seven is a sacred number,” Bartocci said. Bartocci is the fifth American to complete 1,000 marathon races. And he made sure his journey wouldn’t be overly easy. “I purposely scheduled through the very hot and challenging summer races because at some level I wanted to

▲ When Frank Bartocci of Rochester crossed the finish line of his 1,000th race in Florida, Chuck Savage presented him with this award.

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feel worthy of this great honor, and felt that I should be able to make it through extreme, tough, adverse races, resulting in great satisfaction should I be so blessed to make it,” he said. Visit hobt.org or call 612.721.2535 Bartocci said he’ll now back off on the for more information. number of timed races he runs to about 30 per year — “just to stay in shape and enjoy the health benefits.” In the Heart of the Beast MNP 2016 V6 filler.indd 1 7/6/16 10:36 AM He’s looking forward to taking some cruises and maybe a chance to do a bit of writing and reflection. His buddy, Chuck Savage, said he thinks no one will ever exceed Bartocci’s collective accomplishments. GET HELP But Bartocci, who started running 612.825.0000 marathons a bit later in life (in his mid-30s), said: “Never is a long time.” Savage, who had full confidence that his friend would finish his 1,000th race, had a special award, engraved and ready GIVE HELP for him at the end. 612.825.3333 “I am so honored to receive that trophy from Chuck,” Bartocci said. “I was getting choked up as he read it at the finish line.” Congrats, Frank! To read our award-winning story about Tubman helps people of all ages and genders facing relationship Bartocci from 2019, go to tinyurl.com/ violence, sexual exploitation, mngoodage-bartocci. addiction, mental health challenges, or other forms of trauma. Sarah Jackson is the editor of Good Age.

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Photos by Tracy Walsh


Leading by example As she wraps up her first year as CEO at Ecumen, Shelley Kendrick reflects on a career of service BY JULIE KENDRICK

E

ven though she might not have realized it at the time, Shelley Kendrick, 57, was preparing herself for a lifetime of service to seniors even when she was a young girl. The current president and CEO of Ecumen, a nonprofit senior housing and services provider based in Shoreview, recalls helping take care of her grandparents when she was growing up in Flint, Michigan. That included working in the yard, cleaning house, taking them shopping or helping with the dogs. But it wasn’t all work to her. It was a pleasure. “I was always attracted to the company of older adults,” Kendrick said. “I remember how much I loved talking with my great-grandmother. She had been a teacher, and she liked books. I was a reader, and I liked to tell stories. She really encouraged me, and she was a huge influence on me.” Kendrick’s mother, Luetta, has been a major influence and a role model, too. “She was a working mom — an engineer at the phone company,” Kendrick said. “She managed to have a balanced life, and never missed one of her children’s games. I still talk to her every day.” Kendrick (no relation to the author) had an early fascination with sports. “I used to follow my younger brother to little league practice,” she said. “I’d grab my glove, hop on my banana seat bike and show up at the field, hoping I’d get a chance to play. But this was before Title IX, and I wasn’t allowed.”

Minnesota Good Age / February 2020 / 25


Leading by example Still, she made her own way in the world of athletics. Boxed out from playing basketball because she was too short, she won a full-ride softball scholarship to East Michigan University, where she earned a degree in english language and literature. “I’d always wanted to be a journalist,” she said. But it turned out that a different career path would soon open up for Kendrick.

Working her way up After a start in the personnel department of a nursing home, Kendrick eventually worked her way up to become a nursing home administrator. She went back to school and earned a master’s in nonprofit business administration from the University of Notre Dame. “I was called to do nonprofit work, and I realized it was my mission and my service,” Kendrick said. “I met a number of people during the program and learned that Minnesota had some fabulous nonprofits that might offer me work and advancement, so I moved here.” Her first job in the state was at the Minnesota Veterans Home. Gayle Kvenvold, now the president and CEO at LeadingAge Minnesota, an association of organizations serving Minnesota seniors, observed Kendrick’s leadership skills firsthand. “She arrived at a time of strife for the Veterans Home,” Kvenvold said. “The setting had received a number of significant deficiencies in more than one Minnesota Department of Health survey, and it was the subject of several highly 26 / February 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

▲ Shelley Kendrick poses in the lobby of Ecumen in Shoreview, where the values “serve,” “honor” and “innovate” adorn the walls. Photo by Tracy Walsh

critical newspaper articles — and really tough oversight hearings by the Minnesota Legislature.” There also was labor unrest and caregiver morale was low, Kvenvold said. “Shelley was a key leader on the team who literally turned things around for the care community — improving care and regulatory compliance; working with residents and their families, employees and the broader veterans community to restore confidence and build morale. She is a leader who rolls up her sleeves and works alongside her team and never loses sight of the needs and wishes of the older persons at the center of services and supports,” Kvenvold said. Kendrick moved to Ecumen eight years ago. And last year, she was named president and CEO, filling the mighty

big shoes of Ecumen’s CEO Emeritus Kathryn Roberts, who’s received many honors and awards over the years, including the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal’s 2019 Career Achievement Award after 16 years in the role. Today, Kendrick is leading an organization that continues to grow in size and influence. Ecumen is one of the country’s largest and oldest nonprofit senior housing and services providers. Founded in Mankato in 1862 as a foster care organization associated with the Lutheran Church, it’s since evolved to serve seniors. Although its spiritual roots continue 150 years later, Ecumen is nondenominational when it comes to those it hires and serves, focusing on diversity and inclusion. Operating nearly 100 properties and


services in more than 40 communities in eight states, Ecumen had a 2018 revenue of $148.2 million. It serves 15,000 people annually with a variety of senior housing options and resources, including independent living, assisted living, memory care, affordable housing, hospice, shortterm rehabilitation and long-term care, as well as community-based services and an online medical equipment store. The company both owns properties and also manages them for others, and has developed innovative cooperative-living communities, too. “Shelley is one of the most dedicated, loyal and people-focused individuals I know,” said Brett Anderson, Ecumen’s vice president for health and clinical services. “She exudes passion for caregivers and for those we serve. Every single interaction with her and every decision she makes is anchored around those two groups of people. She’s a servant leader who has walked the walk and done many of the jobs people within Ecumen do.”

The state of senior living Kendrick sees the broader valued-based mission of Ecumen as continuing to serve more people and addressing areas of opportunity at a local level. “To expand our mission, we need to have more team members and take care of them by learning what drives them, what their goals are, and providing them ways to continue to grow and learn,” she said. One of her key areas of focus is having an impact on the social

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Leading by example

▲ During an annual fundraiser, Shelley Kendrick bought a special painting created by memory care residents at Ecumen’s Prairie Lodge in Brooklyn Center. “I put a high bid on it. I thought it needed to be at the Shoreview office,” she said. Photo by Tracy Walsh

determinants of health at a local level. One example is social isolation. To ensure Ecumen has a voice at the table for those they serve, Kendrick works with policymakers, legislators and city council members. She points to the recent completion of Zvago Central Village, a 58-unit cooperative independent housing community in Apple Valley, as an example of this “work local” credo in action. “Without the help of the city council and the mayor, this project wouldn’t have happened, but it’s an option that people in the community want and need when they’re downsizing,” she said. “Some 28 / February 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

choose to own, not rent, and this project — like our other Zvago co-ops — make that possible.” Two other Zvago communities are open now in St. Anthony Park and Glen Lake, and two more are coming — one on Lake Superior and another in Stillwater. Described as “limited equity cooperatives,” they provide for a steady annual growth of members’ equity at a fixed rate of return based on an initial share payment. Ecumen is also the organization behind Abiitan Mill City, which opened in 2016 as the first senior services community in the core of downtown Minneapolis,

all in keeping with Ecumen’s mission to innovate, empower and honor to “change how our society views aging.” Despite such successes, Kendrick admits that the senior care and housing system can be frustrating and confusing. “My own mother, who is 77, is looking now at some housing options in Florida. I’ve been helping her, and it’s confusing,” Kendrick said. “If she didn’t have me to help her sort through this, it would be difficult.” Meanwhile, Kendrick continues to make an impact on her community. LeadingAge Minnesota’s Kvenvold told a story about her appearance on a panel


The 14th annual

at the organization’s annual meeting: She was sharing thoughts about the future of aging services, leadership lessons and strategic positioning of not-for-profit organizations. “I was struck by the way she has humility at her core,” Kvenvold said. “In a natural and poised manner, she drew a room of several hundred people right into the conversation, as though she were sitting at the conference room table with them instead of on a raised dais at the front of the room.”

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Kendrick is the mother of four children, all of whom joined her family through adoption. Michael, 24, lives in the Twin Cities. Casey, 30, Ashley, 29, and Chloe, 23, all live in Ohio, where Kendrick started her career. “The y’re the light of my life,” she said. Kendrick and her wife, Mary, live in Stillwater, and the couple can often be found at sporting events. The y root for the Twins, University of Minnesota Gophers football, and men’s and women’s basketball and softb all (for which she has season tickets). Kendrick keeps active by running, biking, hiking and kayaking. “I like to do everything I can physically, and luckily I haven’t had any major injuries,” she said. “My shoulder got beaten up from sliding headfir st into bases when I was playing softb all, but otherwise I’ve been very lucky.” Looking ahead to what’s in store for her career, Kendrick said: “I’ve always liked fin ding solutions to tough challenges, and

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▲ Shelley Kendrick and her former partner have four grown children — Michael, Casey, Chloe and Ashley (top photo). All but Michael (pictured with Kendrick during a race in Minneapolis) live in Ohio.

that’s why I’m here at Ecumen. I want us to be a place that says, ‘Yes, it can be done,’ and then finds a way to resolve issues. Being here allows me to use the strengths I have to do that.”

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CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR

FEBRUARY

ONCE ON THIS ISLAND

→ Winner of the 2018 Tony Award for Best Revival of a Musical, this is the tale of Ti Moune, a fearless peasant girl in search of her place in the world. When: Feb. 4–9 Where: Ordway Center for the Performing Arts, St. Paul Cost: $48–$117 Info: ordway.org Photo by Joan Marcus

ONGOING

A CHOICE OF WEAPONS → See photographer Gordon Parks’ images from the Jim Crow era through the civil rights movement along with photographs by Brooklyn-based artist Jamel Shabazz, who has followed in Parks’ footsteps from the 1980s to the present day. When: Through April 19 Where: Minnesota Museum of American Art (The M), St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: mmaa.org

FEB. 4–9

BLUE MAN GROUP → With new original music, custom-made instruments and engaging audience interaction, these famed blue men provide a show to remember. When: Feb. 4–9 Where: State Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: $40–$126 Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

FEB. 8–9

MINNEAPOLIS HEALTHY LIFE EXPO → Explore 180 exhibitor booths, offering products and ideas for better health and 30 / February 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

wellness, plus three stages with seminars and demonstrations running every hour. When: Feb. 8–9 Where: Minneapolis Convention Center Cost: Admission is $6 or free with a donation for the food shelf. Info: mediamaxevents.com

FEB. 14

THE LOVE SHOW: SKYWAY TO HEAVEN → Minnesota’s storyteller extraordinaire Kevin Kling and local musicians return for a seventh year of this popular Valentine’s Day tradition. When: Feb. 14 Where: The O’Shaughnessy, St. Paul Cost: $25–$29 Info: oshag.stkate.edu

FEB. 15–16

ARBORETUM WINTER ART FAIR → Nature-inspired fine arts and crafts, jewelry, clothing, home accessories, health and beauty products and treats will be for sale. When: Feb. 15–16 Where: University of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Chaska Cost: Included with gate admission of $15 for ages 16 and up, free for ages 15 and younger Info: arboretum.umn.edu

FEB. 17–MAY 11

THE MYSTERIOUS OLD RADIO LISTENING SOCIETY → Society members perform horror and suspense shows from the golden age of radio in the style of a classic radio broadcast, including original commercials, eerie music and live sound effects. When: Feb. 17, March 9, April 19, May 11 Where: Park Square Theatre, St. Paul Cost: $23 Info: parksquaretheatre.org

FEB. 21–23

MINNESOTA GOLF SHOW → The largest golf show in the upper Midwest features 100,000 square feet of golf-related products and services and over 100 exhibitors. When: Feb. 21–23 Where: Minneapolis Convention Center Cost: $14–$149 Info: minnesotagolfshow.com

FEB. 14–23

FEB. 29

→ The Shakespeare classic is reimagined as a modern love story told through different styles of dance with a score of contemporary and pop hits played by a live string quartet.

→ North American and Japanese taiko drumming artists will perform after spending two weeks together in a residency.

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When: Feb. 14–23 Where: The Cowles Center, Minneapolis Cost: $33–$39 Info: thecowlescenter.org

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When: Feb. 29 Where: Ordway Center for the Performing Arts, St. Paul Cost: $27–$42 Info: ordway.org


THE BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY → When a handsome stranger pulls into the driveway to ask for directions, life changes in an instant for an Italian housewife named Francesca in this play based on the 1992 novel by Robert James Waller. When: Through Feb. 16 Where: Bloomington Center for the Arts Cost: $17–$46 Info: artistrymn.org/bridges

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CRYPTOGRAM Break the code to reveal a quote from a famous person. Each letter represents another letter. Source: David Lynch Clue: A=I ' T H U I

W V

G .

M O

W C A U U .

WORD SCRAMBLE Complete the following words using each given letter once.

' I Z V P V ' U

U M F V I Z A B Y

OG

X V

E G C C

C A E V

G WM H I

U I P H Y Y C V .

32 / February 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

S Z

B

C Y

O T

N H

A

EL D

I Z V .

Z H F G B

P

R

ANSWERS

C A B V

3. A Serious Man

C M B Y

2. Winona Ryder

L G B ' L

TRIVIA 1. Anderson

O A C F

SHAWSHANK SPARTACUS SPIELBERG STAGECOACH STRANGELOVE TITANIC ZHIVAGO

GARLAND GODFATHER GOODFELLAS HEPBURN HITCHCOCK KUROSAWA POTEMKIN


TRIVIA

WORD SCRAMBLE Bogart, Psycho, Denzel

1. What last name is shared by Minnesotan-born film and TV stars Louie, Loni and Richard Dean? 2. What star of Beetlejuice, Edward Scissorhands and The Age of Innocence was born in a Minnesotan town, after which she was named?

CRYTPOGRAM Film can’t just be a long line of bliss. There’s something we all like about the human struggle.

North Stars

3. What 2009 Coen Brothers film is set in a Jewish St. Louis Park community, circa 1967? Sources: minnesotafunfacts.com, wikipedia.com, imdb.com SUDOKU

CROSSWORD

ANSWERS

If you have a home, you have a list. GET IT DONE WITH HELP FROM EXPERTS AT THE 15t h ANNUAL

HOME IMPROVEMENT FAIR Presented by

FREE!

2020

SATURDAY, MARCH 21

10 am –3 pm

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FAIR

MEET WITH OVER 40 OF THE TWIN CITIES’ BEST REMODELERS, PLUMBERS, LANDSCAPERS, PAINTERS, MASONS, ELECTRICIANS, ARBORISTS AND MORE, SHOWCASING THEIR WORK AND PRESENTING SOLUTIONS FOR YOUR HOME IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS.

Bring the grandkids to the LEGO ® activity hosted by Snapology of Minneapolis SW HI Fair 2020 GA 0220 H2.indd 1

swjournal.com/homefair 1/23/20 3:09/PM Minnesota Good Age / February 2020 33


Crossword

DOWN 1 Worrier’s stomach woe 2 Seasons with crystals 3 Make official 4 Tackle moguls 5 Cancel out 6 Eccentric sort 7 Capek play about automatons 8 __ mater 9 Toll-paying convenience 10 Sports car that has two syllables in German 11 NFL analyst Collinsworth 12 Slender wind 13 Seasoned sailors 18 “Hamilton” creator Lin-__ Miranda 23 Victor at Gettysburg 25 Chaney of silents 28 Bone: Pref. 29 Pet peeves? 30 Saks __ Avenue 31 Mental flash 32 “I’m __ human” 33 Negative votes

ACROSS

1 Depletes, with “up” 5 Pod in Creole cuisine 9 Theme park that retired its IllumiNations show in 2019 14 Tall and skinny 15 Umpire’s call 16 Greek played by Anthony Quinn 17 Bit of insurance paperwork 19 Earlier offense 20 Series-ending abbr. 21 Set as a price 22 Accumulates 24 Letters shown in the “Wheel of Fortune” bonus round 26 PC panic key 27 No longer in style 34 Public tantrum 37 Hydroplaned 38 Writer Ferber 39 Novelist Levin 34 / February 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

40 Charge card charge 43 Tarzan player Ron 44 Owlet’s home 46 With everything in place 47 ER images 49 Work out regularly at the gym 52 __ ring: foot jewelry

34 Act the fink

53 Postgame rundowns 57 Domed hall 61 Watergate pres. 62 Sigma follower 63 Soft palate part 64 Fungus on an old loaf 67 Latish wake-up hr. 68 James of “Elf” 69 Charitable offerings 70 Catch by trickery 71 Prefix with formal or final

50 Like a generic brand

72 Potter’s material associated with the end of 17-, 27-, 49- and 64-Across

35 First Nations tribe 36 “__ of Eden” 41 Paid for a hand 42 Use, as energy 45 In name only 48 DVR button 51 Designer Giorgio 54 Ring-shaped reef 55 Director Brian De __ 56 Like dishwater 57 Boring routines 58 Baking appliance 59 Fish in cat food 60 Preschool basics 61 Paper quantity 65 Grammy winner Corinne Bailey __ 66 PC alternative


ÂŽ

on each Medicare Part D prescription

when Walgreens is your Preferred Pharmacy*

* Copay savings based on filling a Tier 1 generic prescription at a Preferred Pharmacy compared to a Non-Preferred Pharmacy with select plans.


Profile for Minnesota Good Age

February 2020  

Shelley Kendrick, CEO of Ecumen, is our featured cover star this month!

February 2020  

Shelley Kendrick, CEO of Ecumen, is our featured cover star this month!

Profile for mngoodage
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