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GOOD AGE

GOOD AGE

GOOD AGE


LiVeLife Crest View Senior Community at Blaine offers an exercise class every weekday. Many seniors find they’re getting more movement now than they did living in their own homes. Jackie exercises four days each week. Why? “Because it’s available, and it’s good for your brain and everything else,” Jackie says. Before moving to Crest View, Dorothy loved line dancing. Ardis was a member of a local gym for women. Others walked a lot. Today, they value the exercise options, as well as the other activities, offered at Crest View. Take a tour of Crest View Senior Communities in Blaine or Columbia Heights and see for yourself.

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Contents 24

ON THE COVER How did Dr. David Hilden, originally an engineering grad, end up being one of Minnesota’s most respected physicians? Photos by Tracy Walsh

20

32

St. Augustine is the oldest city in the U.S. — and it’s a great candidate for your bucket list.

Retirement coaching can help older adults find a new path.

HISTORIC FLORIDA

6 / January 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

REAL AGING


JANUARY

HELP US BRING JOY TO ISOLATED SENIORS WITH YOUR GIFT!

FROM THE EDITOR 8 Dr. David Hilden shows respect for his patients, especially older adults.

MY TURN 10 See how a 94-year-old man is giving back to the folks who helped him a lifetime ago.

MEMORIES 12 Sex and the Single Girl changed dating life for women in the 1960s.

MINNESOTA HISTORY 14 Sigurd Olson’s love of the outdoors began in woodsy northern Wisconsin.

HOUSING SPOTLIGHT 16 The Freemasons of Minnesota established senior housing early.

IN THE KITCHEN 18 If you like butternut squash, this healthful recipe is for you.

GRANDPARENTING 35 Check out six books to spark a love of reading with your grandkids.

36 CALENDAR 38 CAN’T-MISS BRAIN 40 TEASERS HOUSING LISTINGS

Gifts for Seniors provides donated gifts and life-affirming personal contact during the winter holidays and year round to isolated seniors in the Twin Cities metro area with the critical support of volunteers, donors, and community partners — people like you.

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Host a Gift Barrel | Organize a Gift Drive Find us on AmazonSmile | Individual Shopping

GIFT IDEAS

CLOTHING: cardigans, slacks, shirts, blouses, sweats, fleece, nightwear, robes, socks, no-skid slippers, hats, scarves, mittens LINENS: towel sets, sheet sets, blankets, pillows ENTERTAINMENT: CD or DVD players, books, music, movies, puzzles HOUSEWARES: dishes, flatware, small appliances, clocks with big numbers AND MORE: personal care sets, grocery gift cards, cash donations

Feel free to use this list for ideas!

We only accept new, unwrapped gift items.

giftsforseniors.org | 612-379-3205 info@giftsforseniors.org Gifts for Seniors GA 2019 2-3page.indd 1

10/24/192020 4:12 PM Minnesota Good Age / January /7


FROM THE EDITOR Volume 39 / Issue 1

PUBLISHER

Janis Hall / jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER

Terry Gahan / tgahan@mngoodage.com

GENERAL MANAGER

Zoe Gahan / zgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR

Sarah Jackson / editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Victor Block, Karen Carr, Ed Dykhuizen, Carol Hall, Dave Nimmer, Karen Ritz, Susan Schaefer, Abigail Thompson, Tracy Walsh

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

ART DIRECTOR

Dani Cunningham

AD COORDINATOR AND OFFICE MANAGER Amy Rash / 612-436-5081 arash@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION

Marlo Johnson / distribution@mngoodage.com

37,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2020 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. To receive Good Age by mail, send a check for $18 with “Good Age subscription” in the memo.

8 / January 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

A true caregiver

B

BY SARAH JACKSON

eing hospitalized can be a harrowing experience. Usually you’re admitted for something serious, and there are risks of secondary infections and other complications, too, especially if your stay is longer. Fortunately, here in Minnesota, we have excellent hospitals and physicians who specialize in hospital care — including this month’s ever-cheerful cover star Dr. David Hilden. You see, Hilden isn’t just a highly revered primary care doctor for Hennepin Healthcare in downtown Minneapolis, he’s also an acute care hospitalist at Hennepin County Medical Center. Being a hospitalist means he’s in tune with the unique situations patients can face in a hospital setting, including infections, blood clots and even bed sores. Add in Hilden’s easygoing temperament, sense of humor and caring bedside manner and you have quite a remarkable physician. Best of all, Hilden enjoys working with seniors, whom he genuinely respects. “Sometimes, I have to make sure I get to their health problems during our appointments,” he said, “because I treasure long and engaged conversations about stories of their youth, family, careers and future dreams.” And that’s not all that’s special about Hilden: He’s also the guy behind the Healthy Matters radio show on WCCO 830 AM, now entering its 12th year. That’s over a decade of sharing health knowledge and answering callers’ questions. In addition to all of the above, Hilden, who has a master’s degree in public health, travels the world to speak to medical educators about health-care topics. Is it any wonder his peers suggested he become Vice President of Medical Affairs for Hennepin Healthcare last year? And yet it’s also a marvel that he can keep up with it all, given his involvement in the American College of Physicians and the Minnesota Medical Association, too. My guess is that he’s fueled by his own natural super-human energy, but also his amazing, close-knit family — a loving wife, Julie, and their two grown children. Hilden’s clearly a fortunate guy. But we’re just as lucky to have him — working as a caregiver/clinician, being a health-care leader in the heart of our city and talking to us all every week on the radio. Thanks, doc!


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MY TURN

One man’s bath brigade mission BY DAVE NIMMER t times in my life I’ve tried to be aware of — and to repay — old debts: writing a letter to a college professor who empowered me, taking a longtime friend who can no longer drive to the grocery store, visiting a former neighbor who lost his wife of 60 years. But I’m a piker when compared to Les Heggernes, who repaid a debt he felt he owed that dates back to 1939. Heggernes, who today lives at Boutwells Landing in Oak Park Heights, remembers going to the Union Gospel Mission’s Ober Boys Club when he was 14 years old. At the time, he lived near the State Capitol in St. Paul. “I grew up in a tough neighborhood,” he said. “We didn’t have much money, and it would have been easy to go down the wrong path. But I went over to the Gospel Mission and met a counselor to whom I could confess anything. He was like a surrogate father and I never forgot him or the mission.” The Gospel Mission is still serving youth today, providing homework assistance, day camps and classes at the Ober Community Center, while also helping adults rebuild their lives by offering safe shelter, nutritious food, medical/dental care and other programs, too. When Heggernes saw a video and learned of the mission’s requirement that residents take a daily shower, he 10 / January 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

figured they could use soap and toiletries. Since March of 2018, Heggernes — with a little marketing help from his son, Mike Heggernes — collected almost half a ton of supplies from fellow Boutwells residents. Each month the pair would bring to the mission their Boutwells Beautiful Bath Baskets (soap, shampoo, deodorant and even bath towels), which filled the trunk and back seat of the car, according to Mike Heggernes. “If other people were showing the same empathy and enthusiasm as my father, this world would be a little better,” he said. “He is an inspiration and I hope we can continue doing this into the future. It’s a reflection and reminder there are a lot of great people still doing what’s right.” What’s right for Les Heggernes is having a plan and a purpose. “You know, this is something positive for me to do,” he said. “I don’t want to be sitting around drinking beer and watching daytime television.” That makes LeNae Williamson, development manager at the Union Gospel Mission, very happy. “People on the streets may not have had a hot shower for many days or even weeks,” she said. “Getting clean, smelling good, putting on clean and dry clothes can all do amazing things for how a person feels, both inside and out.”

▲ Les Heggernes staffed the collection barrel for the soap drive at Boutwells Landing in Oak Grove Heights, ready with stickers that said, “I GAVE: Boutwells Beautiful Bath Baskets.” Photo courtesy of Mike Heggernes

Heggernes and his son made one more amazing effort for the Gospel Mission. On Oct. 16 last year, Heggernes orchestrated the collection of 1,635 bars of soap from residents of Boutwells Landing, a senior living community. Residents were delighted to donate, dropping off their soap bars with smiles on their faces. They figure it ought to go down as an unofficial world record. “Everyone seemed to benefit from the experience,” Mike Heggernes wrote in a report about the soap drive. “Residents increased their sense of community by participating in a worthwhile event. The Gospel Mission supported this effort by supplying the barrel and then retrieving the full barrel and overflowing boxes.”


People on the streets may not have had a hot shower for many days or even weeks. Getting clean, smelling good, putting on clean and dry clothes can all do amazing things for how a person feels, both inside and out.

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— LeNae Williamson, development manager at the Union Gospel Mission

Boutwells employees were encouraging and supportive. “The unintended negative consequence was the potent fragrance (from the soap) that filled the air in the lobby,” Mike Heggernes wrote. Eventually, the perfume drove “the welcome desk person to vanish as the smell grew proportionally to the pile of soap.” For me, the inspiration from the Heggernes bath basket brigade is the partnership between father and son. I suspect the two have never felt closer, and that’s enabled Les Heggernes to not only stay in the game, but to also round the bases. Not too bad for a guy who’s 94 years old. Learn more about Boutwells Landing at preshomes.org. Dave Nimmer had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Write him at dnimmer@mngoodage.com.

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MEMORIES

A single woman’s manifesto BY CAROL HALL

uthor Helen Gurley Brown is likely unfamiliar to most women in their early 20s today, but when I was that age, everyone was talking about her. The book she wrote, Sex and the Single Girl, which came out in 1962, set us all agog — particularly young women like my girlfriends and me. We’d all moved to the big city to work after being reared in small Midwestern farming communities. The book’s subject matter was circumvented in polite conversation — or not discussed at all — in our nice little Lutheran towns. It was all the hush-hush secret stuff that we “good girls,” who were expected to marry young, weren’t supposed to know about — the sort of thing my mother would lapse into Norwegian to discuss with her sisters.

She detailed how to decorate your apartment, what clothing to wear and makeup tricks to enhance an ordinary face. She even provided recipes for a special romantic dinner. 12 / January 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

And here was a woman who’d come right out with it in a book. We couldn’t wait to read it! Too many years have passed for me to recall what Sex and the Single Girl had to offer us. When I spied a copy recently at a garage sale, I grabbed it up, and read it again. Well, then. There, now. Helen Gurley Brown seemed to touch on just about everything we innocents were curious about — and quite a few things we’d never imagined. I mean, who in our group knew that “one girl alone on a beach” could be “a man attractor,” a tip that appears in the chapter titled “Where to meet them.” Or if you go looking for a man at an Alchoholics Anonymous meeting, you should “pick a wealthier chapter of A.A.” Uff da! These “tips” set the tone of the book. Subsequent chapters followed suit, offering encouragement and suggestions — an action plan, if you will — on how to ensnare a man. A rich one if possible. Or, perhaps . . . several men. She detailed how to decorate your apartment, what clothing to wear and makeup tricks to enhance an ordinary face. She even provided recipes for a special romantic dinner. Reading all of this today reminds me of just how eager women were and — if they followed the book’s suggestions —

what lengths they might go just to find a man. But the book’s idea was radical in 1962. Our 1950s values hadn’t vanished; we still had marriage in mind. There hadn’t been any real encouragement — media or otherwise — to remain single and follow a career as the book suggests doing, and as Brown did, becoming editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan magazine. Then, in 1970, came The Mary Tyler Moore Show on TV. Now here was “Mary Richards,” an attractive, bright woman who seemed to be everything a man would want, but who was in no hurry at all to snag the right one. She carved out an interesting career as an associate TV producer and a


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successful life as a single woman. It was food for thought. At this point, I could say, the rest is history. But instead, I’ll give a pat on the back to Helen Gurley Brown. It was time for women to redefine their roles in life. She gave us a boost in that direction — as well as a really good recipe for Pepper Steak Espana!

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MINNESOTA HISTORY

The living legacy of Sigurd Olson

Sigurd Olson stands in front of a canoe in 1959. Photos courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

BY ABIGAIL THOMPSON

O

n April 4, 1899, Sigurd F. Olson was born in Chicago, son of devout Swedish Baptists. He’d soon grow up into one of Minnesota’s most passionate environmental conservationists. When Olson was a young child, his family moved to woodsy northern Wisconsin. He spent his childhood playing in the wilderness, which fostered a passion for nature. He received a bachelor of science degree from the University of Wisconsin in 1920 and later a master’s of animal ecology. He became a biology teacher, teaching high school and junior college

14 / January 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

classes. Olson, his wife Elizabeth, and two sons eventually settled in Ely, where from 1936 to 1947 he served as dean of Ely Junior College, now Vermilion Community College.

Early conservation efforts Olson first began his conservation work in the 1920s with a campaign to keep roads and dams out of the QueticoSuperior area. In the 1940s, he led a successful campaign to ban airplanes from flying into the region. The ban set a precedent for other protected areas in the country and made Sigurd F. Olson a

popular name and leader in the conservation movement. In 1947, he decided to retire from teaching to pursue conservation work full time. Olson’s launch into fame presented many opportunities to protect areas beyond Minnesota. He was a key figure in establishing the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska and Point Reyes National Seashore in California as well as Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota. Olson served as president of the National Parks Association from 1951– 1959 and as an adviser to the National Park Service and Secretary of the Interior


from 1959 into the 1970s. He was also a talented writer. His first book, The Singing Wilderness, became a New York Times bestseller in 1956, thanks to his lyrical, empathetic and humanistic style, which included depections of small moments of clarity and contemplation during his experiences in northern Minnesota. He said: “Wilderness to the people of America is a spiritual necessity, an antidote to the pressure of modern life, a means of regaining serenity and equilibrium.” Olson went on to write eight more books on the subject, and his writing was well-awarded: In 1974, Olson received the John Burroughs Medal in nature writing.

Protecting the wilderness In 1964, Olson aided in creating the Wilderness Act, which President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law. The act created the National Wilderness Preservation System, which protects federal lands across the country. Olson passionately fought for the protection of the Boundary Waters in the 1970s. He was most concerned about mining in the wilderness and the effects it could have on the ecosystem. Olson wrote to politicians and gave occasional speeches on the subject, too. His rhetoric and environmental efforts weren’t always met with praise, however. In 1977, opponents in his hometown of Ely hung effigies of members of the Sierra Club — including Olson and other environmentalists — outside a congressional hearing about the creation of the federally protected Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA). Olson’s critics — who were advocates of logging and motorized vehicle use in the wilderness — worried restrictions would hurt their industries. Olson remained unwavering against the

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▲ The Star Tribune covered protests about the BWCA in Ely in July 1977.

protests. In fact, he stated he was grateful for the incident. Nonetheless, the campaign to protect the northern wilderness proved successful in 1978 when President Jimmy Carter signed a law protecting and creating the Boundary Water Canoe Area Wilderness. In January 1982, Olson died of a heart attack while snowshoeing near his home. But his legacy continues on: Thanks in part to Olson’s long-term commitment to the BWCAW, it has become the most visited wilderness area in the country, with almost 250,000 visitors annually. In 1971, Northland College in Ashland, Wisconsin, where Olson grew up, created the Sigurd Olson Environmental Institute. Today the institute serves as an education center, leads regional conservation efforts and works to foster “the next generation” of environmental leaders. In northern Minnesota, conservationists and campaigns continue Olson’s legacy of environmentalism, including working on some of the same issues Olson devoted himself to, including pollution of ecosystems and freshwater sources, loss of critical habitat and biodiversity. Abigail Thompson is a public relations intern with the Minnesota Historical Society.

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A century of caring T he Freemasons of Minnesota began planning long ago to provide comfortable housing for their senior members. As early as the 1860s, the organization realized it needed to start saving money to build “a real home, not an institution” for aging Masons and their loved ones. Thanks to that vision, the Minnesota Masonic Home on the banks of the Minnesota River in Bloomington is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year. Much has changed, of course, since in the community’s first resident arrived on Aug. 3, 1920. Today, the community is operated by the nonprofit Minnesota Masonic Charities and offers a wide spectrum of services for all older adults — not just those with connections to the Masons. Options include independent living townhomes, assisted living and memory care, plus long-term, skilled-nursing and transitional care.

16 / January 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

BY SARAH JACKSON

In addition to those continuum-ofcare services, the community also boasts 100 physical, occupational, speech and massage therapists and five therapy gyms furnished with state-of-the-art equipment. A 100-bed transitional care unit (TCU) can accommodate therapy seven days a week. The Minnesota Masonic Home’s historic, 83-acre campus was once the summer estate of Marion Savage, owner of the famed racing horse, Dan Patch. The Masons purchased the land from Savage in 1918 for the purpose of building a retirement community. In 1989, after a variety of changes and expansions over the years, the community became certified through Medicaid/Medicare and opened up admissions to all. Today the grounds’ historic buildings and independent living homes sit nestled among green lawns, ponds, walking paths and mature trees. At the center of the campus is the historic

Photo courtesy of Minnesota Masonic Charities

HOUSING

main lodge, which features an indoor Town Square with a beauty parlor, museum, general store, diner, library, game room and exercise facility. Most notable, however, might be the latest addition to the campus — the Minnesota Masonic Heritage Center, which was completed in 2016 and includes a Masonic museum and library, plus a new 443-seat auditorium and theatrical venue, which hosts public matinees and evening performances year-round. Residents here needn’t venture too far to experience the arts; the cultural events come to them instead. Upcoming shows, all open to the public, include Rainy Days & Mondays: The Music of the Carpenters at 1 p.m. Jan. 22 ($32); The Colorful Music of Russia with the Bloomington Symphony Orchestra at 3 p.m. Feb. 16 ($12–$15); and From the King for the King: The Gospel According to Elvis at 1 p.m. March 11–12 ($32).


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IN THE KITCHEN

Eat clean!

Sarah Jackson is the editor of Good Age. Her former food editor and mentor Melanie Munk gave her the recipe and always loved to share the story behind it.

BY SARAH JACKSON

This flavor-packed puree isn’t just good for you: It’s based on a recipe from the Algonquin Hotel in New York City, where writers of the 1920s hung out at their famed round table, trading quips.


ALGONQUIN SQUASH SOUP 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 yellow onion, chopped 1 pear or apple, peeled, cored and chopped 1 stalk celery, diced 8 cups chicken or vegetable broth 3 cups butternut squash, cubed 1 russet potato, cut in pieces 1 head cauliflower, cut into florets 2 teaspoons (or more) sweet curry powder Sour cream and parsley for garnish (optional) ⊲ Saute onion, celery and chopped pear/apple in the olive oil over medium heat for 4 minutes. ⊲ Add curry powder and stir for 1 minute. ⊲ Pour in 6 cups broth and bring to a boil.

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g n i o G oastal c TRAVEL

Rich history and beautiful beaches abound in St. Augustine, Florida By Victor Block


I

n 1607, a small band of settlers founded the first permanent English outpost in the Americas, Jamestown in the colony of Virginia. But did you know that another town already had existed since 1565 in a different part of the Continent? St. Augustine, Florida, which traces its roots to a 16th-century settlement, celebrated its 450th anniversary in 2015, reminding everyone of its reputation as the oldest continuously occupied community in the country (not counting tribal settlements). St. Augustine offers visitors a setting that captures not just the stories, but also an authentic atmosphere of its colorful past, especially in the city’s 144-square-block historic district. The Colonial Quarter is a good place to begin exploring this coastal city of 15,000. The neighborhood is a living history museum: A blacksmith,

carpenter and other costumed historic interpreters combine facts with fun as they help onlookers relive the way things were over the centuries. They recall the expedition led by Pedro Menendez de Aviles, a Spanish admiral, who arrived in 1565 and set up an encampment near a Timucuan Indian village. That tribe was one of a number of Native American groups that began occupying the area some 10,000 years ago. Menendez wasn’t the first Spanish explorer to come ashore in the region, which lies today about an hour’s drive from modern-day Jacksonville. In 1513, Ponce de Leon led an expedition seeking to find — and claim — uncolonized islands, a journey that landed him here and gave birth to the legend of the Fountain of Youth. A fable about vitality-restoring waters was familiar on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, but there’s

Minnesota Good Age / January 2020 / 21


▲ Spaniards constructed the Castillo de San Marcos fort, now a national monument, between 1672 and 1695 to defend the city against pirates and British forces.

no credible evidence that de Leon was searching for the potion. Somehow accounts of his supposed quest found their way into history books after his death. And the story stuck. The Fountain of Youth Archaeological Park occupies the place where Menendez encountered the friendly Timucua people and established the settlement, which evolved into present-day St. Augustine. Attractions include a reconstructed portion of the Indian village, ship building and other exhibits, and cannon and weapons demonstrations. Other than a brief interlude (1763– 1784) when Great Britain gained control of Florida, St. Augustine remained under Spain’s rule. That accounts for the Mediterranean architecture and other reminders of Spanish influence. By the time the U.S. took possession of the city by treaty in 1821, it already was 256 years old. Reminders of those early years abound. The Gonzalez-Alvarez house, aka The Oldest House, was constructed in the early 18th century in the Spanish Colonial style, with touches of Britain’s Colonial architecture, added when the 22 / January 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

English controlled the city. Records date the Oldest Wooden School House back to 1716. Speaking animatronic figures of the schoolmaster and pupils introduce themselves and describe a typical day of classes. One boy wears a dunce cap, the penalty for not knowing his lesson. Among places in St. Augustine where visitors may encounter ghosts, or at least tales about them, is the Old Jail. This historic Victorian-style building housed criminals from 1891 to 1953. The gallows in back were used to administer capital punishment, and explain why the property is one among many in town said to be haunted by spirits.

Because of its role at a time of exploration and conflict in the New World, St. Augustine boasts its share of forts. Most imposing is the Castillo de San Marcos, a massive 17th-century stronghold built by the Spanish to defend the Florida coastline. Some rooms surrounding the central courtyard are furnished to reflect garrison life, while others contain exhibits about military history. A different story comes to light at Fort Mose, hidden away in marshes north of St. Augustine. There, in 1738, a group of slaves who had escaped from British colonies built a log fortress and founded the first free community of ex-slaves. While the original structure is long gone, a small museum describes the events with videos, interactive exhibits and objects found during digs. Given the age of St. Augustine, it’s no surprise that the city is an archaeologist’s dream location. Many artifacts have been uncovered over the years and much more remains buried beneath the streets, buildings and even in backyards. Some 100,000 artifacts were unearthed at the Fountain of Youth Park, including American Indian pottery, carved beads, shell tools and three dog-burial sites. Evidence of the 16th-century Spanish settlement ranges from religious amulets to olive jars. At Fort Mose such objects have shed light on social, religious and Oldest Wooden School House


Ponte Vedra Beach, about 40 miles north of St. Augustine, Florida, is one of many sandy escapes on the historic coast.

military life. In St. Augustine, there’s often a dig underway somewhere in the city, and interested visitors are invited to observe. Although the region’s 60 historic sites and attractions are the main reason why most people visit St. Augustine, this city also manages to keep one foot planted firmly in the present. Sun worshippers can find a choice of inviting beaches all along the coast, each with its own appeal. The two-mile long beach at Anastasia State Park consists of gleaming white quartz sand. The aptly named Crescent Beach is one of the most scenic and unspoiled in the area. A statue of Ponce de Leon guards the towering dunes and shell-laden shore of Ponte Vedra Beach, just southeast of Jacksonville (about 40 miles north of St. Augustine). The explorer spotted the beach during his 1513 journey and stands as a fitting symbol for what awaits visitors in St. Augustine and beyond. Victor Block is a veteran travel writer and has contributed to numerous publications nationwide.

St. Augustine, Florida

Where is it? St. Augustine is about an hour’s drive south of Jacksonville. Delta offers nonstop MSP-JAX flights to get you there. When should you go? According to U.S. News and World Report’s online travel guides, the best time to visit St. Augustine is between March and May, when you’ll find fewer people, comfortable temperatures (highs from 74–85) and lower hotel and airfare rates. Despite the high humidity and heat in June, July, August, that's when it’s the most crowded. The downside of December, January and February is that temps can dip into the 40s. Hotel rooms and flights are cheaper from September to November, but those months fall within the Atlantic hurricane season, which runs June through November. Learn more at travel.usnews.com. Who can tell me more? Contact the St. Augustine, Ponte Vedra & The Beaches Visitors and Convention Bureau at 800-653-2489 or floridashistoriccoast.com. Minnesota Good Age / January 2020 / 23


CARE

[GIVER] As a primary care doctor, radio host and now executive at one of the busiest hospitals in the state, Dr. David Hilden has a way of putting patients first. BY SUSAN SCHAEFER

A

ny summons to a chief executive’s office can spike momentary anxiety. On a winter day in 2008, David Hilden, M.D., entered the office of Lynn Abrahamsen, then CEO of Hennepin County Medical Center (HCMC), the metro area’s safety net hospital, not knowing what to expect. “You’re the voice of Hennepin now,” Abrahamsen told a bemused Hilden. With that proclamation, HCMC took the bold step of pioneering an on-air promotional radio program on WCCO 830 AM. Healthy Matters debuted in 2009 on a one-year trial basis, and Hilden became its inaugural host. “I had never been on radio in my life!” said Hilden, looking back on those times from his new office in HCMC’s administrative wing. Hilden, you see, is an executive now, too, having been selected this past June by his peers to become Vice President of Medical Affairs for Hennepin Healthcare (which includes HCMC and the new Clinic & Specialty Center, both in downtown Minneapolis) plus a network of clinics and other divisions throughout Hennepin County.


Dr. David Hilden works as a hospitalist, which means he specializes in treating hospitalized patients with strong knowledge about the many conditions a patient faces specifically in a hospital setting. Photo by Tracy Walsh

Minnesota Good Age / January 2020 / 25


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[GIVER] “There is no place I would rather practice medicine than Hennepin and I am humbled to represent a medical staff of incredibly talented and committed colleagues,” Hilden, 55, said when his appointment was formally announced. “I hope to follow previous physician leaders in fostering collegiality, purpose and, most of all, a collective sense of joy in our professional lives.”

RADIO DAZE But let’s get back to Hilden’s radio career. It all began as a friendly challenge from two doctor pals. “There I was, minding my own business as a primary care doctor,” Hilden said. “At the time, an email was circulating, soliciting HCMC medical staff auditions for a new radio show that the hospital was considering.” Those friends, Dr. Heidi Coplin, now at Allina, and Dr. Anne Pereira, presently an assistant dean at the University of Minnesota Medical School, encouraged him to audition with a glib decree: “Since you never shut up, you would be good at it!”

26 / January 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

▲ In 2018, David Hilden celebrated 10 years of doing his weekly Healthy Matters radio show with a celebration and live broadcast at Hennepin Healthcare’s Clinic & Specialty Center in downtown Minneapolis. Photo by Alex Carroll Photography

Hilden’s live show — Healthy Matters, now beginning its 12th year on air — proved them right. A whopping 560 one-hour broadcasts later, Healthy Matters regularly tops the radio ratings in the Twin Cities. And it’s moving to a new 7–8 a.m. Sundaymorning timeslot to build on the many listeners Hilden’s reached over the years. Half of Healthy Matters features Hilden answering questions from listeners on open phone lines, while the other half showcases guests discussing specific topics. All of the shows are live, on-air, with yearly live, in-person broadcasts from the Minnesota State Fair. “I’m always amazed at how many people come to see me there,” Hilden confessed, a smile animating his boyish face. Clearly enjoying this aspect of his work, he also produces content for myhealthymatters.org, an associated blog, and hosts short monthly spots on local TV and radio stations as a health expert on topics in the news. Friends Pereira and Coplin retain bragging rights for their wise nomina-

tion of Hilden. “From our early days working together as new physicians at HCMC, it was clear that David naturally and genuinely connects with people, making sense of medical issues that can be complicated and, at times, frightening,” Coplin said. “Of course,” she said, “it doesn’t hurt that he has the gift of gab.” Pereira agreed, citing the way Hilden loves to talk with and meet new people. That, combined with thoughtful care of patients and his enthusiasm for teaching, make Hilden the perfect healthrelated medical show host, Pereira said.

FINDING MEDICINE There’s no mistake that the man behind this media celebrity is first and foremost a practicing primary care physician and acute care hospitalist (more on that later) in one of the state’s busiest hospitals. He also holds a faculty position at the University of Minnesota Medical School. It’s all pretty remarkable, especially


eventually asking why he wasn’t practicing medicine. “I thought that was an odd question,” he said. “I hadn’t really considered medicine as a career.” But he does recall mentioning an old desire to become a medical engineer in passing. With Julie’s notion percolating, Hilden began to consider a different future. He finally reasoned, “Why not?” and began in earnest to make the cut as a medical student. For two years, Hilden transformed his kitchen table into a makeshift biology lab, ▲ Fans of Dr. David Hilden always turn out for his yearly live, in-person broadcasts from the Minnesota State Fair.

when you realize medicine is actually his second profession. Hilden graduated in 1987 with a bachelor’s in electrical engineering from the University of Minnesota. And his first eight professional years were spent working in the forefront of the bar code industry. Bar codes? Yes, bar codes — those ubiquitous black stripes affixed to every jar, can and clothing tag you’ve ever had scanned at your favorite Target, Cub or Best Buy.

Hilden entered the workforce as the operations manager at Minneapolisbased Symbology, then the nation’s largest supplier of bar codes. In charge of computer networks, graphic designers and the film production facility, the recent graduate and newly married Hilden staked his claim in this emerging field. But, over time, the work didn’t prove that challenging. His wife, Julie, discerned Hilden wasn’t living up to his potential, ⊳ David Hilden’s wife, Julie, his sweetheart for the past 30 years, urged him to go into medicine while he was working in the bar code industry in the Twin Cities.

where he spent endless days and nights performing experiments, eventually completing his medical school prerequisites. Not convinced he’d be accepted, he applied to only one school — his alma mater, the University of Minnesota — figuring if it didn’t work out, he would just continue with bar codes. But his efforts paid off, and in 1996 at the respectable age of 31, Hilden traded a world of skinny black bars for hospital blues, and he’s never looked back.

FAMILY FIRST Julie, his biggest advocate, remains the center of his universe. Around her true north rotates the “exceptionally tight” Hilden family. A Minneapolis Public Schools social worker, Julie was “the older woman” Hilden fell for over 30 years ago while he was a young adult counselor for his church’s youth group. “I was 24 and she was 28,” Hilden said, “and I was so smitten that I agreed to drive a rickety old school bus just to get in her good graces.” Realizing that he was more interested in Julie than in his young charges, Hilden proposed marriage.

Minnesota Good Age / January 2020 / 27


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[GIVER]

Dr. David Hilden — a Twin Cities primary care physician and acute care hospitalist — is well-known in the Twin Cities for his call-in radio show Healthy Matters on WCCO Radio 830 AM at 7 a.m. Sundays. Photo by Tracy Walsh


Julie, who also works as a fitness and yoga instructor at various metro area YMCA locations, continues to inspire and amaze her spouse: “Sometimes I come home to find her standing on her head,” Hilden said, lightheartedly adding that he can’t muster a headstand, despite being head over heels about her. Together they’ve raised two children. Their son Alex, 26, attended Oberlin College in Ohio and is following his mother’s lead, currently serving as a special education assistant for Minneapolis Public Schools. Daughter Abby, 25, transferred from the University of Michigan to the University of Southern California, where she’s pursuing an acting career. Through frequent flyer miles, text messaging and family dinners, the parents communicate with and see their children regularly. Their close family life was shaped by Hilden’s own upbringing. His parents, Richard and Joan, were high school sweethearts, who — after graduating from the University of Wisconsin — married young.

“At the age of 84, they still have the strongest marriage I’ve ever seen,” he said. Born in Madison, the youngest of four and the only boy, Hilden moved with his family to Minneapolis when he was only 2. “I’m a lifelong South Minneapolis guy,” he said. “My childhood was defined by my small South Minneapolis world and the people around me. I still have friends from kindergarten.”

WHAT’S A HOSPITALIST? While many medical doctors choose specialties over primary or acute care, Hilden selected the latter, eventually joining the ranks of the relatively new role of hospitalist, which became increasingly common in the 1990s. To be a hospitalist is to specialize in inpatient medicine and to be responsible for managing the care of hospitalized patients in the same way that primary care physicians do for outpatients. But it’s more than a stand-in role. A hospitalist is in charge of minimizing the need for hospital visits to the patient by other physicians, but also to focus on the general medical care of all hospitalized

I think doctors need to always, always, always refrain from patronizing older adults. Many seniors defer to their doctors, but almost all still want an intelligent conversation. — Dr. David Hilden, Hennepin Healthcare

patients through patient care, teaching, research and leadership. Patients, Hilden said, would ideally have one doctor who deeply knows them, treats them and cares for them throughout life, whether at a clinic or hospital or in hospice care. “In the old days, that’s how it was,” said Hilden, who is officially an acute care hospitalist. “But those days are gone.” It’s not all negative, however. In the old days, a family doctor’s hours were brutal. Most physicians today wouldn’t accept them. The big positive about the role of the hospitalist, Hilden said, is that they’re specialized in treating the whole patient — with specific knowledge about the varying conditions one faces in a hospital setting. Bed sores, blood clots and infections are just some of the considerations in addition to the patient’s presenting illnesses, Hilden said. “Primary care is at the heart of what I do,” Hilden said. “And I think it’s the

▲ David and Julie Hilden are close with their grown kids, Abby and Alex. Minnesota Good Age / January 2020 / 29


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[GIVER] most important, and the most difficult, job in medicine.” One of Hilden’s early mentors, Dr. David Williams, said Hilden exemplifies Francis Weld Peabody’s quote: “The secret of the care of the patient is in caring for the patient.” Williams said: “David really cares for the patients he sees, and moreover, very early in his career he understood that the health of any individual had to be viewed in a community context.” That worldview prompted Hilden to pursue additional academic work resulting in a master’s degree in Public Health. This is especially relevant to his practice in a safety net hospital where “the social determinants of disease” are of paramount importance in determining health outcomes. Hilden has appeared in Washington, D.C., many times as a public health policy advocate. Through his role as the Minnesota Chapter Governor of the American College of Physicians (ACP), he puts the rubber to the road, lobbying to make health care equitable for all. Hilden is also a member of ACP’s Health and Public Policy Committee, which is the primary policy-making committee for the nation’s largest specialty physician organization. He was the ACP’s 2017 Minnesota Chapter Laureate Award recipient, and in 2014 took home the Volunteerism and Community Service Award. In 2010, he was awarded the Physician Communicator of the Year Award by the Minnesota Medical Association. 30 / January 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

▲ Dr. David Hilden regularly speaks to medical educators and the public on health-care issues locally and around the world.

AGING AND UNIVERSAL HEALTH CARE Treating older adults with the respect that their experience and wisdom deserve is central to Hilden’s health-care philosophy. “We need to treat people as individuals and not provide different levels of care just because they are older,” he said, stressing the importance of giving honest medical information to older adults — not providing false hope for treatments that aren’t likely to benefit them. On the other hand, he cautions that just because a patient is older, caregivers should never withhold treatment that would be beneficial. Breaking into a wide grin again, Hilden spoke tenderly about seniors’ well-developed sense of humor. He often turns the tables on them, noting how much they appreciate wit. “Sometimes, I have to make sure I

get to their health problems during our appointments because I treasure long and engaged conversations about stories of their youth, family, careers and future dreams,” he said. “I think doctors need to always, always, always refrain from patronizing older adults. Many seniors defer to their doctors, but almost all still want an intelligent conversation.” Hilden regularly talks about end-of-life issues with seniors. “I am convinced that nobody is shocked to know that they will someday die — and this is certainly no surprise to people in their 80s and 90s,” Hilden said. “So, I have a supportive and informative conversation with seniors so that they know what to expect and how we can together go about ensuring that their later years are the best they can be, and when the time comes, that they will indeed have a ‘good death.’”


HEAR DAVE! David Hilden’s Healthy Matters radio show has a new timeslot: 7–8 a.m. Sunday mornings on WCCO Radio 830 AM. Hear past shows at wccoradio.com. Topics include sleep, influenza, food and nutrition, end-of-life care and shoulder replacement surgery. Visit myhealthymatters.org for more information.

ON MUSIC AND LIFE In spite of his jam-packed professional life, Hilden carves out time for essential physical and intellectual pursuits. He’s an avid runner — and reader, recently finishing the biography of Ulysses S. Grant by Ron Chernow, author of Alexander Hamilton, one of his favorites. On his nightstand now is Black Leopard, Red Wolf by Minnesotan Marlon James, whose A Brief History of Seven Killings was challenging at first, but one Hilden became obsessed with eventually. No big secret to those who know Hilden well is his absolute reverence for Bruce Springsteen, whose autobiography Born to Run tops his list. “A Boss concert is a near-religious experience,” he said. Hilden’s wish for the world, however, goes beyond a good night of music or even his health-care advocacy and treatment of patients: “My wish is that we had more love and more justice in the world — that we treat all people as our brothers and sisters all over the planet.” Susan Schaefer is a Minneapolis-based freelance communications consultant, writer and photographer who can be reached at insights@lifeintrans.com.

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REAL AGING

The path with heart What is retirement coaching? Hint: It’s not about finances. BY KAREN CARR

S

ince 2001, I’ve been a life coach. Many factors played a role in my decision to become my own boss: I needed a flexible schedule to parent my kids. But I was also inspired to help others move forward in their lives while making good decisions in line with their passions. And now for the past 18 years, I’ve helped others follow their paths with heart. Words can hardly describe the gratification that comes from coaching individuals seeking the best for themselves. I’ve seen the power of the coaching process and how it can increase selfconfidence and result in deeper reflection to uncover what’s best, be it through acknowledging achievements, validating the numerous decisions life entails and/or appreciating one’s developed qualities and chosen values.

32 / January 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

Finding well-being My first clients right out of coach training asked me to assist them with their retirement life plans. And it wasn’t their finances that needed to be addressed. They wanted to be comfortable with their well-being plans. One of those clients was an elementary school teacher who was looking ahead three years. She knew she wanted to make travel a priority. Coaching with me gave her the opportunity to see more clearly that finding a life partner wasn’t a necessary goal. She chose to travel with groups instead of going solo. She also hired an organizer to help her declutter and organize. Getting and staying organized outside of the classroom was something she realized helped her embrace her retirement years more fully. Another client had taken early retire-

ment due to a medical emergency. He needed to find ways to quiet his mind as well as stay social and involved while still using the talents he gained as an attorney to contribute to his community. He came to the conclusion that he wanted to enjoy an aquarium in his home. But because his wife was opposed to this idea, we were able to find other ways to increase his well-being — that didn’t disrupt his relationship with his wife — through coaching.

Addressing vulnerability People hire me to create a scaffold with them — a scaffold to hold them and guide them on their desired paths; to help them give notice to their bosses and move on to another schedule, one that better fits their desired lifestyle; to move them forward from their prime positions


It’s about seeing more clearly where you are and where you want to be, accepting the change that’s possible, and then taking productive action. where they’ve been planted, perhaps a few months too long. It wasn’t until attending a fundraising event for Youth and Family Services with my friend, Jean Houlding, who is on their board, that I decided to focus solely on being a retirement coach. The event speaker was Tony Buettner, brother of Dan Buettner of Blue Zones fame. His opening statement sparked something in me and added a sense of urgency to my work as a coach. He said that, according to one study, the two most physically vulnerable times of our lives — when we are most likely to die — are our very first year after birth and the year following retirement.

It wasn’t until that day, which happened to follow my own wake-up call after surviving a car accident, that I chose helping people prepare and manage their lives in retirement as the main focus of my work. The average person doesn’t often recognize when it’s time for a broader perspective. If you believe it’s time for you to make a change, yet you’re feeling stuck in your job or lifestyle, it’s probably time to broaden your perspective with the many resources available. I recommend Mary Lloyd’s book — Super-Charged Retirement: Ditch the Rocking Chair, Trash the Remote and Do What You Love — because she admits missteps along her own path. She’s relatable and she also includes many exercises that will help you decide how much selfdevelopment you’re willing to undertake.

Seeing more clearly

RETIREMENT TRICKS First and foremost, define retirement. What does it encompass for you? Then take time to step back to envision options for you that align with that definition and your budget. Remember your friends. Talking with your friends about their plans often leads to being inspired to step into something new. Plus, your friends know you, so they can give you honest feedback when it comes to your resistance to retire or remain in the workforce. Of course, they may not know your bottom line and how you truly feel satisfied spending your time. (Sometimes we don’t know this ourselves.) This is why coaching can help. Finally, remember that self-care is vital to your health. Say YES to yourself before undertaking obligations in retirement. Many people take an entire “sabbatical” year to delve into the newest phase of their lives. And even then, it’s one step at a time.

Most people believe that when they have their financial plans in order, they’re ready to retire. As Buettner states, there’s so much more to it than wealth management. Coaching helps clarify ideas about the emotional changes one goes through at the point of retirement — grief, loss, excitement, fear, joy and freedom. It’s about seeing more clearly where you are and where you want to be, accepting the change that’s possible, and then taking productive action. Some people will benefit from preparing for retirement months — or even years — ahead of time; some want to wait until they take a year off to prepare for their next stage of life; then there are those who find themselves scrambling for a

focus and purposeful life a year or two after they’ve retired. Each person has their own story, such as not wanting to do what their parents did, whether that was sitting around and watch TV or haunting their former workplaces. Others are simply looking ahead and want to nurture their independent spirits, interests and passions. Ask yourself if you’re living the life you envisioned in retirement (aside from the structure of work hours) and, if so, you’re in a great position to continue that path. The path with heart.

⊳ Early retiree Mary Lloyd wrote Super-Charged Retirement to help older adults maintain a sense of purpose by figuring out what’s truly important to them.

You can reach Karen Carr, a Twin Cities-based retirement coach and active grandmother, at 651-426-5123, karen@revitalizecoaching.com or revitalizecoaching.com. Minnesota Good Age / January 2020 / 33


GRANDPARENTING

READ with the grandkids!

→ Tiny, Perfect Things A child and a grandfather take a walk around the neighborhood and it turns into a day of shared wonder as they discover all sorts of tiny, special things together. With rhythmic storytelling and detailed and intricate illustrations, this is a book about how childlike curiosity can transform ordinary days into extraordinary adventures.

BY KAREN RITZ, LEE GALDA AND REBECCA RAPPORT

W

hat should you read with the grandkids? How about books that honor grandparents, curated by three local grandmothers — children’s book illustrator and grandycamp.info founder Karen Ritz; children’s literature professor and author Lee Galda; and Rebecca Rapport, a retired children’s lit professor and editor. Here’s a sampling from their 50 Grand Books With Grandparents list, excerpted with permission.

→ What a Beautiful Morning Every morning is beautiful when Noah visits his grandparents. When Grandpa and Noah wake up, they take off singing and hardly stop: walking the dog, splashing through puddles and eating French toast with cinnamon. But one summer Grandpa seems to have forgotten how to do the things they love. Does he even know who Noah is? Grandma steps in energetically, filling in as best she can. But it’s Noah who finds a way back to something he can share with Grandpa. Something musical. Something that makes the morning beautiful again.

→ I Really Want to See You, Grandma Yumi and her grandmother have the same great idea: They want to see each other. So they each head out to do just that, only to completely miss each other along the way! No problem — they’ll just head back home and wait for the other to return. The trouble is that they have the same great idea — again — resulting in another missed connection. Will this duo ever find each other? Leave it to bestselling author-illustrator Taro Gomi to spin an action-packed story that sweetly, and humorously, celebrates the powerful grandparentchild bond.

→ Grandma’s Purse When Grandma Mimi comes to visit, she always brings warm hugs, sweet treats and … her purse. You never know what she’ll have in there — fancy jewelry, tokens from around the world or something special just for her granddaughter. It might look like a normal bag from the outside, but Mimi and her granddaughter know that it’s pure magic!

→ A Long Way from Chicago Best for a school-age reader, this tale is about a tough, witty, larger-thanlife and, yes, manipulative grandma who can do almost anything. The tales may be outlandish, but “all memories are true.”

→ When I Go Camping With Grandma Penned by former Good Age cover star Marion Dane Bauer, this story follows a young girl who goes camping with her grandmother and, whether paddling a kayak or setting up camp, experiences the wonders of nature and of her grandmother’s love.

Find the authors’ full list of 50 books that honor grandparents at grandycamp.info, featuring tons of book ideas and activities for active grandparents. All the books are also featured on an affiliate page from Amazon at tinyurl.com/grandy-books. Minnesota Good Age / January 2020 / 35


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Contact Rebuilding Together to find out if you qualify for free or low-cost fall-prevention modifications in your home. Ph: 651-776-4273 or Email: SafeAtHome@RebuildingTogether-TwinCities.org Together GA/SPEC S3.indd 1 Good Age 36Rebuilding / January 2020 Minnesota

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AVIDOR IN MINNETONKA Avidor in Minnetonka is an ideal location close to both Downtown Minneapolis and Lake Minnetonka. Restaurants, shopping and Ridgedale Center are right outside your door. At home, in this premiere 55+ community, you’ll find everything to make your next adventure exceptional. Enjoy extensive amenities, high-end finishes and daily events and activities to keep life interesting and engaging. Minnetonka avidorliving.com/minnetonka BOOTH MANOR APARTMENTS Conveniently located across from Loring Park, this 21-story high-rise, with 154 one-bedroom apartments is designed for seniors 62 years of age or better, offering many services and amenities. It also combines the convenience of being near downtown with the serenity of the great outdoors. Minneapolis • 612-338-6313 salvationarmynorth.org/community/ booth-manor CITY OF SOUTH ST. PAUL, HOUSING DIVISION The City of South St. Paul operates 296 one bedroom public housing apartments for residents aged 50+. Rent is based on 30% of tenant’s income. All utilities paid, on-site caretaker, security, after-hours answering service, community room, resident activities, laundry facilities. Call today for an appointment. South St. Paul • 651-554-3270 mostrow@sspmn.org COMMONBOND COMMUNITIES CommonBond builds stable homes, strong futures, and vibrant communities. As the largest


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COVENANT LIVING OF GOLDEN VALLEY Covenant Living of Golden Valley residents and non-residents alike can enjoy the peace of mind that comes with access to our on-site continuum of health care services. At Covenant Living of Golden Valley, we focus on you, your specific needs and personalized care. Golden Valley • 877-473-6903 covlivinggoldenvalley.org EDEN PRAIRIE SENIOR LIVING Our Independent, Assisted and Memory Care living community offers a quality lifestyle in a safe environment. We strive to make residents feel that they are part of the Southview family. Our highlytrained and compassionate staff provide fantastic living arrangements and unbeatable amenities tailored to your evolving needs. Eden Prairie • 651-600-1821 edenprairieseniorliving.com LYNGBLOMSTEN Lyngblomsten is a Christian nonprofit organization serving older adults and their families. A continuum of care offers: independent housing with assisted living services, full range of 24-hour skilled nursing options including short and longterm care, and community services and resources. St. Paul • 651-646-2941 lyngblomsten.org WALKER METHODIST Located in the beautiful East Harriet neighborhood, this charming premiere 55+ community has stunning views of the city and is near restaurants, lakes, and parks. Experience the best in retirement living with an active community, excellent dining, and unique amenities. 612-827-5931 walkermethodist.org

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CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR JANUARY

JAN. 15–FEB. 23

A DOLL’S HOUSE PART 2 → In the final scene of Henrik Ibsen’s 1879 masterwork, Nora Helmer makes the shocking decision to leave her husband and children, and begin a life on her own. This follow-up shows what happened next. When: Jan. 15–Feb. 23 Where: Jungle Theater, Minneapolis Cost: $45–$50 Info: jungletheater.org

JAN. 18

THE FAB FOUR BEATLES TRIBUTE

JAN. 18–FEB. 9

Art Shanty Projects

→ This quirky collection of ice houses converted into art studios has grown into a uniquely Minnesotan festival during the past 15 years.

When: Saturdays and Sundays Jan. 18–Feb. 9 Where: Lake Harriet, Minneapolis Cost: FREE; suggested donations of $10–20 are encouraged. Info: artshantyprojects.org

JAN. 3–5

LAND O’LAKES KENNEL CLUB DOG SHOW → Witness the judging of top dogs and check out demonstrations, exhibitions, seminars, displays and a marketplace, too. When: Jan. 3–5 Where: Saint Paul RiverCentre Cost: $7 for ages 62 and older, $9 for ages 13–61, $5 for ages 5–12, free for ages 4 and younger, and $23 for a family four pack (two adults and two kids) Info: rivercentre.org

JAN. 9–12

MINNESOTA SPORTSMEN’S SHOW → See all the latest outdoor gear, Twiggy the Water Skiing Squirrel, live trout fishing, Ron Schara teaching kids to fish and 38 / January 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

exhibits about boating, camping, vacationing and more. When: Jan. 9–12 Where: Saint Paul RiverCentre Cost: $12 for adults, $2.50 for ages 6–12, free for ages 5 and younger Info: rivercentre.org

JAN. 14–FEB. 14

LOONEY LIFESTYLE TIPS FOR LIVELIER LIVING → The Looney Lutherans — a trio of ladies who use music, comedy and audience participation to create an interactive, family-friendly show — come together in this Livin’ La Vida Lutheran production. When: Jan. 14–Feb. 14 Where: Ames Center, Burnsville Cost: $30–$38 Info: ames-center.com

→ Experience a show of uncanny, note-fornote live renditions of the Beatles’ classics such as Can’t Buy Me Love, Yesterday, Day In The Life, Twist And Shout, Here Comes The Sun and Hey Jude. When: Jan. 18 Where: State Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: $29.50–$59.50 Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

JAN. 18

TOGETHER WE SING FESTIVAL → Enjoy a performance from the diverse youth choir, VocalEssence Singers of This Age, and give back through a service project to support healthy pregnancies among black women and families. When: Jan. 18 Where: Minnesota History Center, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: mnhs.org/event/7627

JAN. 18–MARCH 31

WINTER FLOWER SHOW → This year’s indoor displays will feature a collection of jewel tones, including purple azaleas, red cyclamen, blue pansies and magenta/maroon oriental lilies and amaryllis. When: Jan. 18–March 31 Where: Como Park Zoo & Conservatory, St. Paul Cost: FREE; donations of $2–$3 are encouraged. Info: comozooconservatory.org


JAN. 20

JAN. 23–FEB. 2

JAN. 24–26

→ The VocalEssence youth choir will perform and youth drummers from ARTS Us will share rhythms from across the African diaspora. Families can also drop in to assemble roadside kindness kits for people who are homeless.

→ Check out ice carving, snow sculpting, skiing, dogsledding, a torchlight parade and more at this long-running festival.

→ This annual event offers interior design and home-improvement ideas and presentations with more than 250 vendors.

MLK JR. COMMUNITY DAY

SAINT PAUL WINTER CARNIVAL

MINNEAPOLIS HOME + REMODELING SHOW

When: Jan. 23–Feb. 2 Where: Landmark Center, the Minnesota State Fairgrounds and other locations in St. Paul Cost: Most events are FREE and open to the public. Info: wintercarnival.com

When: Jan. 20 Where: Minnesota History Center, St. Paul Cost: $6–12 Info: mnhs.org/event/8091

When: Jan. 24–26 Where: U.S. Bank Stadium, Minneapolis Cost: $10 online, $12 at the door; $4 for ages 6–12; free for ages 5 and younger Info: homeandremodelingshow.com

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Brain teasers SUDOKU

WORD SEARCH Winter Wonderland

BALACLAVA BLIZZARD CARNIVAL COMFORTER CURLING EARMUFFS FEBRUARY

CRYPTOGRAM Break the code to reveal a quote from a famous person. Each letter represents another letter. Source: John Burroughs Clue: I=W

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WORD SCRAMBLE

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Complete the following words using each given letter once. IT

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I F V X G H .

40 / January 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

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TRIVIA 1. International Falls

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PULLOVER RADIATOR SNOWFLAKE SNOWPLOW SOLSTICE THERMOMETER TOBOGGAN

FIREPLACE FROSTBITTEN HIBERNATE ICICLE JANUARY LONGJOHNS OVERCAST


TRIVIA

WORD SCRAMBLE Mitten, Skiing, Hockey

1. What Minnesota city, known as the “Icebox of the Nation,” is the county seat of Koochiching County, which borders Canada?

CRYTPOGRAM He who marvels at the beauty of the world in summer will find equal cause for wonder in winter.

A Snow Day

2. The Wells Fargo WinterSkate has locations at CHS Field in St. Paul and in what Minneapolis park, which is also home to Holidazzle? 3. What is the name of the “King of the Winds” in Saint Paul Winter Carnival lore?

CROSSWORD

ANSWERS

SUDOKU

Sources: wikipedia.com, mplsdowntown.com, wintercarnival.com

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Minnesota Good Age / January 2020 / 41


Crossword

57 “Not possible” 58 Social oddball 59 Plow-pulling team 60 Chef’s hat

DOWN

ACROSS

1 Burning 6 Do some angling 10 __ Benedict: brunch choice 14 Like some clock numerals 15 Dealer’s request to a poker player 16 Harp constellation 17 Whistle-blower in the street 19 In the thick of 20 Rainbow site 21 Indian or Arctic 22 Blackjack player’s request to a dealer 23 The “P” in POTUS: Abbr. 24 “8 Mile” rapper 26 Kidnap 29 Beltway region, briefly 30 Hooch 42 / January 2020 / Minnesota Good Age

31 Frontier explorer Daniel 32 Network with an eye logo 35 Therefore 36 Singer Simon once married to James Taylor 37 Visit the mall, say 38 Vietnam holiday 39 Three-dimensional 40 Good, in Guadalajara 41 Fights off 43 Boo from the stands 44 Rio Grande city 45 Dryer fuzz 46 Strange 47 Treasure stash 49 Mischief-maker 52 Sicilian volcano 53 Whistle-blower on the court 55 “Yes!” in church 56 RC Cola alternative

1 Martial __ 2 Tined utensil 3 “Possibly” 4 Brit. pilots’ squad 5 Make sure people obey, as laws 6 Turns toward 7 Ancient Peruvian 8 Totally, as sober 9 Cool, like a cat 10 Julia’s “Seinfeld” role 11 Whistle-blower during phys ed 12 Fairy tale brother 13 Marquis de __ 18 “Law & Order: SVU” actor 22 Add to the staff 23 “The Godfather” novelist Mario 25 Multitudes of 26 Help in a heist 27 Yawn inducer 28 Whistle-blower at obedience school 29 Actress Day 31 Polling place receptacle 33 __ fide 34 Dalmatian mark 36 Like dorms for men and women 37 Sheep fat 39 Zoomed 40 Be of help to 42 Quick trip to the market, say 43 Nonsense 44 “I’ll do it” 45 Actress Sophia 46 Gradually withdraw 48 Garden tool 49 Baghdad’s country 50 Diner handout 51 Basketball Hall of Famer “Pistol __” Maravich 53 Sgt., e.g. 54 Green prefix


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