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JANUARY 2019

JAPANESE FOOD

in Minnesota

BORN TO

RUN Frank Bartocci of Rochester sets his sights on his 1,000th marathon

5 STEPS to a

debt-free life

Getting out the

vote

How visiting nurses can lighten your load Inside The Waters at White Bear Lake

Parma, Italy!


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Contents 18

JANUARY

PERFECT PARMA Explore this northern Italian city to discover its rich culture of art, architecture and culinary achievements.

⊳ Parma’s city center is open only to pedestrians and bicyclists.

GOOD START FROM THE EDITOR 8 Meet a local man who loves to run.

MY TURN 10 I stopped complaining about the elections and got involved.

MEMORIES 12 Whatever happened to going outside to enjoy free play?

MINNESOTA HISTORY 14 Learn the fascinating history of Japanese food in Minnesota.

32

ON THE COVER Frank Bartocci of Rochester has run 918 marathons so far.

GOOD HEALTH CAREGIVING 16 Home-care workers and nurses can be lifechanging helpers.

Photos by Tracy Walsh

GOOD LIVING → Correction The December cover of Good Age included a headline for a story that was removed from the issue due to space. Readers can find tasty turkey meatballs in this issue on page 28.

24

HOUSING LISTINGS

38

CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR

6 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

40

BRAIN TEASERS

HOUSING SPOTLIGHT 22 The Waters offers 106 units for seniors in White Bear Lake.

FINANCE 26 Step 1 in reducing debt is ignoring “the Joneses.”

IN THE KITCHEN 28 We made healthy turkey meatballs — and they were a hit!

NANA & MAMA 30 Follow these tricks for getting a sibling ready for a bro or sis.


LiV Li VeLife Crest View Senior Community at Blaine offers an exercise class every weekday. Many seniors find they’re getting more movement now than they did living in their own homes. Jackie exercises four days each week. Why? “Because it’s available, and it’s good for your brain and everything else,” Jackie says. Before moving to Crest View, Dorothy loved line dancing. Ardis was a member of a local gym for women. Others walked a lot. Today, they value the exercise options, as well as the other activities, offered at Crest View. Take a tour of Crest View Senior Communities in Blaine or Columbia Heights and see for yourself.

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FROM THE EDITOR Volume 38 / Issue 1 PUBLISHER

Janis Hall jhall@mngoodage.com

CO-PUBLISHER AND SALES MANAGER

Terry Gahan tgahan@mngoodage.com

GENERAL MANAGER

Zoe Gahan zgahan@mngoodage.com

EDITOR

Sarah Jackson editor@mngoodage.com

CONTRIBUTORS

Kelli Billstein, Ed Dykhuizen, Carol Hall Majorie Eisenach, Caren Gaykto Laura Groenjes Mitchell, Tracy Walsh Larry Kallevig, Julie Kendrick, Dave Nimmer Lauren Peck, Mary Rose Remington, Karen Ritz

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Valerie Moe

SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Micah Edel

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Brenda Taylor

CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER Sarah Karnas

CLIENT SERVICES

Delaney Patterson 612-436-5070 dpatterson@mngoodage.com

CIRCULATION

Marlo Johnson distribution@mngoodage.com

40,000 copies of Minnesota Good Age are distributed to homes and businesses metro-wide. Minnesota Good Age (ISSN 2333-3197) is published monthly by Minnesota Premier Publications. Minnesota Good Age, 1115 Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis, MN 55403 © 2019 Minnesota Premier Publications, Inc. To receive Good Age by mail, send a check for $18 with “Good Age subscription” in the memo.

8 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

Taking it step by step BY SARAH JACKSON

H

appy New Year, Good Age fans! Thank you for picking up our monthly magazine, a perfect way to kick off 2019. This month, we’re incredibly excited to introduce you to an extraordinary man, Rochester-based marathon runner Frank Bartocci. When I first heard about this guy, I was amazed at his claim to fame: He had run 900 marathons and ultramarathons! What? Those miles literally add up to the equivalent of running around the circumference of the Earth! My father, at 75, runs a half-marathon every year and I think that is amazing. (Go, Dad!) But Bartocci’s not only reached 900, he’s shooting for 1,000. How is all of this even possible? Well, Bartocci decided to do it, felt super passionate about it and — in true Nike fashion — just did it. (Caveat: He doesn’t run in Nikes.) I know what you’re thinking: This guy is crazy. But Bartocci, who has as warm and friendly a disposition as any guy you’ll meet, begs to differ: “It has been argued that running this distance — and even running it regularly — is somehow not normal,” Bartocci wrote in a recent essay. “What is ‘normal’, anyway? If not for [pushing] the envelope, most — if not all — discoveries would not have occurred. And what lies beyond our current perceived limits?” Bartocci credits the natural process of “the training effect” for his remarkable ability to endure the running of thousands of miles. “As stimulus is applied to an organism, there is a response. Then removal of the stimulus allows for recovery and rebuilding — after which greater stimulus can be applied before similar breakdown. This is the training effect, where a body adapts, both anatomically and physiologically, to ever-increasing stimulus.” That process, Bartocci said, has allowed his body to handle seven marathons in seven days. Has it been easy for Bartocci? Of course not. In fact, why he got into distance running in the first place is a sad story. He’s been through a divorce and has survived cancer, too. What can the rest of us learn from this man? We can discover determination can take us places we didn’t think were possible, even into our 70s. We can stay the course when things aren’t easy. And we can express gratitude to God and others for all that we’re able to do, even if it’s not a mind-blowing feat like 900 races. Maybe it’s just getting out of bed in the morning.


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MY TURN

Nimmer on the horn BY DAVE NIMMER

H

ere we are in a New Year with a new Congress in Washington, governor in Minnesota and legislature in St. Paul. And for the first time in my life, I got off my fanny — and on the telephone — and got involved. In the process of calling 1,000 registered voters over the course of five evenings, I learned a little something about democracy, humility, transparency and civility. Yes, at the age of 78, I got a civics lesson in the election process. It all started with a supper last spring with three former students in the first journalism course I taught at the University of St. Thomas. We were griping about the state of politics, politicians and public affairs, when it occurred to us we ought to do more than complain.

10 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

Inside the campaigns So, with prompting from the students, I jumped on some candidates’ websites and signed up for phone duty. That took me to an artist’s studio in St, Paul, an office building on East Lake Street and a storefront next to a liquor store in West St. Paul. Depending on the location, I sat on the floor, on a folding chair or a bar stool. Sometimes I used the campaign’s “burner phone” and sometimes my own. Wherever I was, I noticed how much grunt work this business of campaigning requires — keeping the schedules, organizing the volunteers, providing the snacks, leading the cheers and, yes, cleaning the bathroom. This is about as far from the cheering crowds, television lights and victory celebrations as you can get. The task of running a campaign is a gritty, grimy

What humbled me was the thought of calling strangers who, I suspected, would be indifferent — or annoyed. business and I’m impressed with the kids I met who were doing it.

What I said… What humbled me was the thought of calling strangers who, I suspected, would be indifferent — or annoyed. I had their names, ages, addresses and past voting history. I also had a prepared script: Give respondents my first name, tell them I knew they’d voted in past elections and ask them if they planned to vote


in the upcoming election. If they said they were, then I was to urge them to vote for my candidate. This kind of vague introduction produced some responses of, “None of your business.” So I changed the script and got more up front. I started out by giving my full name and the name of the candidate I was supporting. I asked them to please vote and, if they could see their way clear, to vote for my gal/guy. The pitch felt better, and it worked better.

…and how they responded Almost 90 percent of the calls I made were to people who weren’t home or didn’t answer. Of those who did, about a quarter hung up somewhere between my name and my pitch. Another 25 percent didn’t like my recommendation — and a few of those told me to stick it where the sun doesn’t shine. But half of them listened respectfully and some even asked thoughtful questions about my candidate(s). That part was the most rewarding because I got a chance to defend — and define — my choices. Two of the respondents flat-out surprised me, actually thanking me for calling and caring enough about this business of democratic elections to get involved. You guessed it: They were both senior citizens, who’d seen, and voted in, dozens of elections. Chatting with the pair made me feel kind of proud of what I’d done. I’m under no illusion that I became democracy’s handmaiden — although all four of my candidates were elected. The most obvious result of my calling is that I’m now much nicer to telephone solicitors. After saying, “No, thank you,” I wish them a good day. Dave Nimmer had a long career as a reporter, editor and professor. Now retired, he has no business card, but plenty to do. Send comments or questions to dnimmer@mngoodage.com.

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(612) 825-2435 Minnesota Good Age / January 2019 / 11


MEMORIES

Bring back free play! BY CAROL HALL

W

hen I was a kid, my mother ordered me to: “Go outside and play!” if she felt like I was spending too much time in the house. Once out the door, I was completely on my own. But this was never a problem. During my tween years, I’d usually go tree climbing in our backyard with my pal, Janet, in warm weather. Winter days found us gleefully sledding down the steep hill in the park near our home. When we were still in grade school, Janet and I invented elaborate games. “Restaurant,” which was played with

12 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

other neighborhood girls, involved scrounging up Monopoly money, a tea set, a cigar box (the cash register) and tidbits of food from our kitchen. We’d set up shop in our backyard, and take turns being waitress, customer and cashier. Our little “enterprise” kept us busy for hours. Doing a bit of exploring, we “restaurant girls” also discovered the hollyhocks that grew alongside our house could be turned upside down to form colorful hoop-skirted dolls — and voila! — another game, “Scarlett O’Hara,” was born!

But alas, the kind of carefree fun my friends and I enjoyed throughout our youth seems to be fading away today. Thanks to computers, children don’t get outside nearly as much as we did. Studies indicate 10-year-olds spend 7 1/2 hours in front of an electronic screen daily — and only 7 minutes on free play outdoors. Also, many schools have shortened recess to only 15 minutes. And when today’s kids — of all ages — do get out on the playground, they’re more likely to spend a great deal of time participating in competitive organized sports, not the kind of free-form play we enjoyed.


Indeed, I was horrified to discover even my 6-year-old kindergartner granddaughter was deeply involved in soccer. It also struck me that being indoors as much as they are is robbing children of the joy and solitude that comes from exploring the natural world, and uncovering its surprises (for example, a hollyhock can be more than a flower). They’re also missing out on the health benefits of exercise and fresh air, and also of sunshine, which promotes better distance vision in children. Author Richard Louv raises the troubling proposition that society is inadvertently teaching young people to avoid direct experience in nature in his book, Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children From NatureDeficit Disorder. Unstructured outdoor play is vitally important to a child’s cognitive development. With no fixed rules to follow, children are free to invent their own games and rules of play (as we did in “restaurant” and “Scarlett O’Hara”). In so doing, they’re learning teamwork and how to solve problems on their own. But help is on the way. Such is the importance of free-play outdoors that the American Academy of Pediatrics suggested doctors begin writing “prescriptions” for play during early childhood checkups. So grandparents, heed the call. See to it your grandchildren “go outside and play!” Today, it’s doctor’s orders!

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Carol Hall lives in Woodbury. She’s a longtime freelance writer, a University of Minnesota graduate and a former Northwest Airlines stewardess. Send comments and questions to chall@mngoodage.com. Minnesota Good Age / January 2019 / 13


MINNESOTA HISTORY

Our local history of Japanese food BY LAUREN PECK

I

n the early 1950s, Reiko Umetani Weston, a Japanese immigrant, moved to Minnesota, setting the course for the state to be introduced to Japanese cuisine — from teppanyaki to sushi — and for the city of Minneapolis to revitalize its riverfront, too. Weston was born in Japan in 1928, the daughter of an admiral in the Japanese navy. After World War II, she worked as a secretary in Gen. Douglas MacArthur’s Tokyo office, where she met Army Air Corps pilot Norman Weston, a native of Minnesota. In 1953, the couple, as well as Reiko’s parents, moved to Minnesota. Searching for something for her parents to do in Minnesota while she attended classes at the University of Minnesota, Weston opened the state’s first Japanese restaurant in downtown Minneapolis in 1959. Her mother cooked, and her father greeted guests at the restaurant named Fuji-Ya, translating to “second to none.” In that first year, Fuji-Ya grossed $50,000, quickly outgrowing its 25-seat restaurant space. So Weston left school and spent two years searching for a new location. In 1961, she found a site in the Minneapolis milling district in the burned-down remains of two flour mills on South First Street near Central Avenue and the Mississippi riverfront. Once home to booming sawmilling and flour industries, by the 1960s, the Mill District’s riverfront was in decline, becoming a collection of things that industry left behind — “abandoned foundations, burned-out building shells and contaminated soil,” wrote Kimmy Tanaka and Jonathan Moore in a Minnesota History magazine article, Fuji-Ya, Second to None: Reiko Weston’s Role in Reconnecting Minneapolis and the Mississippi River. It was an unusual location choice.

14 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

But Weston, who paid $20,000 for the site near St. Anthony Falls, said in a Minneapolis Star interview: “The Japanese love rivers and bridges and waterfalls. It’s the perfect setting for a Japanese teahouse.” Opening in 1968, the new Fuji-Ya was built on top of the historic mill foundations and featured elements of a traditional Japanese home as well as floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking the river. At first, the restaurant served primarily suki-yaki, a one-pot Japanese dish cooked tableside. But within a few years, Weston added a teppanyaki area with theatrical chefs, cooking and tossing knives in front of diners. In 1981, Fuji-Ya introduced the first sushi bar to Minnesota. Soon Weston had amassed a Twin Cities restaurant empire with Fuji-Ya; the cafeteriastyle Fuji International on the West Bank; Taiga, Minneapolis’ first dim sum restaurant at St. Anthony Main; and Fuji Express in the Minneapolis skyway. In 1978, the Star Tribune reported that her businesses had more than 100 employees and earned $3 million annually. Weston was named Minnesota’s Small Businessperson of the Year by the U.S. Small Business Administration in 1979 — an honor that included an invite to the White House — and became the second woman added to the Minnesota Business Hall of Fame in 1980. In the midst of all this, Weston suffered a stroke and her daughter, Carol Hanson, began helping out with restaurant operations. Even with her health issues, Weston still had grand visions for some of the undeveloped land she’d bought to open Fuji-Ya; she even contacted an architect about designing a Japanese-style hotel and spa to join her restaurant on the riverfront.


LEARN MORE

Attend a free one-hour talk about Reiko Weston’s story and Fuji-Ya’s influence on the city of Minneapolis with historians Kimmy Tanaka and Jonathan Moore at 7 p.m. Jan. 24 at the Mill City Museum in Minneapolis. Learn more at mnhs.org/event/6741.

But in 1987, the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB) acquired Weston’s land between the restaurant and the river (Fuji-Ya’s parking lot) through eminent domain to build West River Parkway. As Fuji-Ya litigated against the MRPB, arguing that the loss of the parking lot had hurt the restaurant’s business, Weston suffered a heart attack and died at age 59 in May 1988. Hanson took over the business, and the lawsuit ultimately settled with the MPRB acquiring the Fuji-Ya property for $3.5 million. With its land now owned by the MRPB, Fuji-Ya closed its riverfront location in May 1990. In 1998, Hanson revived the Fuji-Ya name and opened a new Japanese restaurant on West Lake Street in Uptown. In recent decades, many other businesses have followed Weston’s lead and relocated to the Mississippi riverfront, and the Minneapolis Mill District has been revitalized into a vibrant, booming neighborhood.

▲▲Reiko Umetani Weston (above) introduced Minnesota to Japanese cuisine in the 1960s. Diners silhouetted at Fuji-Ya in 1980 (opposite). Photos courtesy of the Minnesota Historical Society

Meanwhile, the Fuji-Ya building sat empty and unused until fall 2017 when the MRPB razed the restaurant for a new park pavilion and restaurant, part of its forthcoming Water Works park development. The MRPB will retain the original mill ruins that Fuji-Ya was built on, and architectural elements from the restaurant were salvaged to incorporate into Water Works. Today it’s clear that Weston was years ahead of her time when she chose that blighted patch of riverfront for her new restaurant in the 1960s. As longtime local journalist Barbara Flanagan wrote in the Minneapolis Star in 1968: “Nobody looked twice at the riverbank site until Mrs. Weston got there. Leave it to a woman to show the way. Now everybody’s interested in the river.” Lauren Peck is a public relations specialist for the Minnesota Historical Society.

Minnesota Good Age / January 2019 / 15

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CAREGIVING

How home-care visits can help BY CAREN GAYTKO

W

hen you’re ill — especially with a chronic or even terminal illness — managing everyday care can take a tremendous amount of physical and mental energy. Trying to stay one step ahead of medications, appointments and other care needs can be overwhelming — for patients and families.

What is MVNA? Often in-home support is what’s needed, said Julie Endres-Spray, a registered nurse and the clinical director for Home Health at Hennepin Healthcare, which operates MVNA. MVNA, formerly known as the Minnesota Visiting Nurses Agency, has grown to encompass much more. It is the community connections care division for Hennepin Healthcare system, offering safety-net care from prenatal and birth care to end-of-life and bereavement care, serving patients from across Minnesota and Western Wisconsin. “The support needed to keep patients healthy is one that MVNA visiting nurses and their care teams are intimately familiar with and passionate about,” Endres-Spray said. “Support is integral to our mission — and has been for more than 115 years.”

The benefits of home “Home” can mean a private residence, nursing home, homeless shelter or care facility. 16 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

When a nurse or other staff step into a patient’s home, an interesting dynamic takes place, one that differs from the clinic or hospital. We enter the patient’s personal space, seeing how they live, who lives with and cares for them, coming shoulder-toshoulder with the story of the patient and their condition. It is this privileged position and experience that forges the partnership between nurse, patient and caregiver. “The home becomes the heart of care for everyone involved,” said Jean Lukaszewski, a registered nurse and administrator for hospice. “As a caregiver, you are the patient’s advocate, encouraging them to build healthy habits and to live each day fully,” Lukaszewski said, adding: “And as a caregiver, it may be hard to admit that you need support as well.”

A team approach Nurses work hand and hand with interdisciplinary staff, such as social workers, home health aides, community health workers and others to care for patients and minimize barriers to healing. MVNA visiting nurses and staff can lighten the load and offer expertise. Home care lessens a caregiver’s burden by making sure the patient receives safe, effective, high-quality clinical care. It also reduces emergency department visits and re-admissions that might slow a patient’s ability to heal and remain independent. Other staff — such as social workers and

community health workers — can help assess psychosocial needs, such as food resources, transportation and housing needs, and encourage access to community resources. One recent success story is Angel, a New Brighton resident, who is battling heart failure. She was living independently — and didn’t require home care — until she slipped and fell in her bathroom, injuring her back. With the help of her MVNA home-care nurse and a community health worker, Angel was able to take control of her life and her condition by accessing personal care assistant (PCA) services and also Metro Mobility transportation to get to her medical appointments as well as run errands. Whether a patient is a new parent, an adult with chronic disease or a senior in hospice, home-visiting services can make a positive impact on recovery and can help facilitate a return to self-sufficiency.

How to get started A referral is required for home-visiting services. Consult with the patient’s primary care provider to see if home care is appropriate. Most home care is covered by insurance. Caren Gaytko is registered nurse and the Senior Director of Community Care at Hennepin Healthcare, an integrated system of care including HCMC, eight neighborhood clinics; the tri-state poison control center; and a medical education program that trains physicians.


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and community-based home visits help promote healthy birth outcomes and positive parentchild interactions; healthy child growth and development; healthy and safe care environments; family self-sufficiency; school attendance and the use of community resources; and also help prevent complications of illness and chronic diseases and conditions.

⊲ HOME HEALTH: This service helps

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Minnesota Good Age / January 2019 / 17


P

TRAVEL

is for

Parma

… and Prosciutto, Parmigiano, Pilotta, pizza and … perfection! BY M AR JO R IE EISENACH

18 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age


I

hope that if I have a second life, I come back as a Parmigiano, a native of Parma, as there is so much to love about this city. Like most of Italy, Parma — a part of the country’s famed Emilia-Romagna region in the north — has had its fair share of corruption. (Remember the $14 billion Parmalat scandal dubbed “Europe’s Enron” of the 2000s?) But Parma remains more known throughout all of Italy for her elegant, well-preserved beauty, her passion for good food and her famous musicians (Verdi and Toscanini). Because of centuries of prosperity, this university city offers incredible architecture and art, a thriving musical tradition, world-class artisans, elegant shops and a righteous obsession with food. Moreover, the city center is full of grace and charm — and is easy to navigate because it’s open only to pedestrians and bicyclists. Parma has been off the main tourist track since the days of Marie Louise, the second wife of the French emperor, Napoleon, resulting in a lasting French influence in the city due to centuries of French domination. As the daughter of Francis I of Austria, Maria Luigia — as she is affectionately called in Parma — was given the city as part of her duchy when her husband was exiled to St. Helena.

Ham and cheese Parma, like her nearby neighbor to the southeast, Bologna, has been food-focused for centuries. This area is home to both traditionally made prosciutto (Italian ham) and Parmigiano (Parmesan cheese), crafted using centuries-old techniques designed to guarantee their quality. Prosciutto owes part of its perfection to the pigs fattened on the whey left over from the making of Parmesan cheese. Parmigiani love to explain how the nearby hills and gentle breezes of the Langhirano, south of Parma, are ideal for curing their hams, too.

Rostislav Glinsky / Shutterstock.com

Music in a new space

The Ducal Palace (Palazzo Ducale) features Italian Baroque design and ancient frescos and gardens that are open to the public. Marjorie Eisenach

Marjorie Eisenach

Attend a concert at the renovated Eridania Sugar Factory, now known as the Paganini Auditorium (left). Worldfamous architect, Renzo Piano, blended the remnants of the Eridania Sugar Factory with floor-to-ceiling windows to form an incredible backdrop for the stage, allowing the internal space to be flooded with natural and artificial light, revealing numerous trees in the surrounding park. Minnesota Good Age / January 2019 / 19


P

Amazing architecture

is for

In addition to the incredible Parma Cathedral (pictured) dedicated to Maria Assunta with its Antonio da Correggio frescoes, visit the exquisite octagon-shaped Baptistery, constructed in the 12th century and located just a stone’s throw from the cathedral in the heart of the city. The reliefs, both inside and outside the iconic building, are among the most beautiful and important of the Middle Ages. The pink Veronese marble that covers the exterior is breathtaking.

vvoe / Shutterstock.com

Shop and sip Within walking distance of each other, there’s a healthy mix of artisan storefronts as well as larger retail stores, such as Max Mara and Luisa Spagnoli. Parma has been a center of the shoe industry for decades and boasts the shops to prove it. Other shopping options include stores with antiques, books, hats and jewelry. No fancier aperitivo can be had than those served by Le Bistro in the main square, Piazza Garibaldi (inset), whose iconic clock is a city symbol. What’s an aperitivo? Italians often like to meet in a bar, fare un brindisi (make a toast) by clinking their glasses with friends and/or family, and imbibe un aperitivo — a civilized way to start the evening meal. These before-dinner drinks are typically somewhat bitter in order to awaken the appetite and are typically brightly colored (think Campari and Aperol). Order an aperitivo cocktail — the current favorite is an Aperol Spritz — and appetizers, then sit back, relax and watch the evening passeggiata (stroll) unfold. 20 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

Italian gelato Have a first-rate gelato at La Gelateria. With more than 50 ice cream stores in the center of Parma, the competition is keen, but this gelateria is well known for tasty, creamy confections favored by locals.

A picnic lunch The bustling Saturday-morning market is chock full of food, clothing (a few stalls feature local designers), small appliances and housewares. Situated in Piazza Ghiaia, this market — which used to be the site of the city gallows and slaughterhouse — offers the makings for a perfect picnic lunch from the various fruit, cheese and vegetable stands. Pick up lunch fixings, but also take time to gawk at the exquisite array of produce in the market. Be aware of your surroundings, however, and keep your wallet in a safe place.

Yulia Grigoryeva / Shutterstock.com

iryna1 / Shutterstock.com

Parma


Luminous art

Walk through gardens

One of the lesser-known but leading artists who hailed from Parma is Amedeo Bocchi, born here in 1883. The Bocchi museum is just the right size for an hour visit and is a lovely way to learn about an influential oil painter who flourished in the early 1900s. Bocchi’s portraits are particularly noteworthy for their warmth and luminosity. His creations can also be found in several other museums in town, but this museum is devoted exclusively to his work.

Cross the Parma River at the Giuseppe Verdi Bridge behind the Pilotta and stroll in the elegant gardens that border the University of Parma and the storied Ducal Palace. This park is reminiscent of Parisian parks like the Luxembourg Gardens, featuring broad gravel paths, pools and a small lake. You’ll find plenty of benches and a bar in the center of the park, perfect for a morning espresso and croissant.

iryna1 / Shutterstock.com

Palazzo della Pilotta The Teatro Farnese (inset), an imposing Palladio-inspired theater, is part of a complex of buildings including the Galleria Nazionale. A vast palace built for the Farnese family in the 1500s, this set of buildings includes not only the theater, but also an art museum with works by Fra Angelico, Da Vinci, El Greco and Parmigianino. There are other smaller museums, like the Museo Bodoniano, devoted to Giambattista Bodoni, the eminent engraver, printer and typographer. Both the theater and the National Gallery are located in the Palazzo della Pilotta, often simply called the Pilotta, which comes from the word for an ancient Basque card game called pelota, played by Spanish soldiers once stationed here.

Open up Remember — despite your mission to see the sights — it’s often the unplanned and unexpected events that leave the strongest travel impressions. It’s the kindness of strangers, a free concert in the park or a chance viewing of some inexplicable civic event that will add the most magic to your trip. In Parma, it’s quite possible, for example, to encounter a middle-age man set up on a stool who plays his accordion in the center of town. When I saw him, he was playing Bach, flawlessly, making his accordion sound as if it were a small church organ.

Eat pizza The best pizza in town can be found in an upscale pizzeria right in the center of town, Al Corsaro (Strada Cavour 37, reservations recommended). A couple from the port city of Salerno, who certainly know the best pizzaiolo techniques, warmly welcome their guests and will suggest local wines to complement your meal. Both indoor and covered outdoor seating are available and the menu offers a wide variety of artisan pizzas.

Marjorie Eisenach

Marjorie Eisenach has traveled extensively in Italy. She studied at the University in Bologna and taught at the MBA program at Bocconi University in Milan. She lives in south Minneapolis where she teaches Italian language courses and provides trip-planning help to prospective travelers. Learn more at italyanditalian.org.   Minnesota Good Age / January 2019 / 21


HOUSING SPOTLIGHT

Good for a senior’s spirit BY KAREN RITZ

T

he Waters of White Bear Lake is located in a scenic spot just south of downtown White Bear Lake, a cute town with a fabulous quilt shop, book store, bakery, destination restaurants and a summer farmer’s market — you might say a great place to retire. The Waters was designed by high-end

22 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

hotel and apartment teams and in collaboration with the University of Minnesota Earl Bakken Center for Spirituality and Healing, so they’ve thought of everything. Based in Minnetonka, The Waters was recently recognized as an industry leader by the Minneapolis-St. Paul Business Journal. According to the magazine,

it’s the fourth-largest senior living company and the third largest womanowned business in the 24-county metro area, not to mention one of the top real estate developers in the Twin Cities. My biggest impressions while visiting the relatively new White Bear Lake location, which opened in June 2016, were the lightfilled spaces and the resident-centered staff, including a cheery concierge and many others willing to chat about real topics. During my visit, I spoke with one resident (on the elevator, no less!) who told me she’ll save hundreds of dollars in 2019 thanks to a recent visit by a Medicare expert, who took time to work personally with residents after a recent speaking engagement on site. The Medicare talk was such a hit, The Waters senior-living consultant promised to bring the speaker back. I also could see many ways this place, designed with well-being in mind, could be good for a senior's spirit: Its event and activities calendar is resident-driven with


Amenities ⊲ Well-being studio

THE WATERS

⊲ Creative arts studio

WHERE: 3800 Hoffman Road, White Bear Lake

⊲ Community room

OPENING DATE: June 2016

⊲ Private dining room (seats 12) ⊲ Licensed nurse available 24/7

AGES WELCOME: 55 and older; the average age is 82 so far.

⊲ Concierge service

NUMBER OF UNITS & SIZE OPTIONS:

⊲ Guest suite ⊲ Memory care ⊲ Outpatient care ⊲ Full-service salon and spa ⊲ Full-service restaurant with a full-time executive chef, plus a cafe and pub ⊲ Whole-body fitness room with yoga, balance, strength training and more ⊲ Porches, patios, grill and professionally landscaped gardens and outdoor spaces ⊲ Pet friendly

walking clubs, book clubs, games, movies, dances, BBQs, holiday parties and regular trips to local shopping and restaurants. I was especially drawn to the onsite Waters Academy concept, offering higher education courses taught by professors and experts, and monthly opportunities to engage in education on a variety of topics. After all, we’re never done learning! And how nice it would be to invite friends or family to stop by for a lunch visit with a tasty menu, have my hair all done and not even have to put on a coat. Bonus: During the winter months, The Waters offers a trial run to future residents who want make sure the community really is a good fit. Karen Ritz is creator of grandycamp.info, an online community featuring activities, crafts, recipes, destinations and events for Twin Cities grandparents. She’s actively thinking about housing alternatives — especially when she’s shoveling snow or trying to start the mower.

106 units range from 525-squarefoot studios to 1,230-squarefoot 2-bedroom/2-bath units with balconies.

Booth Manor Residence For Seniors 62+ • 1 Bedrooms • Based on Income • Utilities Included • Service Coordinator • Resident Activities & Programs • Community Room • Smoke-Free Building

1421 Yale Place, Mpls

612-338-6313

COST RANGE FOR A SINGLE RESIDENT: $1,995–$4,125

per month includes an emergency pendant, wifi and cable, in-unit washer/dryer, light housekeeping, appliance maintenance and a $275 monthly dining stipend. A la carte health care and memory care are available for additional fees.

CLAIM TO FAME: Programming

and amenities at The Waters actively address the six dimensions that contribute to wellbeing — health, a feeling of security, community, engagement with others, a sense of purpose and connectedness with one’s environment. The idea is for residents to leverage their strengths, discover new possibilities and make meaningful contributions within a thriving community. The Waters Academy and Wellbeing Programs provide higher education courses on site taught by professors and experts, and monthly opportunities to engage in education on a variety of topics related to personal health and wellness.

50 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN EMPOWERING SENIORS TO LIVE LIFE AS THEY CHOOSE.

PROPERTY OWNER:

The Waters, based in Minnetonka

OTHER FACILITIES IN MINNESOTA:

The Waters boasts 11 communities in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, including its newest properties in Excelsior, Minnesota, and Oak Creek, Wisconsin.

INFO: 651-313-6440 or

NEW HOPE ROBBINSDALE WOODBURY SHOREVIEW BROOKLYN PARK

thewatersseniorliving.com Minnesota Good Age / January 2019 / 23


HOUSING RESOURCES •MEMORY CARE •ASSISTED LIVING •INDEPENDENT HOUSING •LONG TERM CARE •NEW CONSTRUCTION CITY OF SOUTH ST. PAUL, HOUSING DIVISION •

The City of South St. Paul operates 296 one-bedroom public housing apartments for residents aged 50+. Rent is based on 30% of tenant’s income. All utilities paid, on-site caretaker, security, after-hours answering service, community room, resident activities, laundry facilities. Call today for an appointment. South St. Paul • 651-554-3270 mostrow@sspmn.org

COMMONBOND COMMUNITIES ••

CommonBond builds stable homes, strong futures, and vibrant communities. As the largest nonprofit provider of affordable homes in the Upper Midwest, CommonBond has been building and sustaining homes with services to families, seniors, and individuals with disabilities since 1971. St. Paul • 651-291-1750 commonbond.org/findhousing

24 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

LYNGBLOMSTEN •••

Lyngblomsten is a Christian nonprofit organization serving older adults and their families. A continuum of care includes: independent housing with assisted living services, a full range of 24-hour skilled nursing options including short and long-term care, and community services and resources. St. Paul • 651-646-2941 lyngblomsten.org

NOKOMIS SQUARE COOPERATIVE •

Nokomis Square Cooperative is a member owned and operated housing and lifestyle choice for individuals 62 plus. We’re situated between Lake Nokomis and Minnehaha Park in South Minneapolis. Concrete and steel construction and experienced maintenance staff provide a carefree, well-kept environment. Minneapolis • 612-721-5077 nokomissquare.com

SAINT THERESE •••

Saint Therese is a nonprofit, senior living organization born 50 years ago out of a simple mission: do ordinary things with extraordinary love. Our continuum of care communities are rich with thoughtful amenities while our compassionate services reach the broader Twin Cities area through inhome services and wellness programs. Multiple locations • 612-322-5477 sainttherese.org


ADVERTISER LISTINGS

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Conveniently located across from Loring Park, this 21-story high rise, with 154 onebedroom apartments is designed for seniors 62 years of age or better, offering many services and amenities. It also combines the convenience of being near downtown with the serenity of the great outdoors. Minneapolis • 612-338-6313 salvationarmynorth.org/community/ booth-manor

MEGAN, 10 YEARS

8131 4th St N Oakdale, MN

In this age where everything moves so quickly, isn’t it nice to know that Oak Meadows’ has many staff who have been here over 10 years?

LET US CARE FOR YOU, OR YOUR LOVED ONE.

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ST. BENEDICT’S SENIOR COMMUNITY •••

Convenience, independence and lifestyle are important aspects when choosing a senior community. Whether it's simplifying your life to make more time for activities, or needing assistance with everyday tasks, our campuses in St. Cloud, Monticello, and Sartell offer choices for vital aging. Sartell • 320-654-2352 St. Cloud • 320-203-2747 Monticello • 763-295-4051 centracare.com/sbscmont

Minnesota Good Age / January 2019 / 25


FINANCE

5 steps to a debt-free life BY LARRY KALLEVIG

H

appy New Year! There are a lot of worthy New Year’s resolutions you could be making for 2019. One of the most important might be starting down the path to a debt-free life. Debt has become an almost universal situation in the United States; more than three-quarters of Americans owe some amount of debt, whether it’s student loans, auto loans, credit card debt or a mortgage. Americans have been struggling to get their heads above water for so long, many may not remember what it feels like to live without debt. But the benefits of a debt-free life cannot be understated. Once you pay off your debt, your next paycheck truly becomes yours. You no longer need to sacrifice part of your income to put toward your credit card bills or student loans and all the interest they accrue. Now you can put that money someplace for you — an emergency fund, a vacation fund, a gift fund or maybe even toward purchasing other items you never thought you could afford. There are five disciplines I recommend you adopt to live a debt-free life:

1 Ignore the Joneses One of the many reasons we spend so much money is to keep up with our friends and neighbors. As financial self-help guru Dave Ramsey said, “We buy stuff we don’t need with money we don’t have to impress people we don’t 26 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

like.” Instead of falling into this trap, ignore the Joneses and focus on your own financial situation. You can slow down your spending by imposing a mandatory 48-hour waiting period on purchases. A lot of times, 48 hours is enough time to realize you don’t really need whatever you wanted to buy.

2 Spend less than you earn To achieve this, you need to keep track of how much money is coming in and how much is going out. That means having a budget and the discipline to stick to it. And never use credit as a substitute for cash. Your credit card must be paid off every month. If you can’t afford something, wait until you can or choose to do without.

3 Pay attention to details You’ve heard the phrase “the devil is in the details,” and you’ll need to pay attention to those details to live a debt-free life. Take a close look at your credit card statements: Are you getting charged for a gym membership you’ve stopped using or paying for cable channels you don’t watch? Pay attention to all of your financial statements so you don’t waste money by missing a payment or overdrafting your accounts.

4 Value hand-me-downs People who live debt-free have a habit of looking for ways to save money. Even if they can afford something, they won’t automatically pay full price for it. These people

cut coupons, wait for sales and buy secondhand items at garage sales or consignment stores. They will always comparison shop before making a big purchase.

We buy stuff we don’t need with money we don’t have to impress people we don’t like. — Dave Ramsey

5 Think long-term Spending a couple bucks here or there may not seem like a big deal, but what if you saved that money and invested it? Every dollar can make a difference in saving for retirement because of the power of compound interest. You’ll find it easier to avoid impulse purchases if you maintain a long-term mindset. If you find yourself struggling to think longterm, 2019 may be the year to meet with a financial professional who can help you create a plan to preserve and protect your money for retirement. Larry Kallevig, owner of Haven Financial Group in Burnsville, helps clients create financial plans that ensure dependable and comfortable income in retirement. Learn more at havenfinancialgroup.com.


IN THE KITCHEN

GOBBLE THESE UP 28 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

I’m always on the lookout for flavorful, nutrientdense food to fuel my household. These delicious homemade meatballs have become a staple in my kitchen along with several other recipes from the bestselling cookbook Run Fast. Cook Fast. Eat Slow. by Megan Devine


TURKEY TROT MEATBALLS

Serving people of all ages, abilities and backgrounds, HOBT collaborates with SCHOOLS and COMMUNITIES on unique, interactive ART RESIDENCIES that nurture the creative spirit and encourage a sense of joy and wonder.

INGREDIENTS 1 tablespoon olive oil ½ cup finely grated Parmesan ⅓ cup almond flour or oat flour ¼ cup finely chopped fresh parsley ½ teaspoon garlic powder ½ teaspoon fine sea salt ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper 1 pound ground turkey 1 egg

DIRECTIONS ⊲ Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and drizzle the oil across the paper, using your fingers to spread it evenly. ⊲ Combine the Parmesan, flour, parsley, garlic powder, salt and pepper in a large bowl. ⊲ Add the turkey and egg, using your hands to combine. Set aside for 15 minutes to absorb moisture.

If you are interested in an art residency for your school or organization, visit hobt.org or call 612.721.2535 for more information.

Plan an unforgettable summer adventure!

⊲ Form the meat into golf-ball size spheres, about 16 meatballs, and space them evenly on the prepared baking sheet.

The 13th Annual

⊲ Bake in the center of the oven for 15 minutes. Remove from the oven, flip each meatball and bake 15 minutes more, or until the meatballs are crispy and lightly browned with no pink inside.

Presented by

⊲ Serve immediately or use them in place of deli meat in sandwiches, salads or rice bowls.

Reprinted from Run Fast. Cook Fast. Eat Slow. Copyright © 2018 by Shalane Flanagan and Elyse Kopecky. Photographs copyright © 2018 by Alan Weiner. Published by Rodale Books, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Random House.

nd SAturday march 2 AT COmo Zoo in st. paul • 10am–2pm mnparent.com/campfair 612-825-9205 events@mnpubs.com

Free admission, parking & kids’ activities! This event is made possible by our sponsors. Thank you! Minnesota Good Age / January 2019 / 29


NANA & MAMA

Bringing home Baby No. 2 BY LAURA GROENJES MITCHELL AND MARY ROSE REMINGTON

MAMA: This past fall, my wife and I had our second child. Our first, Kellan, was 2 1/2 when his little sister, Rory, was born. While we knew it’d be an adjustment for us to become parents of two, unlike our toddler, we had a long time to get used to the idea and plan for it. Like many parents, we worried about how the transition to a family of four might affect our first-born child — and we worked proactively to prepare him as much as possible. Here’s what helped ease the adjustment period for us. ⊲⊲ Talk with the older sibling about what’s happening throughout the pregnancy 30 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

(or adoption process) and how it will end. We used phrases like, “There’s a baby in Mommy’s belly. The baby is growing; once Baby is bigger, he or she will come out and live with us.” ⊲⊲ Help the older sibling understand what will change and what will stay the same once the baby comes home. This can happen through short conversations, books and imaginative play. ⊲⊲ Consider buying a baby doll to help your child practice — through play — interacting with the baby. Our son loved practicing holding the baby and singing lullabies.

⊲⊲ Get support, if possible, from other adults to ensure the older sibling isn’t always taking a back seat to the newborn — especially in the first few days or weeks. We were lucky enough to have my parents staying with us for a full week to ensure Kellan got lots of attention. Other ideas include organizing outings for the toddler with family/friends, such as a trip the children’s museum or zoo, play time at the park or even just having another adult come over to play with your older child at home. ⊲⊲ Enlist the help of the older sibling to help with care of Baby to the extent


possible developmentally. Kellan loves to help give his sister baths, to hand us clean diapers and throw away the dirty ones. These tasks often take longer with the “help” of a toddler, but they ensure he doesn’t feel left out. Make sure your older child is interested and isn’t just completing chores; otherwise this step can backfire and cause the older sibling to become jealous or frustrated. ⊲ Carve out quality time for each parent to spend with the older sibling. My wife and I alternate who puts Kellan to bed each night to ensure he isn’t missing out on time with one of us. If I’m home alone with both kids, I try to set Rory down or babywear to keep my hands and attention free to play with Kellan.

NANA: Looking back, I remember two things we did that helped Laura, our first child, prepare for the arrival of her baby brother, Kevin. When she was 2, we moved her out of her crib into a “big girl bed” so she would have a few months to adjust to the change and not feel displaced by the baby. And shortly before her baby brother arrived, we gave Laura a special doll. We showed her how to feed, change and rock her baby, and talked about doing that soon for the baby who was coming. But for some reason I forgot to explain that, when the baby arrived, I’d need to stay in the hospital for a couple of nights with the baby. Three decades later, I can still recall the sad look on Laura’s face as she left the hospital with her dad. That was an important detail we forgot! Fast forward to September 2018 and the impending arrival of my second grandchild. I contemplated how my husband and I could best help the entire family adjust to the new baby; I didn’t

want to forget anything important. WILLS, ESTATE PLANNING Sensing my daughter would go into labor early, I’d already packed my bags JAMES G. ROBAN Attorney at Law and turned on my out-of-office email 261 Ruth Street North when we got the text: She was in labor! St. Paul We hopped in the car, drove to Colorado and arrived at their house just as they (651) 738-2102 were getting home from the hospital. The Will: $40 first time I met Baby Rory, she had six PoWer of Attorney: $30 adults and her big brother all vying to HeAltH CAre DireCtive: $70 hold her, so my cuddle time was limited. The days that followed were packed with lots of playtime with big brother Kellan. My husband and I took him on • 50+ Community walks to neighborhood parks, read lots of books, played with all his favorite toys • Income Based Rent and gave him baths. He seemed to be • All Utilities Paid adjusting well to having a new baby in the • Newly Remodeled house and all that goes with it. We also • Elevators made Target and grocery runs, cooked • Controlled Entries meals, did laundry and put the household • On Site Caretaker garden to bed. I snuck in a little time here Call for an appointment 651-554-3270 and there to hold the baby, but with all that was going on, I wasn’t getting my fill. Sharing and Caring Hands GA 1018 12.indd 2 8/24/18 1:57 PM The night before we left, I could tell South St Paul HRA Needs Your Help! my daughter really needed sleep, and I was desperately craving cuddle time with my new granddaughter. So I forcefully suggested Laura go sleep, and leave the baby with me; I’d let her know if Your donations provide: Meals • Shelter • Clothing • Beds • Glasses • Toys Rory needed her. Food • Showers • Shoes • Medical & Dental Services I had two full hours of blissful bonding, Household Goods • Help with Emergency Needs A Safe Haven for People Living on the Streets holding baby Rory. When Laura awoke, 92% of your donations go to serve the needs of the poor refreshed from her two-hour nap, and www.sharingandcaringhands.org came to check on the baby, she said, “That was an amazing two hours!” Sharing and Caring GA 2013 Filler 12.indd 1 6/28/13 1:37 PM I couldn’t agree more! 5015 35th Avenue South, Minneapolis My next visit I will make cuddle time www.NokomisSquare.com with baby Rory a higher priority. That detail is too important to forget! We’re ideally located in a comfortable

South St. Paul HRA

62+ Independent Living

Minneapolis neighborhood.

Mary Rose Remington, a baby boomer grandmother living in Minneapolis, is documenting her journey in this occasional series with her daughter, Laura Groenjes Mitchell, a millennial mom who lives in Denver.

Call to schedule your tour today!

612.721.5077 Equal Housing Opportunity

Minnesota Good Age / January 2019 / 31

Nokomis Square GA 0214 12.indd 1

1/15/14 4:37 PM


During the 35 years he’s been running long-distance races, Frank Bartocci has seen his body adapt remarkably to what he calls the “extended training effect,” created through regular (versus sporadic) distance races. Photos by Tracy Walsh


MARATHON MAN

Frank Bartocci of Rochester is on track to run 1,000 long-distance races by 2020

by Kelli Billstein

O

n an August day this past summer — hot enough for the kids of Hurley, Wisconsin, to wonder if they could fry an egg on the sidewalk — 70-year-old Frank Bartocci was poised at the starting line of the Paavo Nurmi marathon, which winds through the seat of Iron County. Bartocci was quiet, contemplative and determined as he ran under a merciless sun, putting one mile after another behind him in the thick and heavy heat of the day. A mile shy of the finish, he lifted his hands to the sky to give spiritual thanks for the gift of being able to run. Expressing gratitude near the finish line is a ritual for him, and he was especially thankful on this sweltering August day because as his feet crossed the finish line, Bartocci had officially completed 900 marathons and ultramarathons. “Nine hundred was big for me. I didn’t know if I could get here,” Bartocci said. “But in a sense, it’s the uncertainty that gives me the spark I need to do it.” Surely Bartocci was being modest. Given his track record for running marathons since 1983 — including harrowing mountain trails at high altitudes in brutal conditions such as sleet and snow — Bartocci has proven he’s motivated by physical challenge. And he’s not slowing down until he hits a nice clean number — 1,000. According to his calculations, and assuming his body doesn’t betray him at some unforeseen point, Bartocci will reach his goal in 2020, running at a rate of 50 to 60 marathons each year. Fun fact: If you multiply 26.2 times 900, you get 23,580 miles, which is roughly the circumference of Earth (24,901); 1,000 marathons would bring that total to 26,200. And that’s not counting additional miles logged as part of ultramarathons and training runs over the years. Few have accomplished so much: Bartocci is now recognized as sixth in the nation for total number of marathons completed. “This whole thing has been a journey to test boundaries,” Bartocci said. “Used to be people would say the human body could only handle one or two marathons a year. But I’ve always tested the limits, my personal limits, since the beginning.”

Minnesota Good Age / January 2019 / 33


The beginning Back in 1980, before Bartocci had run a single mile, he lived with his wife and son in Rochester, Minnesota. Bartocci worked as a computer science engineer for IBM, a company that engaged his mathematical mind. His was a divided mind, however, because at an early age, his son, Matthew, was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis, which compromises the efficiency of the lungs and rarely allows those who have it to live past their mid-30s. Watching his son fighting for air and being powerless to help was an enormous stress for Bartocci. It was the reason that, in 1983 at the age of 35, he took up running and completed his first marathon. It was the Dallas White Rock Marathon in Texas. The physical challenge left Bartocci dazed. He hadn’t trained well enough for it. But it ignited something else in him: Marathons were tangible challenges that one could control through proper training. Races were obstacles Bartocci could surmount, and victories he could dedicate to his son, allowing him to feel for a short while like he wasn’t quite so powerless. It’s possible that Bartocci’s and Matthew’s lungs burned at the same time — for different reasons — as Bartocci pushed himself to run faster and farther, and Matthew fought an unseen internal battle. Running is a basic skill, but at long distances it becomes complex, requiring just as much mental as physical strength. Marathons, in particular, have a way of squeezing your body like a wet towel, wringing every ounce of strength out of you, with varying levels of pain in every twist. But the running gave Bartocci something to focus on. He started to run all the marathons he could in the Midwest — the Twin Cities Marathon, the Med City in Rochester, Grandma’s in Duluth and more. But it wasn’t enough. Not for Bartocci. And not for his son. Matthew passed away in 2011 at the age of 36 after a lung transplant didn’t take. Matthew’s wife and two kids survived him. And Bartocci quietly took his running to the extreme.

50 states, 13 times In the years leading up to Matthew’s death, Bartocci went through a reckoning. He and his wife divorced; he moved into a small trailer home on the outskirts of Rochester; he quit his job at IBM and became a respiratory therapist instead; and he found purpose through running. Bartocci started a spreadsheet of all the marathons he’d run and planned to run, recording not only his times but also the state in which he ran. The Midwest gave way to the East Coast, West Coast and everything in between. By July 2009, he’d completed 300 total marathons and had run in each of the 50 states four times. It made him wonder if he had it in him to do another set of 100, to run in each of the 50 states once more. (He’s now done marathons in all 50 states a whopping 13 times.) 34 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

▲ Since 1983, Frank Bartocci has run marathons and ultramarathons in all 50 states 13 times, plus more, for a total of 918 marathons and counting.

Running a marathon is an abstraction of a life situation. It has nothing and everything to do with putting one foot in front of the other. — Frank Bartocci of Rochester


“One of the secrets of living a good life is passion and having a passion for something,” said Bartocci. “I still have that for running. There are times when I’ve beat myself up, but finishing gives me a sense of great personal accomplishment.” Bartocci still lives in Rochester because it’s centrally located in the U.S. and allows him to travel easily to marathons around the country. After studying an upcoming year’s marathon offerings, Bartocci sits down at his kitchen table and charts courses for himself. He may drive out West and hit marathons in Utah, Nevada, Oregon and Wyoming, collecting four more feats to add to his list of accomplishments. To make a circuit like this, he would load all his gear into his trusty bumper-stickerclad Nissan Altima, driving from one marathon to the next. (He now drives a shiny new Toyota Camry, having run the Altima into the ground in 2017.) “Nowadays, all those hours behind the wheel driving to my marathons are more challenging than running the marathons themselves,” said Bartocci, who just this past fall ran six marathons on six consecutive days in six different states.

The run is touted by seasoned runners as being “a glimpse of heaven and a taste of hell.” Bartocci said that up that high, the race is literally a breathtaking endeavor. But there are moments when, looking down at the cerulean blue of the lake and the craggy mountains stacked like dominoes in the distance, you feel invincible. It’s the same feeling Bartocci gets when he runs Pike’s Peak Marathon in Manitou Springs, Colorado. Runners dash straight up a mountain, over dangerous rock-studded trails. Before the gun sounds the start of the race, Bartocci takes a moment to become aware of the energy of the runners around him, breathing in the excitement and anxiety. He knows that over the next several hours, the mountain will humble each of these people around him. (He’s run Pike’s Peak six times.) “Running a marathon is an abstraction of a life situation,” he said. “It has nothing and everything to do with putting one foot in front of the other.” One of the most special marathons for Bartocci is the Madison Marathon in Montana. The race begins near Black Butte Mountain, a dizzying 10,000-foot summit that lurches out from the earth like a dark anvil. Bartocci ran this marathon in 2014 — it was number 600. At Mile 2, near the base of the mountain, he took a detour off the marked course. He found a rock, moved it aside and scattered some of his son’s ashes there. After a quiet moment of prayer, he returned to the race. “That was a meaningful moment for me. Matthew’s up high, close to God,” Bartocci said. Bartocci still carries some of Matt’s ashes with him whenever he runs.

Running despite aging How does Bartocci not just run, but also keep running — and so frequently — at age 70? “You do have physiological changes as you age, of course,” Bartocci said. “But I’ve found that my body has adapted to running in an amazing way.” He calls it “the extended training effect.”

Favorite races Of the hundreds of marathons Bartocci has run, a few stand out. The Savage Seven, seven marathons run in seven days, takes place down in Ocala, Florida. It’s a set of races that Bartocci cofounded in 2010 with his friend, Chuck Savage, who lives in Florida. Their epic challenge now attracts runners from all over the world. Bartocci reflects fondly on the most beautiful ultramarathon he’s ever run, the Tahoe Rim Trail. Beginning at 7,000 feet beside Spooner Lake, the trail ascends 1,500 feet through alpine evergreens to the undulating ridge dividing Lake Tahoe and the Washoe Valley. Minnesota Good Age / January 2019 / 35


See an alpine race Check out a 4-minute scenic video of the Madison Marathon, which is run above 9,000 feet in Ennis, Montana, in the Gravelly Range, including a 30-second segment with Frank Bartocci. tinyurl.com/ montana-madison

“My bone density has increased over time, my ligaments and muscles developed to support the strain. My capillary beds expanded because my heart demanded more blood all the time,” he said. “My body has essentially adapted to function more optimally and more efficiently.” The training effect has ironically resulted in Bartocci not training for marathons anymore. He averages one or two marathons each weekend — a huge physical demand — and therefore he requires down time during the week to allow his body to recover. He jokes that when he goes into the Mayo Clinic for a physical every so often, doctors simply marvel at him. Over the past 35 years, he’s transformed his body into a machine that anticipates large bursts of energy every week for 26.2 miles — more, if he’s running an ultramarathon. There’s one more thing: Bartocci keeps his attitude sunny. Savage — who at age 80 has run more than 400 marathons, including about 50 with Bartocci — describes his friend as incredibly smart. “He’s also one of the most upbeat and idealistic people I’ve ever known,” Savage said. “He likes to push himself. For him, a thousand marathons is a reasonable goal.”

A cancer battle Even so, Bartocci has faced his own health-related stumbling blocks over the years. In 2013, at age 65, he was diagnosed with 36 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age


lymphoma. Bartocci, an eternal optimist, said he had a few more marathons to finish before he could come in for treatment — as if the oncologist arranging procedures was just a buddy trying to schedule a tee time for a round of golf. At the time, Bartocci was 37 marathons away from hitting his goal of 600 total. He wasn’t going to let cancer stop him. After completing his 600th race, he began treatment — an experimental drug that eradicated the cancer. Relapse-free, Bartocci credits running with optimizing his body, mind and spirit, giving him the strength required to tolerate painful treatments and fight off the disease. Today, he copes with the occasional Achilles tendon issue and sporadic lower back stress. But he’s learned enough tricks of the trails over the years to know how best to handle the setbacks. Pop open the trunk of his Camry and

you’ll find four pairs of Altra Olympus 1.5 shoes (designed specifically for running with extra cushioning), which he rotates through for races. You’ll see shoe goo (for fixing worn down edges of running shoes), visors and handkerchiefs (for hot weather), extra layers for cold weather and supplements to take during runs to keep his electrolytes and energy up. Before every race, he pops two Advil and hopes for the best — but is ready to accept the worst.

Reaping the rewards Bartocci, who retired eight years ago, is always dumbfounded when another birthday passes him by. “I’m getting old out here, but I don’t feel old,” he said with a laugh. What he does feel is his body persistently and patiently asking him to go slower. In his most honest moments, he’ll admit

he’s getting tired. He baits the carrot on the end of the stick more and more to see himself through the races he’s scheduled. Some of recent rewards include a new 4K UltraHD TV, a series of Norwegian cruises (lined up for early 2019) and a stack of untouched David Baldacci paperbacks. The biggest reward of all may one day be a move down to Florida where his four siblings have gone to enjoy their retirement. “I’m not ready to go there yet,” he said. “I’m not ready to trade in my running shoes for a rocking chair to sit and look at the flowers and watch the grass grow. You get older and you think it’s over? Are you kidding me? You haven’t even started!” Kelli Billstein is a St. Paul-based writer, communications professional and a co-founder of StorySprings, a shortform memoir-writing creative service. Learn more at storysprings.com.

Minnesota Good Age / January 2019 / 37


CAN’T-MISS CALENDAR JANUARY

JAN. 4–FEB. 28

OMNIFEST 2019 → See five films this winter on a 90-foot screen — Search for the Great Sharks, Tornado Alley, The Greatest Places, Ring of Fire and Journey to Space. When: Jan. 4–Feb. 28 Where: Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul Cost: Film-only admission is $8.95–$9.95, free for ages 3 and younger Info: smm.org/omnitheater

JAN. 8

QUILTING NATURALLY → The O.W.L.S. (Outwardly, Wiser, Livelier Seniors) program hosts Jeannette Root, past president of the Minnesota Quilters, to share stories and quilt designs inspired by nature. An optional lunch starts after the program. Advanced registration is required. When: Jan. 8 Where: Dodge Nature Center, West St. Paul Cost: $15 for program and lunch or $5 for just the program Info: dodgenaturecenter.org

2019 WINTER FLOWER SHOW

→ This year’s displays will feature purple azaleas, dark red cyclamen, blue pansies, dark pink/maroon oriental lilies, veltheimia and various amaryllis blooms. When: Jan. 12–March 10 Where: Como Park Zoo & Conservatory, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: comozooconservatory.org

ONGOING

DEC. 31

→ This manmade fortress of ice and snow features frozen waterfalls, ice caves, special appearances by the Frozen sisters, fire performances and more.

→ Enjoy a special dinner menu, see a show of your choice and then dance in one of three rooms. Just before midnight, champagne will be butler-served in souvenir commemorative flutes.

ICE CASTLES

When: A late December opening is expected with the event running into February, weather permitting. Where: 135 Lake St., Excelsior Cost: $10.95–$15.95 for ages 12 and older, $7.95–$9.95 for ages 4 to 11 and free for ages 3 and younger Info: icecastles.com 38 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH

When: Dec. 31 Where: Chanhassen Dinner Theatres Cost: $110 per person Info: chanhassendt.com

JAN. 10–13

MINNESOTA SPORTSMEN’S SHOW → This annual show is like five events in one — a boat show, camping show, outdoor equipment show, travel show and family fun show. When: Jan. 10–13 Where: Saint Paul RiverCentre Cost: $2.50–$12 (free for ages 4 and younger) Info: rivercentre.org

JAN. 11–13

PINK FLOYD’S THE WALL → See the Twin Cities Ballet’s original fulllength rock ballet, featuring live music by the band Run Like Hell. When: Jan. 11–13 Where: Ames Center, Burnsville Cost: $26–$42 Info: ames-center.com


JAN. 12

JAN. 19

JAN. 20

→→For many Native peoples, weaving is a way of life, an individual and communal act in which cultural stories and tribal knowledge are conveyed. This dance performance features the work of Rosy Simas, an award-winning native choreographer.

→→An Emmy-winning group performs uncanny, note-for-note live tributes of the Beatles’ classics such as Can’t Buy Me Love, Yesterday, Here Comes The Sun and Hey Jude. Performers will do three costume changes to represent every era of the Beatles’ ever-changing career.

→→Whip up a delicious treat in this baking experience tailored to all ability levels for people living with dementia and their caregivers.

WEAVE

When: Jan. 12 Where: Ordway Center for the Performing Arts, St. Paul Cost: Tickets start at $22. Info: ordway.org

THE FAB FOUR

When: Jan. 19 Where: State Theatre, Minneapolis Cost: $35–$55 Info: hennepintheatretrust.org

JAN. 12–FEB. 10

JAN. 19–21

→→On the lonely British coast, two retired nuclear scientists reside in a quiet cabin while the outside world erupts in utter chaos. An old friend arrives, revealing a frightening request.

→→Celebrate the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and reflect on the legacy of 1968 with art activities, service projects and performances throughout the weekend. Plus, stop in to see The 1968 Exhibit before it closes.

THE CHILDREN

When: Jan. 12–Feb. 10 Where: Jungle Theater, Minneapolis Cost: $35–$50 Info: jungletheater.com

JAN. 13–APRIL 14

URBAN EXPEDITION →→Experience cultures from around the world through music, dance, food, live animals, crafts and more. When: Jan. 13 (Puerto Rico), Feb. 20 (Palestine), March 3 (Romania), March 31 (Great Britain) and April 14 (Vietnam) Where: Landmark Center, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: landmarkcenter.org

MLK WEEKEND

When: Jan. 19–21 Where: Minnesota History Center, St. Paul Cost: Included with museum admission of $6–12 Info: mnhs.org

SPARK!

When: Jan. 20 Where: Mill City Museum, St. Paul Cost: FREE; registration is required. Info: mnhs.org

JAN. 24–FEB. 2

WINTER CARNIVAL →→Check out ice carving, snow sculpting, skiing, dogsledding, a torchlight parade and more at this multi-faceted festival, the oldest and largest of its kind in the nation, with more than 75 events and nearly 1,000 volunteers. When: Jan. 24–Feb. 2 Where: St. Paul and the Minnesota State Fairgrounds Cost: Most events are FREE. Info: wintercarnival.com

MORE ONLINE!

mngoodage.com/cant-miss-calendar

MINNESOTA BOYCHOIR

→→Experience a celebration of holiday music, both religious and secular, performed by talented boys from the Twin Cities. When: 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Jan. 6 Where: Landmark Center, St. Paul Cost: FREE Info: boychoir.org

JAN. 19

TOGETHER WE SING FESTIVAL →→Join in songs of protest and progress, move your feet to the rhythm of justice, try your hand at spoken-word performance and participate in a short service project, all with the local singing group VocalEssence. When: Jan. 19 Where: Minnesota History Center, St. Paul Cost: FREE, but registration is required. Lunch will be provided. Info: mnhs.org Minnesota Good Age / January 2019 / 39


Brain teasers SUDOKU

WORD SEARCH WORK OUT FOR THE BEST

ADRENALINE AEROBIC BALANCE BIOFEEDBACK CALORIE CARBOHYDRATE EXERCISE

FITNESS FLEXIBILITY GLUCOSE INTENSITY MARATHON METABOLISM MINERAL

NUTRITION PROTEIN RESPIRATION RESISTANCE SWIMMING TEMPERATURE VITAMIN

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40 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

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TRIVIA 1. Jane Fonda

Source: Charles Caleb Cotton


HELP US BRING JOY TO ISOLATED SENIORS WITH YOUR GIFT!

TRIVIA A PICTURE OF HEALTH 1. What Oscar-winning actress released a fitness VHS tape in 1982 that sold 17 million copies worldwide? 2. What racquet sport uses a wiffle ball (or similarly perforated polymer ball)? 3. Grandma’s Marathon occurs in what Minnesota city? Sources: vogue.com, usapa.org, this issue

Gifts for Seniors provides donated gifts and lifeaffirming personal contact during the winter holidays and year round to isolated seniors in the Twin Cities metro area with the critical support of volunteers, donors, and community partners — people like you.

OUR GOALS

4,500 isolated seniors receive a gift 100 community partners hosting gift drives / barrels 75 agency partners shopping & delivering gifts 800 hours of donated time by volunteers $90,000 in gifts donated by the community

SUDOKU WORD SCRAMBLE Muscle, Weight, Cardio

GIFT IDEAS:

Feel free to use this list for shopping ideas! We only accept new, unwrapped gift items.

Cardigans • Slacks • Shirts • Blouses • Sweats • Fleece Nightwear • Robes • Socks • No-skid slippers • Hats • Scarves Mittens • Towel sets • Small appliances • Clocks (big numbers) Sheet sets • Blankets • Pillows • Dishes • Flatware CD or DVD players • Books • Music • Movies • Puzzles Personal care sets • Grocery gift cards • Cash donations

giftsforseniors.org | 612-379-3205 info @ giftsforseniors.org Minnesota Good Age / January 2019 / 41

CROSSWORD

ANSWERS

CRYTPOGRAM True friendship is like sound health; the value of it is seldom known until it is lost.


Crossword

67 Body areas that may be irritated by shirt tags

DOWN

ACROSS

1 Hindu royals 6 Tool with jaws 10 Mixer with Scotch 14 Lightweight vacuum first sold to hotels 15 Pianist Gilels 16 Eve’s second son 17 Peppy-sounding cracker brand 18 El __: ocean current 19 Completely occupy, as an arena 20 Well-to-do 23 Above, to poets 24 Drinks with crumpets 25 Instruction to a bank to make periodic payments 31 Loving squeezes 32 Beer whose logo suggests a prize winner, initially 33 Chopping down 42 / January 2019 / Minnesota Good Age

36 Ocean east of N.C. 37 Central Illinois city 40 Funny Tina 41 Rep’s sales target 43 + or - particle 44 Criticize sternly 45 Pink slip 49 Picnicker’s worry 50 Spanish “that” 51 Ship’s required nighttime illuminators 57 __ B’rith 58 “Paula’s Home Cooking” host 59 Extremist sects 62 Puts frosting on 63 Tall and skinny 64 Audibly 65 Pageant body band 66 Greek Cupid

1 “Frasier” role 2 “All bets __ off” 3 Zooey’s “New Girl” role 4 They “speak louder than words” 5 Did figure eights, say 6 Start of Caesar’s boast 7 “Sign me up!” 8 Woo with a tune 9 One who gets hitched in a hurry 10 Sensitive high school health lesson 11 Last bio 12 Shoulder muscle, briefly 13 Partner in war 21 Poppycock 22 Storm-tracking device 25 Former NBA big man, familiarly 26 Ballet skirt 27 Beaming 28 “SNL” network 29 Not enough salt to taste, perhaps 30 Hunter’s weapon 34 Within shouting distance 35 Places with elliptical trainers 37 __ Lama 38 Get dolled (up) 39 Remove a fastener from 42 Become discolored, as silverware 44 Diner flipper 46 Amazon e-reader 47 Out of neutral 48 Trash holder 51 Sluggers’ stats 52 Donald Duck, to his nephews 53 Glasgow denials 54 Jay with a TV “Garage” 55 Tattoo artist’s supplies 56 Sty fare 60 Election Day day: Abbr. 61 Militant ’60s campus org.


Profile for Minnesota Good Age

January 2019  

January 2019  

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