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Call Your Local RealtorÂŽ Today! December 23 through December 29, 2017

feature home

13115 FLINT RIDGE RD SE $224,500

Pg.2

3-4 bedrooms with 2 full baths and walkout basement. Newly landscaped with lots of perennials and concrete sidewalk. Large lot, over 2 acres located in Lakewood schools. All appliances stay including the washer and dryer. Very large open kitchen complete with walk-in panty. New rear sliding door located just off the dining area which allows lots of natural light. Some new flooring. Newer hot water tank. Great location close to Newark or Zanesville. Invisible pet fence will stay. 2 car garage. Lori Frank 740-704-5511

OH-0001147505

Find a home that fits your family in a neighborhood that fits your life.

NewarkAdvocate.com/Homes


The Advocate » Saturday, Dec. 30, 2017

Pocket-size seed packets speak volumes Online

Dean Fosdick ASSOCIATED PRESS

A seed packet may be small, but it speaks volumes. While seed catalogs promote thousands of types of plants, seed packets tell gardeners how to grow one. All the information is printed on the back of a paper pouch slightly larger than the size of your wallet, and at prices that won’t empty it. Although the cost of seeds has risen over the past few years, they’re still an economical way to garden, said Elsa Sanchez, a commercial vegetable crops specialist at Penn State University Extension. “The other option would be to buy transplants, which is generally more expensive,” Sanchez said. “You also find a lot more options for types and cultivars when you start from seed.” Seed packages have been a gardening staple in the United

For more about how to read seed packets, see this fact sheet from University of Vermont Extension: http://pss.uvm.edu/ppp/articles/ seedpkt.html

States for well over a century, although their look is frequently changed. W. Atlee Burpee & Co., for example, has begun shipping re-designed packets for the 2018 growing season. “We made the picture (of the plant) virtually the entire front of the packet, so there’s a very strong shout-out of what it is,” said Burpee chairman and chief executive officer George Ball. “We have just a few things on the front – the name, price and weight, such as we need to have. “But turn it over and you’ll

Seed packs are great little reference tools. While the front of the packets show how the seeds will look when they mature, the rear describes everything needed to grow them from spacing and soil depth to light conditions and moisture requirements.

See SEEDS, Page 4R

“We Always Have Time For You”

Carol Goff

& Associates

Newark 740-366-2121 Hebron 740-527-2710

FIND US ON

14 OFFICES TO SERVE YOU

DEAN FOSDICK VIA AP

NEWARK

MILLERSPORT

COLUMBUS

HEBRON

13115 Flint Ridge Rd.

4207 N Bank Rd.

938 Lornaberry Ln.

116 W Main St.

$224,500

$337,900

$179,000

$450/month

3-4 bedrooms, 2 full baths

2 bedroom, 2 baths

4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths

For Lease Upper Floor Office Suite

Lori Frank 740-704-5511

Dylan Ruby 740-624-8856

The James Team 740-403-9049

Rhonda Lampton 740-624-8887

SAINT LOUISVILLE

NEWARK

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8620 Stickle Rd.

143 Margery Dr.

12085 6th Ave.

744 Francis Dr.

$130,000

$179,900

$149,900

$267,635

3 bedrooms, 2 baths

3 bedrooms, 2 baths

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The James Team 740-403-9049

Tammy Sager 740-703-6501

Rhonda Lampton 740-624-8887

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NEWARK

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2765 S. Elliott Rd.

151 S 5th St.

207 Elmwood Ave.

5344 E. Sheffield Circle

$84,900

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$65,900

$265,900

2 bedrooms, 1 bath

Triplex

Duplex

2 bedroom, 2 bath condo

Rhonda Lampton 740-624-8887

The James Team 740-403-4582

The James Team 740-403-4582

Carol Goff 740-366-2121

www.carolgoffrealestate.com

2R » HOMES WEEKLY

FEATURED AGENTS

Dylan Ruby 740-624-8856

Paul Oliver 740-334-8807 OH-0001163636

Jerry Eshelman 740-973-6930

Rhonda Lampton 740-624-8887

The James Team Jason & Kishma James 740-403-4582 or 740-403-9049

Tami Sager 740-703-6501


Saturday, Dec. 30, 2017 » The Advocate

A person kneads cloth in indigo dye at Wanariya indigo dye workshop in Tokyo.

Indigo dyeing makes everyone look good Linda Lombardi ASSOCIATED PRESS

An instructor demonstrates a folding technique for designing indigo dyed fabric at Wanariya workshop in Tokyo. PHOTOS BY LINDA LOMBARDI/AP

indigo soluble takes “magic and chemistry.” The Japanese method involves composting the indigo leaves. Then, creating and tending the dye vat sounds something like caring for a sourdough starter. There’s talk about “feeding” and keeping it “healthy,” like it’s a living thing. Indigo needs an alkaline environment, which is achieved by using substances like wood ash lye. Then, natural materials are added: Ellis may use sugar or henna; the Japanese use plant material or sake. “What happens is what’s called a reduction,” Ellis says. “During the fermentation and reduction, the oxygen molecule that is bound to the indigo very strongly become less strongly bound, so the indigo can become soluble in water.” As the natural materials break down, conditions become more acidic, so you have to keep “feeding” the vat. “All that froth on the top, you learn how to read it — the size of the bubble, the color of the bubbles,” Ellis says. “You take the pH, you do dye tests with it, you just have to observe.” Indigo and cotton have a special relationship, sticking to each other “like no other dyes and fibers,” says Teresa Duryea Wong , author of “Cotton and Indigo from Japan.” Most people think of silk when they think of Japanese textiles. But Wong says cotton holds a special place as well.

“Raising cotton in Japan started about 600 years ago and it changed everything,” she says. Back then, when the nobility controlled all aspects of everyday life, peasants could grow cotton on the edges of their fields and experiment with it, since it was unregulated. Indigo-dyed cotton was first used for farmers’ clothes and fisherman’s and fireman’s jackets. Gradually it became more decorative, eventually growing into an art form. There is a synthetic version of indigo. It still has to go through the reduction process since it’s chemically identical to the real thing, but it’s less expensive, so the natural dye has become much less common. “In Japan, there were about 40,000 acres of farms growing indigo at the beginning of the 1900s, and making the indigo dyestuff,” says Wong. “Today it’s estimated to be less than a hundred.” The craft itself, though, seems to be doing fine. In her research, Wong saw many trendy uses of indigo-dyed fabric. One is based on the traditional yukata — a sort of light cotton kimono-like robe worn to summer festivals and after a bath: “There’s a high-fashion spin on that, with hand-dyed indigo and wearing it with jeans and boots.” Modern uses are not confined to high fashion. The Wanariya shop, like many others, dyes T-shirts, sneakers, baseball caps and tote bags.

HOMES WEEKLY » 3R

When the outcome of a craft project is a surprise, it’s often not a good surprise. My recent experience trying indigo dyeing in Tokyo was an exception to that rule. Dye from the indigo plant has been used for centuries all over the world. It’s the familiar blue of blue jeans, and in a class at the Wanariya workshop in Tokyo, the technique we used was also familiar: A simple version of the craft called shibori, it reminded me of tie-dyeing in school art classes long ago. Using some scraps as examples, the teacher first explained how to wrap the fabric around marbles with rubber bands, or twist bits of it up with rubber bands, depending on the pattern we wanted. He also showed us a couple of folding techniques, but to me these screamed “not for beginners,” so I stuck with the rubber bands and marbles. We were each given a lovely indigodyed apron to cover our clothes, and two pairs of rubber gloves to wear on top of each other. The reason for the latter was obvious: The instructor’s blue-stained fingers looked like they probably never come completely clean. He warned us that the vat of dye would smell strong. It wasn’t pleasant, but not awful either. Just as striking was the look of it — this wasn’t just a tub of colored liquid. The surface was covered with froth, with a big bubble in the middle that he said was called “the flower of

indigo.” The instructor soaked my piece of fabric in plain water first so it would take up the dye better. Then he told me to dunk it in the vat and knead it “for as long as I say.” That’s where the process gets complicated. After kneading, you lift the item out of the dye and hold it in the air for a few moments, while the color changes from a sort of dull brown to blue, as oxidation takes place. Then you dunk and knead it again — and possibly again. The duration and number of dips is how dyers get so many shades of blue — traditionally there are 48 — out of the same pot of dye. Rinsing was left to a small washing machine. When the other two people in the class unwrapped their items, all three of us gasped at how beautiful they were. I assumed they had some talent that I lacked, but when I unwrapped mine, we all exclaimed the same way. No doubt to a real artisan, the results looked like they’d been made by children, but I’ve never done a craft where the first attempt was so surprising and satisfying. Indigo dyeing is complex and unlike other natural dyes. It’s not easy to get indigo to dye fabric, which is why it’s good for tie-dying: A rubber band is enough to stop it. Most dyes are soluble in water, but not indigo, says Catharine Ellis, textile artist and co-author of a forthcoming book on natural dyes. “Even if it’s a fine powder, you stir it up and you just have fine particles in the water,” she says. To make the


The Advocate » Saturday, Dec. 30, 2017

LICKING COUNTY REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS Transfers are from Nov. 27 through Dec. 1 The first name(s) listed is the seller and the second name(s) listed is the buyer. Bennington Township

» 4101 Johnstown-Utica Rd; Wilbur Kimberly K Trustee; Carey Jonathan M and Angela M; $244,900; 11/28/2017 Burlington Township

» 2020 Marion Rd Nw; Urban James E (tod); Mcguire John R; $115,000; 11/28/2017 » 1720 Homer Rd; Reichelderfer Andrew Joseph; Piatt Zachary S and Slate Olivia R; $118,500; 11/28/2017 Reynoldsburg

» 8914 Betony Ct; Stricker Clarence L (tod); Adhikari Mahendra and Narbada; $229,900; 11/28/2017 » 2051 Ravine Pl; Maronda Homes Inc Of Ohio; Brown Donald C; $257,555; 12/1/2017 Etna Township

» 112 Cameron Dr; Runyons Joseph L and Becky M Trustees; Yucus Anthony and Emma; $192,000; 11/27/2017 » 129 Copland Dr; Pulte Homes Of Ohio Llc; Grove Lewis E and Marissa B; $285,610; 11/27/ 2017 » 111 Pebble Creek Dr; Fields Catherine M; Davis Sandra Love and Davis Michael; $178,000; 11/28/2017 » 196 Wendell Rd; Craig Lorri A Trustee; Feil Scott A and Debra L; $217,000; 11/28/2017 » 48 Georgian Dr; Harris Mark A E; Fischer Daniel E; $230,000; 11/30/2017 » 108 Dusky Willow Dr; Qmi Inc; May Tyler D; $145,000; 12/1/2017 » 175 Copland Dr; Pulte Homes Of Ohio Llc; Patrick Brandon M; $283,928; 12/1/2017 Franklin Township

» 8545 Linnville Rd; Sturgill Justin L and Traci L; Amore David R; $287,400; 11/27/2017 » 7360 Linnville Rd; Winston George R and Leslie A; Hauser Matthew D and Rebecca; $230,000; 11/29/2017 » 7270 Linnville Rd; Young Harry; Flood Kimberly A; $159,800; 12/1/2017 Granville

» 107 Donegal Dr; Thompson Stacy L; Blasczyk Timothy J; $269,000; 11/27/2017 Granville Township

» 66 Trenton Cir; Smith Gary L and Carolyn J Co Trustees; Black Benjamin E and Mari L; $194,000; 12/1/2017 Hanover

» 130 Echo Dr; Roike Jeffrey Trustee; Lentz R Frederick and Cheryl F; $179,900; 11/28/2017

4R » HOMES WEEKLY

Harrison Township

» 4797 Outville Rd; Meeds Heidi L and Brady; George Adam R; $200,850; 11/27/2017 » 113 Terrier Ct; Homewood Building Company Llc; Patten Warren and Jacalyn; $391,957; 11/27/2017 » 306 Forward Pass; French Caroline; Howard Kevin A and Karen L; $232,500; 12/1/2017 Hartford Township

» 13113 Crouse-willison Rd; Blakeman Joey C and Shelly R; Bach Zachary and Dorko Kayla; $350,000; 11/29/2017 Jersey Township

» 115 Fitzwilliam Ln; Garinger Paul N and Michelle A; Bonito Matthew and Amanda; $659,000; 11/28/2017 Liberty Township

» 7716 Windy Hollow Rd; Lewis Kevin K and Gina M Trustees; Smith Ryan J and Brandy R; $315,000; 11/27/2017 Licking Township

» 2105 Ryan Rd; Shade Susan M; Price Joshua H; $126,000; 11/27/2017 » 8269 Somerset Rd; Brown Hildegard; Burchfield James F and Christina M; $180,000; 11/28/ 2017 » 594 Lexington Ave; Orwig James; Ferguson Robert; $110,000; 12/1/2017 » 797 Lake Shore Blvd; Speck Kimberly A; Faller Dale E Jr and Genevieve; $127,900; 12/1/2017 » 797 Lake Shore Blvd; Speck Kimberly A; Faller Dale E Jr and Genevieve; $127,900; 12/1/2017 » Jacksontown Rd; Speck Kimberly A; Faller Dale E Jr and Genevieve; $127,900; 12/1/2017 » Harbor View Dr; Foresta Joseph T Aka Foresta Joseph; Jordan Susan Marie and Terry Lynn; $175,700; 12/1/2017 » 369 Harbor View Dr; Foresta Joseph T Aka Foresta Joseph; Jordan Susan Marie and Terry Lynn; $175,700; 12/1/2017 » 369 Harbor View Dr; Foresta Joseph T Aka Foresta Joseph; Jordan Susan Marie and Terry Lynn; $175,700; 12/1/2017 » 541 E Lake Shore Dr; Shepherd Clint M; Moore David M and Susan J; $260,000; 12/1/2017 Madison Township

» 13120 Claylick Rd; Stowers Lenny; Kollaja Keith B and Megan K; $224,000; 11/28/2017 Mckean Township

» 8942 Marion Rd; Garno Carl L Jr and Garno William B; Thorpe Robert A; $66,500; 11/29/2017 Johnstown

» 381 Buena Vista Dr; Technical Rubber Investment Company; Jeffries Jason M and Michelle R; $70,000; 11/29/2017 » 104 Maple Leaf Dr; Russell Paul G and Laura E; Young Debra L; $157,000; 11/29/2017 » 56 Central Station Pl; Messenger Jeffrey S; League James M and Mccambridge-league Loren N; $210,000; 12/1/2017 St. Louisville

» 8538 Mt Vernon Rd; Mitchell Leonard C Jr and Julie J; Mcfadden Stacy and Zachary; $90,000; 11/28/2017 Perry Township

» 18902 Odell Rd; Cleveland Annette; Carpenter Elisabeth L and Kurt S; $159,900; 11/28/2017 Alexandria

» 45 E Main St; Pestel Heather N; Oneil Colt and Taylor; $169,000; 11/28/2017 Heath

» 1700 Hebron Rd Lot 20; Richards Stephanie; Dyer Jessica M; $500; 12/1/2017 » 1100 Thornwood Dr Lot 28; Roche Amber and Jeffrey W Jr; Blomker Shelly M; $500; 11/28/2017 » 1772 Berkshire Dr; Flood Kimberly A; Hall Roger L; $241,000; 11/30/2017 » 923 Terrace Dr; Overbey Mary L; Stephen Rian and Jeanne Rian Revocable Trust; $180,000; 12/1/2017

Newark

» 405 Jackson Blvd; Mccray Thomas M and Sharon L; Hall Kyle; $80,000; 11/27/2017 » 121 Aqueduct Ave; Oliver Cassandra N; Palmer Nicole; $86,500; 11/27/2017 » 73 Annette Ave; Kbjb Properties Llc; Mills Kenneth N and Brittany J; $119,900; 11/27/2017 » 225 English Ave; Villacres Jorge N Trustee; Terrill William T and Evelyn J; $145,000; 11/27/ 2017 » 134 Fulton Ave; Depaoli Anthony T; Williams Julie; $54,000; 11/28/2017 » 232 N Cedar St; Nelson Darla K; Burnett William C; $62,000; 11/28/2017 » 48 Decrow Ave; Ryan James A and Deborah L; Mitchell Zachary Adam; $66,900; 11/28/2017 » 157/159 Isabelle Rd; Payne Joy S and Wiles Jill Francine; Raegun Development Llc; $82,000; 11/28/2017 » 1765 Churchill Downs Rd; Starr Sheila R; Miller William R and Margaret A; $138,000; 11/28/2017 » 765 Hudson Ave; Schumaker Michael E and Christine A; Hampshire Kristen N; $159,900; 11/28/2017 » 1497 S Wild Turkey Dr; Walker Ryan M and Jaclyn R; Brick Brian J; $197,900; 11/28/2017 » 675 Country Club Dr; Kittle Gwendolyn; Callander Ann; $98,000; 11/29/2017 » 625 Country Club Dr G-2; Keller Laureen L; Smith Alton Don and Bonnie J; $65,000; 11/30/ 2017 » 535 Ridgefield Rd; Stemm Billie K; Mccarthy James F and Gloria J; $79,000; 11/30/2017 » 1721 Churchill Downs Rd; Brehm Jennifer R and Johnson David W Trustees; Cocanour Timothy J; $127,000; 11/30/2017 » 635 Moull St; Jaxson Homes Llc; Hormel Melissa S; $129,000; 11/30/2017 » 133 Decrow Ave; Perry Zachary L; Mortimer John and Tina; $55,000; 12/1/2017 » 562 Kibler Ave; Dewey Brent R; Lane Austin and Charlene; $114,900; 12/1/2017 » 470 Howell Dr; Wells Elizabeth O; Wilson George C Iii and Cynthia J; $185,000; 12/1/2017

Seeds Continued from Page 2R

see that we’ve amped up the type of gardening information you’re going to get – the what, the how, the where and the when. The most important is the when,” Ball said. “We use USDA (hardiness) zones and maps for that.” Company founder Washington Atlee Burpee used to call seed packets his “silent salesmen,” Ball said. “It’s important that the seed packets be seen from 15 feet for in-store sales rather than 15 inches for a catalog. So we go for a more varnished look to make a good first impression,” he said. The kind of information to expect from these miniature reference guides: Days to seed germination and maturity. Expect those to vary somewhat, though, based on sun exposure, soil temperature, fertility and

moisture. Seed count and packing date. “Seed longevity is dependent on the type of seed and also storage conditions,” Sanchez said, recommending that any leftovers be kept cool and dry until another planting season rolls around. “Over time, viability and germination rates will decline.” Plant profile and size: whether it’s a hybrid, open pollinated or an heirloom, an annual, biennial or perennial. Planting instructions, including seed spacing and soil depth, light conditions and moisture requirements. Then there’s the bonus information available through “QR” or quick-response coding, those usually square, artistic designs appearing more frequently on the flip side of seed packets. Download a free QR code reader app into your smart phone or tablet so you can read links and find information online.

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Pataskala

» 763 Woodington Dr; Scopel Brent A and Julie R; Davis Matthew John and Kimberly Anne; $192,500; 11/27/2017 » 343 Isaac Tharp St; Fischer Homes Columbus Lp; Davis Charlie M Jr and Kelly R; $303,788; 11/27/2017 » 181 Fairgrounds St; Utrevis Marcia A and Wiley Robert C; Loudermilk Susan L; $162,000; 11/28/2017 » 14027 Havens Corners Rd; Johnson Janice L; Mccreery Abby L and Raub Kyle W; $167,000; 11/28/2017 » Headleys Mill Rd; Caldwell Sondra Ann Trustee Et Al; Simeral Coleman R; $230,000; 11/28/2017 » 4301 Headleys Mill Rd; Anthony Michael B and Deborah A; Osif Thomas P and Dawn D; $375,000; 11/28/2017 » 160 Railroad St Sw; Mohler Stacy; Kourim Anna Mae; $115,000; 12/1/2017 » 132 Hickory Ln; Minton Eric R; Mccarty Robert E Jr and Ellen F; $172,500; 12/1/2017 » 345 Good Ct; Messer Matthew S; Adcock Lorie; $175,000; 12/1/2017 » 576 Richmond Dr; Lee Roy L; Clay Sharon A and William H Jr; $176,000; 12/1/2017 » 164 Barry Knoll Dr; Gossett Jason; Fraley Keith and Christi; $205,000; 12/1/2017 » 1212 Deansway Dr; Dunn Nathaniel R and Stephanie L; Farmer Jeffery G and Denise R; $225,000; 12/1/2017 » 312 Isaac Tharp St; Fischer Homes Columbus Lp; Damico Michelle and Copeland Alan B; $275,465; 12/1/2017

Weekly For Real Estate Advertising Information, Please Call:

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740-328-8509 • jpettit@gannett.com

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740-328-8505 • strowbridg@gannett.com

12-30 Newark Homes Weekly  
12-30 Newark Homes Weekly  

Media Network of Central Ohio’s weekly real estate publication for Licking County.

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