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Portfolio of Architecture 2016

MITRAN KIANDEE Master of Architecture 2016 Bachelor of Environments 2014 University of Melbourne


MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

Portfolio of Architecture

2016

2


Contents 5

Curriculum Vitae

6

Indonesia, Jakarta

16

Curitiba, Brazil

24

Southland, Melbourne

34

Shibuya, Japan

40

Shenzhen, China

44

Applied Construction

46

Penang, Malaysia

3


4

MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016


MITRAN M KIANDEE MArch, BEnvs

+61 401 496 556 +60 16-832 9968 mitran.mk@gmail.com http://issuu.com/mmmitran 310/123 Pelham Street Carlton 3053 VIC PROFILE As a graduate of architecture, I enjoy working with the complexities of the existing landscape and genuinely care about the delicate details that influence human living and appreciation of place-making.

2015-2016 JUN-JUL 2016

EDUCATION Master of Architecture, University of Melbourne |H1 Average Galápagos International Architecture Studio, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Ecuador

MAR 2016

MSD Travelling Studio / ZEMCH Workshop, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Brasil

2012-2014

Bachelor of Environments, University of Melbourne |H1 Average

JAN-FEB 2014

NOV 2015 - FEB 2016

JAN 2015 - FEB 2015

JAN 2016

Winter Exchange Program, Stuttgart Universität, Germany PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCES Student Architect at BKK, Black Kosloff Knott Architects Team member of a cross disciplinary competition entry, assistant for publications, drafting tender drawings, schematic design developments

Intern at LLA, Lawrence Loh Architects, Penang Part of a dedicated team working on schematic design proposals, visual illustrations & production of detail tender drawings of adaptive reuse projects

Participant at UABB, Urbanism & Architecture Bi-city Biennale in Shenzhen & Hong Kong Invited Representative of the Melbourne School of Design for a collaborative studio rethinking the idea of future cities in the concept of waste

MAY 2015 - PRESENT 2013 -2014 DEC 2012

OTHER EXPERIENCES Head Cook at Many Rooms Kitchen Preparing meals at a drop in centre for homeless and disadvantaged people.

Committee member of OCF, Melbourne University Overseas Christian Fellowship Cell Leader in 2013 and Head of Outreach Ministry in 2014

Hotel Receptionist at The Palace Hotel, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah Front desk services and local enquiries for multi-national guests

2016 2013 & 2014 2014 DEC 2014 JUN 2014 NOV 2013 DEC 2012

AWARDS Melbourne Global Scholars Award Dean’s Honours Award for Academic Merit Melbourne Global Grant Selected Studio Fire Exhibition in MSD Library Selected Axonometric and Detail Drawings for Construction Design Short-list Selected Works Exhibition for Architecture Design Studio Water Selected Virtual Environments Lantern, Melbourne GPO Exhibition

CURRICULUM VITAE

PROGRAM SKILLS After Effects Autocad Microsoft Office Illustrator InDesign Photoshop Revit Rhinoceros 5.0 Grasshopper Sketchup

5


Street Vendor Union MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

INFORMAL HERITAGE MOVEMENT

6

Indonesia is a post-colonial nation shaped throughout its lifetime by influences from Dutch settlements, Portuguese trades and Western modernist ideals. Jakarta, the capital city of Indonesia, has continually searched for a national identity – through a combination of economic developments, political reforms, and racial riots. In the process, mega complexes rapidly sprouted throughout Jakarta, along with the dramatic increase in rural-urban migration, informality and consequentially, the abandonment of ‘old’ buildings to make way

for further modernization. In response, this thesis proposes Koperasi Kaki Lima (Street Vendor Union), allowing Jakarta to unpeel the intricate layers of history, acknowledge the pursuit for a viable economy, comprehend the complexities of informalities and in turn, postulates opportunities to cooperatively work together towards a wholesome integration of these variables. It is this harmonious integration that will reflect the true national identity of Indonesia – the collective image of a diverse but united country.

Koperasi Kaki Lima hopes to champion a unique spatial quality and social relation that is already known within the region. This precinct serves as an encouragement to put aside differences in social wealth and together take ownership as a collective community to improve public spaces and micro-entrepreneurship possibilities in a context-sensitive manner. This idea will become a viable integration of the elaborate historical fabric of a collective nation. A characteristic, added authenticity that is more valuable that it was previously.


EST . 2016

STREET VENDOR UNION: INFORMAL HERITAGE MOVEMENT

EST 2016

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Grand Indonesia Mall

Security check upon every mall entry

False façade of a mall store replicating a street vendor identity

Tanah Abang Market

Congestion of retail inside, citizens desperate to head off to next destination

Forbidden operations on footpaths

Fatahilah Square

Fatahilah Square’s ‘Filtration System’

Declared legal street vending in museums

Informality

MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

THE PARADOX OF DE-COLONISATION

8

Despite being an important part of the city landscape, these communities are often evicted. The city resorts to social cleansing of its own local identity and instead, prioritize the facelifts of abandoned Dutch colonial buildings. The revival of colonial architecture intends to partly keep the historical identity of the urban landscape but more so to legitimise Indonesian elites equal to their former settlers. In the pursuit for a global heritage identity, Jakarta seems willing to risk the loss of a large portion of its own local identity that is believed to be primitive, lapsed and shameful. This is the

paradox of de-colonisation: the movement to get rid of the colonial masters stemmed from an aspiration to become more European. The cleansing of the indigenous structures of Jakarta whilst making active steps to preserve their colonial heritage and the pursuit of ever modern buildings is a clear manifestation of this paradox.


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MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

Vendor Opportunity

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Yet, in the pursuit for wealth and status, there is always an unspoken search for an escape. Old heritage and informalities fulfil the desired sense of displacement from the stiff corporate realm. Perhaps, an acknowledgement of this inherent, underlying interest could serve as a remedy for the disrepair of heritage buildings and the painful process of mass eviction. This thesis aims to prompt both ruling elites and working poor to forge complementaries among them and uphold a common claim of the national heritage. This proposal is not a substitute for the existence of heritage and informality, but rather a place of allowance for the continual refinement and re-appropriation of their already long founded merits, branding and identity.


STREET VENDOR UNION: INFORMAL HERITAGE MOVEMENT

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VEN LIG DOR C HTW OM EIG FOR HT T 0 CAN 1: OP Y

VEN STE DOR C PPE OM D S FOR EAT T 0 ING 2:

VEN OP DOR C ENA OM BLE FOR FAC T 03 ADE :

VENDOR COMFORT

Micro entrepreneurs have a place to return to at the end of a busy shift. They need not loiter in boredom in public spaces. They can relax in the calm combination of open greens, serene waters and ample space, equipped with bare necessities and enriched with heritage vibes.

VEN STODOR E RAG NGA E S GEM HEL EN VES T 0 1:

VEN HANDOR E GIN NGA G R GE ACK MEN T0 S 2

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VEN MO DOR E VAB NG LE AGE DES ME KS NT 03

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VENDOR ENGAGEMENT

MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

There are also abundant places for keen ideas and hardworking forces to meet – to test, try and experiment potential collaborations and leap into the urban market. Shared spaces are complemented with operable furniture to accommodate for various operations and occupations.

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VEN BUI DOR C LDI ON NG TE ENT XT 0 RIE 1: S

VEN BUI DOR C LDI ON NG TE FEN XT 0 CES 2:

VEN BUI DOR C LDI ON NG TE ADJ XT 0 ACE 3: NC IES

VENDOR CONTEXT

Honour is given to exemplar businesses as they are awarded the privilege to operate at premium locations that beautifully merge with the legacy of the Maritime Museum.


STREET VENDOR UNION: INFORMAL HERITAGE MOVEMENT

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PAT R CAN ON C OE OMF HIR OR T0 E

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PAT R SO ON C CIA OM L S FO HAD RT E 02:

PAT R SHA ON C RED OMF SEA ORT TIN 02: G

PATRON COMFORT

Patrons can roam around the unintended flooded lake. There is no need to fret the scorching sun as there are ample shaded areas to enjoy fresh locally made purchases in areas of shelter and age old beauty.

PAT R CO ON E LLA NG BO AGE RAT ME IVE NT ARE 01: A

PAT R CO ON E -WO NG RKI AGE NG ME SPA NT 0 CES 2:

PAT R OP ON E EN NG BAL AG CO EME NY NT 0

3:

PATRON ENGAGEMENT

MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

Have the joy to watch and join in the art of making artisanal everyday goods. This place is a centre that can feed the potent curiosity of 21st century dwellers to “understand more about the origins of the things we enjoy [which is] crucial part of life.”

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PAT R CLO ON C SED ONT SET EXT UP 01:

PAT R PAR ON C TIA ONT L S EX ETU T 0 P 2:

PAT R FUL ON C LY ONT OP EX ENE T 0 D S 3: ETU P

PATRON CONTEXT

Indulge in the gallery of cultural craftsmanship. They deliver freshly made crafts and are housed with the nostalgia of classic street vendor carts. The open spatial quality invites art enthusiasts. The permanent placements of these units embody the predisposed, underlying desire for entrepreneurs to eventually move forward and open a brick and mortar establishment.


STREET VENDOR UNION: INFORMAL HERITAGE MOVEMENT

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EXPANSION DESIRES

58+20+22 10+24+30147105 21+24+7517192

EXPANSION TRENDS

KITCHEN 5.88m2 average 4.22m2 on site Needs

Extra space for new equipments, improvement of life Space for meals in kitchen, no space for table, uncomfortable eating positions Kitchen door towards back of plot

LAUNDRY AREA Commonly not included Extra space too narrow Needs

Only can build outside building Immediate extra construction Shelter Place for appliances

GARAGE Issues with theft Needs

Walls to protect personal belongings Garage & laundry multifunctional space due to limited extra space Privacy and safety while doing laundry Future expansion over laundry area roof

Needs

Less confined spaces after expansion Proper lighting Better ventilation

57.5% No changes in original layout 22.5% Changes in Original layout without increase in area 20.0% Changes in original layout followed by increase in area & rooms

DIRECTION OF EXPANSION 10.0% Front 24.0% Sideways 29.0% Back 14.0% Front & back 7.0% Front & sideways 10.0% Sideways & back 5.0% Second floor

FIRST ROOM OF EXPANSION 21.0% Bedroom 24.0% Kitchen 7.0% Living room 5.0% Lounge 19.0% Laundry 2.0% Storage 5.0% Garage

ENERGY USE, SHOPPING, MOBILITY

ADDITIONAL BEDROOMS Within 5 years, 10% of occupants build 2nd bedroom, 5% build 3rd bedroom

CHARACTERISTICS OF REFURBISHMENT

760+240= 650+350= 600+400= 680+320= 420+580= 490+510= 260+740= 280+720= 840+160=

76% Off lights when leaving room 65% Do not wash dishes with running water 60% Prefer refill products 68% Prefer energy efficient appliances 42% Prefer upgradable or repairable products 49% Support ecological products 26% Use recycle bags 28% Prefer to bicycle instead of car 84% Would purchase a car if could afford

Mass Personalisation MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

SELF-HELP SOCIAL HOUSING DEVELOPMENTS IN CURITIBA

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If megacities are the brightest stars in the urban firmament, three-quarters of the burden of future world population growth will be borne by faintly visible second-tier cities and smaller urban areas. As UN researchers emphasise, these are places where “there is little or no planning to accommodate these people or provide them with services.” (Davis, 2006)

In Curitiba, Brazil, much has been done by CoHab to address these issues. However, most of the social housing developments are produced too slowly and are usually incompatible to these low income groups. In contrast, favelas have been able to better cope with these

problems due to their independent and self-help spirit. Such a culture empowers individuals to uphold and maintain their individual wellbeing, despite all the lack of basic amenities and infrastructure. This project aims to adopt the culture of a self-sufficient community. This helps to ensure that low-income individuals can meet their basic needs, and are equipped to escape the consequences of poverty.


URBAN

Urban City

AVOID

Urban Slum

HOUSING CONCERNS

Gabmling

Drugs / Micro-credit Lending

ENTREPRENEUR

Housing Cost

Tenure Security

Business Investor

Restaurateur

Journey to Work

Quality of homes (materiality and size)

Start-up Groups

Local Internet Provider

HOUSING CONDITIONS

FRAGMENTED JOBS

Overcrowding

Tradesman

Mechanical Services

No winter heat

Poor lighting and electricity

Fruit Vendor

Leisure Centre / Arcade

MASS PERSONALISATION: SELF-HELP SOCIAL HOUSING DEVELOPMENTS IN CURITIBA

Broken pipes and overflowing sewerage

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MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

Incremental Development

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The semi-organic masterplan layout lends itself to create community intersections that encourage people traffic and boost community support for any self-help income generating initiatives. Over time, each unit grow and change uniquely according to family sizes, income, wellbeing and building performance.

The masterplan incorporates the culture of selfhelp and independent spirit among the favelas and low income community groups. Houses will be constructed incrementally. First, provision of basic infrastructure by CoHab and later, an elaborate process of customisation by individual dwellers. The masterplan is derived from a response to the number of units required, site topography, sun orientation, need for communal space and beneficial densification. Growth is restricted to the grid setback to ensure no overshadowing by neighbours in front or above.


MASS PERSONALISATION: SELF-HELP SOCIAL HOUSING DEVELOPMENTS IN CURITIBA

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B 1.05

B 2.05

C 1.05

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D 1.05

D 2.05

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B 1.06

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C 1.06

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D 1.06

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E 1.03

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B 1.07

B 2.07

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B 1.08

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B 1.13

B 2.13

C 1.13

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D 1.13

D 2.13

Customisation Options

MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

EXPANSION POSSIBILITIES

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The 3.2 m x 6.4 m (20.48m2) modular The most adaptable layout is extracted structural grid ensures that all units can be from this catalogue; its potential is later highly customisable according to individual demonstrated in the personalisation phase. B 1.14 B 2.14 C 1.14 C 2.14 D 1.14 D 2.14 needs. These options are derived through the adjustment of the service core (toilet, The masterplan incorporates the culture of kitchen, stairs) location and relativity. The self-help and independent spirit among the positioning of these elements influence favelas and low income community groups. furniture layout of occupants. However, Houses will be constructed incrementally. not all options are ideal because each First, provision of basic infrastructure by household are of different sizes and have CoHab and later, an elaborate process of different personal needs. As such, the layout customisation by individual dwellers. of these modules allow for expansion in the gap between two neighbouring structural The masterplan is derived from a grids. response to the number of units required,

site topography, sun orientation, need for communal space and beneficial F 1.03 F 1.06 F 1.09 F 1.12 densification. Growth is restricted to the grid setback to ensure no overshadowing by neighbours in front or above.


1. DEFAULT MASTERPLAN

2. CONTOUR SENSITIVE

4. COMMUNAL SPACE

5. BENEFICIAL DENSIFICATION

6. INCREMENTAL IMPROVEMENTS

MASS PERSONALISATION: SELF-HELP SOCIAL HOUSING DEVELOPMENTS IN CURITIBA

3. SUN ORIENTATION

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TYPICAL 1: INITIAL SINGLE FLOOR CONSTRUCTION

TYPICAL 2: ELONGATED SINGLE FLOOR CONSTRUCTION

TYPICAL 3: HALF DOUBLE STOREY CONSTRUCTION

TYPICAL 4: HALF DOUBLE STOREY SHIFTED CONSTRUCTION

YEAR 0: BASIC

YEAR 1: BASIC CUSTOMISATION

YEAR 3: HOUSEHOLD EXPANSION

YEAR 5: SUSTAINABLE ACTIVE BUILDING SYSTEMS

YEAR 6: INCOME GENERATING SPACES, EXPANSION, DISASSEMBLY

YEAR 10: INCOME GENERATING SPACES, PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE

MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

Room Components

22

Given the smaller building footprint restraint on current housing developments (and this proposed housing design), there will be pressure to expand the rooms in these houses. However, instead of urging for a physical expansion, each home owner could maximise the compact nature of their houses by having adjustable and operable furniture. The following are few ideas that local inhabitants can adopt to have a good sense of spaciousness and convenient access to individual components within a multi-functional house.

These solutions will reduce the need for expansion, thus giving more room for home owners to utilise their additional space to generate family income and contribute to overall community wholesomeness.


.0: N1 E SIO HOM R E R D IT V VE EA UN PRO R 1 Y IM FTE A

2.0: E ION HOM ERS PED ARS V E O IT UN EVEL R 5 Y D FTE A

MASS PERSONALISATION: SELF-HELP SOCIAL HOUSING DEVELOPMENTS IN CURITIBA

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SOUTHLAND MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

As Frank Lowy, the chairman of Westfield believes,

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"EVOLUTION AND CHANGE ARE THE WORDS FOR SHOPPING CENTRE SUCCESS."

At Westfield, we hold the vision to continually need to adapt and always serve customers first. Westfield is determined to not only deliver world leading retail and luxury brands, but also would like to collaborate with local entrepreneurs to offer fresh, organic, daily produce to the much deserved community of Kingston. With our Southland shopping town, we are interested to give its perimeter a public presence and revisit original 1960s Southland architectural ideas of a shopping mall.

The quality of carparks on the South will be improved with new technology, increasing its efficiency and providing comfort for drivers heading in for their unique shopping experience. This gives room for further development on the North perimeters, where carparks can be converted to recreational areas and accessible day-day shopping market stalls. These areas serve as a transition space between the roads, pedestrian spaces, individual retail and the old shopping mall building.


REINVENTING: WESTFIELD SOUTHLAND

CONCEPT COLLAGE

CITY PLAN

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MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

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NORTH ESPLANADE The north Esplanade is a celebratory of civic space, accessible through a network of public trams, busses and trains. It is the one stop starting point for all. An invitation for shoppers to sit back and indulge in a freshly brewed cup of coffee or a scrumptious brunch made by local artisan brewers and culinary masters alike.


As you extend your journey further in, allow yourself to be amazed by the hustle and bustle of a local market at the carpark bazaar, a permanent architectural occupation of leased spaces within the old carpark column grid modules. Feel the atmosphere of local vendors shouting out discount offers in the ample double to triple height spaces.

REINVENTING: WESTFIELD SOUTHLAND

CAR PARK BAZAAR

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MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

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SOUTHLAND AVENUE Just before you enter into the retail mall, you would find yourself on Southland Avenue, once a mere bypass for cars, now a magical streetscape of indie buskers, restless children running around and happy families taking a casual stroll under the enchanted network of grapevines that engulf over the exposed upper car park structures.


NAPEAN BOULEVARD

On the other side, the Napean Boulevard elevated street side boutique opens up the road as a celebration of man’s inventiveness and technological advancement.

REINVENTING: WESTFIELD SOUTHLAND

NAPEAN BOULEVARD

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MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

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PRODUCTIVE ROOF GARDEN The new Westfield development also pays homage to the original Southland design. Using the latest state of the art technology, local farmers are invited to cultivate and grow fresh market produce, consisting of aquaculture, meat, poultry, dairy, fruits and vegetables. These systems are conveniently mechanised and automated. Programs have been composed though our through analysis of the successful South Melbourne Market.


This once unadorned roof is now replace with romance of a country landscape where residents of the exclusive apartment is greeted daily by the fresh scent of herbs and flowers as farm animals laze around the vast roofscape.

REINVENTING: WESTFIELD SOUTHLAND

EXCLUSIVE APARTMENTS

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GOOD FOOD IS GOOD MOOD MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

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FOOD PROCESSING DISTRICT Down at the Food processing districts, strong and dedicated tradesman work effortlessly to operate and monitor complex network of machines that harvest, process, package and distribute fresh food to the stores below.


MASTER YOUR CULINARY EXPERTISE WITH US

The journey of food production ends at places like this. The fresh food masterclass is one fine example of Westfield’s determination to elevate the suburban lifestyle qualities of neighbouring households. Housewifes and food enthusiasts alike are welcomed to join our culinary classes taught by professional chefs to improve their culinary expertise and provide that little extra happiness in the tummies of their beloved family members.

REINVENTING: WESTFIELD SOUTHLAND

FRESH FOOD MASTERCLASS

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MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

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交差 INTERSECT SELFIS H GENE 2.0 MITRA N K IA NDEE


SELFISH GENE 2.0: 交 差 INTERSECT

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U R B A N CIRCULATION

U R B A FRONTAGE

N

ANIME

FILM

MANGA

AUDITORIUM

FASHION

KARAOKE

BAR & KITCHEN

VISITOR PACE VISITOR MOVEMENT PUBLIC INTERACTION PROGRAM ENGAGEMENT

VISITOR PACE VISITOR MOVEMENT PUBLIC INTERACTION PROGRAM ENGAGEMENT

VISITOR PACE VISITOR MOVEMENT PUBLIC INTERACTION PROGRAM ENGAGEMENT

MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

U R B A N CIRCULATION

VIDEO GAMES

VISITOR PACE VISITOR MOVEMENT PUBLIC INTERACTION PROGRAM ENGAGEMENT

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INTERSECTION SAMPLES

交 差 (INTERSECT) is a contemporary Replay centre located at the heartbeat of the infamous Shibuya 109 pedestrian crossing. This new design hosts the contemporary culture and lifestyle of the metropolitan community in ways that accommodate their current behavioural trends and the existing typology of the urban fabric. Research in Studio Selfish Gene 2.0 reveal that urban growth and technological advancements constantly changes the identity of the city. The only unchanging element of the city is its uninhabited spaces.

U R B A FRONTAGE

N

INTERSECTION SAMPLES

VISITOR PACE VISITOR MOVEMENT PUBLIC INTERACTION PROGRAM ENGAGEMENT

VISITOR PACE VISITOR MOVEMENT PUBLIC INTERACTION PROGRAM ENGAGEMENT

VISITOR PACE VISITOR MOVEMENT PUBLIC INTERACTION PROGRAM ENGAGEMENT

VISITOR PACE VISITOR MOVEMENT PUBLIC INTERACTION PROGRAM ENGAGEMENT

交 差

交 差 embodies the paradox of permanent circulation. It is an agglomeration of the urban profiles (circulation, frontages and intersections samples) that generate opportunity spaces that reflect the trends and behaviour of the city.

they function and engage with visitors. The crossing of circulation paths accentuates the excitement and Interaction that occurs in the public realm. There is a freedom in the expression of pop-culture individuality and subculture belonging.

The union of these city components create opportunities to host activity spaces. Emerged void spaces are a reflection of the commonality that runs throughout the circulation-scape of Shibuya. Program spaces are not mutually exclusive but instead, have a resemblance in the way

Overall, the façade of the replay centre frames the expression of the public dependence on Shibuya circulation spaces and how they intersect as a social centre to indulge in selfish interests and fantasy happiness.


0

2

4

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SELFISH GENE 2.0: 交 差 INTERSECT

SECTION Y-Y PERSPECTIVE

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X

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1

2

9 3

8

2 2

2 1

Y

Y

7 2 1

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

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CIRCULATION EXHIBIT SPACE TOILETS KITCHEN BAR DISPLAY PANELS VENDOR SPACES RECEPTION LIGHT WELL

VIDEO GAMES

MANGA

1 1

X

13F

6F

FILM

FASHION PRECINCT

12F

KARAOKE

11F

5F

FASHION PRECINCT

4F

KARAOKE & AUDITORIUM

FASHION PRECINCT

10F

3F


X

1

4 2

7 1

10

2 2

8 Y

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CIRCULATION KARAOKE CAPSULE KARAOKE STAGE KARAOKE LOOP KARAOKE SERVICES KARAOKE ENTRY TOILETS OUTDOOR BREAKOUT SPACE AUDITORIUM SEATING AUDITORIUM STORAGE AUDITORIUM STAGE

5

4 1

X

9F

ANIME

8F

MANGA & ANIME

7F

SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION AXONOMETRIC DIAGRAM CAFE & RESTAURANTS

2F

BAR & CAFE

1F

RECEPTION & EXHIBITS

GF

CIRCULATION BUFFER PROGRAM

SELFISH GENE 2.0: 交 差 INTERSECT

KARAOKE & AUDITORIUM

Y

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3

LEVEL 9 FLOOR PLAN KARAOKE & AUDITORIUM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

9

6

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UABB 2016 MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

URBANISM & ARCHITECTURE BI-CITY BIENNALE IN SHENZHEN & HONG KONG

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This 2.0 x 5.2 m section board is a manifest of the collective ideas on future cities and the concept of waste. I have worked closely with a group of 25 invited high achieving students of MSD to interrogate our former studio projects to speculate how old ideas can be repurposed to bring relevance to themes of Technology, Trade, Culture, Transportation in the future planning of Shenzhen city.

Shenzhen is believed to be a young city with only 35 years of history. The Republic declaration of the Shenzhen Special Economic Zone promoted robust industrial growth and high domestic migration from other parts of China and has meant that the local identity of this urban landscape was thus overpowered by the influx of foreign culture. ‘What constitutes the city’s culture?’ We believe that the city’s cultural multiplicity presents a unique opportunity to imprint a new culture into the city.

Culture cannot be designed. It can only be created by people that occupy it. This city is configured as a container of dynamic flows of various elements not only static spaces. Wasted spaces in between destinations are areas of opportunities for people to adapt with their own ad hoc practices. The merging of everyone’s habits triggers a new hybrid of culture. The culture­heart of the city is at these interstitial spaces.


2010 | Life and Work in the Migrant City

Illegal

Legal Residents ‘80

‘12

Expat

Migrant

Hukou

2016+ | Demographics

“In an urban milieu where context and the genius loci of a place have become subsidiary to economic and political considerations, reducing architecture to predetermined programmes and their formal manifestation, the act of binding architecture into the story of its inhabitants can bring a new relevancy to the built environment, projecting, but not predicating the rules of its occupation.”

"The scope, speed and scale of transformation both from a social point of view, and from a geographical point of view, is quite unprecedented in human history" said Du. With an original population of 30,000, Shenzhen's official population was 12 million in 2005, making the demographic 99% migrants. There is no easy way to capture the amount of traffic into and out of the city; the population is never static, or consistently calculated in official documents. Du believes that the 22 million active SIM cards registered in Shenzhen now may well be the most accurate description of the volume of people and activities observed in the city today.

“Jitters emanating from China’s equity and currency markets have exposed widespread fears that the way ahead will be rocky indeed- and that Mr Xi and his colleagues are ill-equipped to navigate it.” _The Economist Jan 2016

“The problem is thus not an economic one per se. It is that a government once widely thought of as all powerful -even over markets- may be losing its grip.”

_AD: Drawing Architecture 2013

_The Economist Jan 2016

However, the increase of multiple cultures and different regions of people have largely increased the community lifestyles within the villages. While some might reckon that urban villages are densified and vulgar, others, on the other hand, tend to regard this as a typical urban village culture which enables the residents to enjoy a busy and lively atmosphere among the modern CBD area.

Shenzhen, historically called "Bao'on", a territory of treasured peace was known for its tranquil beauty. In 1979, Deng Xiaoping established Special Economic Zones (SEZs) in the Pearl River Delta region, with Shenzhen being one of the zones, set up under common policies, receiving the same economic treatments with its peers. Shenzhen soon stood out among the SEZs not solely due to the growth in its population or economy, but also due to the amount of constructed landscape that totally changed the geography of the region.

5%

17%

The creation of the floation popu.ation was triggered by the increasingly larger urban-rural income gap, which has developed since the mid 1980s. Hundreds of millions of rural migrants have left thier homes for cities for job opportunities and better lives, resulting ain a huge labour pool in urban areas.As they circulate among jobs in different cities, rural migrants barey have a chance to obtain hukou. Consequently they are overlooked and excluded. Pu Hao 2012 Utertcht University

In 2004, the average floor area ratio and built-up density of urban villages in Shenzhen was 1.13 and 35% respectively, indicating that urban villages were much denser than the overall built-up area of the city. The construction intensities between the Special Economic Zone and the non SEZ were significantly different. With houses generally above six storeys, the average floor area ratio of urban villages in the SEZ was 2.7 and the average floor space of a single building was 506 m sq. However with much lower buildings, the floor area ratios of urban villahes outside the SEZ was only 1.0 and the average floor space was 275 m sq. Pu Hao 2012 Utertcht University

1,000-5,000

1,000-5,000

5,000-10,000 10,000+

10,000+ 10,000+

17%

<2%

13%

“Computer-aided design technology has advanced rapidly in the past two decades and is now widely adopted by architects. Today, digital models can be produced faster and cheaper than physical ones. despite being represented on a flat screen, the digital model appears to be three-dimensonal since it can be rotate, moved and navigated in real time. Furthermore it can be be rendered to produce photo-realistic still images. With these qualities, the digital model has undermined the primacy of the physical model as a represetational device. At the same time, it has also largely replaced the working model, as it is easy to edit and thus even more suited for quick itterative design exploration than its physical counterpart.” “If robots are to be employed in he construction of high-rise structures, logistics and material systems have to be entirely rethought to cater for both their abilities and limitations: robots have limited loading capacity, but greater dexterity than other on-site, automated construction techniques.” _AD: Made By Robots, 2013

URBANISM & ARCHITECTURE BI-CITY BIENNALE IN SHENZHEN & HONG KONG 2016: FUTURE CITIES & CONCEPT OF WASTE

1990 | The Special Economic Zone

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MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016


URBANISM & ARCHITECTURE BI-CITY BIENNALE IN SHENZHEN & HONG KONG 2016: FUTURE CITIES & CONCEPT OF WASTE

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MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016


APPLIED CONSTRUCTION: LOBBY DETAIL DRAWINGS

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KKU Office Fitout MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

INTERNSHIP EXPERIENCE

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Proposal for an office fit out within an abandoned 18th century colonial warehouse in the city of Georgetown, Penang. The clients were keen to accommodate both their creative studio and corporate office within the heritage identity of the city. I was involved in the mid stages of material selection, digital modelling, visual representation and Photoshop post-processing. (Clockwise from bottom left) KKU Office workstations Outdoor chillout area

ThinkCity workzone ThinkCity workstations Toilet finishes


INTERNSHIP EPERIENCE: KKU OFFICE FITOUT

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LAYOUT REVIEW – OPTION ID-2 First Floor

proposed KKU corporate offices @ wisma uab. lebuh china. pulau pinang

LAYOUT REVIEW – OPTION ID-2 Ground Floor

MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016

ground floor plan

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proposed KKU corporate offices @ wisma uab. lebuh china. pulau pinang

(Clockwise from bottom left) First Floor Plan Ground Floor Plan

Internal verandah Gallery of transitions Main entrance


INTERNSHIP EPERIENCE: KKU OFFICE FITOUT

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MITRAN KIANDEE: PORTFOLIO OF ARCHITECTURE 2016


Mitran Kiandee: Portfolio of Architecture 2016