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ENERGY conservation PATIENT GUIDE1


table of contents

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HOW TO CONSERVE ENERGY

MEAL

MANAGEMENT

HOME

MANAGEMENT

SELF

MANAGEMENT

FOCUS ON

YOUR BREATHING

PURSED LIP BREATHING

DIAPHRAGMATIC BREATHING

BREATHING WITH ACTIVITIES


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HOW TO conserve energy 5


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PACE YOURSELF • Allow yourself enough time to complete a task without having to rush. • Spread both light and heavy tasks throughout the day and week. • Do not schedule too many activities in one day. PLAN AHEAD • Gather all items you will need before you start a task. • Keep items organized and within easy reach. BE REALISTIC • Prioritize which activities are most important to you. • Realize you do not have to do things the same way you’ve always done them. • Ask for help. Divide tasks among family and friends. • Use adaptive equipment when needed. Use appliances to do the work for you.

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AVOID FAST MOTION • Limit the need to bend, reach, and twist. • Minimize arm movements, especially above the shoulder level. • Keep your elbows low and close to your body. • Support elbows on a surface when working in one place.

GOOD POSTURE • Sit and stand straight. • Proper body alignment balances muscles and decreases stress. • A stooped posture makes breathing more difficult.

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AVOID FATIGUE • Do not wait until you are tired before you stop and rest. • Plan rest periods throughout the day. 5-10 minutes out of every hour. • Sit when possible. • Used pursed lip breathing (page 34). • Do not plan activities right after a meal. Rest 20-30 minutes after each meal. • Get a good night’s sleep and elevate your head when you sleep.

GOOD BODY MECHANICS • Stand close to the object to be moved. • Push or pull rather than lift. Slide objects along the counter. • Avoid bending, reaching, and twisting. • Carry items close to the body, keeping your back straight. If you must lift, use your leg muscles rather than your back.

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MEAL management 13


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MEAL PLANNING AND SHOPPING • Organize your shopping list to correspond with the layout of the grocery store. • Shop when the store is not busy. • Get help reaching for high and low items. Also, get help carrying heavy items. • Use the store’s electric scooter to move around the store. • Ask the clerk to bag groceries lightly, with like items together (bag cold and frozen food together). • Use a rolling cart to transport groceries from your car to the house. • Make several trips to bring the groceries into the house, beginning with cold and frozen groceries first. Rest and go back for the remainder. 16


COOKING • Gather all necessary items before beginning. • Prepare part of the meal ahead of time. • Sit to prepare food, mix ingredients, and wash dishes. • Use recipes that require short preparation time and little effort.

CLEAN-UP • Rest after meals before starting to clean up. • Eliminate scrubbing by soaking dishes. Let your dishes air dry. • Eat on paper plates several times a week. • Use the garbage disposal. Empty the trash frequently to lighten your load or have a family member do it.

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HOME management

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HOUSEWORK • Divide up each room into smaller areas. Work on one section at a time. • Break up chores over the whole week, doing a little each day. • Sit while dusting furniture. • Use long-handled dusters and cleaning attachments. • Use a mop to clean up spills instead of bending over. • Pick up items off the floor using a reacher. • Use paper towels to eliminate extra laundry. BED MAKING • Make half the bed while you are still lying in it. • Pull the top sheet and blanket up on one side and smooth out. • Exit from the unmade side, which is easy to finish. LAUNDRY • Sit to iron, sort clothes, pre-treat stains, and fold laundry. • Transfer wet clothes into dryer a few pieces at a time. • Get help to fold large pieces such as sheets.

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SELF management 25


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DRESSING • Gather all the necessary items you will need. Sit to dress. • Minimize bending by bringing your foot to the opposite knee, use a step stool or use long-handled equipment to put on pants, shoes, and socks. • Wear easy to put on, comfortable clothes such as slip-on shoes, elastic waistbands, and one-size larger shirts. • Avoid restrictive clothing such as belts, ties, tight socks, girdles, and bras. • Use suspenders if belts are too restricting. GROOMING • Sit to shave, comb your hair, and brush your teeth. • Support your elbows on the counter while grooming or shaving. • Use an electric toothbrush and an electric razor. • Wash your hair in the shower. Keep your elbows low and your chin tucked. • Avoid aerosols and strong scents.

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BATHING • If your doctor has prescribed oxygen to be used during exercise, use it when you take a shower. • Make certain your bathroom is well-ventilated. • Consider taking your shower in the evening to allow plenty of time. • Gather all necessary items you will need, including your clothes. • Sit to undress, bathe, dry, and dress. • Use a bath chair in your shower. • Avoid over reaching. Use a long-handled brush to wash your back and feet. Use a hand-held shower head to rinse. • Use a shower caddy to keep needed items handy and at arm’s reach. • Have a towel or robe nearby. Avoid the task of drying by putting on a terry cloth robe. 29


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FOCUS ON your breathing 31


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PURSED LIP BREATHING Pursed lip breathing is the key to gaining control over your breathing. • It will help you to empty your lungs of stale air and maximize the amount of oxygen you breathe in. • The rationale behind pursed lip breathing is that breathing in through the nose warms, filters, and humidifies the air and increases your relaxation. • Blowing out through pursed lips provides a resistance to the airflow at the level of the mouth. • This increases pressure in the lungs, keeping them open longer and allowing more oxygen to be used by the lungs. • Use pursed lip breathing with activities that make you short of breath, such as when exercising, bending, or climbing stairs. • If you’re already short of breath, use pursed lip breathing to help you regain control of your breathing. 34


EXERCISE Relax your neck and shoulder muscles. Breathe in slowly through your nose as if smelling a flower. Purse your lips as if you were going to cool off a hot liquid. You should exhale twice as long as you inhale.

INHALE

EXHALE 35


DIAPHRAGMATIC BREATHING The diaphragm is a flat square muscle that divides your chest and abdominal cavities. The goal of diaphragmatic breathing is to regain the mobility and strength of your diaphragm muscle. Many patients use their upper chest muscles to breathe. These muscles are ineffective and when the diaphragm is not used, it becomes weaker.

TRACHEA LUNGS

TRACHEA LUNGS

DIAPHRAGM

DIAPHRAGM

INHALE

EXHALE

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EXERCISE • Sit in a comfortable position with your back supported or rest comfortably in a bed in a semi-reclined position. Loosen your belt and waist button. Do not rest your head; instead lean it forward. This will promote the use of the diaphragm and decrease the use of the upper chest muscles. Relax your neck and shoulder muscles by slowly rolling your shoulders. • Place one hand on your stomach above the naval. Place your other hand on your chest. • Using the hand on your stomach, locate your stomach with a quick “sniff” or a few short pants. • Exhale slowly and gently push in with the hand that is on the stomach. The hand on your chest should be still. • Inhale deeply and allow the hand on your stomach to rise with the expanding diaphragm. • Practice your breathing during three 10 minute sessions, daily. When you become comfortable with this technique, begin to use it all the time. • If you become dizzy or lightheaded, stop the exercise. When your symptoms resolve, continue this technique but slow your breathing.

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BREATHING WITH ACTIVITIES Coordinating Pursed Lip Breathing with activities will conserve energy.

• Widen your arms, holding them farther away from your body, to help open your chest and breathe in through your nose. • Reaching up to comb the top of your hair: Breathe in through your nose as you reach your arm up. Breathe evenly as you comb your hair. Breathe out through pursed lips as you bring the item down. • Reaching up to get an item from the cabinet or a shirt from the closet: Breathe in through your nose as you reach up, and breathe out through pursed lips as you bring the item down. • Putting on a shirt over your head: Breathe in though your nose as you place the shirt over your head. Breathe out through pursed lips as you pull the garment down. 38


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BREATHING WITH ACTIVITIES • Bending to the side while seated to pick up something: Breathe out through pursed lips as you bend sideways. Breathe in through your nose as you sit up. • Twisting around to clean up after using the bathroom: Breathe out through pursed lips as you twist; then breathe in through your nose as you return forward. • The exception to these rules is when you are lifting or pushing something heavy. Lifting or pushing heavy items expends a lot of energy and should be avoided.

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NOTES

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NOTES

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RESTORE your energy POINT OF CONTACT: NAME OF FACILITY: PHONE NUMBER: ADDRESS:

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Energy Conservation  

Energy saving tips for senior citizens. Brought to you by Restore Therapy Services. http://restoretherapy.com

Energy Conservation  

Energy saving tips for senior citizens. Brought to you by Restore Therapy Services. http://restoretherapy.com

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