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  The  Project   The  first  project  for  this  semester  is  called  ‘Mise-­‐En-­‐Scene’,  which  is  french  for  ‘what’s  in  the   frame’.  Marc  and  Mike  have  asked  us  to  find  three  photographs  and  research  the   photographer  of  the  one  we  choose.  We  then  have  to  shoot  a  1-­‐minute  scene  bringing  the   photo  to  life.  We  have  to  consider  the  aims  of  the  photographer  and  from  there  formulate   our  own  narrative  in  order  to  stimulate  our  own  imagination  and  creative  thinking.      

I   first   selected   a   photograph   by   Diego   Ferrari.   A   photographer   who   I   met   a   couple   of   summer’s   ago   through   a   good   friend.   We   met   at   a   bizarre   exhibition   of   a   photographer   who   lost  her  memory  due  to  falling  off  a  ladder  and  getting  electrocuted  on  holiday  in  Spain.  So   we   chatted   and   exchanged   emails,   I   also   looked   up   his   work   on   ‘Urban   Habitat’   as   it   was   closely  related  to  my  experimental  film  on  ‘London  Metropolis’.     The   second   photograph   that   I   looked   at   was   by   a   wedding   photographer   who   is   based   in   York,   UK,   called   Andy   Gaines.   I   immediately   thought   of   ‘journeys’   when   I   looked   at   his   photograph.   The   third   photo   that   I   looked   at   is   unnamed   and   a   more   experimental   approach   to   Mise-­‐En-­‐ Scene  or   what   is   described   as   ‘the   magical   powers   of   ‘mise-­‐en-­‐scene’   and   ‘cinematic   conjuring’  in  Film  Art  by  Bordwell  and  Thompson.  

  Film  Art-­‐  Bordwell  and  Thompson   Mise-­‐En-­‐Scene  ‘What’s  in  the  frame?’     An   expression   used   to   describe   the   design   aspects   of   a   theatre   or   film   production,   which   essentially   means   “visual   theme”   or   “telling   a   story”—both   in   visually   artful   ways   through   storyboarding,   cinematography   and   stage   design,   and   in   poetically   artful   ways   through   direction.     Mise-­‐en-­‐scène  is  a  French  term  and  originates  in  the  theater.  It  means,  literally,  "put  in  the   scene."  For  film,  it  has  a  broader  meaning,  and  refers  to  almost  everything  that  goes  into  the   composition   of   the   shot,   including   the   composition   itself:   framing,   movement   of   the   camera   and  characters,  lighting,  set  design  and  gen  eral  visual  environment,  even  sound  as  it  helps   elaborate   the   composition.   Mise-­‐en-­‐scène   can   be   defined   as   the   articulation   of   cinematic   space,  and  it  is  precisely  space  that  it  is  about.            

 

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  Choosing  3  Photographs   Three  images  that  I  stumbled  across  whist  doing  a  search  online:   The  first  is  by  Diego  Ferrari  and  is  photographed  at  the  Barbican  Centre.    

 

   

 

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      Ink   in   Glass   could   be   filmed   and   then   the   frame   rate   can   be   manipulated   to   create   a  scene  more  experimental  and  abstract.                                                

 

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  Urban  Habitat:  A  Co-­‐existence  of  the  senses   Diego  Ferrari  Photography     Diego  Ferrari  described  his  work  as  follows:     “In   urban   space   I   see   an   expression   of   a   particular   society’s   values   regarding   democracy,   identity   and   citizenship.   Public   and   private   space   are   key   elements   of   the   imagined   communities   we   call   nations.   This   project,   investigate   the   individual’s   relationship   with   their   private   habitat   and   the   social   built   environment.   From   these   two   realms   we   construct   our   personal  meaning  of  place.  The  private  and  the  social  realm  are  not  segregated,  of  course;   but  the  spatial  ambiguity  created  between  the  personal  subjectivity  and  social  objectivity  is   a   fertile   platform   to   critically   elaborate   a   psychological   as   well   as   bodily   and   metaphysical   relationship  to  space.  A  lived  in  space  always  transcends  geometry  and  measurability.”      

                                 

 

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                          His   work   draws   inspiration   from   Philosophy   and   in   particular,   the   branch   of   Metaphysics,   which  deals  with  how  we  perceive  the  world.     The   Poetics   of   Space   is   a   book   by   Gaston   Bachelard.   Bachelard   applies   the   method   of   phenomenology   to   architecture   basing   his   analysis   not   on   purported   origins   but   on   lived   experience   of   architecture.   He   is   thus   led   to   consider   spatial   types   such   as   the   attic,   the   cellar,  drawers  and  the  like.  This  book  implicitly  urges  architects  to  base  their  work  on  the   experiences  it  will  engender  rather  than  on  abstract  rationales  that  may  or  may  not   affect   viewers  and  users  of  architecture.  It  is  about  the  architecture  of  the  imagination.   Sometimes  the  house  of  the  future  is  better  built,  lighter  and  larger  than  all  the  houses  of  the   past,   so   that   the   image   of   the   dream   house   is   opposed   to   that   of   the   childhood   home….   Maybe  it  is  a  good  thing  for  us  to  keep  a  few  dreams  of  a  house  that  we  shall  live  in  later,   always  later,  so  much  later,  in  fact,  that  we  shall  not  have  time  to  achieve  it.  For  a  house  that   was  final,  one  that  stood  in  symmetrical  relation  to  the  house  we  were  born  in,  would  lead  to   thoughts—serious,   sad   thoughts—and   not   to   dreams.   It   is   better   to   live   in   a   state   of   impermanence  than  in  one  of  finality.   —Gaston  Bachelard,  The  Poetics  of  Space    

   

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Andy  Gaines  Photography   http://andygaines.com/andy-­‐gaines-­‐creative/shed-­‐7-­‐chris-­‐helme-­‐york-­‐barbican-­‐york-­‐ wedding-­‐photographer-­‐mixing-­‐it-­‐up/     Photograph  Untitled   A  gig  in  York,  UK     Although  Andy  Gaines  photograph  may  not  be  as  intellectually  challenging  as  Ferrari’s,  I  am   still  however  drawn  to  the  exciting  possibilities  that  it  holds.  Following  the  movement  of  feet   in  a  subway  could  be  very  challenging  in  terms  of  applying  the  right  technique  and  process.   It  can  formulate  into  an  exciting  piece  of  experimental  cinema.              

                     

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

  Analysis  of  the  photograph:     A  man  going  to  a  gig  in  York,  UK   Subway/train  station     Following  a  person  on  a  journey   Focusing  on  the  feet  and  legs  and  not  the  entire  body   Stranger   Pace  and  rhythm   Beginning  or  end  of  a  journey   Meeting  someone  or  going  home   Do  the  legs  interact  with  other  passengers?   Sense  of  isolation  and  mystery   Rush  hour  or  late  at  night   Peaceful  and  calm   Character    

   

 

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  Every  time  we  use  the  tube,  we  are  surrounded  by  thousands  of  strangers,  most  of  them  we   will   never   see   again.   We   are   merely   feet   and   legs   as   we   travel   around   London   living   our   separate   lives.   We   go   to   work,   to   a   gig,   meet   up   with   a   friend   for   dinner   or   coffee;   we   make   hundreds  of  journeys  in  a  year,  touching  in  and  out.     I  will  follow  these  feet  and  watch  these  legs  at  Kings  Cross  station  as  they  make  their  journey   around  London  on  a  Friday  night.  Their  movement  is  a  mystery  to  me  but  their  presence  is   intriguing.                                            

 

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Preparing  to  film   With   the   use   of   a   steady   cam   and   a   Canon   500D,   the   scene   will   be   shot   at   Mile   End,   Bethnal   Green  or  Stepney  Green  station.   • •

• • • •

I  would  film  a  commuter’s  legs  as  they  step  off  the  train  and  exit  the  station  going   up  the  staircase.     The   scene   will   look   at   how   he   interacts   with   other   legs   that   surround   him   on   the   platform   and   use   that   to   build   up   a   narrative.   Does   he   meet   someone   on   the   platform,  at  the  bottom  of  the  stairs  or  at  the  top  of  the  stairs?  Does  someone  get   close  to  him  and  he  steps  away  or  will  the  camera  watch  him  as  he  moves  in  and  out   from  other  legs.     Film  other  objects  that  may  spontaneously  enter  the  scene.   Place   the   camera   under   a   chair   on   the   platform   to   film   legs   stepping   off   the   train   and  entering  the  train.     Film  the  various  textures  in  close  up  on  the  floor  of  the  platform     Incorporate   varying   speeds   into   the   post-­‐production   stages,   such   as   slow   motion,   reverse  and  increasing  speed.    

The  Steady  Cam    

 

 

I  am  very  lucky  to  get  my  hands  on  one  of  this;  unfortunately  it  is  only  on  loan  from  a  friend.     Changing  the  location  to  film…    

 

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Kings  X  Station  

    Bethnal  Green  Station  

             

 

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Bank/Monument  Station  

              Initially  I  was  considering  constructing  an  ambient  sound  for  the  film  but  the  diegetic  sound   may   suffice.   It   adds   to   the   busy   commuter’s   journey.   The   juxtaposition   of   the   sound   of   people   talking,   train   doors   opening   and   the   infamous   ‘mind   the   gap’   will   help   build   up   my   portrait  of  The  Underground.    

 

Diegetic  Versus  Non-­‐Diegetic  Sound       Diegetic  sound  whose  source  is  visible  on  the  screen  or  whose  source  is  implied  to  be   present  by  the  action  of  the  film:     *  Voices  of  characters     *  sounds  made  by  objects  in  the  story     *  music  represented  as  coming  from  instruments  in  the  story  space   Diegetic  sound  is  any  sound  presented  as  originated  from  source  within  the  film’s  world     Digetic  sound  can  be  either  on  screen  or  off  screen  depending  on  whatever  its  source  is   within  the  frame  or  outside  the  frame.     Another  term  for  diegetic  sound  is  actual  sound    

 

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Diegesis  is  a  Greek  word  for  “recounted  story”     The  film’s  diegesis  is  the  total  world  of  the  story  action       Non-­‐Diegetic  sound  whose  source  is  neither  visible  on  the  screen  nor  has  been  implied  to  be   present  in  the  action:     *  Narrator’s  commentary   *  sound  effects  which  is  added  for  the  dramatic  effect   *  mood  music   Non-­‐diegetic  sound  is  represented  as  coming  from  a  source  outside  story  space.     The  distinction  between  diegetic  and  non-­‐diegetic  sound  depends  on  our  understanding  of   the  conventions  of  film  viewing  and  listening.  We  know  of  that  certain  sounds  are   represented  as  coming  from  the  story  world,  while  others  are  represented  as  coming  from   outside  the  space  of  the  story  events.       A  play  with  diegetic  and  non-­‐diegetic  conventions  can  be  used  to  create  ambiguity  (horror),   or  to  surprise  the  audience  (comedy).        

                                                     

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        Toronto  Street  Art   -­‐Artist  Unknown   Subway  art  has  used  the  underground  as  a  canvas,  another  way  to  explore  the  interaction   with   those   around   us.   There   is   something   quite   intriguing   about   a   subway,   it   seems   to   connect  us  with  the  rest  of  the  world,  with  strangers  but  those  we  share  the  world  with.  We   seldom  talk  and  some  people  we  will  never  see  again.      

  I  have  managed  to  stumble  across  of  couple  of  artists  that  work  around  the  theme  of   journeys.    

David  Nash  on  Journey’s…   David   Nash   is   a   British   sculptor   based   in  Blaenau   Ffestiniog.   Nash   has   worked   worldwide   with  wood,  trees  and  the  natural  environment  capturing  the  theme  of  journey’s  and  space.     Nash’s  adopts  a  more  abstract  perspective  on  journeys;  perhaps  he  is  looking  at  the  spiritual   nature  or  a  life  journey.    

 

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Inspiration  from  Andy  Goldsworthy Andy   Goldsworthy   is   a   British  sculptor,  photographer  and  environmentalist   producing  site-­‐ specific  sculpture   and  land   art  situated   in   natural   and   urban   settings.   I   like   how   he   has   worked   with   natural   materials   to   capture   the   theme   of   journeys.     He   is   interested   in   individual  and  day-­‐to-­‐day  journeys.          

 

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Thinking  about  camera  angles…  

 

 

 

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Reflecting…     Today   I   have   been   editing   my   mise-­‐en-­‐scene   film   and   although   a   little   disappointed   with   what   I   shot,   it   can   still   be   developed   and   seen   as   work   in   progress.   Andy   Gaines   took   the   photo  of  a  man  on  his  way  to  a  gig  in  York.  I  could  have  re-­‐created  that  and  perhaps  filmed   someone  on  his  or  her  way  to  a  gig  in  Brixton  or  Hammersmith  but  would  the  station  have   resembled  the  one  in  the  photo?  It  would  have  also  been  nice  to  follow  someone  with  the   steady   cam   but   as   the   steady   cam   needed   additional   weights   to   support   and   balance   my   camera,   this   was   not   possible.   Also,   due   to   the   amount   of   staff   at   Kings   X   I   would   have   needed  to  gain  permission  to  film  at  the  station.      

 

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