Page 1

THE PIONEER SENIOR ISSUE


~ Saying Goodbye to Maine East ~

Bittersweet Goodbye Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you’ll land among the stars. -Les Brown

Dear SENIORS,

Forty-four minutes a period, nine periods a day, 180 days a year, and four years and 23.5 credits later bring us to what we have been waiting for since the first day we walked into the grand old building at 2601 Dempster: Graduation. Even though many of us are anxious and excited to go our separate ways, let’s remember what we have grown to love these past four years at Maine East. Next year, we won’t be able to walk into a lunch room and order hot Cheetos with cheese, or walk down the hallway hearing someone sing lyrics to a Lil’ Wayne song, or get chased by a hall monitor for not having a pass, or get kicked out of the library for “breathing too loudly”; we will even miss the opportunity to wake up early for a Saturday detention because our cell phone went off during class the day before (silly friends – don’t they know not to call in school!) It seems like just yesterday we stepped foot into this school not knowing where to go or what to think. Do the upperclassmen really throw pennies at freshman? Do they really give out fake elevator passes? Of course, we soon learned that Maine East students save their change for

the vending machines, not ammo, and wouldn’t waste their time making a fake elevator pass when they have two hours of chemistry homework to finish. Now, after four years of hard work we are finally stepping off this roller coaster that has turned us into the people we are today and given us the memories we’ll laugh at in our 40s. With every mistake and triumph, we start new chapters of our lives, yet hopefully keep in mind where we came from. After we leave here, we will step into a world that will look a lot like the hallways we walked in. We will be thankful that we know how to interact with people from many different cultures and backgrounds. There is the sadness of loss, leaving Maine East forever, but the knowledge we have gained here will stay with us. To the class of 2009, with every decision in life there will be the chance for success and failure, admiration and criticism. Success in life comes with experience. Every opportunity teaches us something new, so when we fall down, remember how much you grew from freshman year to senior year. The only way to keep going is to get back up. The last couple years have had a lot of ups and downs, but at the end of the day that’s what makes us who we are. We all know how it feels to laugh, cry, have our first crush, and our first heartbreak. But we have grown to learn that as the world keeps mov-

ing we keep moving with it and sometimes it’s best to laugh at the rumors, forget the drama, and enjoy the moment. I know that I will miss cheering on my friends during their games, walking into Mr. Zielinski’s class and having him explain the first Star Wars episode for half an hour, but most importantly I will miss the delicious food they served in the café. So, thank you Maine East for helping me, teaching me, and loving me. Hopefully our years here at Maine East have prepared us for the challenges we will face down the road. You never know, there may be a future Lil’ Wayne, Tina Fey, U.S. President or even a Michael Phelps. But no matter what, always cherish your memories from Maine East High School. Good Luck and Congratulations Class of 2009, our high school days are forever over. Sincerely, Alessandra N. Incandela Senior Editor

TEN RANDOM FACTS ABOUT GRADUATION BACCALAUREATE: Commencement is when graduates are handed their diplomas and flip their tassels. The Baccalaureate (bàk–ah- láw-ree-aht) is the farewell address recognizing the achievements of the graduating class. HOOD: Hoods on the gowns represented the superior intelligence of Druids (Celtic priests). Now, color on the outer edge of hood symbolizes the type of degree. CLASS RING: Rings were thought to bring eternal life to the Egyptians, victory to the Romans, and represent nobility throughout Europe. DIPLOMA: The term, “hang your sheepskin on the wall,” originates from the fact that diplomas were made of sheepskin. MUSIC: “Pomp and Circumstance.” It was composed by Sir Edward Elgar in 1901 in Liverpool, England. CAP: Caps should be worn horizontally, not tipped, with the point in the center GOWN: Starting in the 1950s, students were given gowns the colors of their school. HAT: Find it after the toss by writing your name with magic marker on masking tape and place the tape on the inside of your hat.

P.S. To the freshmen, sophomores, and juniors: Enjoy high school, but remember that it isn’t everything – the best years are still ahead!

TASSEL: For high school graduation, tassels are normally worn on the right of the hat, then flipped to the left side upon receiving the diploma. TASSEL 2: In college, tassel colors are different for different fields of study.


~ Saying Goodbye to Maine East ~

Mr. Gelz says “It’s time” for his kids, grandkids By Samra Matin

“Sometimes I get e-mails from former students asking, ‘Mr. Gelz, Are you dead?’ I respond with ‘Yes butthead.’” One of several staff members who will leave us at the end of the school year is Mr. Gelz. Having taught at Maine East for 37 years, Mr. Gelz has many fond memories of Maine East. One memory that stands out was the closing of Maine North in 1982, and how well the new students adjusted to Maine East. Another moment that stands out was Hillary Clinton’s visit to Maine East in 1995, during which Mr. Gelz met the current Secretary of State personally. His most positive experiences include the band trips to New Orleans, Florida, and California. These trips allowed for

strong bonds between Mr. Gelz and his band students, most of whom still maintain communication with him. Perhaps most comical is what others will remember about Mr. Gelz. When asked to say a few words about the band director, Fine Arts Department Chair Mr. Ed Eubank breaks into a rendition of the “Teapot Song,” recalling an anecdote about the Rock and Roll Diner at MGM Studios, a stern waitress, and green beans. and Gelz and Eubanks laughing hysterically. “This tale is just one of many that involve Gelz exceptional sense of humor,” Mr. Eubanks says, adding that Mr. Gelz is a wonderful person and will be missed profoundly. So why is Mr. Gelz retiring? According to him, the timing is just right.

“It’s time to retire and spend time with my grandchildren,” he said. He has four children and five grandchildren and he plans to devote a significant amount of time to them after he leaves Maine East. But Mr. Gelz won’t be a stranger to Maine East; he plans to come back as a substitute teacher. He will also be teaching trumpet privately. Mr. Gelz will be remembered as a superb instructor and person by his colleagues and students. “He is a really nice teacher,” said student Karen Ho. “He will be missed.”

The Maine East community offers its deepest thanks to Mr. Gelz for his 37 years of hard work. He has made a noteworthy difference at Maine East.

Mrs. Koss has dedicated 34 years to District 207 By Annie Ziga Mrs. Debra Koss is retiring from Maine East this year, after a career of 34 years of working for District 207. Mrs. Koss began as a substitute teacher at Maine East after doing her student teaching at Maine West. She then became a teacher’s aide in Special Education and worked off campus in many alternative programs for Special Education students. Mrs. Koss found a profession she truly loves and devoted herself to a school that she loves, too. “Maine East chose me, and I am forever grateful that they did,” she said. “I love this school, its history and our beautiful campus.” She also greatly enjoys the diversity and energy of the students she works with every day and the creativity and dedication of Maine East’s staff. Mrs. Koss has thankfully brought so much success to

our school with her many wonderful years hard work. She wants to express a big thank you to all the people who encouraged her to pursue her employment in District 207 and greatly appreciates the day-today enjoyment of working with Ms. Murphy in her classroom with their students. Still relatively young, Mrs. Koss made the decision to retire now so that she can pursue new dreams. After her retirement she plans to continue teaching, this time at night school. She also hopes to kayak the Chicago River this fall and catch up on all of the books that she set aside while working. Mrs. Koss has contributed so much to Maine East and has helped shape it into the great institution that it is today. Although we are sad to see her leave, we will remember everything she has accomplished and wish her the best in pursuing her future dreams.

Mrs. Koss and her assistant, Ms. Murphy, have improved the lives of scores of students at Maine East.


~ Saying Goodbye to Maine East ~

Mrs. Bohlman helped students fit in at M.E. By Jiten Patel

Mrs. Carolyn Bohlman retires this year after two decades of teaching students here at Maine East. She has taught English as a Second Language for over twenty years, which has led her to experience many new cultures and values. Mrs. Bohlman’s students come from a variety of places around the world. Thanks to her efforts, hundreds if not thousands of students have made the successful transition to American high school from foreign lands. In addition to her ESL teaching, she sponsored the Newcomers Club, which promotes unity

and friendship for these new students to Maine East. She has enjoyed all the traditions at Maine East through the years, but notes that “the years have gone

by so quickly!” She particularly enjoyed the visit by Secretary of State Hilary Clinton and has always loved the annual school events.

Another significant role that Mrs. Bohlman has performed so admirably at Maine East for the past several years is that of Publicity Coordinator – writing press releases to inform the local media about the interesting and important events at Maine East. She has loved the opportunity of letting the public know about Maine East students’ special achievements, as well as highlighting important events at our school. Ms. Bohlman will never be forgotten by the countless students she helped to make the transition not only to a new school, but to a completely different life. So many students who

have spent their entire lives in different countries have benefitted from her kindness and generosity. “She was a great influence on my life,” said student Maggie Sobieraj. “I will always remember her for all her hard work at this school. She put a smile on my face every day and taught me to appreciate education so much more.” “Now it’s time to leave,” says Mrs. Bohlman. “Goodbye, Maine East. It has been a great ride.” Goodbye Ms. Bohlman. The ESL department and all of Maine East appreciate the great work you’ve done over these past 20 years and will certainly miss you!

Dr. Lampert’s influence will continue at M.E. By Jenny Krawiec Social worker Dr. Joan Lampert will retire this year after serving the students at Maine East for 24 years. One of the most educated faculty members in the building, Dr. Lampert graduated with Honors from the University of Cincinnati, then earned a Masters Degree in Social Work at the University of Michigan. After that, she earned a Masters Degree in Educational Administration from Roosevelt University and an Ed.D. at Northern Illinois before serving as a Post-Doctorate Visiting Scholar at Harvard University in 1999. One of her favorite aspects of her career at Maine East was “being a part of something that has been

here longer than any of us has been alive.” Although she is retiring from Maine East, she plans to continue teaching at Northwestern University and working at the Department of Leadership at Concordia University in Chicago. Even after her departure, Dr. Lampert’s influence will continue at Maine East with the Freshman Advisory program she started several years ago. It helps students from junior high transition into high school life and has proven to decrease failure rates and increase the sense of belonging for freshmen at Maine East. Don’t worry – Lampert won’t have any trouble filling her time. As she says, “I’m a complex human being with tons of things

to do.” She would like to spend more time with her her daughters, Heather and Shannon, as well as her husband of 43 years, Bill. She and Bill will also continue running their small manufacturing business.

Dr. Lampert’s legacy will live on after her as she continues to positively affect others with one of her favorite things to do: laughing out loud. Maine East will miss Dr. Lampert’s dedication,

loyalty, and overall positive outlook towards life. “Leaving here is a little scary,” says Dr. Lampert. “But going on to other opportunities is exciting.” Thank you Dr. Lampert and good luck in the future.


~ Saying Goodbye to Maine East ~

Mrs. Litwin will head for warmer weather By Vanessa Rosario “I’ve been here at Maine East for 17 years, and I feel so lucky to have been here,” said Mrs. Lesley Litwin, who has been a dedicated teacher in the Special Education and Math Departments at Maine East. Mrs. Litwin is sad about leaving, but she feels very fortunate to have been able to work in such a remarkable building. She is proud of her work and thankful for the opportunity to work at 2601 Dempster. “Maine East is full of

extremely talented educators and staff,” she said. She has also felt privileged to work with a unique and wonderful student body. She loved the diversity and being surrounded on a daily basis with students who were willing and wanting to learn. In Mrs. Litwin’s eyes there is “No Quit” in our Demon student body. “They’re great kids, whom I will definitely miss.” Mrs. Litwin is retiring to cut back on her workload. However, she would also like to spend more time with the people she loves, and doing the things she loves doing.

She is preparing to move this summer to Nevada, where she and her husband have purchased a new home. Although Mrs. Litwin loves it in Illinois, she feels she is getting too old for the cold Chicago winters and really looks forward to the non-stop warm weather. Everyone here at Maine East who has had the pleasure of working and getting to know Mrs. Litwin will miss her greatly. We thank her and wish her the best of luck on her new home, and life-style, and hopes she enjoys her retired years.

Dr. Ken Wallace to lead District 207 By Yogi Patel On July 1st, Dr. Ken Wallace will become the new Superintendent of District 207 upon the retirement of current Superintendent Dr. Joel Morris. Wallace has served as the district 207’s Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction for the past four years. “As far as I’m concerned, this is as good as it gets,” Wallace said. “We have a great Board, great teachers, great students and families, great communities and tradition, and it’s the kind of place where a person can come in and be successful over the long run because of the type of support that District 207 offers. I feel very fortunate and blessed. It’s on a short

list of the best superintendent jobs available. If I have learned anything in my four years in 207, it’s that you’re only limited by your imagination. You can’t say that about very many districts.” Wallace was one of 40 applicants from 10 states chosen by the Board of Education. The choice was “no surprise” according to Board of Education President Joann Braam. “We know him well,” said Braam. “He is a bright, accomplished leader with a proven track record. He embraces collaborative decision-making and is passionate about making sure every student succeeds. We’re very fortunate to have Ken as our new superintendent.” Wallace sees District 207 as one of the most in-

teresting districts in the country. He believes 207 has a proud tradition and provides an excellent education for all of its students. Specifically, Wallace appreciates Maine East’s friendly and inviting environment. “The school makes people feel at home,” he said. Wallace attended the University of Southern Indiana where he received a B.S. in English and a M.S. in English Education. Later Wallace received a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership from Indiana State University. ­ One of Wallace’s priorities is to continue updating the classrooms of District 207 to meet the technological needs of 21st century learners.

Dr. Ken Wallace will be the Superintendent of District 207 beginning July 1.


The Pioneer

Page 6

Senior Issue 2009


Senior Issue 2009

Page 7

The Pioneer

Senior Send-off


Page 8

The Pioneer

Senior Issue 2009

Senior Honors Night

Maine East honors its best and brightest TOP FIVE PERCENT OF THE CLASS OF 2009 Preksha Agnihotri Jessica McMillan Rose-Ann Aragon Rehan Nizamuddin Mohammed Baqui Ravi Patel Roxanne De Leon David Perez Roberta Dume Stephanie Peter Zafreen Farishta Sophia Rafiqi Jayati Gohel David Sanchez-Aguilera James Kelly Gregory Skoczek Seul (Kathy) Ku Pete Srisuk Elma Lugonjic Blazej Szymoniak Ryan Malitz Melvin Thomas

Illinois State Scholars Tina Aggarwal Preksha Agnihotri Rose-Ann Aragon Agata Bogucka Patrycja Bronowicz Michelle Buckle Sabarish Chockalingam Roxanne De Leon Roberta Dume Tomasz Dziergas Zafreen Farishta Jayati Gohel Meeshali Gupta Michael Guzzarde Kevin Ho Dong Hoon Jang James Kelly Jelena Krstic Seul Ku Bradley Langlo Maxwell Lewis Marian Lopez Brian Lov Michael Lucki Elma Lugonjic

Ryan Malitz Bradley Markovich Jessica McMillan Beth Ann Melnick Allison Nettnin Rehan Nizamuddin Arielle Ordonez Kaushal Patel Ravi Patel Jayson-Angel Peralta David Perez Stephanie Peter John Pondo Sophia Rafiqi Aaron Reinhart David Sanchez-Aguilera Sarika Simon Gregory Skoczek Pete Srisuk Joanna Szewczuk Katrina Tan Melvin Thomas Lian Weinstein Wun-Yan Wong Jennifer Youkhana

President’s Award for Educational Excellence Tina Aggarwal Preksha Agnihotri Rose-Ann Aragon Donna Aziz Naina Baledina Mohammed Baqui Klaudia Bartyzel Ankita Bhagat Agata Bogucka Patrycja Bronowicz Michelle Buckle Albert Cho Harish Chockalingam Sabarish Chockalingam Brenda Cruz Roxanne De Leon Roberta Dume Tomasz Dziergas Zafreen Farishta Jayati Gohel Meeshali Gupta Michael Guzzarde Kevin Ho Gemmy Hormese Idia Ifianayi Alessandra Incandela Dong Hoon Jang Zhivko Kamenov James Kelly Jelena Krstic Seul Ku Dorota Kubowicz Bradley Langlo Jong Lee Marian Lopez Brian Lov Michael Lucki Elma Lugonjic Farrah Malik Ryan Malitz Luella Mascarenhas Steevenson Maurissaint Jessica Mcmillan

Beth Ann Melnick Ritta Merza Karolina Mis Battulga Myagmarjav Allison Nettnin Rehan Nizamuddin Guadalupe Olmos Arielle Ordonez Ema Pajic Medgine Papillon Akshar Patel Kaushal Patel Ravi Patel Shreyangiben Patel Urvika Patel David Perez Stephanie Peter Ann Plamoottil Magdalena Plonka John Pondo Hinaben Punjabi Abdulmateen Qaisar Sophia Rafiqi Aaron Reinhart David Sanchez-Aguilera Byeongguen Shin Sarika Simon Gregory Skoczek Pete Srisuk Joanna Swiatek Joanna Szewczuk Blazej Szymoniak Rima Tailor Bansari Thakkar Melvin Thomas Stacey Thomas Bao Tran Maryam Vali Lian Weinstein Kevin Williams Wun-Yan Wong Jennifer Youkhana


Senior Issue 2009

Page 9

The Pioneer

DEPARTMENT AWARD WINNERS The graduating senior who has excelled the most in a particular department at Maine East earns the Department Award, voted by the faculty of each department. This highly coveted honor recognizes truly exceptional accomplishment throughout several years of study.

Applied Technology

Akshar Patel

Business Education

Family & Consumer Science

Robert Lewosz

Allison Nettnin

Samantha Lynn

Stephanie Chan

Jinsol Won

Beth Ann Melnick Speech Arts

Mathematics

Jessica Demars

Kathy Ku

Ryan Malitz

Tiffany Jones

James Kelly

Foreign Language

Physical Education

Tijo Jose

Art

Science

Music

Social Science

English

Female Athlete of the Year

Shreyangiben Patel ESL

Kathy Ku

Male Athlete of the Year


The Pioneer

Page 10

Senior Issue 2009

Department Merit Awards

Each department at Maine East may grant up to three Merit Awards to individuals who have completed at least two credits of course work in the department. Recipients have demonstrated either excellent performance, unusual service, special accomplishment, or significant improvement in the department giving the award.

APPLIED ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY Applied Technology John Pondo Christopher Scanlon Zafreen Farishta Business Division Farrah Malik Shivam Patel Arjun Verma

MATHEMATICS David Sanchez-Aguilera Pete Srisuk Melvin Thomas

FINE ARTS Art Department Roxanne De Leon Seena Mathew Sahak Zakarian

Music Department Rose-Ann Aragon Michal Talarczyk Beth Ann Melnick

Speech Arts Department Family & Consumer Sciences Elma Lugonjic Jacquelyn Fernandez Joanna Szewczuk Natalia Adamovic Vivianne Velazquez Eileen Rayahin ENGLISH Stacey Thomas Roxanne De Leon Jessica McMillan

FOREIGN LANGUAGE Elma Lugonjic Brian Lov Roberta Dume

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Farrah Malik Aaron Reinhart Jennifer Lescano SCIENCE Melvin Thomas Rehan Nizamuddin Roxanne De Leon SOCIAL SCIENCE Ravi Patel Preksha Agnihotri Tijo Jose

Good Will Awards Good Will Awards are given to those students of the senior class who have done the most, as determined through nomination by the faculty and election by the senior class and faculty, to promote good will at Maine East and in Maine Township.

Rose-Ann Aragon Tijo Jose Stephanie Chan James Kelly Alessandra Incandela Brian Lov Jelena Krstic Ravi Patel Phebe Philip David Sanchez-Aguilera


Senior Issue 2009

Page 11

Clark Duncan Scholarship Allison Nettnin

D.A.R. Good Citizenship Award James Kelly Ron Heiser Memorial Scholarships Alyssa Jenrick Joshua Myers

Robert O. Grottola Memorial Scholarship Roberta Dume

Marine Corps Distinguished Athlete Award Agnieszka Dadej Christopher Scanlon

SJB Scholarship Roxanne DeLeon Blazej Szymoniak

Marine Corps Distinguished Scholarship Award Seul (Kathy) Ku Ravi Patel Semper Fidelis Award Rose-Ann Aragon Bradley Langlo

Park Ridge Pan Hellenic Award Samantha Lynn

Assoc. of Illinois Townships Committees on Youth Ronique Shaw

Chick Evans Caddie Scholarship Erick Garcia

Rotary International Club of Glenview Ryan Malitz

Army Reserve National Scholar Athlete James Kelly

Maine Township District 207 Educational Foundation Scholarship Preksha Agnihotri 1983 Scholarship Amanda Grzetic

The Pioneer

Park Ridge Juniors & Foundation Scholarship Blazej Szymoniak

Charles Himel Scholarship Preksha Agnihotri Blazej Szymoniak

Fine Arts Boosters Scholarships Art – Roxanne De Leon Music – Jinsol Won Speech Arts – Ronique Shaw

National Honor Society Scholarship Farrah Malik

Senior Service Scholarships

Roxanne De Leon • Seena Mathew Preksha Agnihotri • Kevin Ho Sadia Younus

Jiffy Lube Scholarship Roxanne DeLeon

College, Organization, & Community Scholarships

Stephanie Chan Crystal Cisneros Julia Comia Michael Cristino Cameron Davis Erick Garcia Alessandra Incandela

Marian Lopez Elma Lugonjic Allison Nettnin Magdalena Plonka Birju Shah Wun-Yan Wong Sahak Zakarian‑

Athletic Awards

DECA Service Scholarship

Sam C. Marzulo Achievement Award

Helen Dobbins MTA Scholarship

Sam C. and Ruth E. Marzulo Achievement Award

E.C. Hildebrandt Scholarship

Al Carstens Athletic Leadership Award

Farrah Malik Tijo Jose

Jayati Gohel Samantha Lynn Christopher Ripple Jayati Gohel

Fawaad Ahmed

Jennifer Lescano

Blazej Szymoniak


Page 12

The Pioneer

Senior Issue 2009

National Honor Society

Established in 1921, The National Honor Society (NHS) is one of the nation’s premier organizations to recognize outstanding high school students. More than just an honor roll, the NHS serves to honor those students who have demonstrated excellence in the areas of Scholarship, Leadership, Service, and Character. These characteristics have been associated with membership in the organization since its beginning. NHS chapters are found in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, many U.S. Territories, and Canada. Today, it is estimated that more than one million students participate in activities of the NHS, challenging themselves to develop further through active involvement in school activities and community service. For more information, visit the NHS website: www.nhs.us.

Maine East NHS Class of 2009 Tina Aggarwal Preksha Agnihotli Rose-Ann Aragon Naina Baledina Ankita Bhagat Alben Cho Roxanne-Milli De-Leon Roberta Dume Zafreen Farishta Jayati Gohel Meeshali Gupta

Jelena Krstic Seul(Kathy) Ku Malian Lopez Brian Lov Elma Lugonjic Farrah Malik Ryan Malitz Jessica Mcmillan Karolina Mis Allison Nettnin Rehan Nizamuddin

Ravi Patel Urvika Patel Stephanie Peter John Pando Sophia Rafiqi David Sanchez-Aguilera Sarika Simon Katrina Tan Melvin Thomas Stacey Thomas Bao Tran

Sadia Younus James Kelly Kaushal Patel Jennifer Youkhana Wun-Yan Wong Akshar Patel Gemmy Hormese Lian Weinstein Arlelle Ordonez Kevin Ho


Senior Issue 2009

Senior Memories Page 13

What is your favorite door to exit the building? “Fieldhouse” -Jenny Scaletta

“Bus shelter doors” -Rafaela Sahagun “That one door” -Nick Barlock

What was your most embarassing moment at Maine East? “Freshman year, when I walked into my flap bio class at the regular bell time and was 20 minutes late.” -Maddie Buttitta

“Falling into the Chicago River on an APES fieldtrip.” -Ayisha Zec “All my prom dates.” -Shane Long

What teacher would you like to be like if you were a teacher? ~

“Senor Cintado” -Roberta Dume “Mr. Tomasiewicz” -Akshar Patel “A mix between Mr. Z and Mrs. Caliendo” -Rocky Ruiz

The Pioneer

What is the best book you were forced to read?

One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest -Joe Lucchesi Freakonomics -Nick Nitti To Kill a Mockingbird -Phebe Phillip

What was the best quote you heard from a teacher? “You are here physically, but mentally you are off into Lake Michigan.” -Mr. Brown “Students don’t get grades, they earn them.” -Mr. Zielinski ‘When you look in a concave mirror, you will see that it is enlarged, erect, and real.” -Mr. Fedewa “Every day is a Holiday.” -Papa O (Coach Olson’s dad)

Where is your favorite hangout spot at school? “Parking lot” -Tia Soumbasis “Kristina/Alessandra’s locker” -Rita Simon “Fedewa’s room” -Allison Nettnin


The Pioneer

Page 14

Senior Issue 2009

SENIOR SUPERLATIVES

Class Clowns

Best Hair

Kristina Louras Thach Tran

Biggest Brain Kathy Ku Melvin Thomas

Tiffany Jones Eman Montes

Next Talk Show Hosts

Biggest Flirt

Alessandra Incandela Spiros Loukopoulos

Abby Blan Armando Figueroa

Most Artistic

Roxanne De Leon Sahak Zakarian

Most Fashionable Tia Soumbasis Cesar Yanez

Biggest Jock Lauren Rossi Josh Meyers

Most Outgoing Class Couple Jenny Zajac & Brad Markovich

Next Bill Gates (Most likely to be a billionaire)

Ayisha Zec Shane Long

Farrah Malik Tijo Jose

Best Friends

Danny Radovanovic Rocky Ruiz

Most Contagious Laugh Albert Cariaga Arjun Verma

Knows Everything About Everyone Labrini Giannakopoulos Sherif Aly

Next American Idol Natalia Florczyk Anthony Sanders

Most likely to be late to Graduation Agata Bogucka Danny Radovanovic

Best Twins

Raquel & Rachel Barkan


Senior Issue 2009

Page 15

The Pioneer

COLLEGES – ALPHABETICAL BY NAME

NATALIA ADAMOVIC ANGELICA ADAP SAHAR AFSHAN TINA AGGARWAL PREKSHA AGNIHOTRI GLORIA AGUILAR-GUANO MOHAMMED AHMED ALEXANDRIA AL-BAZI PREETHU ALEX SHERIF ALY TABISH ANSARI NICKOLAS G. APERGIS ROSE-ANN ARAGON JAPHLET ARANAS, JR. STEPHANIE ARAUJO ANTON ATANASOV DONNA ROSE AZIZ PRABHJOT BAINS ERIK BALAGA CHRISTINE BALDERAS NAINA BALEDINA RHENESSA BALLESTEROS RUBINA BANU MOHAMMED BAQUI RACHEL BARKAN RAQUEL BARKAN NICHALOS BARLOCK KLAUDIA BARTYZEL FRANK BELIZAIRE ALAN BETANCE ANKITA BHAGAT SHEHZAD BHAYANI AMALIA BIR ABEER BLAN ETHAN BODZIN AGATA BOGUCKA NEMANJA BOJIC KARISHMA BRAHMBHATT PATRYCJA BRONOWICZ MICHELLE BUCKLE SARIQ BUKHARI ZARIN BUSHRA JULIANA BUTTITTA MADELEINE BUTTITTA ROCKY CAMARILLO ALBERT CARIAGA SALVATORE CARUSO LILIAN CASTILLO STEPHANIE CHAN AMITH CHANDY CHRISTIAN CHAVERO ALBERT CHO HARISH CHOCKALINGAM SABARISH CHOCKALINGAM AVADH CHOKSHI REENA CHRISTIAN SONIA CHROSTOWSKI JOSEPH CIMINELLO CRYSTAL CISNEROS JEFFREY COLLINS JULIA COMIA DERRICK CONTRERAS MICHAEL CRISTINO BRENDA CRUZ

Northeastern Illinois University Oakton Community College International Academy of Design and Technology University of Illinois at Chicago Loyola University Chicago Wilbur Wright College Elmhurst College Northeastern Illinois University Saint Augustine College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Lewis University University of Illinois Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Loyola University Chicago University of Illinois at Chicago Oakton Community College University of Illinois Millikin University Millikin University Western Michigan University Carthage College Oakton Community College City College DePaul University Northwestern Business College - Southwestern Campus Northeastern Illinois University Northeastern Illinois University United States Marine Corps Recruiter University of Iowa Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Illinois Institute of Technology Pennsylvania State University Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Virginia Western Comm. College Virginia Western Comm. College University of Illinois at Chicago Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College University of Illinois at Chicago Oakton Community College Oakton Community College University of Illinois University of Illinois at Chicago University of Illinois at Chicago Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Northern Illinois University Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Universal Technical Institute Blackburn College Lake Forest College Carthage College Oakton Community College

CARLOS ANTONIO CRUZ Oakton Community College KIRSTIE ANN CUA University of Illinois at Chicago ALEXANDER CZUBAK North Park University AGNIESZKA DADEJ Lake Forest College AYA DAJANI William Rainey Harper College KAMRAN DARAMJEE Oakton Community College SOLONGO DASHZEZEK Oakton Community College CAMERON DAVIS Universal Technical Institute DWIGHT DAVIS Northern Illinois University ROXANNE DE-LEON Brown University JESSICA DEMARS William Rainey Harper College JENNICA DIMAILIG Trinity International University MIRJANA DIMITRIC Northeastern Illinois University NICHOLAS DIMOULIS DePaul University RICA MAE DIONISIO Oakton Community College ANKIT DIXIT Oakton Community College MERCEDES DOZIE College of DuPage ROBERT DOZIE William Rainey Harper College ROBERTA DUME Lake Forest College PAOULA DYANOVA Roosevelt University PATRYK DZIEGLEWICA Columbia College TOMASZ DZIERGAS University of Illinois VASYL DZIVORONYUK Universal Technical Institute RACHEL ENBLOM University of Illinois at Chicago DONNELLE ESDICUL University of Illinois at Chicago ANDREA FALCONI Oakton Community College ZAFREEN FARISHTA Grinnell College JACQUELYN FERNANDEZ Southern Illinois University ARMANDO FIGUEROA Oakton Community College NATALIA FLORCZYK Lincoln College AMANDA FORNECK Northern Illinois University NIKITA GANDHI Oakton Community College ERICK GARCIA University of Illinois ERIKA GATO Northeastern Illinois University ERVIN-JOSHUA GAYAPA Northern Illinois University JACKSON GEORGE Oakton Community College JOBIL GEORGE Oakton Community College MEGHAN GERMAINE Oakton Community College SHOAIB GHALIB Oakton Community College LABRINI GIANNAKOPOULOS Oakton Community College JAYATI GOHEL Northeastern Illinois University SARAH GOLENIA The Illinois Institute of Art-Schaumburg JULIE GONZALEZ Oakton Community College LILIA GONZALEZ Oakton Community College HENRI GONZALEZ-VALEZQUE Oakton Community College BRIAN GREENBERG Oakton Community College MIRSADA GRIZIC The Illinois Institute of Art-Schaumburg BARTOSZ GRONKIEWICZ Oakton Community College KYLE GROSSE EMT School AMANDA GRZETIC Northeastern Illinois University MEESHALI GUPTA Drake University GLADYS GUZMAN Missionary Work MICHAEL GUZZARDE DePaul University VITALIY HAFYCH Oakton Community College LINNEA HERNANDEZ Oakton Community College Oliverio HERNANDEZ-CISNERO Lincoln Technical Institute-Chicago SERGIO HERRERA Oakton Community College KEVIN HO University of Illinois GEMMY HORMESE Oakton Community College DEREK HOWARD Oakton Community College ALEKSANDER HRNJAK Oakton Community College NASIR HUSSAIN Marquette University IDIA IFIANAYI University of Illinois ALESSANDRA INCANDELA Columbia College LIYA ISSAC Oakton Community College JENI JAMES Oakton Community College


The Pioneer

ORNINA JANDO DARIUSZ JANDURA DONG JANG ADRIANNA JAWORSKY-FORTE LUKASZ JEDRYCHA ALYSSA JENRICK RADU JENTIMIR MIRELA JEZERAK JACOB JONES TIFFANY JONES TIJO JOSE JEFFREY JOSEPH JESSICA JOSEPH JIBIT JOY MUHAMMAD JUNAID CYNTHIA JUSTINIEN AIDA KAEWWILAI ZHIVKO KAMENOV ARAN KAMRANPOUR DHRUV KAVI ROSE KAYE JAMES KELLY HANA KHALED GEORGIA KHAMO SHAHREQ KHAN NEKOLLE KHVILOVSKY BRIAN KIM TSU-YU KO AGNIESZKA KOROL JULIE KROHN JELENA KRSTIC NELYA KRYSHCHUK SEUL(KATHY) KU DOROTA KUBOWICZ ELVIS KUJUKOVIC AID KURTOVIC CRYSTAL KURUVILLA ARKADIUSZ KUSIAK ANGIE LALL LAUREN LALUZ BRADLEY LANGLO JONG SEOK LEE JENNIFER LESCANO KORI LEVY ROBERT LEWOSZ JOHN LEYNES JOSHUA LINDNER SHANE LONG MARIAN LOPEZ SPIROS LOUKOPOULOS CHRISTOULA LOURAS BRIAN LOV JOSEPH LUCCHESI ROI-CEDRIC LUCENA MICHAEL LUCKI ELMA LUGONJIC SAMANTHA LYNN LUISEL-AYBIL MACATUAL HANAN MADBOULY FARRAH MALIK RYAN MALITZ PETER MARES BRADLEY MARKOVICH JACQUESLEAN MARSALIS SARA MARTINEZ LUELLA MASCARENHAS

Page 16

Oakton Community College Oakton Community College University of Illinois Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Illinois State University Oakton Community College Northeastern Illinois University Oakton Community College William Rainey Harper College DePaul University University of Illinois at Chicago Saint Xavier University Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College University of Illinois at Chicago Oakton Community College University of Illinois at Chicago Northern Illinois University Northwestern University Community College of the CUNY-Manhattan Oakton Community College Dominican University Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Carroll University (Wisconsin) University of Illinois at Chicago Harvard University Oakton Community College Triton College Oakton Community College University of Illinois at Chicago Oakton Community College University of Illinois at Chicago Marquette University Marquette University University of Minnesota – Twin Cities University of Illinois at Chicago Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design Kendall College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Loyola University Chicago Northeastern Illinois University Oakton Community College University of Illinois Carthage College Oakton Community College Loyola University Chicago Loyola University Chicago Bradley University Oakton Community College Oakton Community College University of Illinois at Chicago University of Chicago William Rainey Harper College Oakton Community College National Guard City Year Los Angeles Oakton Community College

Senior Issue 2009

BRIAN MATHEW SEENA MATHEW JESSICA MCMILLAN MORGAN MCMILLIAN KURT MEISTER BETH ANN MELNICK RITTA MERZA IOANA-DIANA MIHULET KAROLINA MIS LETICIA MONTESINOS ZULEYMA MONTESINOS JOSE MONTIEL ANGIE MOON MAIDELY MORENO SAAD MUGHAL SERGIO MURO SYEDA MUZAFFAR JOSHUA MYERS BAYARSAIKHAN NADMID MARIA NAJARRO ALLISON NETTNIN NICK NICHOLOPOULOS FELICIA NIKOLAOU MICHAEL NITTI NICHOLAS NITTI REHAN NIZAMUDDIN JANET NUNEZ VERSA ODESHO GEORGE ODICHO GUADALUPE OLMOS ARIELLE ORDONEZ RITA OSTASZ EMA PAJIC STEPHANIE PALAGUACHI MEDGINE PAPILLON ERWIN PASIA GEOMIL PASIA ADIL PATEL AKSHAR PATEL DHRUVIT PATEL DIXITA PATEL HARDIK PATEL JAY PATEL JOYAL PATEL KAMAL PATEL KAUSHAL PATEL KRUNAL PATEL MIRAJ PATEL RAVI PATEL SHITAL PATEL SHIV PATEL SHIVAM PATEL SHREYANGIBEN PATEL URVIKA PATEL VAIBHAV THAKOR PATEL JAYSON-ANGEL PERALTA DAVID PEREZ DAVID PETER STEPHANIE PETER PHEBE PHILIP SONU PHILIPOSE JASON PILLAI ANN PLAMOOTTIL MAGDALENA PLONKA JACINTA POLICHT SUDEEP POLUDASU JOHN PONDO

DePaul University University of Illinois at Chicago Vanderbilt University Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Millikin University Oakton Community College Harrington Inst. of Interior Design Loyola University Chicago University of Illinois at Chicago Oakton Community College Oakton Community College University of Illinois at Chicago Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College William Rainey Harper College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Allegheny College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Machine Operator Oakton Community College University of Illinois Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Trinity International University Loyola University Chicago Marquette University Wright College Northeastern Illinois University William Rainey Harper College University of Illinois at Chicago Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Illinois Institute of Technology Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College University of Illinois at Chicago William Rainey Harper College Oakton Community College DePaul University Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Northwestern University Oakton Community College Tallahassee Community College Northern Illinois University Oakton Community College University of Illinois at Chicago Saint Louis University University of Illinois at Chicago University of Illinois Oakton Community College Knox College Carthage College Oakton Community College University of Illinois at Chicago Oakton Community College University of Illinois at Chicago North Park University Knox College Milwaukee School of Engineering


Senior Issue 2009

LAURA POP RAHUL PRAJAPATI TERESA PRZYBYSLAWSKI ADRIANA PULIDO-MEDINA HINABEN PUNJABI UTKARSHKUMAR PUNJABI ABDULMATEEN QAISAR DANIEL RADOVANOVIC SOPHIA RAFIQI EILEEN RAYAHIN MA.CECILIA REGASPI AARON REINHART CHRISTOPHER RIPPLE ANDRAE ROBINSON DANIEL ROJAS-BAZAN JASMINE ROMERO KARINE ROSIME LAUREN ROSSI PAUL RUKAWICZKIN KRZYSZTOF RYGIEL RAFAELA SAHAGUN-VELASCO ALAA SALEH VASILIKI SAMIOTAKIS SAMCY SAMUEL NATHALIE SANABRIA DAVID SANCHEZ-AGUILERA JENNIFER SCALETTA CHRISTOPHER SCANLON ARIANA SERNA BIRJU SHAH RONIQUE SHAW BYEONGGUEN SHIN KELLY SHORT OMERA SIDDIQ JUAN SILVA RITA SIMON SARIKA SIMON MANSI SINGAPORI JATINDER SINGH GREGORY SKOCZEK KEVIN SLEWO LATOYA SMELLIE ISAK SONG RUCHIR SONI STAMATIA SOUMBASIS PETE SRISUK MARIAM SUBHANI

Page 17

Northeastern Illinois University Oakton Community College Northeastern Illinois University Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Loyola University Chicago Columbia College Northwestern University Oakton Community College Oakton Community College University of Illinois Augustana College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College The Illinois Institute of Art Northwestern University University of Kansas Dominican University University of Illinois at Chicago Oakton Community College Northeastern Illinois University Oakton Community College William Rainey Harper College Oakton Community College Brown University Northeastern Illinois University Northeastern Illinois University Oakton Community College St. Louis College of Pharmacy California State University, Northridge University of Illinois at Chicago Carroll University (Wisconsin) Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Northeastern Illinois University University of the Sciences in Philadelphia Loyola University Chicago Wyotech Institute University of Illinois Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Dominican University University of Illinois Oakton Community College

The Pioneer

PURA SUGADUGA MENSUR SULIC JENISH SURATI JOANNA SWIATEK SANDRA SWIETLIK JOANNA SZEWCZUK PAWEL SZYMANSKI BLAZEJ SZYMONIAK RIMA TAILOR MICHAL TALARCZYK KATRINA TAN BANSARI THAKKAR MELVIN THOMAS STACEY THOMAS MILAN TIJANIC BAO TRAN SAMAD USMANI BENEDICTO UY JOANN VACHACHIRA MARYAM VALI ANSUMOL VALLIKATTUCHIRA ALVIN VARGHESE VIVIANNE VELAZQUEZ ARJUN VERMA RASHIED VILLARINO CHERRIE-LYNE VIRAY JOSHUA VIRUET JESSICA VOEGTLE RIDDHI WAGADIA DAVID WAITE DANIEL WALKER BARTOSZ WARJAS LIAN WEINSTEIN KRYSTIAN WIDLAK WOJCIECH WILCZYNSKI KEVIN WILLIAMS DANHI WILSON DANIEL WITKUS JINSOL (JENNY) WON WUN-YAN WONG CESAR YANEZ JENNIFER YOUKHANA SADIA YOUNUS ARTHUR YUROV JENNY ZAJAC SAHAK ZAKARIAN AYISHA ZEC FAIZAN ZIKARIA

Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Northern Illinois University Illinois State University Oakton Community College University of Illinois University of Illinois University of Illinois at Chicago Marquette University University of Illinois at Chicago Drake University University of Illinois at Chicago Carthage College Loyola University Chicago Oakton Community College Carthage College Bradley University Northeastern Illinois University Oakton Community College College of Southern Nevada Illinois State University Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Northeastern Illinois University Oakton Community College University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee Oakton Community College Oakton Community College Loyola University Chicago Oakton Community College Oakton Community College University of Illinois Ashland University Oakton Community College Illinois State University Michigan State University Carthage College University of Illinois University of Illinois at Chicago University of Illinois at Chicago School of the Art Institute of Chicago School of the Art Institute of Chicago Dominican University Oakton Community College

The ACT is one key to get into your dream college By Lance Lindsey One of the most important aspects of your college application is your score on the ACT test. Preparing for this test is crucial and can dramatically affect your chances of getting into the college you want to attend after Maine East. Thankfully, there are several resources available to help you do your best on this important test. One of the most important things you can do to prepare for your

ACT is very simple: do all of your homework. Since the ACT is based partly on the skills and knowledge you should be learning in your classes, you will be more knowledgeable, and more prepared, if you do your homework. Another way to improve your chances of ACT success is to take an ACT Prep class, (some of these classes are available through Maine East). There are also many ACT Prep books available at Barnes & Noble, Books A Million, and even

Wal-Mart. Hint: if spending any money is a problem, ask to borrow an older student’s ACT Prep book that he or she won’t need anymore. The most proven way to improve your ACT Test score is to take practice tests. This cannot be overemphasized -- taking practice tests will not only increase your knowledge in the relevant subject areas, it will make you more comfortable with the test format and reduce your stress levels when you take the test for real.

Here are some free websites that for ACT preparation and to assist in your search for a school once you get past the ACTs: www.number2.com www.collegezone.com www.collegeboard.com www.actstudent.org www.march2success.com www.testprep.sparknotes.com www.highereducationstation.org www.4tests.com www.act.org


Page 18

The Pioneer

Senior Issue 2009

COLLEGES – ALPHABETICAL BY COLLEGE

Allegheny College

College of So. Nevada

ALLISON NETTNIN

ALVIN VARGHESE

International Acad. of Design and Technology SAHAR AFSHAN

Ashland University DANHI WILSON

Augustana College CHRISTOPHER RIPPLE

Blackburn College JULIA ANN COMIA

Community Coll. of the CUNY – Manhattan HANA KHALED

Bradley University JOANN VACHACHIRA SAMANTHA LYNN

Brown University

DAVID SANCHEZ-AGUILERA ROXANNE DE LEON

Columbia College ALESSANDRA INCANDELA DANIEL RADOVANOVIC PATRYK DZIEGLEWICA

DePaul University ANKITA BHAGAT BRIAN MATHEW KAUSHAL PATEL MICHAEL GUZZARDE NICHOLAS DIMOULIS TIJO JOSE

Dominican University AYISHA ZEC PAUL RUKAWICZKIN SHAHREQ KHAN STAMATIA SOUMBASIS

Drake University MEESHALI GUPTA MELVIN THOMAS

California State University – Northridge

Elmhurst College

RONIQUE SHAW

MOHAMMED AHMED

Carroll University (Wisconsin)

EMT SCHOOL

JELENA KRSTIC KELLY MARIE SHORT

Carthage College

KYLE GROSSE

Grinnell College ZAFREEN FARISHTA

BENEDICTO UY CESAR YANEZ JOSEPH LUCCHESI KLAUDIA BARTYZEL MICHAEL CRISTINO MILAN TIJANIC PHEBE PHILIP

Harrington Institute of Interior Design

City College

Illinois Institute of Technology

ALAN BETANCE

City Colleges of Chicago, Wilbur Wright College GLORIA ESTEFANIA AGUILAR-GUANO

College of DuPage MERCEDES DOZIE

IOANA-DIANA MIHULET

Harvard University

Kendall College

Millikin University BETH ANN MELNICK RACHEL BARKAN RAQUEL BARKAN

ROBERT LEWOSZ

Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design

Knox College

KORI LEVY

STEPHANIE PETER SUDEEP POLUDASU

Lake Forest College

Milwaukee School of Engineering JOHN PONDO

AGNIESZKA DADEJ DERRICK CONTRERAS ROBERTA DUME

JACQUESLEAN MARSALIS

Lewis University

North Park University

NICKOLAS APERGIS

ALEXANDER CZUBAK JACINTA POLICHT

Lincoln College

National Guard

NATALIA FLORCZYK

Northeastern Illinois University

Lincoln Technical Institute-Chicago

ABEER OTHMAN BLAN ALAA MAHER SALEH ALEXANDRIA AL-BAZI AMALIA BIR AMANDA GRZETIC CHRISTOPHER SCANLON EMA PAJIC ERIKA ALEXANDRA GATO JAYATI PANKAJ GOHEL JENNIFER LYNN SCALETTA JESSICA RURIKO VOEGTLE LAURA AMALIA POP MARYAM FATIMA VALI MIRELA JEZERAK MIRJANA ANDJA DIMITRIC NATALIA ADAMOVIC RITA SIMON SPIROS LOUKOPOULOS TERESA PRZYBYSLAWSKI

OLIVERIO HERNANDEZ-CISNERO

Loyola University Chicago ABDULMATEEN QAISAR BAO TRAN ELMA LUGONJIC GUADALUPE OLMOS KAROLINA MIS LIAN WEINSTEIN MANSI SINGAPORI MARIAN LOPEZ MICHAEL LUCKI NAINA BALEDINA PREKSHA AGNIHOTRI

SEUL (KATHY) KU

Marquette University

AKSHAR PATEL PATRYCJA BRONOWICZ

Illinois State University ALYSSA JENRICK JINSOL (JENNY) WON JOANNA SZEWCZUK VIVIANNE VELAZQUEZ

ARIELLE ORDONEZ BRADLEY LANGLO KATRINA TAN LAUREN LALUZ NASIR HUSSAIN

Michigan State University WUN-YAN WONG

Northern Illinois University AMANDA FORNECK DWIGHT DAVIS ERVIN-JOSHUA GAYAPA ROSE KAYE SANDRA SWIETLIK SHIVAM PATEL SONIA CHROSTOWSKI


Senior Issue 2009

Northwestern Business College - Southwestern Campus SHEHZAD BHAYANI

Northwestern University JAMES KELLY KARINE ROSIME RAVI PATEL SOPHIA RAFIQI

Oakton Community College ADIL PATEL ADRIANA PULIDO-MEDINA ADRIANNA JAWORSKY-FORTE AGNIESZKA KOROL AID KURTOVIC AIDA KAEWWILAI ALBERT CARIAGA ALEKSANDER HRNJAK AMITH CHANDY ANDRAE ROBINSON ANDREA FALCONI ANGELICA ADAP ANKIT DIXIT ANN PLAMOOTTIL ANSUMOL VALLIKATTUCHIRA ANTON ATANASOV ARJUN VERMA ARAN KAMRANPOUR ARIANA SERNA ARKADIUSZ KUSIAK ARMANDO FIGUEROA AVADH CHOKSHI BARTOSZ WARJAS BARTOSZ GRONKIEWICZ BAYARSAIKHAN NADMID BRADLEY MARKOVICH BRENDA CRUZ BRIAN GREENBERG BRIAN KIM CARLOS CRUZ CHERRIE-LYNE VIRAY CHRISTIAN CHAVERO CHRISTINE BALDERAS CHRISTOULA LOURAS CRYSTAL CISNEROS CYNTHIA JUSTINIEN DANIEL WITKUS DANIEL WALKER DANIEL ROJAS-BAZAN DARIUSZ JANDURA DAVID PETER DEREK HOWARD DHRUVIT PATEL DIXITA PATEL

Page 19

The Pioneer

Oakton cont.

Oakton cont.

DONNA AZIZ DOROTA KUBOWICZ EILEEN RAYAHIN ERIK BALAGA ERWIN PASIA FAIZAN ZIKARIA FELICIA NIKOLAOU FRANK BELIZAIRE GEMMY HORMESE GEOMIL PASIA GEORGIA KHAMO HANAN MADBOULY HARDIK PATEL HENRI GONZALEZ-VALEZQUE HINABEN PUNJABI ISAK SONG JACKSON GEORGE JACOB JONES JANET NUNEZ JAPHLET ARANAS JR JENI JAMES JENISH SURATI JIBIT JOY JOANNA SWIATEK JOBIL GEORGE JOHN LEYNES JOSE MONTIEL JOSEPH CIMINELLO JOSHUA VIRUET JOSHUA LINDNER JUAN SILVA JULIE KROHN JULIE GONZALEZ KAMAL PATEL KAMRAN DARAMJEE KARISHMA BRAHMBHATT KEVIN SLEWO KRUNAL PATEL KRYSTIAN WIDLAK KURT MEISTER LABRINI GIANNAKOPOULOS LATOYA SMELLIE LILIA GONZALEZ LILIAN CASTILLO LINNEA HERNANDEZ LIYA ISSAC LUELLA MASCARENHAS LUISEL-AYBIL MACATUAL LUKASZ JEDRYCHA MA.CECILIA REGASPI MAIDELY MORENO MARIA NAJARRO MARIAM SUBHANI MEGHAN GERMAINE MENSUR SULIC MIRAJ PATEL MORGAN MCMILLIAN MUHAMMAD JUNAID

NATHALIE SANABRIA NEKOLLE KHVILOVSKY NEMANJA BOJIC NICHOLAS NITTI NICK NICHOLOPOULOS NIKITA GANDHI OMERA SIDDIQ ORNINA JANDO PAWEL SZYMANSKI PRABHJOT BAINS PURA SUGADUGA RADU JENTIMIR RAFAELA SAHAGUN-VELASCO RAHUL PRAJAPATI RASHIED VILLARINO REENA CHRISTIAN RICA MAE DIONISIO RIDDHI WAGADIA RITTA MERZA ROI-CEDRIC LUCENA RUBINA BANU RUCHIR SONI SAAD MUGHAL SALVATORE CARUSO SAMAD USMANI SARIQ BUKHARI SERGIO MURO SERGIO HERRERA SHANE LONG SHERIF ALY SHITAL PATEL SHOAIB GHALIB SHREYANGIBEN PATEL SOLONGO DASHZEZEK SONU PHILIPOSE STEPHANIE ARAUJO SYEDA MUZAFFAR TABISH ANSARI TSU-YU KO UTKARSHKUMAR PUNJABI VASILIKI SAMIOTAKIS VERSA ODESHO VITALIY HAFYCH WOJCIECH WILCZYNSKI ZARIN BUSHRA ZULEYMA MONTESINOS

Pennsylvania State University,

Saint Louis University VAIBHAV PATEL

Saint Xavier University JESSICA JOSEPH

School of the Art Institute of Chicago JENNY ZAJAC SAHAK GEORGE ZAKARIAN

Southern Illinois University JACQUELYN FERNANDEZ

St. Louis College of Pharmacy BIRJU SHAH

Tallahassee Community College SHIV PATEL

The Illinois Institute of Art JASMINE ROMERO

The Illinois Institute of Art-Schaumburg MIRSADA GRIZIC SARAH GOLENIA

The University of Iowa AGATA BOGUCKA

Trinity International University GEORGE ODICHO JENNICA DIMAILIG

MICHELLE BUCKLE

Triton College Roosevelt University

ELVIS KUJUKOVIC

PAOULA DYANOVA

Saint Augustine College PREETHU ALEX

United States Marine Corps Recruiter ETHAN BODZIN


Page 20

The Pioneer

Universal Technical Institute CAMERON DAVIS JEFFREY COLLINS VASYL DZIVORONYUK

University of Chicago RYAN WILLIAM MALITZ

University of Illinois at Chicago ANGIE LALL ANGIE MOON ARTHUR YUROV BANSARI THAKKAR BYEONGGUEN SHIN CRYSTAL KURUVILLA DHRUV KAVI DONNELLE ESDICUL FARRAH MALIK HARISH CHOCKALINGAM JASON PILLAI JAY PATEL JAYSON-ANGEL PERALTA JEFFREY JOSEPH JENNIFER LESCANO KIRSTIE CUA KRZYSZTOF RYGIEL LETICIA MONTESINOS MAGDALENA PLONKA MEDGINE PAPILLON MICHAL TALARCZYK NELYA KRYSHCHUK RACHEL ENBLOM RHENESSA BALLESTEROS ROCKY CAMARILLO SABARISH CHOCKALINGAM SADIA YOUNUS SEENA MATHEW STACEY THOMAS STEPHANIE CHAN TINA AGGARWAL URVIKA PATEL ZHIVKO KAMENOV

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign AARON REINHART ALBERT CHO BLAZEJ SZYMONIAK BRIAN LOV DAVID PEREZ DONG JANG ERICK GARCIA GREGORY SKOCZEK IDIA IFIANAYI JENNIFER YOUKHANA

University of Illinois cont. KEVIN WILLIAMS KEVIN HO MOHAMMED BAQUI PETE SRISUK REHAN NIZAMUDDIN RIMA TAILOR ROSE-ANN ARAGON TOMASZ DZIERGAS

University of Kansas LAUREN ROSSI

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities JONG SEOK LEE

University of the Sciences in Philadelphia SARIKA C. SIMON

University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee DAVID WAITE

Vanderbilt University JESSICA MCMILLAN

Virginia Western Community College JULIANA BUTTITTA MADELEINE BUTTITTA

Western Michigan University NICHALOS BARLOCK

William Rainey Harper College AYA DAJANI JESSICA DEMARS JOSHUA MYERS JOYAL PATEL PETER MARES ROBERT DOZIE SAMCY SAMUEL STEPHANIE PALAGUACHI TIFFANY JONES

Wright College RITA OSTASZ

Wyotech Institute JATINDER SINGH

Senior Issue 2009

Junior year is filled with challenges By Annie Ziga

Walking down the halls during the last few weeks of school, you probably overheard most of the juniors’ shrieks of relief about this very stressful year finally coming to an end, and for good reason. Junior year is considered the most important year in your high school education. With all the stress caused by the increased difficulty of homework, the search for colleges, the fulfillment of high school requirements and the ACTs, it is hard to stay focused throughout the year and not lose your mind a bit along the way. What sophomores need to remember before going into junior year is that the upcoming year is really important: it can determine how colleges look at you and can set the bar for what you want to do in life. This does not necessarily mean that all the fun of high school goes down the drain – that’s not the case at all. What you need to do is realize that you have to take the next school year very seriously and avoid slacking off; if you take it seriously, you will reduce your stress levels and you will be able to balance your school work with your personal life. This past year caught me a bit by surprise because I went into it not fully prepared and unaware of what the year was really all about. I thought that the work was going to be easy and that I could just focus on my personal life and have fun, but now, having gone through it, I realize that the key word for junior year is balance. You need to start with the knowledge that you can have academic success and a pleasurable social life at the same time, IF you take your work seriously and focus. You cannot go into junior year with the mentality that the work will be done for you. More than ever, YOU are the only person who can make it happen during junior year. I’m not trying to scare you sophomores out there. When the summer ends and junior year arrives, you

shouldn’t be afraid, you should just be prepared. If you get things done and don’t slack off, especially at the start of the year, you will be able to have a successful junior year, academically and socially. And if you do find that you are struggling with your work, I strongly suggest you take action early. Take advantage of all of the assistance Maine East has to offer. You can go to COACH or the Math Resource Center to get help with your work, and the Writing Lab has an English teacher every period to help you. Talk to your teachers about assignments or projects and make sure you understand them and get them done. Also, make sure you talk to your counselor about your required classes, such as Driver’s Ed. or other required classes you might not have taken. You do not want to be stuck with a surprise required class when you are gearing up for senior year and graduation. This summer, you can already start getting prepared by making sure you do your summer reading -- it will get you off to a great start in your junior year English class and might even help you connect with the other students and teachers who read the same book. If you have room in your schedule for fun elective classes, then go for it! These classes can really help and can be a major stress reliever throughout the day. Junior year also means that you are becoming an upperclassman; you have been at Maine East for a while now, so you know basically how things work. Just focus on your work, be positive and enjoy your remaining years here. If you concentrate and constantly reach for your goals, then it will work out in the end and your junior year will be a highlight and a great springboard into your senior year, instead of a year you regret. Have a great summer and congratulations on becoming an upperclassman!


Senior Issue 2009

Page 21

The Pioneer

Tweet Tweet Tweet: Meet By Madiha Khan and Samra Matin It’s the latest and hottest social networking craze in the world. Over 2 million people a day do it. Celebrities like Oprah, Ashton Kutcher, Pete Wenz, Britney Spears, Shaquille O’Neal, and P. Diddy do it. President Obama does it. And that’s not even the tip of the communication iceberg that is the internet phenomenon Twitter. The novelty of Twitter is being able to broadcast a sentence or two -- called a “Tweet” -- to a few people who are “Following” you (or a few thousand people, or, if you’re Ashton Kutcher, to over ONE MILLION Followers) instantly and at any time from a cell phone, PDA, or computer. There’s little time (and no space) for thoughtful analysis or reflection -each Tweet has a limit of 140 characters; the value of Twitter rests in its scope and immediacy. And this reporter, along with millions of other “Tweeters”, finds Twitter ingenious and amazing. Twitter is relatively easy to figure out and modify to your personal desires -- all but a few features are optional. Therefore, you can make your Twitter experience as involved or as detached as you wish. When you join Twitter and start an account, you choose what Tweeters you want to follow (similar to the friends feature on Facebook and Myspace). When you follow someone, everything they “tweet” comes to you on your Twitter home page. You can follow additional people or at any time

choose to unfollow people. You can also choose to accept or block people from following you. (This is an important aspect of Twitter to be aware of -- as with any new technology, there are those creepy crawly people out there who want to use Twitter to snoop into others’ lives or worse.) Most Twitter users follow between 20 and 1,000 other Tweeters, usually

You can also set up your phone to share pictures with your followers instantaneously. In fact, a picture of the U.S. Airways crash landing in the Hudson River in January appeared within moments of the event, via tweets from a passenger on the plane. So what do tweeters tell their followers about? Most of them are enlightening friends and fans

The time-saving factor of twitter is another big plus. All of the updates of the people you are following appear in real time (meaning that you don’t need to refresh your browser) on your Twitter page. To reply to them, you simply hit a button and type your message. Voilá, you have just communicated with someone in less than 140 characters and without

“I can’t talk now... I’m Tweeting!”

including friends, family, news sources, companies, and celebrities. Oprah, CNN, and Ashton Kutcher were all in a close race to be the first to have 1 million followers on Twitter, which Kutcher won (by a tweet?). Tweeters can also follow major corporations like American Airlines, who updates flight information on Twitter, and Starbucks, who answers all your drinkrelated questions. After the basic set up on a computer, you have many options for setting up Twitter with your cell phone so you can tweet and follow via text-messaging.

with routine updates about the spectacular banality of their everyday lives: shopping, doing laundry, meeting friends, reading other people’s Tweets. Perfect examples of such ordinariness are pop start Demi Lovato’s tweets, a majority of which read like “I should clean my room.” “I should go to sleep.” “I should do a lot of things that I’m supposed to be doing, but.... I don’t wanna. :)” The triviality of Twitter is what attracts celebs to it. According to Ashton Kutcher, “It’s so personal. I can interact with my fans and set rumors straight before the tabloids air them.”

visiting dozens of profiles. And if Twitter hasn’t won you over yet, it can actually help save lives. In 2008, Twitter was credited with helping a man get out of a foreign jail. A California college student named James Buck was arrested during an anti-government demonstration in Egypt.

As he was hauled off to jail, he managed to Tweet one word: “arrested.” That Tweet immediately notified his friends and family, who began contacting the authorities for his release. Within hours, the American Embassy was notified and Buck was freed. Twitter, currently the third most popular networking site in the world, has gained a dedicated network that has quadrupled in the last few months. Almost everyone who joins finds it easy, useful, and, at times, even addicting. Some companies, such as the one that Michelle Jones applied to, have began accepting job applications through Twitter. Your mission: to make yourself seem as qualified as possible in 140 characters or less. Skeptics say that Twitter is a fad, diminishing it by comparing it to pet rocks and the Macarena. And recent studies show that over 60% of new Twitter users stop using the site within a month. And what do loyal Twitterers say to that? They agree, but they also believe that for the time being, Twitter is a useful, time-saving, and overall fun social network to use. Just ask any of 2 million people probably sending a Tweet right about now.

BREAKING TWITTER NEWS!!! You can now follow The Pioneer on Twitter! Pioneer sponsor Mr. Miller will tweet about news and events related to Demon Nation. Seniors-- keep updated about Maine East after you leave! Sign up at www.twitter.com and follow mehspioneer.


Page 22

The Pioneer

Senior Issue 2009

Will Jon and Kate Gosselin separate? By Ebboney Wilson Cable network TLC’s popular show John and Kate Plus Eight drew a record viewing audience for its fifth-season premiere, according to Nielsen Media Research. The boosted ratings are mostly due to the media siege about Jon Gosselin’s alleged affairs and the Gosselin’s troubled marriage. The family of ten – with twin eight-year-olds and five-year-old sextuplets – is America’s new favorite family to watch. Recently, Jon the man of the house, has been under heavy scrutiny from viewers and the media. According to US Weekly, he has had an affair with a third grade teacher. Jon and Kate have been married to Kate for almost 9 years. They claim to have had a good marriage for many years, prior to the reality show. According to viewers on their own website, they do not believe that they were telling the truth. Frequent viewers of the show know that John and Kate seem to constantly annoy each other. Could this be caused by all the media attention this family has been receiving? It seems as if any couple that decides to put their lives on television for the world to see regrets it later on.

Rumors of marital difficulties fueled higher ratings for Jon and Kate Plus Eight, but will the marriage survive?

For example, Jessica Simpson and Nick Lachey decided to put their first year of marriage on television. They seemed to put on a front for the camera, so when the camera is not there, they don’t understand what’s different with their significant other. Jon and Kate may have forgotten what reality was like before all the fame and they may have

forgotten about what each other’s personality is like. Putting your life out there for the world to see is not a smart idea. Psychologists will tell you that when a camera rolls, people tend to change their behavior and perform for the camera. Then, when the director yells “Cut!”, their behavior reverts back to ‘normal’, and they can’t understand

why things seems so different. Yes, the Gosselins have made quite a bit of money for their family, not to mention getting a tummy tuck (Kate) and some hair plugs (Jon), but it looks like it was bad decision for them to put their lives out there for the TV world to see. They will forever be scrutinized and their family and marriage will likely never be the same.

Graduation Sensation Graduation Sensation 1

2

1

3

2

3

4

4 5

5

6 7

7

8

8

9 10

9

10

11

12 12

13

11

13

14 14 15 15 1616 17 17 1919

18

18

20 20

21

22 22

23

25 25

26

24

23

21

24

26 27

27

28 28 29 29 30 30

31 31

32

33

32

33

Across Across

Down Down

2. A graduate's cap 2. A graduate's cap 4. Splashy summer fun place: ______ park 4. Splashy summer fun place: ______ park 8. Department Award Winner Shreyangabin ______ 8. Department Award Winner Shreyangabin ______ 10. Department Award Winner Kathy 10. Department Award Winner Kathy 11. Summer month 11. Summer month 14. Graduation ceremony 14. Graduation ceremony 16. ______ Vacation 16. ______ Vacation 18. The ______ of 2009 18. The ______ of 2009 19. Female Athlete of the Year: ______ Jones 19. Female Athlete of the Year: ______ Jones 23. A graduate's garb 23. A graduate's garb 24. National ______ Society 24. National ______ Society 25. Money awards for college 25. Money awards for college 27. Male Athlete of the Year: ______ Kelly 27. Male Athlete of the Year: ______ Kelly 29. Internet communication phenomenon 29. Internet communication phenomenon 31. Department Award Winner Robert ______ 31. Department Award Winner Robert ______ 32. Department Award Winner: Allison ______ 32. Department Award Winner: Allison ______ 33. Summer month 33. Summer month

1. Sandy summer destination 1. Sandy summer destination 2. Department Award Winner Ryan ______ 2. Department Award Winner Ryan ______ 3. Graduate's newest possession 3. Graduate's newest possession 5. Summer month 5. Summer month 6. Top graduate (grade‐wise) 6. Top graduate (grade‐wise) 7. Department Award Winner Jessica ______ 7. Department Award Winner Jessica ______ 9. Common graduation month 9. Common graduation month 12. _______ Will Awards 12. _______ Will Awards 13. Top academic achievers: Maine ______ 13. Top academic achievers: Maine ______ 15. Department Award Winner Beth Ann ______ 15. Department Award Winner Beth Ann ______ 17. TV show on TLC: Jon and Kate Plus ______ 17. TV show on TLC: Jon and Kate Plus ______ 19. M.E. Graduation location: Rosemont ______  19. M.E. Graduation location: Rosemont ______  20. Department Award Winner Stephanie ______ 20. Department Award Winner Stephanie ______ 21. Cold summer treat on a stick 21. Cold summer treat on a stick 22. Destination for many high school graduates 22. Destination for many high school graduates 26. Department Award Winner Akshar ______ 26. Department Award Winner Akshar ______ 27. Department Award Winner Tijo ______ 27. Department Award Winner Tijo ______ 28. Department Award Winner Samantha ______ 28. Department Award Winner Samantha ______ 30. Department Award Winner Jinsol ______ 30. Department Award Winner Jinsol ______

CROSSWORD ANSWERS ON PAGE 25

6


Senior Issue 2009

Page 23

The Pioneer

A blast from the past Do you think you’re cool? Here are some of the cool. hip, and radical things that the Maine East Faculty thought was cool during their senior years of high school.

“Bellbottoms were still ‘groovy’." -Mr. Harper “I graduated high school in 1996 and the big trend me and my friends spent most of our time on was ska music.” -Mr. Reuhs

“Vanilla Ice, ‘Ice, Ice, Baby’ and MC Hammer ‘Can't touch this’” -Ms. Bonifazi

“‘Cool’ then was tight clothes, lots of polyester, too much hair, and tall shoes.” -Mr. Lloyd

“All things preppy, and Really Big Hair!’ -Ms. Wolfe

“Respecting our elders.” -Mr. Kett

Some friendly advice for sophomores-to-be By Brittany Krawiec Now that freshmen year is drawing to a close, you will be proceeding into your sophomore year and there are a few quick things you should know. Sophomore year is just as important as any other high school

year – starting off the year, make sure you do not fall behind in your homework. Make a good impression on your teacher; after all, you’ll be stuck with your teachers for either all or most of the year. Tests are a very important part of your grade, and if you feel as if you don’t understand something before a test,

always go to your teacher for some extra help. Don’t be afraid to ask questions, you wouldn’t want to get a problem wrong just because you were afraid to ask the question. One thing I regret is taking a sick day from school; I fell behind a whole day and had two days’ worth of assignments due for the

day I came back. Absences are not the best way to do well in school, so try and limit the number of times you take “sick days.” As you are making your transition into your sophomore year, remember to have fun because next year, with the ACT and college planning, most of your time will be consumed!

A Musical Montage is coming this way

By Erika Oppermann

What do you get when you mix R.E.N.T, High School Musical, Dirty Dancing, Fosse, Slumdog Millionaire and The Sister Act? A musical montage of course, that is what theater dance periods 2 and 6 are doing with Mrs. Greiwe. “This will be my 8th year of doing these mini performances. We have done Grease, High School Musical, Thriller, Chicago, and West Side Story, oh, and Hairspray too!” said dance instructor Ms.Greiwe with enthusiasm. This year’s theme for her second and sixth period classes was “Love in Life” and “Brothers and Sisters United”. With all the practice that has been going on this is sure to be one of her best.

Maine East basketball star Danhi Wilson signs a full-ride scholarship to play basketball at Ashland University next season.


Boys Soccer Game Firelight Rally

Dress Up Like a Celebrity

Thursday

Friday

Spirit Day Homecoming Football Game

Dance

Saturday

Pep Assembly

Twin Day Powder Puff Football Game

Wednesday

Pajama Day

Color Wars

Tuesday

Homecoming Week 9/21-9/26/2009

Monday

Pioneer Exclusive Preview

The Pioneer Page 24 Senior Issue 2009


Senior Issue 2009

M.E. DECA students perform on worldwide stage in California

The MDA is an organization supporting people with neuromuscular disorders. Over a course of a longtime partnership with the MDA, DECA has donated over $5 million to the charity. This year alone, the Maine East DECA chapter has raised $5,000, placing it 9th out of over 1,000 high schools worldwide and awarding them with a prestigious banquet. Besides the entrepreneurial activities taking place in Anaheim, the attendees also visited multiple area attractions, like Disneyland, Universal Studios, and the sunny California beaches. The estimated economic impact coming into Anaheim from the DECA conference was about $14 million. The Maine East DECA club is a chance for the students to show off their skills. It is also a fundamental opportunity for success. “Students in DECA expand their communication and thinking skills,” said advisor Mr. Baysingar. “This experience will eventually lead to excellent future careers.”

By Judy Bielaga The Maine East DECA club continued its victorious streak all the way through the National Competition in Anaheim, California, which attracted over 15,000 students and advisors. After setting a record with its number of victories at the State level, our DECA chapter sent 13 national qualifiers to the worldwide DECA Conference. Senior Lauren Rossi placed in the Top 10 of the world, defeating students from countries like the U.S., Canada, England, and Germany. After three days of intense competition, 10 of the 13 Maine East national qualifiers finished in the top 1% of DECA competitor’s worldwide. “Our students demonstrated on a worldwide stage that they can compete and win against the best in the world,” said Mr. Schwan, one of the DECA advisors. The national conference also presented the Muscular Dystrophy Association with a check for over a half-million dollars.

Graduation Sensation 1

2

B

M O R

E 7

8

D

P

A

T

E

A R

C

I

M

H

T

A

F

A N

H

E

I

C

K

L

30

T W

I

T

T

O N

32

N

S H

N

T

T

N

26

P A

L Y

T 31

L

V A

L

L

S

E

T

D I

A

S

S

T 21

P

27

E

J

O

24

H O N O R

S

P

I

A M E

S

A

I

N

Z

C

O

E

L 33

N

Y

C

E W O S L

I

L

E R 6

A

R O B

I

T

N

U

A

28

E R

E M E N

23

G

A R

G E

C

I

H

L 29

18

E

C

22

J

T

O

20

Y

11

O

H

D 17

T

R

S

O

S C H O L

A

13

C O M M E N C

25

E

L

14

M

F

K U N

L I

G

G

S U M M E R

T

P

12

Z

5

W A

J

10

15

4

U

9

16

19

3

B O A R D I

L

E

R

T

A

J

U N

E

Across

Down

2. A graduate's cap [MORTARBOARD]  4. Splashy summer fun place: ______ park [WATER]  8. Department Award Winner Shreyangabin ______  [PATEL]  10. Department Award Winner Kathy [KU] 

1. Sandy summer destination [BEACH]  2. Department Award Winner Ryan ______ [MALITZ]  3. Graduate's newest possession [DIPLOMA]  5. Summer month [AUGUST]  6. Top graduate (grade‐wise) [VALEDICTORIAN] 

Page 25

The Pioneer

Chemically proven to cause a reaction By Judy Bielaga

Maine East Students enrolled in Ms Etzwiler’s and Mrs. Klein’s chemistry classes that have earned and maintained a grade of 94% or higher are now part of a new program called the Chemistry Plus Program. The students meet every other week after school to talk about what’s new in the chemistry world and to perform various demonstrations and labs that are normally excluded from the regular chemistry curriculum. Students in Chem Plus opt out of doing regular homework as long as they keep a 94% grade and meet every other week. They also

complete extra assignments. Several weeks ago, the Chemistry Plus Program took a trip to Gemini Junior High School to present some of the demonstrations at which the students worked hard to excel. They not only presented the demos but explained the chemical and real-life applications behind them to the captive junior high audience. Both Ms. Entzwiler and Mrs. Klein believe that such experiences will benefit both groups of students. “The middle school students will look forward to doing similar activities in high school,” said Mrs. Klein. “I look forward to explaining the chemistry in

each experiment and inspiring students to study chemistry,” said Chem Plus student Shaina George. The Chem Plus students definitely feel the experience will help them with their future goals. “I look forward to explaining the demos since I’m considering being a teacher,” said Justina Kaczmarczyk No matter what their futures might entail, the high school students will gain confidence and get to share their love for science with the youngsters. Students in this program also go on field trips to see demonstrations performed by well-known chemists and to visit chemical companies.

Transformers II will battle for box office gold this summer By Jiten Patel Transformers II comes out June 24 and the muchhyped movie is even getting the average moviegoer pumped. Michael Bay and Steven Spielberg are back as director and producer, and stars Shia LaBeouf, Megan Fox and John Turturro return to form the A-list cast. Transformers ended when the noble Autobots and the devious Decepticons fought for a strange cube called the off-spark. Sam Witwicky (LaBeouf) gets pulled into the story when his grandfather’s glasses hold the key to the cube’s location. Sam and Mikaela (Fox) ultimately help the Autobots protect

the cube from the Decepticons and save mankind. The movie’s special effects and amazing plot drew in a huge audience, earning over $320 million dollars. Transformers II is expected to be this year’s huge blockbuster and will compete with Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince for the top grossing movie of the summer. Sam Witwicky unlocks the history of the Transformers on Earth, which leads to the Decepticons’ attempting to hunt him down again. They plan to forcefully pick Sam’s brain in order to figure out the crucial information. This leads to Optimus Prime, leader of the Autobots, joining forces with

armies from countries all over the globe. They fight an epic war against the Decepticons over the lands of Egypt. Secrets about both human and Cybertronian history are revealed throughout the storyline. The sequel incorporates some ideas from last year’s blockbuster The Dark Knight and treats its audience to giant explosions in a number of new settings. Many new robots are introduced, some even bigger Transformers are thrown in. With director Michael Bay using IMAX cameras, the images will fill the entire eight-story screen. This means you’ll be seeing your favorite Cybertrons at double their actual size.


Page 26

The Pioneer

Senior Issue 2009

Biting off more than you can chew, and why it tastes so good

Dear Demons, Transitioning into high school, most freshmen would like to spend their first year getting used to how things work, keeping up with homework, maybe joining a sports team or a club, and simply falling into place. I was the same way. I never dreamed of being a leader and taking on responsibility outside of my academic career. That all changed on August 25 when I walked into ninth period and was given an opportunity I couldn’t refuse. I knew being EditorIn-Chief of a school newspaper was going to be hard work, and because I never did it before, I knew that

wouldn’t be easy. But the only word that could come out of my mouth at the time was “yes”. I remember coming home that day and thinking, “What did I just get myself into?” It hadn’t been a week and I already was in over my head. But I stuck with it and decided that I would take on the challenge of being an Editor. That decision changed what I thought was going to be a relaxed freshman year. It wasn’t easy at first working with a group of people I had never met, but slowly we all came together and brought our own originality to The Pioneer. I’ve gotten used to staying up late at night during deadline weeks and making layouts not thinking

about all the Math and English homework that is waiting for me when I get done. Or pondering for hours in my room about how to start an article and then suddenly pouring words onto a sheet of paper. Those acts have become second nature to me. The memories and experience that I gained throughout this year will stay with me forever. But obviously one person can’t do it alone. This year’s staff has been simply perfect. Starting from the first day, everyone has helped me get situated into high school and has worked so hard to contribute to the newspaper. There is only one word to describe you guys: incredible. And to our lone senior editor, Ms. Alessandra In-

“Productivity is never an accident. It is always the result of a commitment to excellence, intelligent planning, and focused effort.” --Paul J. Meyers

candela: you have been so amazing this year. I’m sad that you have to leave but you’re moving on to bigger and better things. I wish the best for you and I hope to work with you again in the future. You are an awesome friend.

Most importantly, I would like to thank Mr. Miller, without whom producing The Pioneer would be impossible. Your guidance, support, and wisdom is greatly appreciated. Words cannot describe how thankful I am for your help. I am honored to be working with such a great man. I am extremely grateful for this opportunity and will continue to work hard on The Pioneer. Hey, I still have three years left! And I promise to make the next three years at The Pioneer incredible. Sincerely,

Yogi Patel Editor-In-Chief

THE PIONEER STAFF 2008-2009 Editor-In-Chief Yogi Patel Editors Andrew Suriano Sean Foley Madiha Khan Lance Lindsay Samra Matin Ericka Oppermann Jiten Patel Antonette Puleo udit Parikh Ebboney Wilson Annie Ziga Brittany Krawiec Alessandra Incandela jenny Krawiec

reporters and photogrAphers Judy Bielaga Christina Flournoy Dhruv Kavi China Lukado Sophia Rafiqi Vanessa Rosario Onon Sugar Ariana Serna Sam Stankowicz

Sarah Krawiec Erwin Pasia Frank Belizaire Derek Howrd Arthur Yurov Pratik Vaidya Eileen Rayahin Sagar patel Rachel krawiec Jenish Surati

THE PIONEER Maine East High School • Park Ridge, Illinois The Pioneer is dedicated to reporting on news, entertainment, and sports events for Maine East High School and the surrounding community. The Pioneer is distributed to students, staff, and a limited mailing list. The Pioneer does not accept outside advertising. Submit story suggestions, photos, letters to the editor, or comments regarding the content of the newspaper to sponsor Matt Miller via email: mmiller@maine207.org


Senior Issue 2009

Page 27

The Pioneer

Coach Olson leaving M.E. for Niles North next season

By China Luckado Mr. Glen Olson has done a terrific job as the Head Coach of the varsity boys basketball team, but he will be leaving Maine East to coach at rival Niles North High School next season. With a very successful past two seasons, including taking the team to the Regional Championship last season, Olson has lead Maine East basketball to respectability in the Central Suburban League and has accomplished so much. Although all of Demon Nation is sad to see Coach Olson go, this hit home particularly hard with the members of the basketball team. The players were surprised when he told them he was leaving. Olson had been working with some of the players for as many as 10 years now. Many of the players were upset by this

decision, and it wasn’t an easy one for Olson. The question on a lot of people’s minds is what will this mean for next season at Maine East? Olson himself tries to answer that. “The future looks bright for Maine East basketball,” he said. “They will hire a great coach and the team will do very well.” Teaching at Maine East was an amazing experience for Coach Olson. “The teachers were not only great professionals, they are quality people and we had a lot of fun together,” said Olson. “I will miss them greatly. Mr. Chovanec is as good as a boss as there is.” One memory Olson will never forget is obviously winning the Regional Championship. He will continue to treasure the relationships he developed with all the players and will remember all the fun they had in practices.

Coach Olson turned around the Demon basketball program and hopes to do the same at Niles North.

“I have been able to coach the greatest kids in the world and that is the most important thing to me!” The coach will be greatly missed but promises to return to Maine East and visit when he can. He will be back here to scout when

the Niles North Vikings play the Maine East Demons. This year, we are sad to see the great Coach Olson leaving us, and going to coach the Niles North Vikings beginning the 20092010 season. Olson says he has a similar coaching plan for the Vikings.

“Similar to what we were at Maine East, we will play a fast and aggressive style of play,” he said. Coach Olson says he will still root for all of his former players, even when he competes against them. “I want to thank all the players who committed to the Maine East basketball program,” he said. “The improvement they have made has been tremendous. I hope they keep working hard. They truly have inspired me and I want nothing but the best for them as individuals and as a team.” Olson is excited about the challenge ahead at Niles North. His new team will work extremely hard, hoping to bring its program up from where it now exists. Although we would all prefer for him to stay a Demon, the Maine East faculty and students wish the best for Coach Olson.

By Antonette Puleo


SPORTS

Fall All-Conference Athletes Winter All-Conference Athletes

Top row, L to R: Natalia Bialecka, swimming; Cesar Yanez, soccer; Laura Wise, volleyball. Bottom row, L to R: Jeremy Umansky, football; Stan Babon, soccer; Nick Barlock, golf. Not pictured: James Kelly, soccer; Michelle Zdobylak, cross country.

Top row, L to R: Josh Myers, wrestling; Danhi Wilson, basketball; Christine Balderas, gymnastics. Bottom row, L to R: Nusrath Khan, basketball; Shahreq Khan, basketball.

Spring All-Conference Athletes

Top row, L to R: Christopher Ripple, baseball; James Kelly, volleyball; Aleksandr Hrnjak, water polo; Michael Guzzarde, volleyball; Daniel Walker, baseball. Middle Row, L to R: Jeremy Umansky, tennis; Jessica Demars, softball; Natalia Bialecka, water polo; Chris Scanlon, water polo; Jenny Krawiec, softball; Tiffany Jones, soccer. Bottom row, L to R: Rinel Tabamo, gymnastics; Elisa Gerena, track; John Agsao, gymnastics.

Three-Sport Athletes at Maine East

Maine East’s Three-Sport Athletes, L to R: Laura Wise, Aleksander Hrnjak, and Josh Myers

The Pioneer Senior Issue 2009  

Senior Issue June 2009

Advertisement