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C R E AT I N G V I TA L C O N N E C T I O N S

STRENGTHENING COMMUNITIES BETWEEN AND AROUND ANCHOR INSTITUTIONS ANNUAL REPORT

2017


CONTENTS Introduction

1

Memphis Medical District Overview

2

Place People Land Use Anchor Institutions

Memphis Medical District CollaborativeÂ

11

Public Spaces Safety & Security Programming & Marketing Community Development Anchor Programs

Budget

32

Acknowledgements & Looking Forward

34


MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

CREATING VITAL CONNECTIONS

INTRODUCTION

DISTRICT AREA: 2.6 SQUARE MILES


In 2014, eight anchor institutions - Baptist College of Health Sciences, Memphis Bioworks Foundation, Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, Regional One Health, Southern College of Optometry, Southwest Tennessee Community College, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital/ALSAC, and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center - began collaborating with local philanthropists and national experts, U3 Advisors, in an effort to revitalize the Memphis Medical District. Together, these anchors employ 16,000 people, educate 8,000 students, have $2.7 billion in collective

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

INTRODUCTION

operating budget, and control 250 acres of property. The anchor institutions developed a shared strategy that included launching a nonprofit community development organization designed to strengthen the communities between and around their locations in the Memphis Medical District. It would do this by coordinating development activity, leveraging institutional demand to capture greater economic impact in the Medical District, and focusing on the development of walkable, vibrant, inclusive, mixed-use neighborhoods within the District. In February, 2016, the Memphis Medical District Collaborative (MMDC) launched to fulfill this mission. The MMDC focuses on four key program areas: improving public space, coordinating safety and security, programming and marketing of the District, and facilitating community development. MMDC also works closely with the anchor institutions to leverage their demand locally through Live, Buy, and Hire Local programs. In its first year, the MMDC has made significant progress toward the transformation of the Medical District. This report highlights some of the efforts deployed in 2016 District-wide clean-ups, providing housing incentives, coordinating safety and security, attracting new retail, and developing programming that engages employees, students, and residents. It is our hope this report provides insight into the work we have implemented so far and what we intend to accomplish in the years to come.

INTRODUCTION

including streetscape improvements, creating new public spaces, completing

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MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

PLACE

Memphis Medical District Neighborhoods With over 24,000 employees and students and more than 10,000 residents, the Memphis Medical District is poised for growth, expansion, and opportunity. Located between Downtown and Midtown Memphis, the Medical District is in the process of transformation and forging an identity of its own. The District is home to large medical and educational institutions, including several prominent hospitals and colleges that make up what is historically called the Medical Center. Also within the District borders are several historic and unique neighborhoods including the Pinch District, Peabody-Vance, the Edge, and Victorian Village.

LOCATION

The Medical District

sits between Memphis’ thriving Downtown to the west and the city’s traditional, walkable, Midtown neighborhoods to the east. Together, these areas of the city form a vibrant chain of opportunity and potential, linked by major east-west corridors and numerous parks and public spaces.

Memphis Medical District and Downtown Memphis

HISTORY & HISTORIC CHARACTER The Medical District is rich in historic character and blends architectural styles from several eras dating back to Memphis’ founding. Ample original building stock has been preserved in the District. Ornate Victorian

O V E RV I E W

mansions sit a few blocks from the

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brick storefronts where rock and roll was invented and reinvented. Today, the District’s sidewalks, shade trees, and close-knit built environment make it ideally suited for walking and exploring. Victorian Village


The Medical

District contains a multitude of characters, buildings, and businesses coexisting to create a place more intriguing than the sum of its parts. The Edge is home to restaurants, recording studios, furniture makers, art galleries, guitar makers, and a craft brewery. A few blocks away, the historic Victorian Village beckons visitors to see a past chapter of Memphis history, while the life-saving medical research occurring daily throughout the District points the way to the future. In a city known for its eclectic style,

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

ECLECTIC STYLE

the mix of people and places within the Edge District

District is exceptional.

OPEN SPACE

The District is anchored

by several major public parks, including Health Sciences Park, Morris Park, and Winchester Park. Other public spaces, such as the Edge Triangle, make innovative use of the District’s unusual street grid to create attractive places for respite and play. Other public realm enhancements, including the addition of pedestrian plazas at major intersections, provide safe places for people to gather. This has opened up the District for more residents, workers, and visitors to discover and enjoy. Edge Triangle

EDUCATION

Being a successful

neighborhood means meeting the needs of everyone -- including those with small children. Downtown Elementary School is an Enriched Academics Optional School within the Shelby be a high-quality education resource for families who value a unique, urban lifestyle. The District is also home to Central High School.

Downtown Elementary

O V E RV I E W

County Schools system, created specifically to

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s St

Mill

is D

r

N. Manassa

Will

Ave

N Fr on t S t

A.W.

North Park way

Exc

e 240

t

I-40

han

ba

N Lauderda

Ala

Interstat

ge A ve le St

N Sec ond S

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

PEOPLE

ma

Peach A ve

e Av

Adam s

Ave

urth

St

Poplar Av e

Madi

Jefferson

Ave

Ave

Street

Unio

n Ave

Cleveland

S Danny Th

omas Blvd

S Fo

son

Vance Av e

East HH Crump

Peabody Ave

P O P U LAT I O N DE N SI TY 1 O V E RV I E W

PEOPLE PER SQUARE MILE

4

500 OR FEWER

1

Decennial Census, 2010

501 TO 2,000

2,001 TO 4,000

4,001 TO 8,000

8,001 OR GREATER


HOUSEHOLDS

Median Age2: 39

32% Family Households2

10,081

EMPLOYEES

5,351

33,000+ Daily Population4

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 2

FAMILY COMPOSITION

8%

Graduate, Professional or Doctorate

2

EMPLOYEE EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 4

15%

32% 12%

50%

18%

Graduate, Professional or Doctorate

25%

Family Households

52%

28%

Associate’s or Some College

Non-Family Households Non-Family Households in Group Quarters

High School or Below

30%

Bachelor’s

AREA MEDIAN INCOME FOR A FAMILY OF FOUR 3

60%

1.7

$16K $60K 5.4%

21%

2

1.6%

Households with Children2

28%

64% African-American

Other

Caucasian

Asian

30%

Associate’s or Some College

AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD SIZE 3

RACE/ETHNICITY

High School or Below

2

American Community Survey, 2015

3

ESRI Business Analyst, 2016

4

U.S. Census Bureau, LEHD, 2014

Earning More than $40,0004 Annually RACE/ETHNICITY 4 1%

4%

41% 54%

African-American

Other

Caucasian

Asian

O V E RV I E W

Bachelor’s

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

RESIDENTS

5


St

Mill

is D

r

N. Manassa s

Will

Ave

N Fr ont S t

A.W.

North Park way

Exc

240

t

I-40

han

ba

N Lauderda

Ala

Interstate

ge A ve le St

N Sec on d S

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

LAND USE

ma

Peach A ve

e Av

Adam s

Ave

urth

St

Poplar Ave

Madi

Jefferson

Ave

Street Cleveland

n Ave

Vance Av e

East HH Crump

1,170

O V E RV I E W

6

Ave

Unio

S Danny Th

omas Blvd

S Fo

son

Acres Within Medical District

5%

2.9%

INSTITUTIONAL

10%

21%

Peabody Ave

COMMERCIAL/MIXED USE RESIDENTIAL

62%

INDUSTRIAL PARK/RECREATION

Land use Classification, Shelby County, 2015

1


A P P R O X I M AT E LY

COMMERCIAL/INSTITUTIONAL LAND: 83%

7,000

A P P R O X I M AT E LY

1,000

Housing Units2

Businesses and 33,000+ jobs3

18%

Vacant

9%

Owner Occupied

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

RESIDENTIAL LAND: 10%

13% Other

73%

14%

Renter Occupied

Educational

73%

Healthcare & Social Assistance

JOBS BY EARNINGS3

10% $90,000 Median Rent

2

$500 American Community Survey, 2015 3U.S. Census Bureau, LEHD, 2014

2

60%

$40,001 or Greater $15,000 to $40,000 $15,000 or Less

O V E RV I E W

Median Home Value2

30%

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St

Mill

is D

r

N. Manassa s

Will

Ave

St. Jude ALSAC

N Fr ont S t

North Park way

han

urth

St

Ave

S Fo

Jefferson

Ave

Unio

n Ave

Bioworks

SWTCC Vance Av e

Baptist

East HH Crump

Regional One 5%

O V E RV I E W

8

250

Bioworks 5%

Acres Owned By Anchor Institutions

SWTCC 7%

Baptist 8%

Methodist/ Le Bonheur 18%

Ave

Southern College of Optometry

Regional One Health

SCO 5%

Peach A ve

Poplar Ave

UTHSC son

omas Blvd

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital

e Av

Adam s

Madi

S Danny Th

Interstate

ma

ba

N Lauderda

Ala

le St

ge A ve

Street

Exc

240

t

I-40

Cleveland

A.W.

N Sec on d S

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

MEDICAL DISTRICT ANCHORS

PeabodMethodist y Ave

St. Jude / ALSAC

St. Jude/ ALSAC

29%

UTHSC 25%

St Jude/ALSAC

UTHSC

LeBonheur/Methodist

Baptist

SWTCC

Bioworks

SCO

Regional One

Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare

University of Tennessee Health Sciences Baptist College of Health Sicences

Southwestern Tennessee Community College

Memphis Bioworks Foundation

Southern College of Optometry

Regional One Health


Beyond fulfilling their respective missions to educate, heal, research, or provide other services,

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Large institutions—universities, hospitals, and colleges—are referred to as anchors because of their permanence and their stabilizing physical and social ties to surrounding communities. anchor institutions are powerful economic engines. They employ large, diverse workforces; occupy and manage real estate; purchase goods and services; and attract investment through capital projects and research activities. Anchor institutions are positioned to play a significant role in the Medical District. Through leveraging their workforce, purchasing power, real estate holdings, and core missions, anchors can contribute to economic integration while creating vibrant, healthy, mixed-use and mixed-income neighborhoods.

ANCHORS EMPLOY OVER

ANCHORS EDUCATE OVER

16,000

8,000

EMPLOYEES

STUDENTS

Baptist Bioworks 136 27

Baptist 1,100

SCO 530

SCO 186

St Jude 3,918

Southwest 300 ALSAC 747

Southwest 3,774

Source: Anchor Institution Data, 2014

Methodist 3,198

LeBonheur 2,506

Regional One 2,539

UTHSC 2,676

O V E RV I E W

UTHSC 2,591

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MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016 M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

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WHO WE ARE: MMDC STAFF

TOMMY PACELLO

ABBY MILLER

President

Program & Data Director

DANE FORLINES

MARIKO KRAUSE

Program Associate

Program Associate

CELESTE RUDD

LARISSA REDMOND THOMPSON

Program Associate

Program Associate

DISTRICT AMBASSADORS Ricardo Cervantes (Director)

Marqavious Lurks

Brandon Adams

Quincey Lurks

Deroyce Bean

Ray Malone

Steve Donelson

Mario Murrell

Antonio Guy

James Ragland


The MMDC is responsible for strengthening the communities between and around the anchor institutions, making the District more livable, economically prosperous, clean, and safe.

FOCUS AREAS

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

WHAT WE DO

PUBLIC SPACES Public spaces help define our neighborhooods and can create walkable, bikeable, and livable places.

The safety and well-being of every resident, worker, and visitor in the District is the top priority of MMDC and its partners.

PROGRAMMING EVENTS Two key tactics to connecting people to places are holding events that invite people to mix and telling people about all the District has to offer.

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Encouraging and strengthening commercial corridors, real estate development, and transportation and mobility.

ANCHOR PROGRAMS Leveraging the demand of the anchor institutions’ employees and students, procurement, and hiring needs to better impact the Medical District.

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

SAFETY AND SECURITY

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MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

PUBLIC SPACES The streets, parks, plazas, and other green space in the District create connections between people and places. They function as the natural network for the District and are the platform for a vibrant public life. Public spaces help define neighborhoods and can create walkable, bikeable, and livable places. As a result, one of the MMDC’s core priorities is maintaining and improving the quality of public spaces within the Medical District.

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

CLEAN

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• Litter & Trash Removal • Sidewalk Cleaning • Graffiti Removal

GREEN • Creative Landscaping • Tree Planting & Care • Public Recycling

PLACEMAKING • Public Art • Public Space Upgrades • Streetscape Improvements • Signage and Wayfinding


D I S T R I CT A M B A S S A D O R S H I R E D

40

L I N E A R M I L E S O F W E E D A B AT E M E N T

74

P I E C E S O F G R A F F I T I R E M OV E D

925

B A G S O F L I T T E R R E M OV E D

3

P U B L I C A R T P R OJ E CT S C O M M I S S I O N E D

7

S T R E E T S CA P E I M P R OV E M E N T P R OJ E CT S

DISTRICT AMBASSADORS The nine Memphis Medical District Ambassadors focus on keeping the District clean and green. The Ambassadors are approachable and welcoming for visitors, employees, students, and residents – they can help with directions or offer suggestions for places to eat and visit in the District.

Landscape Maintenance

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

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MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

2016 PERFORMAN CE HIGHLIGHTS

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MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

PUBLIC SPACES MO N R O E AV E N UE & MARSHALL AVEN UE ST R E E TS CA P E I MP ROVEMEN T Before Improvement

The prominent intersection of Marshall and Monroe Avenues is the heart of the Edge neighborhood. In an effort to create a safer and more walkable environment, reduce vehicle speeds, and invite more pedestrian activity, the MMDC facilitated a community planning process. This effort elicited feedback and insights from workers, neighborhood residents, business owners, and others. From this process, a playbook of ideas for implementing public spaces emerged which detailed specific areas for intervention including opportunities for public art and activation; the addition of street furniture and simple

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

landscaping; and pedestrian enhancements to the design of the streets themselves.

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The Marshall & Monroe streetscape improvements included: pedestrian plazas, seating and planters to dramatically reduce the street width and slow traffic; adding bike lanes; and increasing parking; for a total cost of approximately $200,000. In total, seven intersections were improved at an approximate cost of $500,000. The Downtown Memphis Commission (DMC) provided $240,000 to support this work. In our construction we achieved 42% minorityand women-owned business participation. DMC added an extraordinary dimension to this project by sponsoring “There Is More To Be Proud Of,” a shimmering, soothing, shade-casting public art installation from noted local artist Cat Peña. Peña’s piece was unveiled to the public at a street party on the plaza in March 2017. “We want the quality of our public spaces to match the quality of the hospital and university campuses throughout the District,” says MMDC president Tommy Pacello. “MMDC and our partners will make additional public space improvements across the District each year, but what we’ve already done proves that a big difference can happen pretty quickly without spending millions of dollars. That creates a safer and more attractive environment for everyone who visits, lives, works, or studies in the Medical District.”


“There Is More To Be Proud Of” Installation party

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016 M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

Monroe Avenue and Marshall Avenue Improvements (photo by Chris Porter, Downtown Memphis Commission)

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MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

SAFETY & SECURITY The safety and well-being of every resident, worker, and visitor in the District is the top priority of MMDC and its partners. Crime—or the perception of crime— deters the pedestrian activity, economic vibrancy, and institutional investment that the District needs to help fulfill its potential. MMDC deploys a range of tactics, including coordination, strategically placed cameras, and additional public lighting in the District, to make sure it remains safe and inviting for everyone. MMDC collaborates closely with existing law enforcement agencies including the Memphis Police Department, University of Tennessee Health Science Center Police, and Southwest Tennessee Community College Police to collect data about criminal activity in the District, such as types of offenses, times of occurrence, and precise locations. These data are then used to adapt their public safety tactics. As security and comfort within the District increase, more and more people and investment will find their way to the District, triggering an upward cycle of development

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

and discovery that lifts all neighborhoods in the area.

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COORDINATION • Monthly Coordination Meetings

SUPPLEMENT • National Best Practices • Crime Data Coordination

ENVIRONMENT • Lighting Projects • Camera Projects


• Ongoing Monthly Coordination Meetings Since March 2016 • Crime Data Coordination with Safety and Security Committee and Real Time Crime Center

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

2016 PERFORMAN CE HIGHLIGHTS

• Volunteer Event to Audit and Report Streetlight Outages

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

• Working with MPD and Partners to Select Sites for 3-5 Lighting and Camera Installations

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MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

SAFETY & SECURITY MMDC TOURS UPENN On September 28 – 29th, 11 delegates representing the Memphis Medical District Collaborative travelled to West Philadelphia to explore the innovation and model of UPENN’s Department of Public Safety for the University City District (UCD). Representatives from the anchor institutions’ policing and security agencies­— Memphis Police Department, MMDC, and U3 Advisors­—got a first-hand look at behind-the-scenes operations of UPENN’s command center, and learned how the school’s safety and security strategy positively impacted the community surrounding it.

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

Covering about a 3-mile-radius

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area, similar to that of the Memphis Medical District, delegates had the opportunity to take a tour of West Philadelphia as the tour guide explained the new developments coming into the District as a direct reflection of the UCD’s

University City District safety ambassadors and local PPD

partnership with UPENN’s public safety. The trip was beneficial in providing insight on various safety strategies, as well as innovative approaches on how safety and security within the UCD was redeveloped to influence positive community development changes for the area.


University City District (UCD) is dedicated to improving the neighborhood in and around UPENN. Partnering with UPENN’s Department of Public Safety, the organization has been instrumental in facilitating campaigns such as Operation Building Safe and Trolley Portal Project, which

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

BACKGROUND ON UNIVERSITY CITY DISTRICT

provided a unique tactic in addressing some of the petty theft and low crime activity within the District. Their Public Space Maintenance staff cleans and enhances more than 160 University City commercial and residential blocks, and their safety ambassadors provide walking escorts, vehicle lock-outs, and transfers to homeless shelters. Likewise, the MMDC has begun to mirror this model through its Ambassador program to perform such tasks as cleaning up blight and reporting code violations in the Memphis Medical District. As the MMDC moves into the next phase of the safety and security strategy it will begin to work with policing agencies and the

Blue – Vehicle Patrol; Green – Bike Patrol; Red – Stationary Post

University City Institutions and Neighborhoods, Major Colleges and University

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

anchor partners.

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MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

PROGRAMMING & MARKETING Two key tactics to connecting people to places are holding events that invite people to mix and telling people about all the District has to offer. After all, what’s the use in being one of the most fascinating corners of Memphis if nobody knows about you? That’s why the MMDC has invested in event planning, media relations, and social media tools to tell the world where the District is located, what’s already happening there, and

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

why everyone in Memphis should get into it.

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PROGRAMMING • Community Events in the District • Event Grants

MARKETING • MMDC Website and Social Media Presence • Newsletter


FREEWHEEL EVENTS

1 VOLUNTEER CLEAN-UP

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400+ SUBSCRIBERS TO MMDC’S MONTHLY NEWSLETTER

EVENT GRANTS

1 FA L L H O O T E N A N N Y

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

18 EVENTS HELD

5

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

2016 PERFORMAN CE HIGHLIGHTS

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MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016 M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

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PROGRAMMING & MARKETING Employees, students, and residents in the District made it clear that in addition to big events and landmark developments, they wanted smaller activities happening with more frequency and regularity. Events that carried a clear healthy lifestyle component were particularly desirable. One of the responses was Freewheel. MMDC partnered with the Downtown Memphis Commission to produce a series of community bicycle rides that originated from the heart of the Edge neighborhood. Having seen what similar programs had achieved in Detroit and Miami, we knew that Memphis was ready to ride.

For Freewheelers, the journey is the destination. When people get outdoors on bikes and more connected to each other, they become more connected to their city. In its first year, Freewheel’s slow rides of 4 - 8 miles exploring different corners of our core city drew upwards of 60 participants each, representing 20 different Memphis-area ZIP codes. Rides started and ended at High Cotton Brewery. If you had a bike, great; if you didn’t, the Freewheel fleet consists of vintage bicycles retrieved from the Cycle Shop, a former Edge neighborhood business, and tuned up by Binghamton’s Carpenter Street Bike Shop. The program will launch again in Spring 2017 with a new home in a retrofitted and branded shipping container near the Marshall and Monroe intersection.


Artist highlighting Freewheel’s base

Carpenter Street Bike Shop mechanics

“From doctors and medical students to cyclists and residents, our Freewheel crowds represented such energy, diversity, and dedication to Memphis,” said Abby Miller, program director of the MMDC. “By opening their eyes to a new perspective by bicycle, these participants have become true ambassadors of our neighborhoods.”

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Freewheel Kickoff

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

Bikes before rescue from Cycle Shop

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MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

COMMUNITY & DEVELOPMENT Every small business that opens in the District or historic home rehabbed triggers incrementally more investment and activity. New residential and commercial developments – particularly new businesses and the jobs they create – make use of underutilized land and create the kind of density that makes the District vibrant and viable. MMDC has a range of tools for both residential and commercial projects, including community engagement, retail recruitment, and small business assistance grants that work to keep the District’s heart beating strong. Investments in real estate and mobility keep the whole metro area

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

healthy and growing.

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COMMUNITY SERVICES • Transportation & Mobility Planning • Community Engagement

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT • Retail Recruitment • Pre-Development Grants • Existing Business Assistance

• Commercial Corridor Planning


Parking Summit with Anchors Edge Alley - Micro Retail opportunity for 6 New Businesses

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

2016 PERFORMAN CE HIGHLIGHTS

Holiday Market with 12 Local Makers

New Gateway Signs in Victorian Village

Emerging Developers Bootcamp

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

9 Businesses Engaged for Assistance

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MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

COMMUNITY & DEVELOPMENT RETAIL INCUBATOR “EDGE ALLEY” Edge Alley combines a conventional business enterprise—coffee roaster and café—with an innovative new idea—incubating several micro-retailers and budding entrepreneurs. Recognizing the immense potential of their location at 600 Monroe, Edge Alley’s ownership consulted early in their development process with MMDC about how they might realize their vision for this concept. MMDC was able to provide a pre-development grant that connected the Edge Alley team with a local architecture firm who delivered initial renderings of how

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

600 Monroe’s storefront might be activated. MMDC also managed a competitive

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application process through which entrepreneurs sought acceptance into one of Edge Alley’s four micro-retail bays. These burgeoning businesses will receive financial assistance and helpful business services from EPICenter Memphis during their time in Edge Alley. The café and retail incubator will work together and leverage each other’s customer traffic and purchasing power to support the growth of other enterprises throughout the District. MMDC regards Edge Alley as a crucial element for rebuilding vacant and distressed commercial corridors, which are essential to sustaining the healthy, vibrant neighborhoods that the District’s students, residents, and workers need.


Renderings by Archimania

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M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016


MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

ANCHOR PROGRAMS An important element of the Memphis Medical District Anchor Strategy is leveraging the demands of the anchor institutions’ employees and students, procurement, and hiring needs to better impact the Medical District.

LIVE LOCAL

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

The Live Local Medical District Program provides several types of incentives for eligible employees to live and invest in their homes in and around the Medical District. These incentive options accommodate those looking to purchase a new or existing home, those interested in renting, and current homeowners who wish to complete exterior improvements on their homes. The Live Local Medical District Program is administered by MMDC for four participating anchors.

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BUY LOCAL

MMDC partnered with anchors on a District Purchasing Council that meets monthly to network, match with local/minority businesses, and connect to resources that support the development and expansion of businesses within Memphis and the Medical District. The Buy Local Program vision for 2016 included:

• Networking – To build working relationships between representatives of discrete purchasing entities and facilitate longer term cooperation • Matchmaking – To connect purchasers with qualified local and minority vendors within several key areas of purchasing • Attraction/Expansion – To identify and pursue collective contracts in which volume can attract, expand, or further grow an existing supplier

HIRE LOCAL

MMDC is working on a partner-driven strategy that connects human resource departments with local workforce partners for tailored job training and pipeline development efforts to connect residents to jobs at anchor institutions.


LIVE LOCAL •

Launched with 4 anchor institutions

Processed over 200 Housing Incentive Applications

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

2016 PERFORMAN CE HIGHLIGHTS

BUY LOCAL • Introduced 11 minority- or women-owned businesses to Buy Local Purchasing Group •

Redirected more than $700,000 of new spend at local minority- and women-owned businesses

HIRE LOCAL •

Completed Data Analysis of Anchor Institution Hiring Demand

Laid groundwork for Hire Local council

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

• Held 7 Buy Local Purchasing Council Meetings

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MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

ANCHOR PROGRAMS O PERATION O PPORTUNITY CHALLENGE / MEDHAUL

Erica Plybeah’s interest in healthcare began early. Three years ago, in the midst of a move back to the Mid-South, Erica saw a job posting for the Bioworks Foundation, which was hiring a clinical systems project manager. “I honestly didn’t think I could find a job in Memphis,” she says, explaining her ambivalence about coming back home. “But the Bioworks job looked like someplace where I could learn and grow.” She applied and was hired.

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

Erica Plybeah

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The idea for MedHaul came during her daily commute, when she saw a billboard for a local public hospital system promoting “Free Taxi Rides For New Moms!” “It actually made me really frustrated,” she says. “New moms deserve more than a dirty yellow cab! But it got me thinking: how can we improve patient experience, beginning at discharge, and continuing through arrival at home and after they are returned?” In this frustration, Erica found the same curiosity and ambition that had originally fueled her childhood interest in health and helping people, coupled with a way to utilize her professional passion for data. “I want to extend quality patient experience to improve health outcomes and patient satisfaction.” Coincidentally, the Memphis Medical District Collaborative and EPIcenter were soon launching their Operation Opportunity business plan competition. Operation Opportunity is one of several programs deployed by MMDC to capture and redirect some of the immense purchasing power of the Medical District’s major hospital and higher education partners, particularly as a way to boost minority- and women-owned business enterprises (MWBEs). As a champion for regional entrepreneurs and resource for start-up businesses, EPIcenter was a logical partner. “I initially didn’t apply for Operation Opportunity, but then they actually extended the deadline,” Erica recalls. “It was a sign.”


MedHaul is a software application intended to make the work of medical transportation for patients faster, easier, and more efficient. It is a business-to-business service, targeting existing medical transportation providers that service the major hospitals and healthcare providers in the Memphis Medical District.

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

Specific areas of focus for the program include efficiency in end-to-end transportation management for patients and software solutions for managing customer relationships, among others. MMDC and U3 Advisors estimate that the nine hospitals and universities within the District spend approximately $1.2 billion on these lines of business.

The basic software specs for MedHaul have been built. Following the customer discovery phase, Erica expects to begin building the application in Spring 2017.

ideas, as well as the energy and subject matter expertise to make those ideas happen.”

Operation Opportunity Challenge

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

“We were overwhelmed by the quality of ideas and applications to the Operation Opportunity business plan competition. The winning companies really demonstrated what we were hoping to find by holding this competition – local innovators who can solve for specific challenges within the Medical District and deliver competitive solutions,” says Leslie Lynn Smith, President of EPIcenter. “Erica is a great example of someone who is naturally entrepreneurial – she has lots of innovative

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MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

MMDC BUDGET In its start-up year, MMDC had an operating budget provided mostly by the eight anchor institutions in the Medical District and philanthropy.

2016 REVENUES

38% ANCHOR

CO N T R I B U T I O N S

$1.29M

54%

F O U N DAT I O N S

$1.7M

1%

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

MISC. I N CO M E

32 36

$27K

7%

OT H E R CO N T R I B U T I O N S

$245K

23%

A D M I N I ST R AT I V E EXPENSES

$787K

2016 EXPENSES

PROGRAM EXPENSES

• Public Spaces

77%

• Clean & Green

PROGRAM EXPENSES

• Safety & Security

$2.6M

• Events & Marketing • Community Development • Anchor Programs


MMDC would like to thank all of the partners and funders that work in the Medical District. Our core mission is to collaborate in order to see lasting change in the District. We could not do it without the support of residents, students, employees, and visitors to the District. In addition we’d like to thank...

A NCHOR PARTNERS AND FUNDERS • Baptist College of Health Sciences

• The Pyramid Peak Foundation

• Hyde Family Foundations

• Regional One Health

• The Kresge Foundation

• Southern College of Optometry

• Memphis Bioworks Foundation

• Southwest Tennessee Community College

• Methodist/Le Bonheur Healthcare

• St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital/ALSAC

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

2016 PARTNERS

• University of Tennessee Health Science Center

• All World Construction

• EPIcenter

• Running Pony

• Alta Planning

• Forever Productions

• Annesdale Park Neighborhood

• High Cotton Brewery

• Bike Walk Memphis

• Little Bird Innovation

• Southwest Tennessee Community College Police Department

• Bike Walk Tennessee

• Key Public Strategies

• BLDG Memphis

• LRK

• Caissa Public Strategy

• Innovate Memphis

• Carnes Garden

• Memphis City Beautiful

• Cat Peña

• Memphis College of Art

• Choose 901

• Memphis Police Department

• City of Memphis

• Urban Arts Commission

• Clean Memphis

• Medical Education & Research Institute

• Constance Abbey

• Montgomery Martin Contractors

• UT Police

• Crosstown Arts

• Neighborhood Preservation Inc.

• Victorian Village CDC

• Crosstown Concourse

• Peabody/Vance Neighborhood

• Volunteer Memphis

• DCA

Association

• Downtown Memphis Commission

• Premiere Contracting

• Edge District

• Robert Shemwell

A LL OF OUR INDIVIDUAL VOLUNTEERS

• St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral • U3 Advisors • University of Memphis • University of Pennsylvania Police Department • Uptown Neighborhood Association • Urban Land Institute

M E M P H I S M E D I C A L D I S T R I C T C O L L A B O R AT I V E

ORGANIZATIONAL PARTNERS

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MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

LOOKING FORWARD From the beginning, the Memphis Medical District Collaborative has had the mission of strengthening the communities between and around our eight anchor institutions in the Memphis Medical District. This requires a truly collaborative approach. During our first year, we focused on building relationships with stakeholders while working with a diverse group of partners to start projects across the District: clean and green programs, streetscape improvements, public art projects, small area planning, events intended to connect people with places, and new businesses opening. Together, these projects make a noticeable impact and help elevate people’s awareness of all the Medical District has to offer. From every resident, neighborhood leader, and business owner to every anchor institution, city division, and community organization that worked collaboratively with us this year, we are grateful for your dedication and hard work. Over the next year, MMDC will focus on increasing housing options, strengthening commercial corridors, improving public life, enhancing safety and security, and capturing the impact of the anchor institutions in the District. We will also focus on increasing connectedness to the Medical District community among employees, students, and residents and looking to build a mixed-use, mixed-income District

L O O K I N G F O R WA R D

with options for people across the socio-economic spectrum.

34 38

In looking forward, MMDC is dedicated to continuing the relationship building of the past year and empowering more residents and stakeholders to join us on this journey. To do this we must keep creating vital connections through collaboration and thoughtful approaches to building stronger communities.


CHAIR

VICE-CHAIR

TREASURER

CEO, Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare

Executive Vice-Chancellor, University of Tennessee Health Science Center

President, Baptist College of Health Sciences

SECRETARY

DIRECTOR

DIRECTOR

President, Southern College of Optometry

Executive Director, Memphis Bioworks Foundation

President, Victorian Village Inc. Community Development Corporation

DIRECTOR

DIRECTOR

DIRECTOR

Executive Director, The Pyramid Peak Foundation

President & CEO, Regional One Health

President, Southwest Tennessee Community College

DIRECTOR

DIRECTOR

DIRECTOR

Trustee, Hyde Family Foundations

COO, City of Memphis

President & CEO, Downtown Memphis Commission

DIRECTOR

DIRECTOR

President & CEO, ALSAC

President, Edge Neighborhood Association

Dr. Lewis Reich

Mr. Jim Boyd

Mr. Pitt Hyde

Mr. Richard Shadyac Jr.

Dr. Kennard Brown

Dr. Steve Bares

Dr. Reginald Coopwood

Mr. Doug McGowen

Dr. Betty Sue McGarvey

Mr. Scott Blake

Dr. Tracy Hall

Mr. Terence Patterson

Mr. Mike Todd

WORKING TOGETHER TO MAKE A DISTRICT A COMMUNITY

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Mr. Gary Shorb

MMDC ANNUAL REPORT 2016

2016 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

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656 MADISON AVENUE MEMPHIS, TN 38103 (901) 552-4781 M D C O L L A B O R AT I V E . O R G

MMDC 2016 Annual Report  
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