Issuu on Google+

A Day at Plimoth Plantation

Original Paintings and Text by Mange Camara


As the sun goes up over Plimoth Plantation, the sky explodes with color. The big cow wakes up from his long sleep. He rushes over to see the owl, but the owl is leaving his warm nest to catch a field mouse. The wind quickly rushes through the trees. The chipmunk hides in his dark hole. The cow eats the soft, chewy grass. An Indian boy spies from behind a tree as the cow watches him. Day has begun for the Pilgrims.


As the sky blooms from its rest, the boys run quickly to the garden to make sure that no bunnies get in and eat the vegetables. The rooster stands high on the roof, saying, “Cock-a-doodle-doo!� The plump, juicy vegetables look as fine as gold. The sun is peeking over the side of the house. It is sunrise.


A tall Pilgrim boy and his short dog run to the animal trap to check on it. Soft, green grass sparkles in the noon sun, spreading like butter in the deep, blue sky. The dog barks two times, which means they are close. Suddenly, they spy a Wampanoag boy looking at their trap. They quietly watch him.


The Indian boy is not aware that a Pilgrim boy and his dog are creeping up behind him. He sees the animal trap and fiddles with it. Suddenly, he hears leaves crunching behind him. He turns around to find a great buck eating grass close by. He grabs his bow and chases after it. The Pilgrim boy and his dog follow along. It is afternoon.


The sun is going down. Leaves are falling as the sky gets darker and darker. The boys are running home so they don’t miss dinner. The sparkling water and the shining sun meet at an angle. The sky is vibrant. As the Indian men finish fishing, they tip over the mishoons to dry and swim back to their village. The sun is setting behind the hills. Day is done.


As the sun disappears behind the hills, the Wampanoag people go home to their wetus. The sky is growing darker. The wetus get darker and the people grow tired. Soon they light the fire and tell stories. The tall trees sway in the wind. Then the sunlight goes out.


As the Wampanoags and Pilgrims sleep, the sparkly night sky shines on the water. Bumpy rocks make the water splash. An owl comes home from his far journey. He has brought food for his owlets. The fish hide in the deep water. They taunt the hidden seagulls.


This is one of the many books which came to life while the students of Mrs. Mattson’s 3rd grade class explored the rich relationship between visual imagery and the written word. This Time of Day book was created as a part of Picturing Writing: Fostering Literacy Through ArtŽ, an art-and-literature-based writing program developed by Beth Olshansky at the University of New Hampshire. The program is designed to support the acquisition of literacy skills in children with diverse learning styles. A research-based literacy program, Picturing Writing has proven

its

effectiveness

in

dramatically

improving

student

writing. After

a

visit

to

Plimoth

Plantation

in

Plymouth,

Massachusetts, our class combined the Time of Day unit with our study of the Wampanoag Indians and Pilgrims to create our own, unique visions of A Day in the Life of Plantation.

December, 2009


Mange-Plimoth Book