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A Fall Day in the Wampanoag Village

Jonathan Salem-Chacon


The magenta sky reflects the calm water. It is dawn and the earth is peaceful. It is very quiet in the Wampanoag village. Everyone is still in their wetus except for one woman who is cooking fish for her family. The fire is warming the woman because it is a cold, fall morning.


The bluish, yellowish-orange sky blows across the Wampanoag Village. The sun rises and it’s about to be morning. The Chief went hunting earlier in the morning. He found a deer and got it!


The aqua day sky is hot over the village. A fire burns near a Wampanoag wetu. A mother cooks deer that was caught in the morning by the Chief. The children run to eat the deer because it smells so good!


The sun is going down behind the mountain at the Wampanoag village. The fish hide in the deep water so they don’t get caught by the net. But the Wampanoag men catch five white codfish! They paddle back up the river to their village. They tie their mishoons to a tree, put their paddles in the boat then walk to the Wampanoag village for dinner.


The shiny moon and the stars glow in the deep blue night sky. All the Wampanoags sleep in their wetus. It’s night, the sky is dark and asleep, and it’s time for everything to sleep. All is quiet ‘til sunrise.


This is one of the many books which came to life while the students of Mrs. Mattson’s 3rd grade class explored the rich relationship between visual imagery and the written word. This Time of Day book was created as a part of Picturing Writing: Fostering Literacy Through Art®, an art-andliterature-based Olshansky

at

writing the

program

University

of

developed New

by

Beth

Hampshire.

The

program is designed to support the acquisition of literacy skills in children with diverse learning styles. A researchbased literacy program, Picturing Writing has proven its effectiveness in dramatically improving student writing. After

a

visit

to

Plimoth

Plantation

in

Plymouth,

Massachusetts, our class combined the Time of Day unit with our study of the Wampanoag Indians and Pilgrims to create our own, unique visions of “A Day in the Life of Plantation.”

December, 2010


Jonathan S's Book online