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African & African Diaspora Studies School of International and Public Affairs

Contents 3 Statement of Director Dr. Jean Muteba Rahier

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4 Statement of Director of Graduate Programs Dr. Heather Russell 4

Staff

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AADS Faculty

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Faculty Achievements

New Core Faculty

Dr. Okezi T. Otovo

Dr. Danielle Clealand 4

AADS 2012-2013 Students

4 AADS Graduate Student Association 4 AADS Study Abroad Programs 2012 Senegal/The Gambia Summer

Historical Dictionary of Republic of the Congo & Black Social Movements in Latin America: From Monocultural Mestizaje to Multiculturalism 4

New Affiliate Faculty

4 Karell Travel Grant Fiacre Bienvenu 4 Events Spring 2012-Fall 2012 4

AADS Academic Programs

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2012-2013 AADS Courses

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Donate

Kin XXXII (Run Like the Wind), 2008 by Whitfield Lovell.

Sin Fronteras/ Sans Frontières/ Without Borders: AADS 2012 Newsletter


Sin Fronteras/ Sans Frontières/ Without Borders: 2012

Contents 3 Statement of Director Dr. Jean Muteba Rahier 6 Statement of Director of Graduate Programs Dr. Heather Russell 8

Staff

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AADS Faculty & Committees

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Faculty Achievements

Historical Dictionary of Republic of the Congo & Black Social Movements in Latin America: From Monocultural Mestizaje to Multiculturalism & Kings for Three Days:

The Play of Race and Gender in an Afro- Ecuadorian Festival 22

New Core Faculty

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New Affiliate Faculty

Dr. Eric J. von Wettberg 25

AADS 2012-2013 Students

29 AADS Graduate Student Association 30 AADS Study Abroad Programs 2012 Senegal/The Gambia Summer 33 Karell Travel Grant Fiacre Bienvenu 34 University of the West IndiesFIU, Fifty-Fifty: Critical Reflections in a Time of Uncertainty Dr. Percy Hintzen 44 Events Spring 2012-Fall 2012 57 AADS Courses Spring 2013

Dr. Okezi T. Otovo

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AADS Academic Programs

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Donate

New Affiliate Faculty

Dr. Danielle Clealand


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Statement of Director

I am writing this statement as I begin my second term as African & African Diaspora Studies (AADS) Director. Now more than ever, I am well aware of the challenges AADS faces. Indeed, until about 2008, our Program—then still called “African-New World Studies” (ANWS)—mostly functioned as both an ethnic studies body, as well as a unit that housed teaching about, and research on African diaspora communities in the world’s big regions: North America, Latin America and the Caribbean, Europe, Asia, the Middle East, etc. With the adoption of our new name, AADS, which coincided with our joining the School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), we also became an area studies by adding to what we were doing already, in an unambiguous way, teaching and research on continental Africa. Our past, present, and future programming of events expresses the multiple facets of our identity(ies) as a unit and the multiple disciplines we incorporate in our multi- and inter-disciplinary fields of inquiry: this fall semester 2012, we will host our third AADS Humanities Afternoon entitled Afro Homo: Norming Nation, Norming Sex; we’ll have our 14th Eric Williams Memorial Lecture on the celebration of the 50th anniversary of Jamaican and Trinidad and Tobago’s independences (with lectures by Rachel Manley and Reginald Dumas); we organize in partnership with LACC a lecture by Dr. Marta Maffia, from the Universidad de la Plata in Argentina, entitled Africanos y Afrodescendientes en la Argentina Actual; and we host a one-man performance by actor David Mills on the work of Langston Hughes. In the spring semester 2013, we will have anthropologist Deborah Thomas, from the University of Pennsylvania present her new film, “Bad Friday: Rastafari after Coral Gardens,” on January 31, 2013; and we will have Pedro Noguera on February 14 who will lecture on “Trayvon Martin and the Ongoing Crisis Confronting African American Males in America: Race, Class, Gender and the Dangerous Consequences of Intersectionality.” Since 2008, we have managed to continue to aliment our strengths in African diaspora studies at the same time that we accomplished a number of things in this new or renewed Africanist endeavor of ours. We developed a study abroad program to Senegal and The Gambia that will still run during the summer C session of 2013. That program allows us to regularly teach WOL 1170 “Wolof Language and Culture” (see the article about the study abroad program in this newsletter).


Sin Fronteras/ Sans Frontières/ Without Borders: 2012

We have replaced our undergraduate certificate in African & African Diaspora Studies with two new ones: the Certificate in Global Black Studies , which focuses on millions of Afrodescendants across the world but outside of Africa, and the Certificate in African Studies. We now have two Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) with two West African universities: The Université Cheihk Anta Diop in Dakar, Senegal, and the University of The Gambia (UTG) in Banjul, which are two partner universities for our study abroad program. This summer, FIU also signed an MOU with the University of Liberia, following the fruitful contacts with that institution of FIU Biology professor, Dr. Ophelia Weeks. With the arrival of Percy Hintzen at FIU, we have also participated in the initiative that wants to revive a multi-faceted partnership between FIU and the multi-campus University of the West-Indies (UWI). There are there possibilities for the expansion of our online course offerings on Africa, which could be made available to UWI students. On the opposite direction, existing and to be developed UWI online courses on the Caribbean could be made available to FIU students. In the context of what we’d like to become a vigorous UWI-FIU Partnership, we are also organizing an international meeting in April 2013 (the program will soon be made available on our website). That meeting will take advantage of Miami’s geographic location as the gateway to Latin America and the Caribbean to position FIU’s AADS as the site for the creation of an international research group on comparative work on tourism in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean. The meeting we are organizing this April 4-6, 2013 has for tentative title: “Tourism and ProPoor Sustainable Development in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean: Comparative History and Policy Analysis,” and will bring together researchers from the UWI system, FIU, the U.S., Africa, and Europe. Please view Professor Hintzen’s brief entitled “FiftyFifty: Critical Reflections in a Time of Uncertainty” for an overview of prospective goals of this initiative. This past academic year, we submitted—unsuccessfully for now—a Title VI UISFL grant proposal for the development of an undergraduate certificate in African studies at FIU. We were hoping to have it in hand at the very beginning of the official birth of our certificate in African studies. The scores obtained during the 2012 competition are encouraging and we will address the reviewers’ comments and prepare what should be an even stronger proposal for this academic year’s UISFL competition.


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I am also pleased to announce that a search for news two faculty members is currently underway: we are trying to fill an Africanist position in both the Department of History and AADS. The second one, to be fully located in the Department of Politics and International Relations, also aims to bring in an Africanist. In the same vein, I would like to extend a hearty welcome to our three new affiliate faculty members: Biology Assistant Professor Dr. Eric Von Wettberg, Political Science Assistant Professor Dr. Danielle Clealand, and Nursing and Health Sciences Assistant Professor Dr. Lincoln Pettaway. Our graduate program continues to grow steadily, thanks to everyone’s efforts, and particularly as the result of our colleague Dr. Heather Russell’s work, as the AADS Graduate Program Director (see her statement in this newsletter, as well as the graduate students’ section). The AADS office continues to function well thanks to the excellent work of our two new capable staff members: Hector Solimán-Valdez and Reynia Valerio, who are accompanied by two student workers, Hollesha Foster and Diana Yovera, and by (Martina) Carla Louis as Graduate Assistant for this academic year. Many thanks to Carla for successfully taking on the task of putting this newsletter together. This academic year, we will be going through a Program Review, an exercise that any academic unit must perform every seven years. I will be asking for the help of all core and affiliate faculty with this process: we will need to compile a considerable amount of information about ourselves. We will also be continuing with our campaign for enrollment increase in all our academic programs. I will be calling on the help of both students and faculty for this. May you all have a great academic year!

Sincerely, Jean Muteba Rahier, Director


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Statement of Director of Graduate Programs

My first year as acting Director of Graduate Programs for the African & African Diaspora Studies (AADS) program has ended and another exciting, fulfilling, and busy year begins! I am so pleased that all three of our combined MA/PhD programs in AADS/International Relations and AADS/History and AADS/Global and Sociocultural Studies (GSS) are fully underway, and based upon our stellar recruitment results this year, it is obvious that these are already sought-after programs by students all over the country. In fact, I am pleased to announce that we had over twenty applicants to our four graduate programs. I am truly delighted, however, to welcome to our AADS family for this academic year 2012-2013:

Danielle Black, who is pursuing her MA in AADS, and comes to us from Duke University, North Carolina. Santos Cayetano, who served as McNair Director at Wesleyan University, Connecticut, and is pursuing his MA in AADS. Binta Dixon, who comes to us from East Carolina State University, North Carolina and is pursuing her MA in AADS. Carla Louis, who is pursuing her MA/PhD in AADS and GSS, and comes to us from Smith College, Massachusetts. Dennika Mays, who is pursuing her MA/PhD in AADS and GSS and comes to us from the College of Saint Scholastica, in Duluth, Minnesota. I extend a very warm welcome as well, to Consuella Askew and Lisa Hoskins who join our graduate students currently completing AADS graduate certification. Lastly, I join with Dr. Rahier in heartily welcoming Dr. Okezi Otovo to our AADS family and the department of History. Her scholarship, in particular on Afro-Brazilian history and culture will indeed meet a vital need here at FIU, and in AADS as we continue to develop and grow our graduate programs.


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“BIG-UPS, CONGRATULATIONS, AND BRAVOS” Our current graduate students continue to do amazing work. Jheanell Haynes, Oceane Roberts, and Mamyrah Prosper presented papers at the University of the West Indies’ (UWI) Sir Arthur Lewis Institute of Social and Economic Studies’ (SALISES) 50-50 Conference, held in Kingston Jamaica. The title of their panel was: “The Caribbean and the Emerging Postnational Global System.” Felix Jean-Louis published an article, "Dèyè mòn gen mòn, ant mòn yo gen moun (Behind mountains there are mountains, between those mountains there are people)," in the Jamaican Beacon. Fiacre Bienvenu, who was the recipient of the Karell travel grant, was able to spend a month this past Spring, conducting research in Rwanda. He will deliver the Karell Lecture next year. Last year, under the direction of outgoing President, Felix Jean-Louis, the AADS-GSA won the award for best Graduate organization at FIU and hosted a stellar two-day graduate student conference. Jheanell Haynes is President of our award-winning AADS-GSA this year, and we are anticipating an exciting, productive, and intellectually stimulating year as we work together in support of each other. Charles May II and Jheanell Haynes were respondents for Toure’s lecture, Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness Charles May II and Christina Bazzaroni presented their research at the UGS’s Scholarly Forum for graduate students. Last BUT not LEAST…… Jameel Barnes and Sabrina Collins successfully defended their research projects and graduated from AADS with their MA degrees! In closing, I want to remind students and faculty to attend to all of the deadlines regarding MA-Thesis submissions and Graduation requirements. I will continue to email reminders as often as I can. All of this information, however, can be found very easily at the University Graduate School’s (UGS) website under “Forms.” Please keep abreast of AADS’ graduate program information by regularly checking our web-site and making note of any announcements in this newsletter. Finally, I want to extend my sincere gratitude to Jean Rahier, Director of AADS, for his continued support, advice, and collegiality during the past year. I look forward to our continued collaboration. In addition, I am extremely grateful to Hector SolimanValdez for his continued excellent work and support. Last but by no means least, I am thrilled to welcome to our program and thank Reyni Valerio whose professionalism and dedication has helped to ease what has been a challenging time of personnel transitions for us at AADS. Thank you, Heather


Sin Fronteras/ Sans Frontières/ Without Borders: 2012

Staff Reyni Valerio Program Assistant

Hector Soliman Office Assistant

Diana Yovera Assistant

Hollesha Foster Assistant

Born in the Dominican Republic but raised in New Hampshire, I am thrilled to be living in Miami and experiencing all that it has to offer. I received a BBA in Marketing from FIU this past spring and hoping to start my Master’s Degree next year. As the Program Assistant for the AADS program, I am in charge of everything related to academics and also updating the website, the weekly digest, and assisting students. I’m excited to be a part of this program and look forward to working with you all.

I have a Bachelor’s in International Relations with a Certificate in Latin American and Caribbean Studies I do a lot of different work here at AADS. Ranging from the Department Finances, Coordination of Travels for Students and Staff, Schedule of Classes, and Programing of Events. My career goals are to pursue a Masters in Urban Planning and eventually a PhD. I was born in Puerto Rico, Raised in Rhode Island, and now am in Miami.

I am a senior at Florida International University. My major is International Relations and Political Science, I just finished a certificate in Women’s Studies and I am on my way to graduation at the end of the spring semester. I have just started working at the AADS department at the beginning of this term and I have enjoyed every moment so far! It‘s been lovely to learn about the programs offered and the study abroad opportunities to The Gambia and Senegal. As well as the events hosted like the Welcome Back Ceremony with African Performers such as Titi. I hope it continues to be this interesting and informative!

I am the Work Study Student assistant for her second year at the AADS office. I assist the AADS Director, Office Manager, and Program assistant on all events, programs, office duties and academic projects. I am from Deltona, Florida and am currently a Junior studying Human Resource Management. After graduation I aspire to enter graduate school in order to receive a Masters in Human Resource Management.


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AADS FACULTY AND COMMITTEES Core Faculty: Jean Muteba Rahier, Associate Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies & AADS, Director, AADS Jean-Robert Cadely, Associate Professor, Modern Languages & AADS Alexandra Cornelius-Diallo, Assistant Professor, History & AADS Andrea Queeley, Assistant Professor of Anthropology & AADS Okezi Otovo, Assistant Professor of History & AADS

Affiliate Faculty: Pascale Becel, Chair and Associate Professor, Modern Languages Steven R. Blevins, Assistant Professor, English Maya Boutaghou, Assistant Professor, Modern Languages and Women’s Studies Phillip Carter, Assistant Professor, English John Clark, Professor, Politics & International Relations Danielle Clealand, Assistant Professor, Politics & International Relations Carolina Faria, Assistant Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies Jenna Gibbs, Assistant Professor, History Percy Hintzen, Professor, Sociology Tometro Hopkins, Assistant Professor, History Andrea Mantel-Seidel, Associate Professor Dance & Director of Academic Programs, Latin American and Caribbean Center Assefa Melesse, Associate Professor, Environmental Studies April Merleaux, Assistant Professor, History Aurora Morcillo, Associate Professor, History and Women's Studies Roderick Paul Neumann, Chair, Global & Sociocultural Studies; Professor, Geography Ulrich Oslender, Assistant Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies

Vrushali Patil, Assistant Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies & Women's Studies Valerie Patterson, Clinical Associate Professor, Public Administration Joyce Peterson, Associate Professor, History & Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences David Rifkind, Assistant Professor, History Heather Russell, Director of Graduate Studies, AADS; Associate Professor, English Vicky Silvera, Head, Special Collection, Library Linda Spears-Bunton, Associate Professor, College of Education Dionne Stephens, Assistant Professor, Psychology & AADS Alex Stepick III, Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies Juan Torees- Pou, Associate Professor, Spanish Chantalle Verna, Assistant Professor, History and Politics & International Relations Eric Von Wettberg, Assistant Professor, Biology Donna Weir-Soley, Associate Professor, English Kirsten Wood, Associate Professor, History Albert Wuaku, Assistant Professor, Religious Studies

Adjunct Faculty: Mariama Jaiteh, Adjunct Instructor, AADS Ida Tafari, Adjunct Instructor, AADS

Noelle Theard, Adjunct Instructor Global & Sociocultural Studies & AADS

Steering Committee: Jean-Robert Cadely Alexandra Cornelius-Diallo Carolina Faria Perccy Hintzen Tometro Hopkins

Okezi Otovo Jean Muteba Rahier Heather Russell Valerie Peterson Andrea Queeley Albert Wuaku


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Historical Dictionary of Republic of the Congo By Affiliated Professor John F. Clark & colleague Samuel Decalo

Hardcover: 570 pages Publisher: Scarecrow Press; Fourth Edition Date Published: August 9, 2012 Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 1.6 inches

The fourth edition of the Historical Dictionary of Republic of the Congo provides a comprehensive set of references on the country’s history, politics, economics, and culture. It traces the careers of the country’s leading personalities into the era following the democratic experiment of the 1990s. It updates the country’s social, economic, and political evolution through the first decade of the 21st century. Clark and Decalo provide a snapshot of the Republic of the Congo through a chronology, an introductory essay, appendixes, an extensive bibliography, and the dictionary section of over 700 cross-referenced entries on important personalities, leading political figures, institutions, economic enterprises, ethnic communities, and cultural features. It provides information on many aspects of Congolese society, culture, and society not available on any web-based source or in any other publication. It is an excellent access point for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about the Republic of the Congo.


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Black Social Movements in Latin America: From Monocultural Mestizaje to Multiculturalism Edited by AADS Director Jean Muteba Rahier with a contribution from Affiliate Faculty member Ulrich Oslender and collaboration of GSS PhD student Mamyrah Prosper

Hardcover: 272 pages

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

Date Published: June 19, 2012

Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.6 x 0.8 inches

This collection of essays explores the transformations of the political landscapes within which black social movements in Latin America have been operating since the end of the 1970s. Evaluating black social movements in their various national contexts, the essays reveal that these transformations have mostly consisted in the passage from statesponsored ideological 'monocultural mestizaje' to state-managed multiculturalism and corporatism or cooptation. As the contributions to this volume show, black personalities and leaders of social movements were incorporated within the apparatus of the state. These new situations have rendered Afro-Latino political struggles more complex, at times even heightening the antagonism they encounter. Endorsements: "An excellent and up-to-date overview of black social movements in Latin America. The chapters give detailed insight into the complex and contradictory relationships of these movements with diverse levels of the state, illustrating some of the gains made since the 1990s and highlighting how much further there is still to go in the face of powerful forces of cooptation, continued marginalization and, in some cases, outright violence." -- Peter Wade, author of Race and Ethnicity in Latin America


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Kings for Three Days:

The Play of Race and Gender in an Afro- Ecuadorian Festival By AADS Director Jean Muteba Rahier Publisher: The University of Illinois Press Forthcoming: May 31, 2013 With its rich mix of cultures, European influences, colonial tensions, and migration from bordering nations, Ecuador has long drawn the interest of ethnographers, historians, and political scientists. In this book, Jean Muteba Rahier delivers a highly detailed, thought-provoking examination of the racial, sexual, and social complexities of Afro-Ecuadorian culture, as revealed through the annual Festival of the Kings. During the Festival, the people of various villages and towns of Esmeraldas--Ecuador's province most associated with blackness--engage in celebratory and parodic portrayals, often donning masks, cross-dressing, and disguising themselves as blacks, indigenous people, and whites, in an obvious critique of local, provincial and national white, white-mestizo and light-mulatto elites. Rahier shows that this festival, as performed in different locations, reveals each time a specific location’s perspective on the larger struggles over identity, class, and gender relations in the racial-spatial order of Esmeraldas and of the Ecuadorian nation in general. Endorsements: "A captivating and informative study of the Roman Catholic Feast of the Three Kings as celebrated in two Ecuadorian towns. Rahier gathers extremely rich observations, described in minute detail and finely illustrated, and the book sheds new light on Ecuadorian race and gender relations with great flashes of analysis." --Kris Lane, author of The Colour of Paradise: The Emerald in the Age of Gunpowder Empires "An important contribution to analyses of ritual and performance in terms of history, race, and gender. Rahier departs from the recent emphasis on transnationalism and makes a strong argument for the importance of studying the performance within specific local contexts." --Rachel Corr, author of Ritual and Remembrance in the Ecuadorian Andes


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Faculty Achievements BOOK PUBLICATIONS (PUBLISHED) Oslender, Ulrich 2011 Comunidades negras y espacio en el Pacífico colombiano. Hacia un giro geográfico en el estudio de los movimientos. Bogotá: Instituto Colombiano de Antropología e Historia. 2nd edición. Rahier, Jean Muteba (Editor) 2012 Black Social Movements in Latin America: From Monocultural Mestizaje to Multiculturalism. New York: Palgrave-McMillan. Rifkind, David. 2012 The Battle for Modernism: Quadrante and the Politicization of Architectural Discourse in Fascist Italy. Venice: Centro Internazionale di Studi di Architettura Andrea Palladio and Marsilio Editori. BOOKS (IN PRESS) Rahier, Jean Muteba Kings for Three Days: The Play of Race and Gender in an Afro-Ecuadorian Festival. UrbanaChampaign: The University of Illinois Press. May 31, 2013. Rahier, Jean Muteba Blackness in the Andes: Transformations and Continuities of Cultural Politics in the Time of Multiculturalism and State Corporatism. New York: Palgrave-McMillan.

BOOK CHAPTERS (PUBLISHED) Stephens, D.P. (2012). The influence of mainstream Hip Hop’s female sexual scripts on African American women’s dating relationship experiences (pp. 69-83) In M. Paludi (Ed.) The Psychology of Love. Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger Publishing. Stephens, D. P., Patil, V., & Thomas, T. L. (Invited Chapter- 2012). STI prevention & control for women globally: A reproductive justice approach to understanding women’s experiences (pp. 117- 144). In J. Chrisler (Ed.) Reproductive Justice: A Global Concern. Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger Publishing. [APA Division 52 International Committee for Women and Division 35 Global Issues Committee Project]


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PEER- REVIEWED BOOK CHAPTERS (PUBLISHED) Rahier, Jean Muteba 2012 “Introduction Black Social Movements in Latin America: From Monocultural Mestizaje and ‘Invisibility’ to Multiculturalism and State Corporatism/Co-optation.” In Black Social Movements in Latin America: From Monocultural Mestizaje to Multiculturalism. Edited by J.M. Rahier. New York: Palgrave-McMillan: 1-14.

PEER- REVIEWED BOOK CHAPTERS (PUBLISHED) Rahier, Jean Muteba 2012 “Introduction Black Social Movements in Latin America: From Monocultural Mestizaje and ‘Invisibility’ to Multiculturalism and State Corporatism/Co-optation.” In Black Social Movements in Latin America: From Monocultural Mestizaje to Multiculturalism. Edited by J.M. Rahier. New York: Palgrave-McMillan: 1-14.

Rahier, Jean Muteba and Mamyrah Prosper Dougé 2012 “Interview with María Alexandra Ocles Padilla, Former Minister, Secretaría de Pueblos, Movimientos Sociales y Participación Ciudadana, Ecuador.” In Black Social Movements in Latin America: From Monocultural Mestizaje to Multiculturalism. Edited by J.M. Rahier. New York: Palgrave-McMillan: 169-184. Rahier, Jean Muteba 2012 “Interview with Maria Inês Barbosa, Former Vice-Minister, Secretaria Especial de Políticas de Promoção da Igualdade Racial (SEPPIR), Brazil.” In Black Social Movements in Latin America: From Monocultural Mestizaje to Multiculturalism. Edited by J.M. Rahier. New York: Palgrave-McMillan: 213-224. Rahier, Jean Muteba 2012 “Afro-Ecuadorian Community Organizing and Political Struggle: Influences on, and Participation in, Constitutional Processes.” In Comparative Perspectives on Afro-Latin America edited by Kwame Dixon and John Burdick. Gainesville: University Press of Florida: 198218.


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BOOK CHAPTERS (IN PRESS) Stephens, D. P. & Fernandez, P. Ni pardo, ni prieto: The influence of parental skin color messaging on emerging adult Hispanic women’s dating beliefs. In D. M. Kawahara & O. Espin (Eds.) Feminist Therapy with Latina Women: Personal and Social Voices. Routledge: New York, NY. (Reprinted from Women & Therapy: Special Issue on Latinas and Latin America, 35, 4-18).

PEER- REVIEWED JOURNAL PUBLICATION Rahier, Jean Muteba 2011 “From Invisibilidad to Participation in State Corporatism: Afro-Ecuadorians and the Constitutional Processes of 1998 and 2008.” Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power. Volume 18(5): 502-527.

Rahier, Jean Muteba 2011 “Hypersexual Black Women in the Ecuadorian ‘Common Sense’: An Examination of Visual and Other Representations.” Civilisations, Revue Internationale d’Anthropologie et de Sciences Humaines. Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium. 60(1): 59-80. Stephens, D. P., & Fernandez, P. 2012 The role of skin color on Hispanic women’s perceptions of attractiveness. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, 34, 77- 94. Stephens, D. P. & Fernandez, P. 2012 Ni pardo, ni prieto: The influence of parental skin color messaging on emerging adult Hispanic women’s dating beliefs. Women & Therapy: Special Issue on Latinas and Latin America, 35, 4-18. PEER- REVIEWED JOURNAL PUBLICATION (IN PRESS) Stephens, D. P. & Thomas, T. Cultural values influencing immigrant Haitian mothers’ decision to vaccinate daughters’ against human papillomavirus (HPV). Journal of Black Psychology. Stephens, D. P. & Thomas, T. L. The influence of skin color on heterosexual emerging adult Black women’s dating preference beliefs. Journal Feminist Family Therapy.


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JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS (PUBLISHED) Faria, Caroline. 2012 Faria, Caroline and Good, R. eds. “Fieldwork in an African Setting: Advice, Reflections and Stories of Research on the continent”. African Geographical Review. Volume 31(1)

Rifkind, David. 2011 "Misprision of Precedent: Design as Creative Misreading." Journal of Architectural Education. Volume 64 (2): 66–75.

Rifkind, David. 2012 "Gondar. Architecture and Urbanism for Italy’s Fascist Empire." Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians. Volume 70 (4). Wettberg, Eric. 2012 Kassa, M.T., Penmetsa, R.V., Carrasquilla-Garcia, N., Sarma, B.K., Datta, S., Upadhyaya, H.D., Varshney, R.K,. von Wettberg, E.J., and Cook, D.R. Genetic patterns of domestication in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp) and wild Cajanus relatives. PlosOne, 7(6): e39563. JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS (IN PRESS) Cornelius, Alexandra. “‘A Taste of the Lash of Criticism’: Racial Progress, Self-Defense, and Christian Intellectual Thought in the Work of Amelia E. Johnson.” Mia Bay, Farah Griffin, Martha Jones, and Barbara Savage eds. Toward an Intellectual History of Black Women. BOOK REVIEWS AND OTHER PUBLICATIONS Clark, John 2012 Elections and the media in post-conflict Africa: votes and voices for peace?, Marie-Soleil Frère, Choice 49, no.9 (May): 5300.


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BOOK REVIEWS AND OTHER PUBLICATIONS Rahier, Jean Muteba Forthcoming People Get Ready: African American and Caribbean Cultural Exchange. By Kevin Meehan. Jackson: The University Press of Mississippi, 2009. Xv + 231 pp. in The New West Indian Guide/Nieuwe West-Indische Gids (NWIG) vol. 87, nº 3&4.

ESSAY REVIEWS (PUBLISHED) Rahier, Jean Muteba Forthcoming “Henry Louis Gates Jr.: A Self-Identified U.S. Black IntellectualEntrepreneur on Blacks in Latin America.” Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology. 17(1). (Review essay of Gates, Henry-Louis 2011

Black in Latin America. A four part PBS television series.

2011

Black in Latin America. New York: New York University Press.)

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS (FORTHCOMING) Thomas, T. L. & Stephens, D. (2013, April). Health disparities and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination: Research Findings and implications for pediatric nurses in advanced practice. Podium presentation for the Presented at the Podium presentation for the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners Annual Conference, Orlando, FL. Thomas, T. L. & Stephens, D. (2013, March). Social Norms, Social Networks and Human Oramas, L., Whiddon, M., & Stephens, D. P. (2012, August). influence of parental conflict strategies on Hispanic men’s conflict resolution with intimate partners. Poster presentation for the American Psychological Association, Orlando, FL. Stephens, D. (2012, October) Exploring the influence of mainstream Hip Hop cultural messaging on Black adolescent IPV beliefs. Structured Dialogue for the 12th Annual Diversity Challenge: What to Do About Race, Culture, and Violence. University of Boston, Boston, MA. Thomas, T. L. & Stephens, D. (2012, October). Reaching out to rural areas; Developing a school based adolescent cancer prevention program. Podium presentation for the National Meeting for the American Public Health Association, San Francisco, CA. von Wettberg, Eric (2012, October) Congress on Legume Genetics and Genomics on biogeography of legumes in the Caribbean and Florida on.


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CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS Clark, John 2012 “Ethnicity, Governance, and Development in Africa.” Presented at a Conference entitled “Achieving Sustainable Development in Africa,” University of Pittsburgh. Cornelius, Alexandra. 2012 “‘Can We Afford It?’ : The Impact of Poverty on Children in the Work of Ann Petry.” Association for the Study of African American Life and History. Pittsburgh. Stephens, D. 2012 Psychological aspects of a health care decision making: The HPV vaccine, boys and their fathers. Poster presentation for the American Psychological Association, Orlando, FL. Stephens, D. P. 2012 Cultural constructions and the coercion of college men. Symposium paper presented in M. McHugh (Chair), The consequences of sexual standards and scripts: Dates, hookups, coercion, shame and offense. Paper presentation annual meeting of the Association of Women Psychologists, Palm Springs, CA.

CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS Stephens, D. P. 2012 Perceived Benefits of the HPV Vaccine by Parents Who Reside in Rural Areas. Presented at the 2012 Southern Nursing Research Society. New Orleans, LA. Stephens, D. P. 2012 African American adolescent women’s perceptions of verbal coercion and sexual risk in mainstream Hip Hop contexts. Roundtable presentation for the American Psychological Association, Orlando, FL. Stephens, D. P. 2012 The new STI Decision for young Hispanic men: Now or never for the HPV vaccine. Poster presentation for the American Psychological Association, Orlando, FL.


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RESEARCH AWARDS & FELLOWSHIPS Faria, Caroline. 2012

Summer Research Stipend, College of Arts and Sciences, Florida International University.

Faria, Caroline. 2011 UN Mission in Sudan (UNMiS) Gender Unit: Donation of flights to travel within South Sudan to conduct research with women civil society leaders. Joint application with the South Sudan Women’s Empowerment Network (SSWEN). Rifkind, David. 2012 Graham Foundation: funding to conduct research in Ethiopia this on urbanism and modern architecture. Stephens, D. P. 2013- 2012 Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Nursing Research: Tailoring an Intervention with Parents in Rural Areas to Reduce HPV Transmission Stephens, D. P. 2012 Institute for Feminist Academic Psychologists Fellow American Psychological Association and Division 35: The Society for the Psychology of Women


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AWARDS & RECOGNITIONS Rifkind, David. 2012 Graham Foundation: funding to conduct research in Ethiopia on urbanism and modern architecture. Stephens, D. P. 2011

Exemplary Course Award for Online Instructional Development

Online Department Learning Department, Florida International University. Rifkind, David. 2012

Florida International University’s Faculty Senate Research Award

Rifkind, David. 2012

Florida International University’s Top

Stephens, D. P. 2012

Research Presentation Travel Award (FIU PRIME Program- $1000)

Laura Oramas, Doctoral Student in Psychology- FIU Stephens, D. P. 2012 Outstanding Student Award (FIU College of Arts & Sciences - Biscayne Bay Campus) Luis Abreu, 2012 Bachelor of Arts in Psychology- FIU Stephens, D. P. 2012 Outstanding Student Researcher (Emory University Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing) Amy Blumling, 2012 Bachelor of Science in Nursing- Emory University Stephens, D. P. 2012 Student Researcher Honors (Emory University Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing) Sam Snell Segue, 2012 Bachelor of Science in Nursing- Emory University


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INVITED ADDRESSES Rahier, Jean Muteba November 30, 2011 Invited by the Ecuadorian Ministry of Culture to participate in the roundtable entitled “Aporte de la población Afrodescendiente a la cultura e identidad nacional,” during the 2011 Feria Internacional del Libro (Internacional Book Fair), Quito, Ecuador. INVITED ADDRESSES

Rahier, Jean Muteba November 10, 2011 Invited Keynote Closing Lecture of the International Conference “L’autre métissage. Nation, ethnicité, inégalités (Amérique, Caraïbe, France)” (The Other Métissage. Nation, Ethnicity, Inequality [The Americas, the Caribbean, France]), organized at the Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, France, 8-10 novembre 2011by its Institut des Sciences Humaines et Sociales. Title of my keynote lecture: “De panacée des relations raciales harmonieuses à outil idéologique: réflexions sur le métissage à travers le temps et trois continents” (From Panacea of Harmonious Racial Relations to Ideological Tool: Reflections on Métissage through Time and Three Continents.” See the conference program at: http://lautremetissage.blogspot.com/2011/09/programme.html

COMMUNITY SERVICE Stephens, D. P. 2012 Sticks and stones may break my bones, but names will always hurt: The power of words in our intimate relationships. Invited Guest Lecture for GirlPower Annual It Takes a Village Conference, Miami, FL. Stephens, D. P. 2012 Sexual Scripting and Sexual Risk. Invited Guest Lecture for Biscayne Bay Campus (BBC) Women Who Lead Conference- FIU Women’s Center, FIU Student Affairs, & Multicultural Programs.


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New Core Faculty: Dr. Okezi T. Otovo Assistant Professor of History & AADS

Dr. Okezi T. Otovo is Assistant Professor of History and a Core Faculty member of the African and African Diaspora Studies Program. She joins the FIU faculty after three years at the University of Vermont. Beyond academe, Professor Otovo also has experience in the development policy world, after two years of research work for the Instituto Interamericano para el Desarrollo Social at the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington, DC. At FIU, Professor Otovo teaches introductory, advanced, and graduate courses on Latin America, modern Brazil, and thematic topics such as gender, race, public health, and the social history of medicine. She received an M.A. in Latin American Studies and a Ph.D. in History from Georgetown University. Professor Otovo has extensive research experience in Brazilian archives and particularly in those in the state of Bahia. Her research interests focus on modern Brazilian social history, specifically peoples of African descent and the politics of gender and citizenship in the 20th century. She is currently in the final stages of completing her first book manuscript, titled “Progressive Mothers, Better Babies: Race, Health, and the State in Brazil, 1850-1945.” The manuscript analyzes the rise of the maternalist movement in Brazil as a reaction to international discourses on health and progress as well as local concerns about the deconstruction of slavery. The manuscript connects the history of changing cultural and medical ideas about mothers and children to the actual experiences of poor black and brown families in newly-formed institutions devoted to public health and social welfare. Dr. Otovo also has a journal article in progress that deals with legal-medical debates over consanguineous marriages and the promulgation of the Brazilian Civil Code of 1916. This research will be presented as part of a special invitation to speak at the Casa de Rui Barbosa in Rio de Janeiro in June 2013. Professor Otovo is excited to have joined such a vibrant, dynamic, and engaged learning community at FIU and in AADS specifically. She looks forward to contributing new courses in AfroBrazilian and comparative Afro-Latin American history to the AADS undergraduate and graduate programs.


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New Affiliate Faculty: Dr. Danielle Clealand Assistant Professor of Politics & International Relations I am very excited to join the faculty at Florida International University and am particularly happy to be able to affiliate with African and African Diaspora Studies. It is wonderful to have my work on black politics throughout the Americas so well supported and I look forward to being able to be part of the dialogue here at FIU among its scholars that study the African Diaspora. My research focuses on comparative racial politics, racial ideology, nationalism, group consciousness, and racial attitudes throughout the Americas. My current project comes out of my graduate work on racial ideology and racial politics in Cuba. I am now finishing work on my book manuscript, Uncovering the Power of Race: Racial Ideology and Black Consciousness in Contemporary Cuba. Uncovering the Power of Race examines the social norms with regard to race that the Cuban Revolution's racial ideology has created. Through this analysis, the book highlights the ideological and institutional mechanisms that support racial inequality in Cuba. In addition, it gives a nuanced portrait of black identity in Cuba and argues that while spaces of black consciousness do exist, even among those that are the most vocal regarding racism in Cuba, elements of the dominant revolutionary ideology are infused within their framework. Through survey data, interviews with ordinary citizens, organizers, activists, and artists, this book draws from the many black spaces on the island, both formal and informal, to highlight what constitutes black consciousness in Cuba. The book is part of a larger research focus that brings to light the power of racial ideologies that negate the existence of racism and their effect on racial progress and racial activism. Consequently, my next projects will focus on this analysis in the Spanish-speaking Caribbean and the United States. In the United States, this moment in the post-civil rights era with the election of our first black president allows for arguments that claim a post-racial state where race and racism should no longer be relevant. There are important connections between racial ideologies in Latin America and the United States that deny the centrality of race and their role in the continued existence of racial inequality. I will be teaching a variety of courses at FIU focusing on racial politics in my home department, Politics and International Relations. In the spring of 2013 I will offer Racial Politics in the Americas and during the summer semester of 2013 I will teach a course on racial politics in the United States. I am also looking forward to teaching a graduate course on comparative racial politics in the fall of 2014. I received my Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Political Science, an M.A. from New York University in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, and a B.A. from Tufts University in International Relations. Before joining the faculty at Florida International University, I was a visiting fellow at the Center for African American Studies at Princeton University.


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New Affiliate Faculty: Dr. Eric J. von Wettberg Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences

As a relatively new faculty member in Biology, I sought out an affiliation with AADS because some of my research involves crops such as pigeonpea and blackeyes peas that are widely grown in Africa and came to the Americas as part of the African Diaspora. My primary research interest is in understanding how plant stress tolerance is a result of the environment in which plants grow and their genetic makeup. Some of my work is with legume crops, where improving tolerance of stress responses is one of the things we'll need to do to move beyond the premise of the green revolution- using fossil fuels to make agricultural habitats un-stressful. As I develop my research at FIU, I am interested in creating opportunities for my students to do field work in Africa and in the Caribbean that complements the work we can do here. Understanding the agro-ecology of crops like pigeonpea that are widely grown in parts of Africa, as well as the Caribbean, and in India, and that have good potential for wider use in community gardens here in Miami, is of particular interest to me. I want my students to understand more than just the biology of the places where they work, and to have the skills to communicate in interdisciplinary settings. My affiliation with AADS helps me achieve that, and can do the same for humanities and social science students who may only rarely encounter biologists. In addition to my work with crop plants, I also work with both rare plants and with plants that are genetic models - plants for which we've developed a complete genome. In my first year here, as well as my post- doctorate work at UCD Davis, I worked with a wild alfalfa from the Mediterranean basin, with field work facilitated by close collaboration with a research group in Tunisia. Wild alfalfa is a good study organism for improving the salt tolerance of alfalfa, the fourth most widely grown crop in the US that is susceptible to salt and is widely irrigated with slightly saline water. I've been to Tunisia many times for field work, and seen things before the revolution. I'd like to expand that to field work in sub-Saharan Africa. I've started to develop contacts in the Caribbean, facilitated by US fish and wildlife service and other grants that should facilitate travel to the DR, Bahamas, and perhaps elsewhere. Most of my teaching at FIU is admittedly not central to the AADS mission, but it most certainly fulfills the university's global learning mission. Most of my graduate students, for example, are in forensics rather than biology, and I use a number of human examples- as well as my own research examples.


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Santos I. Cayetano

AADS 2012- 2013 Master’s Students Santos I. Cayetano comes to graduate work in African and African Diaspora Studies from Wesleyan University (Middletown, CT) were he served as the Administrative Director of the Ronald E. McNair Program. His position at the university was the latest in a long connection with TRiO Programs and work with underrepresented and underserved young people. Although born in Honduras, Santos spent most of his childhood in Belize prior to joining his mother who had immigrated to the South Bronx. Each of these many identities plays a significant role in both the path and purpose of his work. As a graduate student in the African and African Diaspora Studies program, he will conduct my research on the Garinagu (Garifuna) population. As one from within the culture who ventured out, as our ancestors have done for generations, his research will attempt to answer the following three questions: Who are the (Garifunas)? How does the study of Garifuna’s help us to understand the black subject? What accounts for and is the subsequent impact of the migration of Garifunas to the United States? Through this investigation he hopes to add new insight into the discourse of African and African Diaspora.

Binta Dixon

Originally from Charlotte North Carolina, I received by BA in Anthropology with a concentration in culture, as well as a minor in English from East Carolina University located in Greenville, NC. As an undergraduate I served on the Deans Student leadership Council as a representative of the anthropology department. I also participated in a study abroad and research initiative in Botswana studying African literature and languages. As a first year Masters student in the African and African Diaspora studies program my region of interest is Sub Saharan Africa. I am looking to focus on the role of language policy in social development, as well as language choice and representation of minority populations.

Dennika Mays I received as degree in Global, Cultural, and Language studies at the College of Saint Scholastica in Duluth, Minnesota in 2012. I am currently in the combined AADS M.A. and GSS PhD program. My research interests include (but are not limited to): systemic marginalization of and human rights abuses towards Afro-Latin@ populations, grassroots movements, and the effects of colonization in the African diaspora today.


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AADS 2012- 2013 Master’s Students Martina Carla Louis

Danielle Black

Officially, my transcript says I attained a Bachelor’s degree in Social Psychology, but I think we all know our majors barely ever cover the breadth of our undergraduate careers. In college I gained an appreciation for the multi-disciplinary method, and as an AADS Master’s/ GSS PhD student I hope to gain a deeper understanding of the history and culture of Africa and the African Diaspora. My current research interests include Haiti, Queer narratives, sexual violence, and delineating factors of resilience for communities in crisis. I am interested in generating scholarship on those who, as Professor Hintzen would say, are kept hidden in plain sight.

I am a first year M.A. student from Wilmington, NC. I received my A.B. in African & African American Studies from Duke University in 2012 with minors in Spanish and Psychology. My current research interest is in understanding how the legacy of slavery and the historic objectification of the female body impact African American women’s predisposition to HIV/AIDS and their adoption of particular sexual scripts in contemporary times. I am a member of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc., through which I have had the opportunity to engage in my love of service and organize events such as an academic achievement brunch highlighting the academic achievements of students of African descent in disciplines ranging from history and philosophy to medicine. I also have a fondness for lemurs, having spent 3 years conducting research on species patterns of mouse lemurs and understanding their implications on conservation in Madagascar. After completing my M.A. I plan to pursue an M.D. and eventually work in pathology and on minority health disparities.

AADS 2012- 2013 Continuing Master’s Students Fiacre Boenvenu

An outgoing MA student in African and African Diaspora Studies (AADS), Mr. Bienvenu joined the FIU learning community from Rwanda in fall 2010. Before he started the AADS program at FIU, Fiacre had earned a BA in Sociology and a Master of Business Administration applied in Project Management. He had also worked in Africa with international Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) for ten years in the areas of good governance, community development, public health, and civil society strengthening. Fiacre’s predominant research interests are in “East Africa” Regional Development and Governance realm. In spring 2012, Fiacre was awarded the Karell Travel scholarship to travel back to Rwanda for four weeks to conduct research fieldwork. His research focused on the study of interconnectedness between civil society and good governance in post-conflict and reconstruction context of Rwanda. His work is tentatively titled “Unproducing Good Governance? Embracing the Uncomfortable Middle Reality of a Post-ethnic Civil Society and Potentialities of Good Governance in Rwanda.” In fall 2012, Fiacre Bienvenu was confirmed in the FIU’s Politics and International Studies doctoral program. En route to his PhD, Fiacre Bienvenu will be graduating from the AADS MA program this fall.


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AADS 2012- 2013 Continuing Master’s Students Jheanell Haynes

Charles May

A second-year African and African Diaspora Studies M.A. student, Jheanell Haynes was born in Kingston, Jamaica and raised in Palm Bay, Florida. She received a B.A. in International Relations and Political Science from Florida International University in 2011. During her undergraduate studies, Haynes also pursued a Certificate in African & African Diaspora Studies (AADS), where she discovered her passion for learning about the African legacy that exists in nations of the African Diaspora as well as the circular migration that occurs between nations and its impact on development. Her research focus in the AADS M.A. program examines the reincorporation of members of the Jamaica diaspora into political, social and economic areas of the Jamaican nation-state to ascertain why some returnees as well as members of the Jamaican diaspora appear as a catalyst for change in specific social and institutional circumstances at home whereas others do not. Upon completion of her M.A. at FIU, Jheanell intends to pursue a Ph.D. in Public Policy.

Originally from Warr, Ohio, Charles May II attended Kent State University and received a B.A. in History in May 2011. Charles was recruited by the McNair Scholars Program at Kent State in June 2008 and has presented his academic work at several national research conferences. He has presented on the topics Black Radical Thought in the African National Congress Youth League (Kent State University, July 2010), The Negro National Convention Movement of the Antebellum North (Oklahoma State University, February 2010) and Jeremiah Wright’s Social Gospel as Black Liberation Theology (University at Buffalo, July 2009). While enrolled in the African and African Diaspora Studies M.A. Program, Charles has presented his work at the FIU Scholarly Forum and the African and African Diaspora Studies Graduate Student Association conference; both held in February, 2012. Currently, Charles serves as the representative to the Council for Student Organizations (CSO) for the AADS Graduate Student Association. Charles hopes to expand on his research on African American communities in the antebellum North to include a discussion of the race, gender and class dynamics which affected the project of community building.

Christina Bazzaroni Originally from Northern California, Christina relocated to Miami in 2007 after having completed the Florida International University summer intensive program in Haitian Creole. She received her Master's degree in Africa & African Diaspora Studies at FIU in 2011. Christina is now a second year doctoral student at FIU's Global and Sociocultural Studies program, with a concentration in Geography. Christina's research interests are varied. Her doctoral project is still being developed though she aims to look at interracial relationships to understand how colonial legacies are articulated and shape identities in the post-colonial period. Christina's work will privilege analyses through critical race studies, critical feminist geographies, gender and sexuality studies, and poststructural and postcolonial studies.


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AADS 2012- 2013 Certificate Students Jackal Tanelorn

My research focuses on the global and social mobility of Mexican university students in the U.S. I am currently exploring counter-narratives to Mexican and immigrant identities through interviews with Mexican international students who hold J1 or F1 student visas and their undocumented immigrant counterparts, sometimes referred to as DREAMers and who are currently exempt from deportation through the new DACA legislation.

Lisa Hoskins

I am currently pursuing my Master’s degree in Global and SocioCultural Studies with a focus in Anthropology. However, because of my interest in black Bahamian migrants, I also enrolled in the African and African Diaspora graduate certificate program. With the findings garnered from her ongoing research, I would like to publish ethnographic fiction. I am native of Miami, Florida and I hold a Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University of Florida.

Consuella Askew

I currently work for FIU Libraries as the Associate Dean for Public Services. Throughout my 20 years as a librarian, I have worked in school, academic, public and special libraries. My research interests include library leadership, HBCUs and HBCU libraries. I am obtaining a Certificate in AADS with the intention of enhancing my knowledge of the African Diaspora and perhaps parlaying it into another career opportunity.


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AADS Graduate Student Association The purpose of the African & African Diaspora Studies Graduate Student Association shall be to generate interest in and understanding of issues related to the African & African Diaspora studies, to provide a forum for the exchange and presentation of innovative ideas to benefit the University community, to represent student needs and wants in regards to the successful completion of their graduate program, and to provide fellowship among students and faculty in a variety of departments and programs within the University. Our bi- weekly, Friday meetings are held in LC 325. All FIU Graduate students are welcomed to join AADS Graduate Student Association. We look forward to collaborating with you!

President Jheanell Haynes Treasurer Lisa Hoskins Graduate Liaison Charles May Secretary Binta Dixon Special Events Committee Leader Danielle Black

EVENTS AADSGSA is sponsoring the 3rd Annual AADS Humanities Afternoon AfroHomo: Norming Nation, Norming Sex: November 9, 2012 AADS/SAAGSA Professional Development Workshop Series: November 8, 2012 Holiday Celebration for Children: December 6, 2012 Real- Talk: November 29, 2012 Call for Undergraduate & Graduate Papers for Afro- Latino Conference: Deadline is December 7, 2012 Afro- Latino Conference: February 2012


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Senegal & The Gambia: Traditions, Globalization, and Tourism in West Africa 2013

This coming summer, the AADS study abroad program to Senegal and The Gambia, which continues under the same title, “Traditions, Globalization, and Tourism in West Africa,” will be running during the summer C term, from May 20 to July 1, 2013. It is a six-week program (one week in Miami and 5 weeks abroad) designed to provide students with an introduction to West African cultures and traditions. The program explores the growing centrality of tourism—particularly “roots and heritage tourism,” “sex tourism” and “academic tourism”—as an increasingly significant sector of the global economy. Students will be introduced to some of West Africa’s largest ethnic groups (including the Wolof, Mandinka, and Fulani), and will gain rudimentary understanding of the Wolof language and culture as they explore questions related to the politics and aesthetics of constructing difference in globalized tourism. Tourism is a complex socioeconomic and cultural phenomenon that is also the world’s biggest industry (over 3 US$ trillions, according to the UN World Tourism Organization). Africa occupies a special place in the imagination of tourists who are either searching for their roots, wanting to experience “authentic non-modern cultures,” and eager to enjoy exotic human proximity. According to data from the World Tourism Organization (WTO), a United Nations agency, it is in Africa that the growth of the tourism industry, when compared to the industry’s situation in other continents, has been the most important in the last decade, even though Africa does not represent more than 5% of the global tourism (number of international arrivals and amount of receipts). The multi- and inter-disciplinary field of tourism studies—in which the course “Anthropology of Globalization” (ANT 4473 and ANG 6472) taught during this study abroad program is embedded— has, since the 1970s, interpreted the industry as a neo-colonial project, an opportunity for development, a social phenomenon that does not do anything but destroy local and traditional social and cultural realities, or—most recently—as an utopian avenue for the promotion of peace and for the meeting of peoples through genuine and respectful cultural exchanges. What students have found exciting about this program in the past is that they can see first-hand the realities in focus in the scholarly articles they are reading for the course during the program. Throughout the program, students will be asked to reflect upon their experiences as “academic tourists” by writing a diary.


Le Monument de la Renaissance Africaine in Dakar, Senegal

Market scene in GorĂŠe Island, Senegal

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FIU Students going to Grande MosquĂŠe in Dakar, Senegal


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Enrolled students will also be exposed to the course WOL 1170, “Introduction to Wolof Language and Culture,” taught by Gambian American AADS Adjunct Professor Mariama Jaiteh, who is a native speaker of Wolof. What is learned in the classroom will be applied during visits of sites during which students will be asked to practice their newly acquired linguistic knowledge (market, Senegalese and Gambian students, etc.). While in Senegal (one week), students will visit Gorée Island and its Maison des Esclaves (slave house), near Dakar, the capital City. Gorée is a poignant reminder of the region’s role as a West African center of the slave trade to the Americas (roots/heritage tourism). Students will also visit the island-city of Saint Louis, which was the capital of the French colonial empire in West Africa. The trip will also bring students to the Petite Côte, mostly known for its beautiful beaches and its sex tourism. In The Gambia (four weeks), students will be housed in townhouses in Kololi, near Banjul, the capital city, for two weeks. From there, students will visit, among other sites, the Makasutu culture forest and spend some time with bands of vegetarian baboons. The Gambia being a predominantly Muslim country, students will also have the opportunity to visit and spend some time in sites associated with Islamic religion. For the other two weeks of their stay in The Gambia, students will be housed in the Sitanunku Lodge, on the River Gambia. From the Sitanunku Lodge, we will make a number of visits of the surrounding areas, among which the village of Juffureh, which was identified by Alex Haley as the place of origin of his ancestors. Students will also visit the Kunta Kinte Island (formerly known as James Island) and the ruins of Fort James, from where slaves were shipped to the Americas (roots/heritage tourism). In Sitanunku, students will have the opportunity to perform a number of water sports. The program is open to undergraduate and graduate students at FIU and other universities nationally and internationally. For a total of 6 FIU credits, undergraduate students will take WOL 1170 - Introduction to Wolof Language and Culture (3 credits), and ANT 4473 - Anthropology of Globalization (3 credits), which is an FIU Global Learning (GL) course. Graduate students will take ANG 6472 - Anthropology of Globalization (3 credits), and AFA 6905 Independent Study / Directed Readings in African & African Diaspora Studies (3 credits). AADS organizes this program in collaboration with the University of the Gambia (UTG) in Banjul and the Université Cheikh Anta Diop (UCAD) in Dakar, Senegal. Study abroad students will have the opportunity to interact with students from these two universities. AADS Scholarships •AADS has $5,000 in scholarship funds to be disbursed for its study abroad program in Senegal & The Gambia. Scholarships will be awarded in the amounts of $500 - $1,000. •To apply for a Scholarship - Senegal & The Gambia 2013 - please contact the AADS office at 305 3484156 or 305 348-6860 Due to limited space, we encourage students to join our list of interested students as soon as possible.


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Karell Travel Grant Last Spring, Fiacre Bienvenu was awarded the Karell Travel Grant which enabled him to travel to Rwanda for four weeks to conduct his research fieldwork. His research focused on the study of interconnectedness between civil society and good governance in post-conflict and reconstruction context of Rwanda. He was able to conduct this research with the invaluable of assistance civil society activists, officials in the government of Rwanda, other local development partners, international donor community experts, and many more civil society, development, and voluntary partners, who participated in the interviews he conducted. He also performed archival data research to get a historical picture of the civil society – good governance binary in the past. The research revealed that civil society in Rwanda did not genuinely stem from grassroots initiatives, nor was it state created—it has, instead, been fashioned by a serial political events history which continues to shape its motion. His key claim is that there is a wide space for civil society in Rwanda to become vibrant but given the fragile environment, the space infrastructure has been obfuscated by polarized and polarizing authorships. He concludes that in societies undergoing post-conflict reconstruction, like Rwanda, a circumstantial civil society effects policies better than politics. Mr. Bienvenu’s work is tentatively titled Unproducing Good Governance? Embracing the Uncomfortable Middle-reality of a Post-ethnic Civil Society and Potentialities of Good Governance in Rwanda. Please be sure to show your support when he presents his research on November 16, 2012 at 11 am LC 309.


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University of the West Indies- FIU, Fifty-Fifty: Critical Reflections in a Time of Uncertainty Dr. Percy Hintzen Professor of Global and SocioCultural Studies & AADS Fifty-Fifty: Critical Reflections in a Time of Uncertainty

Conference on Fifty Years of Independence and a Program of Development for the next Fifty Years (The Fifty-Fifty Project.)

The Sir Arthur Lewis Institute for Social and Economic Studies (SALISES), University of the West Indies.

August 20-24, 2012.

The Dean of Arts and Sciences, LACC, AADS, SIPA, the College of Nursing and Health Policy, and The Department of Molecular Microbiology and Infectious Diseases provided funding for FIU’s Participation. FIU’s participation in the Fifty-Fifty Conference stemmed from ongoing efforts aimed at collaboration between Florida International University and the University of the West Indies. FIU and SIPA are poised to play critical, central, and leading roles in international and global scholarship and higher education with significant opportunities opening up for global and international research, scholarship, and scholarly practice. Central to these developments are efforts to develop collaborative relationships such as the one proposed and being developed with the University of the West Indies. A joint proposal prepared by Professors Percy Hintzen and Jean Rahier of FIU and Professor Brian Meeks, Director of the Sir Arthur Lewis Institute of Social and Economic Studies (SALISES) identified a number of areas of collaboration that formed the basis of a meeting with senior administrators of the University of the West Indies.


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These areas, inter alia, were a. Teaching, Research, Faculty and Student Exchanges and Collaborations. i) African Studies: There is interest by UWI to remedy deficiencies in its area studies offerings, particularly on Africa and Latin America and in other professional and disciplinary fields by making arrangements for access to FIU’s online course offerings, certificate programs, and graduate programs. ii) Active collaboration and partnership between UWI and FIU to allow respective graduate students to benefit from the expertise and strengths of each university through online or video-conference teaching and any other form of advising and instruction. iii) Providing UWI assistance with the development of its online course facility, capacity, and capability. iv) Making UWI Caribbean Studies Programs and course offerings available to FIU students and allowing enrollment of FIU students in Caribbean Studies Courses v) Development of a Caribbean Studies focused Summer Abroad and Education Abroad programs at UWI b. Caribbean Research and Policy Initiative i) Development of capabilities and mechanisms to provide the region, its countries, its diasporas, and their various sectors with advice and assistance, with practical support, and with the capacity to develop and implement policies and practices ii) Development of capabilities for supporting and conducting research in the region and on its Diaspora c. A Fifty-Fifty Project This project uses the touchstone of the fiftieth anniversary of independence of Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago to i) critically explore and assess the meaning of independence, its successes, failures and contradictions, as it has unfolded over the past fifty years, ii) examine the next steps required to move the entire region forward from the present conjuncture and, on the bases of these steps, to explore what the Caribbean and its global relations might look like in the next fifty years. iii) examine the entire region (its Spanish, English, French and Dutch speaking parts including the Central America, Mexico, Venezuela, and Columbia) and its experiences and relations for policy, research and analysis on other small states as well as to engage with new and alternative vectors of global formation organized around postcolonial, South-South and diasporic relations. This may serve as a basis upon which to build an inter-regional project at FIU. d. Justice Administration and Criminal Justice This project involves collaboration with SIPA, the Department of criminal justice, and the Center for Justice Administration at FIU and the Institute of criminal justice and Security and Justice at UWI. This collaboration would include a project on criminal deportees from North America and Europe to the Caribbean. e. West Indian Diaspora Collaboration on research and policy initiatives related to West Indian diaspora communities in the United States and elsewhere focused on the Caribbean’s Diasporic linkages, including the region’s linkages with its immigrant populations residing particularly but not exclusively in the


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f.

g. h.

i.

Global North, its linkages organized through its regional networks to Latin America (most importantly Brazil), its “heritage” linkages to Africa, to South and East Asia, and to the Middle East. Tourism and Development Engaging tourism policy makers and tourism scholars from the West Indies in multidirectional collaborations on the issue of tourism policy and practice in the growing tourist industries in continental Africa using the experience of the Caribbean tourist industry. Health and Development Research collaboration on health delivery practice and health policy consistent with future development needs of the Caribbean. Environment and Development Development of a joint environmental biology educational/research program with UWI that focuses on the unique scientific and public policy challenges facing the Caribbean-including the retention of biodiversity and ecosystem services, the restoration of natural capital, and the sustainable management of natural resources whether forest or coral reef. Technology and Development An Engineering Initiative: explorations for the development of collaborations between FIU’s College of Engineering and Computing and UWI’s Faculty of engineering focused engineering and urban and regional planning for the region.

Funding There are significant benefits to this collaboration related to project funding. As an American institution, FIU brings to the endeavor access to funding sources that are restricted to U.S. organizations and individuals. UWI, on the other hand, brings to the project its access to multi-lateral, bi-lateral, and regional sources of funding that are unavailable to U.S. citizens and institutions. This expands considerably the depth and breadth of funding possibilities available to either institution.

The project will focus on the development of a strategy to access funding for projects identified as part of the initiative. The plan is to explore current opportunities for access to funding from European sources that target the Caribbean and to identify specific sources for such funding. Everyone at UWI cautioned that any initiative to be pursued must have the region’s interest at its core rather than serving the interests of donor countries and institutions. Potential funding agencies identified were the usual sources of funding from the US, as well as the European Union (EU) and the Africa, Caribbean, Pacific Group (ACP) of the EU, and bilateral funding from Europe and Canada, and regional bodies such as the Caribbean Development Bank and CARICOM.


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Conferences and Workshops Identified for practical ongoing efforts the joint hosting of conferences and workshops on the Caribbean and its Diaspora. We see these as serving a number of functions, including charting, elaborating, discussing, and communicating the direction for i) development of the Caribbean Studies; ii) for policy and research agenda for the region: iii) for pressing and current issues at local, institutional, national, regional levels; iv) for current and critical problems facing the region; and v) for issues related to the Caribbean global Diaspora.

Outcomes of The Fifty-Fifty Conference FIU’s participation in the Fifty-Fifty Conference was built on proposed and ongoing collaborative initiatives discussed earlier. Five FIU panels (one a double panel) and a workshop were organized with paper presentations focused on specific areas identified as arenas of collaboration between FIU and the University of the West Indies, including one that exposed graduate students to critical engagement with Caribbean researchers, scholars, and students.

Topics and Issues Discussed at the Conference: Health Policy, Developmental Challenges and Epidemiological Future in the Caribbean. Papers were delivered by Lincoln Pettaway, Assistant Professor, Health Service Administration Department of Nursing & Allied Health Sciences, Florida International University Aileen Marty, Professor, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Infectious Diseases and Development in the Global South. Albert Wuaku, Assistant Professor, Religious Studies on another panel on Health and Religion in the Caribbean.

These papers and subsequent discussions were used as a basis for a) proposing and developing relations with health policy personnel on Health, Human Rights, and Development with a particular emphasis on HIV prevalence and Homophobia in the Caribbean; and b) for exploring possibilities for collaboration between the FIU’s and UWI’s Medical School for biomedical research.

Environment, Biodiversity, Society and Public Policy in the Caribbean Region There was a double panel and open-forum workshop organized by environmental biologists and environmental researchers at Florida International University, that included participation by scholars and researchers from University of the West Indies, the Institute of Jamaica, and the Fairchild Tropical


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Garden. Discussions were aimed at developing a joint environmental biology educational/research program with UWI that focuses on the unique scientific and public policy challenges facing the Caribbean-including the retention of biodiversity and ecosystem services, the restoration of natural capital, and the sustainable management of natural resources whether forest or coral reef. This was certainly the most developed of the projects that built upon already established relations among the four participating entities. Broad and intense discussions centered around the following as first steps: (1) key research areas that will allow FIU and UWI to develop joint research/educational initiatives aimed at training new generation of Caribbean environmental scientists and to directly respond to the challenges of establishing a sustainable Caribbean (2) opportunities for faculty of both universities to serve on graduate student committees of both institutions (3) opportunities for faculty of both universities to organize workshops and to participate in relevant courses as invited lecturers. (4) exploring ways of improving the awareness of conservation and science issues in the Caribbean and the Caribbean community in Miami, specifically amongst the students attending FIU. There were also proposals for i) the use of online courses offered by FIU being made available for UWI instruction, ii) the broadening of collaborations with other campuses of the University of the West Indies, the inclusion of countries in the region in the policy and research agenda, iii) using the model of FIU and Fairchild Gardens collaboration as a basis for the incorporation of non-university organizations and projects into UWI’s academic, scholarly and research program (an area that was extensively discussed as particularly problematic.

Tourism and Development Professor Jean Rahier presented a paper entitled "Tourism and Sustainable Development: Lessons from the Caribbean Experience for Sub-Saharan Africa" He met, during the conference, with UWI colleagues with the objective of creating the international working group on "Tourism and Sustainable Development in Sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean: Comparative History and Policy Analysis." The first meeting of that working group--organized by FIU's AADS--will take place at FIU on April 46, 2013, and will also involve African tourism studies scholars.

Graduate Student Panel: The Caribbean and the Emerging Post-National Global System. The purpose of this panel was to further efforts to develop graduate student research on the Caribbean and to expose them to the community of scholars and researchers in the region and to the work of these scholars. Three graduate students presented papers on Haitian Popular Movements, Social entrepreneurship and development in Haiti, Diaspora and Development in Haiti, Jamaica, and the Dominican Republic. The students participated vigorously in discussions between FIU and UWI faculty on the collaboration initiative. Their participation at the conference served as a prototype for graduate student involvement in the initiative.


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Collaboration on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Professor Sylvan Jolibois used his presentation on NGO’s and Hard Development to make the case for collaboration aimed at the incorporation of STEM research and scholarship with Political Economy of the Caribbean at both FIU and UWI. He also used his presence at the conference to begin to explore collaborations with UWI’s Faculty of Engineering.

Inter-Library Collaborations Digital Library of the Caribbean (Dloc) Discussion focused on efforts aimed at acquisitions and funding for the Digital Library of the Caribbean housed at FIU and headed by Brook Wooldrich. There was general agreement that funding initiatives for the Digital Library of the Caribbean can be undertaken through the proposed collaborative arrangement with SALISES. Significant expansion of the digitization of Caribbean archival materials was seen as essential.

Library Access and Sharing of Archives There were discussions aimed at exploring the feasibility of sharing library resources and securing faculty and student access to the libraries of both institutions. This was tabled for discussion in the future.

VISIT BY PROFESSOR BRIAN MEEKS TO FIU A decision was made to invite Professor Brian Meeks to FIU as an immediate follow-up to the FiftyFifty conference. As a result, Professor Meeks will visit FIU between October 24-26th to meet with FIU’s President, Mark Rosenberg, The Dean of Arts and Sciences, Kenneth Furton, The Director of SIPA, John Stack, Assistant Dean of Arts and Sciences, Mike Maunder, and representatives from the School of Medicine, Engineering and Computing, Nursing and Health Policy, LACC, AADS, the Center for Justice Administration, the Cuban Research Institute, and Asian Studies. Professor Meeks will also be participating in the Eric Williams Memorial Lectures, organized by SIPA and AADS, as an invited discussant.


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Appendix

Panel and Paper Presentations Wednesday August 22nd

Chair: Oceane Roberts, Graduate Student, African and African Diaspora Studies, Florida University.

Mmyrah Prosper, Graduate Student, African and African Diaspora Sudies, Florida International University. Resisting the "Occupation" and envisioning another nation-state: the Haitian Popular Movement strikes back. Oceane Roberts, Graduate Student, African and African Diaspora Studies, Florida University. Social Entrepreneurship, Poverty, and Salvaging the Development Project: Lessons from Haiti Jheanell Haynes, Graduate Student, African and African Diaspora Studies, Florida International University. Diaspora, Development, and the Demise of the Nation State: Lessons from Haiti, Jamaica, and the Dominican Republic. Thursday August 23rd

11.00 A.M - 12.30 P.M. Panel 41: Diaspora and Linkages in the New Global Architecture of Caribbean Development

Panel Chair: Percy C. Hintzen, Professor Global and Sociocultural Studies, Florida International University. Eric Bishop von Wettberg, Assistant Professor, Biological Science, Florida International University. Pigeonpea: cultural and genetic history and future prospects for development in the Caribbean. Sylvan C. Jolibois, Jr., Associate Professor of Civil/Environmental Engineering and of Urban/Regional Planning, College of Engineering and Computing Florida International University NGOs in Hard Development: Strategies for Success


41 Jean Muteba Rahier, Director, African and African Diaspora Studies. Associate Professor, Global and Sociocultural Studies. Florida International University. Tourism and Sustainable Development: Lessons from the Caribbean Experience for Sub-Saharan Africa. Albert Wuaku, Assistant Professor, Religious Studies. Florida International University. Health and Religion in the Caribbean: The role of Vodou ritual as diasporic gnosis in alternative health practice. Percy C. Hintzen, Professor, Global and Sociocultural Studies, Florida International University. The Caribbean in the Modern World: Ideology, Reality, and Utopian Vision.

1.30-3.00 p.m. Double Panel and Colloquium Environment, Society and Public Policy in the Caribbean Region

Panel Organizer: Prof. Percy Hintzen Colloquium Chairs: Prof. Javier Francisco-Ortega and Dr. Byron Wilson Panel 46: Environment Panel 1. Chair: Prof. Javier Francisco-Ortega, Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, FIU and Director of the DNA laboratory of Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden

1.- Welcome words: Prof. Percy Hintzen. 1:30-140 2.- Dr. Byron Wilson, Senior Lecturer in Conservation Biology & Head, Jamaican Iguana Recovery Group, UWI, Mona Title of talk: Biodiversity conservation and politics in Jamaica: if only lizards and trees could vote. 1:40 - 1:55 PM 3.- Dr. Sherry Johnson, Director of Academic Programs, Latin American and Caribbean Center, FIU Title of talk: Climate and Catastrophe in the Caribbean Basin: Agendas for Future Research. 1:55 - 2:10 PM 4.- Prof. Ralph Robinson, Professor of Parasitology and Deputy Dean (Science and Technology) UWI, Mona Title of talk: Whither environmental ethics in the grim face of environmental destruction? 2:10 PM - 2:25 PM 5.- Dr. Kurt McLaren, Lecturer, Department of Life Sciences, UWI, Mona Title of talk: The state of Jamaica's primary forests: are there any left? 2:25 - 2:40 PM


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Friday August 24th 11:00 – 12:30 P.M. Panel 57: Environment Panel 2 Chair: Prof. Javier Francisco-Ortega, Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, FIU and Director of the DNA Laboratory of Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden) Building Prof. Javier Francisco-Ortega, Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, FIU and Director of the DNA Laboratory of Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden) Building Community Title of talk: Participation in Caribbean Biodiversity Conservation. Opportunities through partnerships between Botanic Gardens and Universities. 11:00-11:15 PM Ms. Tracy Commock, Director Natural History Museum, Institute of Jamaica Title of talk: Natural history museums and their role in conservation. 11:15-11:30 PM Dr. Pallab Mozuumder, Assistant Professor, Economics and Earth & Environment, Florida International University Title of talk: Integrating Economic Decision Making in Environmental Management for Sustainable Development in the Caribbean. 11:30 - noon Prof. Michael Taylor, Department of Physics, UWI, Mona Title of talk Climate Change and the Caribbean - Insights from the regional modelling community. noon- 12:15 PM Mr. Keron Kampbell, Herbarium Curator, Natural History Museum, Institute of Jamaica Title of talk Conservation Projects: Practical experiences and the way forward. 12:15 - 12:30 PM Lunch break Discussion Meeting Director Brian Meeks, Sir Arthur Lewis Institute of Social and Economic Studies, UWI Acting Director, Marifelli Perez-Stable, LACC, FIU Director, Jean Rahier, AADS, FIU Professor Percy C. Hintzen, SIPA, UWI Professor Javier Ortega, Biological Sciences and Fairchild Gardent Director Tracy Commock, Natural History Museum, Institute of Jamaica


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1.30-3.00 P.M. Workshop Workshop to discuss future actions. Chair: Professor Percy C. Hintzen, Global and Sociocultural Studies, FIU

3.05-4.35 P.M. Panel 68: Health Policy, Developmental Challenges and Epidemiological Future in the Caribbean

Panel Chair: Lincoln Pettaway, Assistant Professor, Health Service Administration Department of Nursing & Allied Health Sciences, Florida International University.

Lincoln Pettaway. Assistant Professor, Health Service Administration Department of Nursing & Allied Health Sciences, Florida International University. HIV/AIDS, same-gender relationships, masculinity, and Health Policy for Development in the Caribbean Future

Aileen Marty, Professor, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Infectious Diseases and Development in the Global South

Please note that the content of this report is not at the moment definitive. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Professor Percy Hintzn at phintzen@fiu.edu.


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EVENTS: What We Have Done Haiti: Des Initiatives International Symposium Haiti/ France USA/ Canada

May 18- 19, 2012

For more information please visit: http://africana.fiu.edu/events/2012/haiti-des-initiatives/


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AADS Welcome Back Reception

August 31, 2012 The AADS Welcome Back Reception was held Friday, August 31, 2012 in the West Ballroom, Graham Center, Modesto Maidique Campus. The AADS director Dr. Jean Rahier presented the upcoming plans for the academic year, introduced our new graduate students, and the new faculty. Due to our successful Study Abroad Program in Senegal and The Gambia that will continue to run during 2012-13, and as a way to announce our sponsorship of an Alternative Break program to The Gambia, we enjoyed a special performance by Titi from Senegal. The event included dancing, food, drinks and music which made it an all-around fun event.

Dr. Jean Rahier AADS Director with Titi and the Crew of Champion Sounds Productions

AADS Students Learning Senegalese Dance Moves from Titi


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The Nostalgic Present in Tanzanian Verbal Arts: Dr. Aaron Rosenberg

September 26, 2012


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Celebrating Academic Excellence at Faculty Convocation

September 27, 2012 PLEASE JOIN US IN CONGRATULATING OUR AADS FACULTY! David Rifkind received the Faculty Award for Excellence in Research in Architecture.

Althea “Vickie� Silvera received the Faculty Award for Excellence in Librarianship.

Events: WHERE WE ARE DOING

The Department of History and AADS Search for an Africanist Historian Florida International University invites applications for an assistant professor of 19th- and/or 20thcentury African history. This is a joint appointment in the Department of History and the Program in African and African Diaspora Studies. The successful candidate will contribute a transnational and interdisciplinary perspective to the Department and Program. Ability to teach broad surveys required, but candidate will also teach in subfields of interest in upperdivision undergraduate courses and our vibrant graduate programs. Regional specialization is open but West Africanists are particularly encouraged to apply; topic of specialization is open but scholars of decolonization or historians with expertise in Africa and the Atlantic World will be of special interest. This position is contingent upon funding. Please send three letters of recommendation, a CV, cover letter, and writing sample (the last document in .pdf format) to fiuafrica2012@gmail.com. We will begin reviewing applications December 1, 2012.


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WE ARE CONTINUING SCHOLARSHIP IN SENEGAL AND THE GAMBIA

Study Abroad InfoSessions will be held in LC 309 from 3:30 – 4:45 pm on the following dates: November 1, 2012

November 29, 2012

January 17, 2013


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Events: WHAT WE ARE GOING TO DO Eric Williams Memorial

October 26, 2012

For more information, please call us at (305) 348-4264 or visit our website: http://africana.fiu.edu/lecture-series/


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Progressive Mothers/ Better Babies: Race, Health, and the State in Brazil, 1850-1945: Dr. Okezi Otovo

October 29, 2012


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Africanos y afrodescendientes en la Argentina actual: Dra. Marta Maffia

November 7, 2012


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Afro- Homo: Norming- Nation, Norming Sex: AADS 3rd Annual Humanities Afternoon Dr. Neville Hoad, Dr. Frieda Ekotto, Dr. Thomas Glave, & Dr. Marlon Bailey

Novemeber 9, 2012

For more information, please visit our website: http://africana.fiu.edu/events/2012/3rdannual-aads-humanities-afternoon-afro-homo-norming-nation-norming-sex/


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The Works of Langston Hughes: Actor David Mills

November 15, 2012


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Karell Travel Lecture Series: Unproducing Good Governance? Embracing the Uncomfortable Middle-reality of a Post-ethnic Civil Society and Potentialities of Good Governance in Rwanda: Fiacre Bienvenu

November 16, 2012


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Bad Friday: Rastafari After Coral Gardens: Film Screening by Dr. Deborah Thomas

January 31, 2013


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Trayvon Martin and the Ongoing Crisis Confronting African American Males in America: Dr. Pedro Noguera

February 14, 2013


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M.A. in African & African Diaspora Studies Master of Arts in African and African Diaspora Studies The M.A. degree in African & African Diaspora Studies provides interdisciplinary, graduate level education that draws on AADS core faculty, as well as on faculty from a variety of Departments in the College of Arts and Sciences (English, Cultural Geography, Modern Languages, Political Science and International Relations, Sociology/Anthropology, History) and other Colleges within the university. This M.A. program aims to develop scholars with specific analytical skills and research methodologies in an ever growing interdisciplinary field of inquiry that has been on the cutting edge of scholarly research. This degree will lead to professional positions in a range of fields as it simultaneously prepares students for further study at the doctoral level. The Program should attract those who are interested in subjects as diverse as—non exhaustively—national and transnational policy analysis, cultural studies, international relations with and within continental Africa, African and African diaspora gender constructs and sexualities, African and African diaspora literatures, the history and contemporary experiences of descendants of Africans in the United States, pre-national, national, transnational, and post-national processes such as pre-colonial African history, the Trans-Atlantic slave trade, the movement of “returnees” to what is today’s Liberia, Ghana and Ethiopia, European colonization of Africa, the Caribbean contributions to the “black movement” in the United States, Panafricanism, the Caribbean presence in colonial Africa, the Caribbean migration to the U.K. in the mid-20th century, Caribbean popular culture and cultural politics, the processes of creolization in the Caribbean and beyond, the struggle of Afro-Latinos for the recognition of their collective rights in different national contexts, the migration of Eastern Africans to Australia, the current migration of Central Africans to South Africa, the Asian diasporas in Eastern and Southern Africa, the migration of Western Africans to France, Spain, Italy, and Germany, and the escape of Sudanese “ethnic Africans” from Darfur to Chad. All students who enroll in this M.A. Program will be exposed to the diversity of approaches, conceptualizations and interventions in the many debates that characterize the field, developed by a diversity of scholars based in different locations around the world.


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Combined M.A. in African & African Diaspora Studies /PhD programs Combined African and African Diaspora Studies MA/ PhD in International Relations The combined African & African Diaspora Studies MA/International Relations PhD program allows qualified graduate students to pursue both degrees at the same time. The Ph.D. program is designed to prepare students for careers as scholars and teachers. It provides students with a solid theoretical foundation while allowing individual latitude for rigorous research on a wide range of subjects. Students work closely with dedicated, internationally recognized scholars. To be accepted into this program, students must submit an application to the PhD in International Relations with a sub plan for a MA in Africa and African Diaspora Studies. This designation will appear in the menu of programs in the graduate application. The application must be submitted by January 15 in the year in which they wish to begin their studies.

Combined African and African Diaspora Studies MA/ PhD in History The Combined African and African Diaspora Studies MA / PhD in History program allows qualified graduate students to complete the MA in Africa and African Diaspora Studies (MA in AADS) en route to the PhD in History. This program will train doctoral students within the discipline of Atlantic History while giving them area studies expertise in African and African Diaspora Studies, in order to help them stay competitive in seeking careers with an international focus in today’s global, cultural and intellectual environment. In tandem, these two programs can offer students an unusually close fit and remarkably beneficial synthesis in interdisciplinary approaches to both the Atlantic world and the African diasporic experience. Combined African and African Diaspora Studies MA/ PhD in Global Sociocultural Studies The PhD in Global and Sociocultural Studies is an innovative interdisciplinary degree which combines the theories and practices of three key social science disciplines; geography, sociocultural anthropology, and sociology. The combined African & African Diaspora Studies MA/Global & Sociocultural Studies PhD program allows qualified graduate students to pursue both degrees at the same time. To be accepted into this program, students must simultaneously submit applications for the MA in African & African Diaspora Studies and for the PhD in Global & Sociocultural Studies by February 15 in the year in which they wish to begin their studies.

Graduate Certificate The African & African Diaspora Studies (AADS) Graduate Certificate seeks to provide graduate-level multidisciplinary instruction in the diverse fields of African and African Diaspora Studies. Specifically, the Certificate seeks to provide students with an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the global, economic, cultural, and historical experiences of people of African descent, both in Africa and in the Diaspora. The Certificate complements students’ work in their major fields of study. Thanks to the diversity of areas of research interests of the core and affiliate AADS faculty, students may choose courses that will allow them to focus more specifically on African Americans, Continental Africans, or communities of the African diaspora internationally. Students may also choose courses that will bring them to learn about all three or any other combination of these areas.


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African & African Diaspora Studies Undergraduate and Certificate Programs Undergraduate Programs AADS offers two undergraduate certificates, either in face-to-face or fully online delivery: 1) the Certificate in African Studies, and 2) the Certificate in Global Black Studies. These certificates provide grounding in Africana Studies and offers excellent preparation for graduate study and professional development. Their curricula consist of 15 credit hours of coursework. Students must complete one core course requirement (AFH 2000 “African Civilizations” or AFA 3153 “African Civilization, Religion, and Philosophy” for the Certificate in African Studies; and AFA 2004 “Black Popular Cultures: Global Dimensions” for the Certificate in Global Black Studies. The remaining 12 credits are chosen from the AADS-compiled lists of Arts and Humanities, and Social Sciences courses. Courses not on the lists may count but must be approved beforehand by the program director after presentation of the relevant syllabus.

Certificate in African Studies Housed within the College of Arts and Sciences, in the School of International and Public Affairs, the African Studies Certificate provides students with an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the global, economic, cultural, and historical experiences of African peoples, communities, and nation-states. The Certificate complements students’ work in their major fields of study at the undergraduate level while fostering greater understanding of traditionally marginalized topics. Thanks to the diversity of areas of research interests of the core and affiliate AADS faculty, beginning in the fall 2012, students will be able to choose courses that will allow them to focus more specifically on SubSaharan Continental Africa and Africans. The Certificate places a strong emphasis on African cultural expressions in all their regional, temporal, and socioeconomic diversities. It offers coordinated insights into the ongoing challenges African communities face locally, nationally, and internationally. It also focuses on the ways in which continental African communities and individuals have developed political and creative strategies for survival in the midst of, and resistance to, racism and political, economic, and social oppression.

Certificate in Global Black Studies Housed within the College of Arts and Sciences, in the school of International and Public Affairs, the Global Black Studies Certificate provides students with an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the global, economic, cultural, and historical experiences of people of African descent. The Certificate complements students’ work in their major fields of study at the undergraduate level while fostering greater understanding of traditionally marginalized topics. Thanks to the diversity of areas of research interests of the core and affiliate AADS faculty, students may choose courses that will allow them to focus more specifically on either U.S. born African Americans or communities of the African diaspora internationally. Students might also choose courses that will bring them to learn about both of these areas. The Certificate places a strong emphasis on African diasporic cultural expressions in all their regional, temporal, and socioeconomic diversities. It offers coordinated insights into the ongoing challenges black communities face locally and internationally. It also focuses on the ways in which African diasporic communities and individuals have developed political and creative strategies for survival in the midst of, and resistance to, racism and political, economic, and social oppression.

For more information on any of these programs, please visit our website at Africana@fiu.edu. You can view our Graduate Program Brochure at www.issuu.com/fiupublications/docs/africanstudiesbrochure, or contact the AADS Office at Africana@fiu.edu, or 305-348-6860.


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DONATE

Please support the AADS graduates of tomorrow by donating to today! Your money can go towards the many educational and cultural events throughout the year, such as our lecture series and conferences. You can also help sponsor a student‘s travel expenses for research conducted in Africa or any of the Diaspora areas. Your support can make a difference in the education of today‘s certificate and MA students. To make a contribution, follow this link to a secure donation form. To learn more about the African & African Diaspora Studies Program (AADS) at Florida International University, please contact our offices at africana@fiu.edu or at 305 348-6860. Our Program Assistant can be reached at 305 348-4264.

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AADS Newsletter 2012

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