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Collegiate

ISSUE 1 — October 2017

MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ UNION MAGAZINE


COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

CONTENTS From the Principal������������������������������������������������3 From The OGU President������������������������������������������4 OGU Committee Members�����������������������������������������5 Eminent Old Girls in Academia�������������������������������������6 Back to College Day����������������������������������������������11 Class of 1967 50 Year Reunion�������������������������������������12 Class of 1977 40 Year Reunion and Class of 1987 30 Year Reunion����14 Class OF 1997 20 Year Reunion and Class of 2007 10 Year Reunion����16 Old Girls’ Register������������������������������������������������18 Births, Careers and Marriages�������������������������������������20 Vale������������������������������������������������������������24 2018 Calendar���������������������������������������������������28 How to Update Your Details��������������������������������������30 Next Issue�������������������������������������������������������31

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COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

FROM THE PRINCIPAL D

uring my time here it has been one of my chief delights to spend time with the Old Girls of MLC School. What has impressed me above all is the qualities you all share, no matter how long ago you left the school. From light hearted banter about the ‘best’ House colour to a deep-seated sense of service, MLC School women are united by a very special sense of self and a desire to make positive changes in the world. I hope you enjoy this new publication – which is in fact a revival of an MLC School tradition. The Collegiate magazine was first published in 1995 and since 2000 it has been incorporated into our regular magazine LUCIS. With the support of the Committee of the Old Girls' Union, we have taken the decision to expand the magazine and dedicate it entirely to Old Girls.

As I step down from my role as Principal of MLC School I would like to thank all Old Girls for making me so very welcome here. It has been an honour to play my own part in the richly varied story of life at MLC School, and I look forward to keeping up to date with you all through the pages of Collegiate.

Mrs Louise Robert-Smith Principal

MLC School Old Girls have taken so many interesting journeys in their lives and made so many and such varied contributions to the world, we felt it was time to create a place for these stories to be more fully told. Your contributions are most welcome, of course, and can be directed to oldgirlsunion@mlcsyd. nsw.edu.au

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COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

FROM THE OGU PRESIDENT

W

elcome to the first issue of our Collegiate magazine – a magazine just for you, a proud alumnae of MLC School. We see this as being a place to share your news and hear about others from across the generations. And it’s not just for the births, deaths and marriages, although we welcome this news, it’s a place to showcase your lives, sharing the good the bad and the ugly.

Whether you attended Methodist Ladies College, MLC School, or across the transition, the fact that you have kept your details up to date enough to receive Collegiate means that your school has had a profound effect on you; and so I invite you to share with us. Share your stories, share your suggestions and even share your time by coming along to OGU meetings once a term or attending a Reunion or Back to College Day. My links to MLC School started long before I was born, with my grandfather’s sister attending MLC School in the early part of the 20th century. Another generation along, my mother, my aunt and her cousin all attended. And then it was

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my turn, along with my cousin. I was fortunate, and started MLC School in Year 5 at Kent House, giving me eight years at MLC School over a period of change that saw the boarding house burn down to be replaced with the Drama Theatre and Chapel, and the establishment of the Uniting Church, leading to the name change. Some things, however, did not change. Mum and I wore the same uniform and we had the same Sewing teacher! And now my daughter is attending MLC School. Of special note is my dad – he has the longest individual link with MLC School in my family, serving on the School Council for nearly 20 years, including five years as the Chair of Council. I truly loved my time at MLC School. Although I was not one of the high achievers in anything at all, MLC School always felt like a safe place, an extension of my family, and a place where I knew that I could achieve all that I wanted to achieve in a supportive and progressive environment. We were encouraged to Dare ourselves to Be, even before that became the school slogan. And as I watch my daughter get involved as much as she can, I know that this school is still providing incredible opportunities for young leaders of the future.

We were encouraged to Dare ourselves to Be, even before that became the school slogan.

Why get involved in the Old Girls' Union? That is easy… to support the current and future generations of young women attending MLC School by collaborating with the School Executive in ways both big and small. My vision for this is the inclusion of our Old Girls from all walks of life in the life of the school. This could be sharing history, or it could be corporate (or more casual) sponsorship/mentoring, or even assistance in providing back to the school some ‘nice to have’ things. You know, those things that fall outside the school’s core business, but can provide opportunities to our girls today and in the future. I would like to encourage you to spend some time with us. We meet just once every term for a general meeting, and if we have some event coming up, such as the Year 12 leaving ceremonies or similar, we may meet as a subcommittee to iron out details. We would welcome your ideas on how we can remain active in the life of the school, and how we can contribute to the generations that come after us. Sue Cartwright (Packham, 1981)


COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

OGU COMMITTEE MEMBERS VICE PRESIDENT | HELENA GRAHAME (1959)

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spent my whole education at MLC School; commencing in Kindergarten in 1948 and completing my Leaving Certificate in 1959. I have long family connections to MLC School – my mother, great aunt, aunts and cousins are all Old Girls, so I was destined to also become an MLC School Old Girl. After completing my Teachers’ Certificate at Alexander Mackie Teachers’ College I became a Primary School Teacher. I then graduated with a BA from Macquarie University and a Diploma of School Administration from Armidale CAE. I have held a number of teaching positions in south western Sydney schools as well as various city demonstration schools.

Currently I am an Elder of Burwood Uniting Church and on the Board of UnitingCare Burwood Preschool. My commitment to MLC School did not end with my graduation. I have been a long serving member of the MLC School Council (1985–2017) supporting, promoting and participating in activities within the school and in representing MLC School in the local community. I have also been a lifelong member of the MLC School Old Girls’ Union and have held Executive positions within the OGU since 1970. It has been an honour to have the good fortune of an MLC School education and I am glad that I have been able to support my old school in many ways.

TREASURER | INGRID ZHANG (2001)

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entered MLC School in 1999 and graduated in 2001. I joined the MLC School Old Girls’ Union purely out of love and affection for the school. I am proud of the school’s long history of

excellence in women’s education and I want to do something for this admirable school and to feel part of it still.

SECRETARY | MICHELE TIMMINS (COOTE, 1973)

I

entered MLC School in 1968 as a very young and scared first former and somehow managed to achieve the status of Prefect before completing my time at MLC School in sixth form. After school, I spent a short time at Macquarie University before finally deciding to study Early Childhood Education at Kuring-gai College of Advanced Education. I began my teaching career in 1978 and left teaching to run my family’s business, which I did in between getting married and having three beautiful daughters. In 1992 I left the workforce to be a stay at home mum and after reentering the workforce in 2000 I found myself back in schools again, but this

time in administration. Starting at Meriden, onto Scots College and then finally back full circle to MLC School in the role of Director of Admissions, a role I relished. If anyone had told me when I left MLC School I would return and be on the Management Team I would have laughed wholeheartedly! Coming back for me was very cathartic and I regretted not sending my girls to this wonderful school. My time as a staff member from 2006–2014 was an extremely happy time which prompted me to join the OGU when I retired. I did this for a couple of reasons – to remain connected to the school and to give something back.

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COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

EMINENT OLD GIRLS IN ACADEMIA T

helma Herring attended MLC School from 1923 to 1933 when she graduated as Dux of the school. In 1943, Thelma became the first female staff member of the English Department at the University of Sydney where she remained as a highly regarded senior lecturer and publisher for 32 years until her retirement in 1975.

DR THELMA HERRING (1933) 1933 Dux photo of Thelma Herring from Excelsior, June 1934.

For many years Thelma was also associated with the English Association’s Sydney Branch. The Association supports creative writing, the study of literatures in English, and English as a discipline – its journal Southerly has fostered Australian creative and critical writing since 1939. The period of Thelma's Presidency of the Sydney Branch of the English Association was a very flourishing one for the Association. Thelma joined the Association in 1940 as Editorial Secretary and was elected President in 1955, presiding over the Association during troubled years and not retiring from office until 1964 when she deemed the Association to be in safe hands. She was a staunch contributor to Southerly, contemporaries recall that her reviews and articles were wise, scholarly and discerning reflections; particularly her writing on the work of Patrick White. In a tribute published in Southerly after her death in 1977 at the age of 60, friends stated that friendships with Thelma Herring once begun were lasting. She was described as a charming, efficient and gracious

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This biography on Thelma Herring has drawn from these sources: Wilding, M. (1977). Miss Thelma Herring. Southerly, 37(4): 442-445. Kirby, M. (2011). Sydney University: Pure Poetry. Introduction of the Professorial Lecture. Thursday 10 November 2011.

person who had a ‘living, genuine, active enthusiasm for a whole range of the arts’. Michael Wilding’s contribution to Southerly ’s dedicated to Thelma Herring recalled that ‘Thelma was much more complex, much more alive, curious, open than later generations ever suspected’. Thelma’s generosity in inviting Wilding and other young Sydney writers to a dinner party she had arranged in Surry Hills for Patrick White was particularly remembered by Wilding. At that time White was still the legendary recluse, who in particular avoided academics and writers. Wilding recalls that ‘it was one of those generous, beautiful things that Thelma did. It came from her love of living literature. And it was a brilliant evening.’ The Hon Michael Kirby, while delivering the Introduction of the Professorial Lecture in 2011 reminisced on his time at the University of Sydney and said that Thelma Herring was a great teacher, that her students sought out the inspiration she plainly felt and was determined to convey. Kirby concludes that ‘Thelma Herring was greatly loved by me and by my brothers, although we never told her so. Now, tonight, I try to repay my debt to her’ and acknowledged the long overdue creation of the Chair of Poetry and Poetics dedicated to Thelma Herring.


COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

ALRENE SYKES (1946) 1946 Dux photo of Alrene Sykes from Excelsior, 1947.

Alrene Sykes was a pioneer in the study of Australian drama

lrene received her entire schooling at MLC School where she was a Senior Prefect and Dux of the School in 1946.

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the Seventeenth Doll and her early sponsorship of the writing of Steve Sewell in Three Political Plays (1980) exemplify this.

At matriculation she gained 1st class Honours in English, Latin and French. She commenced studies in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Sydney in 1947. In Latin II she gained the Sir Charles Nicholson Scholarship and for English III the James Coutts Scholarship.

In 1979 she initiated one of the most significant Theatre History Projects in Australia, the Australian Drama Bibliography Project at the University of Queensland, and from the early 1970s worked indefatigably to increase substantially the holdings of the Hanger collection of Australian playscripts in the Fryer Library.

Soon after graduation Alrene joined the ABC Drama Department. She left the ABC in 1960 for the External Studies Department of the University of Queensland where she gained her MA in 1967. She later transferred to the English Department. Alrene lectures, whether in drama or fiction, had the hallmark of careful preparation, excellent organisation and stimulating content. Her delivery was clear and precise, always communicating her enthusiasm for the subject. Alrene Sykes was a pioneer in the study of Australian drama, and from the mid-1960s a noted expert in the field, publishing on the works of Alan Seymour, Douglas Stewart, Jack Hibberd, Louis Nowra, Patrick White, David Williamson, and David Ireland. As well as editing five collections of Australian plays, Alrene wrote a book on Harold Pinter (for which she received a letter of approval from Pinter) and numerous articles on and introductions to dramatic works.

During the 1980s Alrene became increasingly interested in contemporary Australian fiction, particularly fiction by women. Her last articles were on the novels of Barbara Hanrahan and Jessica Anderson. At the time of her death she was working on a major study of Hanrahan’s fiction and printmaking. Alrene’s remarkable contribution to Australian letters was not confined to these publications. Her radio script work at the ABC, her dedicated and inspired teaching, her constant support of the work of colleagues and friends, and her sane, always valuable advice to critics and playwrights alike will be remembered by all who benefited from her experience and her unfailing generosity. Alrene was a distinguished scholar and a deeply valued friend and colleague to all at the University of Queensland who created ‘The Alrene Sykes Memorial Prize’ in her memory.

Always enthusiastic, she gave years of support to the Brisbane Theatre, La Boite and Playlab. She had a gift for spotting new talent. Her instant recognition of the significance to the Australian tradition of Summer of This biography of Alrene Sykes was drawn from these sources: Dr Patricia Birch (1946). Obituary for Alrene Sykes, 1928–1990. The Alrene Sykes Memorial Prize Appeal, Dept of English, The University of Queensland.

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COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

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os Pesman, who was known as Roslyn Cooper when she was a Boarder at MLC School, was the first female Challis Professor of History at the University of Sydney and the first woman to be elected Chair of the Academic Board at the university.

EMERITUS PROFESSOR ROS PESMAN, AM FAHA (ROSLYN COOPER, 1954) Roslyn Cooper, 1954 MLC School Exit Photo.

Ros completed the Leaving Certificate at MLC School in 1954 when she also successfully won a Commonwealth Scholarship for study at the University of Sydney. In 1959 she completed a BA (Honours) in History and in 1965 she was awarded a Doctor of Philosophy from the University of London, where she was the Junior Fellow of the Warburg Institute from 1963–1965. Her thesis was on the Italian Gonfaloniere and statesman, Piero Soderini, entitled Piero Soderini, Gonfaloniere a Vita of Florence 1502–1512. After her return to Australia, Ros took up a lectureship at the University of Sydney (1966–1972). She was promoted to Senior Lecturer in 1972, Associate Professor in 1984 and to a personal chair in history in 1996. Ros is known as a leader in the professions of history and in tertiary education, and has contributed to the history of the Florentine Renaissance politics, Italian-Australian connections, Italian migration to Australia and women’s travel and travel writing, and to academic leadership, particularly at the University of Sydney. Some of the many key administration roles at the University of Sydney that Ros has held include: Head of the Department of History, Acting Principal of the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, and Director of the Frederick May Foundation for Italian Studies. She also served as the Deputy Chair, Academic Board (1995–1997) and as Chair of the Academic Board (1997– 1999). She was the first female Chair of the Academic Board. During her term of office as Chair, the Academic Board commenced development of the Summer School, approved the Code of Conduct for Responsible Research Practice and developed new

Principles of Assessment and new policies and procedures for academic promotion. From 1997 to 1999, Ros served as a Fellow of the University of Sydney Senate. In March 1999 she was appointed Pro Vice-Chancellor, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, responsible to the Vice-Chancellor for the academic, administrative and financial management of the faculties of Arts, Economics and Business, Education and Law, the Sydney Conservatorium of Music and the Sydney College of Arts. After five years in this position, Ros was appointed to the Challis Chair in History. After her retirement from the University in 2005 she was appointed Professor Emerita. Ros was also appointed a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Humanities in 2002, serving as Vice-President of the Academy from 2005 to 2006. She is a former President of the Australian Historical Association (2004–2006). In recognition of her contribution to the history discipline as a whole, as well as her many years of service to the University of Sydney, the History Council of New South Wales awarded Ros the 2012 Annual History Citation. In 2012 she was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) for services to tertiary education through academic and administrative roles, particularly the study of the history of Italian migrants in Australia, and to the community. After her survival from cancer, in 2013, Ros became involved in the cancer community as a member of Cancer Council NSW‘s Consumer Review Panel. On the Cancer Council NSW website Ros stated that ‘My wish is that my survival is no longer exceptional and that the research can be undertaken so that sooner, rather than later, my experience is the norm.’

Information sourced from: The Encyclopedia of Women & Leadership in Twentieth-Century Australia, and Cancer Council of NSW websites.

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COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

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lison Turtle attended MLC School from the late 1940s to 1955 and was awarded Dux of the school in her final year. She was well liked and made many friends, a quality she kept throughout her life. Alison went on to become a Senior Lecturer at University of Sydney and the foremost historian of Australian psychology.

ALISON TURTLE (1955) Alison Turtle, 1955 MLC School Exit Photo.

The University of Sydney’s psychology museum, a collection of 19thand 20th-century psychological artefacts – early experimental scientific apparatus, photographs, demonstration materials and cartoons – is named after Alison Turtle. After her death in 2006, her memorial service was held in the University’s Great Hall. Intellectual life at Sydney University was particularly lively in the 1950s and 1960s, when the student ranks included Les Murray, Robert Hughes, Clive James, Germaine Greer and Bob Ellis. Alison’s mind was brilliant and probing: ‘Alison stood out intellectually as an undergraduate and not only because of her stellar performance in exams,’ Barbara Gillam, a fellow student now the Scientia Professor of Psychology at the University of NSW, said in Alison’s eulogy. ‘Alison was stimulated by the turmoil of new ideas and the interesting and odd people and was very much engaged in student life.’

and psychology – the influence of Charles Darwin’s theories on psychology. She was studying in London when she was offered a job back at the University of Sydney, where she became a lecturer in 1968 and remained with the Psychology department until retirement in 1999, staying on as an honorary senior lecturer until her death. Her main area of teaching and research was the history of psychology. She developed her own third year course, ‘The Nature/ Nurture Controversy in Psychology’. She served on the editorial boards of the American periodicals, Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences and History of Psychology. Alison also had a broader interest in the cultural and social contexts of psychological research, which included research on HIV/AIDS education and prevention strategies in the 1990s. Alison was a feminist and a staunch unionist. She toiled away on such issues as bringing equal superannuation rights to women academics and forming the Association of Women Employees of the University of Sydney, thinking up the acronym which could be read, AWE US. Throughout her life she stood by her strongly worked out values and was never fearful of voicing those values.

She enjoyed conversation about philosophical, political and ethical issues, about films, plays and books, about people and their foibles. Gillam said Alison cared about ‘the situations and dilemmas in which people find themselves as lovers, spouses, parents, friends, carers and colleagues’. Alison completed her Arts degree with double first class Honours in Psychology and History in 1961. She took her Master’s degree in 1963 with a thesis on evolution

Information sourced from: http://www.smh.com.au/news/obituaries/goodbyes-in-the-great-hall/2006/07/12/1152637736199.html

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COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

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fter her HSC at MLC School in 1987, Hsu-Ming’s Honours Class 1 BA won her the Sydney University Medal in 1994. Within four years she had completed her PhD (1998) at the Department of History, University of Sydney. Hsu-Ming is currently an Associate Professor, Senior Lecturer and Head of Modern History at Macquarie University. She is a cultural historian and novelist who works in the area of 20th-century European history, British imperial culture, Orientalism, travel and tourism, and popular literature.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR HSU-MING TEO (1987) Hsu-Ming Teo, 1987 MLC School Exit Photo.

She is the author of Desert Passions: Orientalism and Romance Novels (2012) and co-editor of Cultural History in Australia (2003). In 1999 Hsu-Ming won The Australian/Vogel Literary Award for her first novel Love and Vertigo, which was also short-listed for the inaugural Tasmania Pacific Region Literary Prize and the Dobbie Award

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n 2011 Nikita Simpson received the MLC School Prize for the highest university admissions rank. She recently completed her undergraduate degree in Social Anthropology at Cambridge University. Nikita’s particular area of interest is in advocating for women’s rights across the globe. She has worked in Kathmandu, Nepal and in Himachal Pradesh, India.

NIKITA SIMPSON (2011) Nikita Simpson, 2011 Year 12 MLC School photo.

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An aspiring anthropologist, Nikita has begun a PhD on Gender Empowerment Policy in India at the London School of Economics, focusing on women’s rights and the law in contemporary India and the dissonance between the government’s rhetoric and the reality when it comes to India’s female poor. India accounts for a quarter of the world’s maternal deaths and is home to one third of the world’s poor. Nikita has interviewed public health experts, district attorneys,

for women’s fiction. It has been translated into German, Italian, Chinese and Thai. Her second novel, Behind the Moon, was published in 2005 and shortlisted for one of the 2006 NSW Premier’s Literary Awards. Hsu-Ming is an editorial board member of the Journal of Australian Studies, the Australasian Journal of Popular Culture, the Journal of Popular Romance Studies, and area chair of history for the Popular Culture Association of Australia and New Zealand (PopCAANZ). She was a member of the NSW Premier’s Literature and History committee in 2004 and was one of the judges of the 2007 NSW Premier’s Literary Awards. She has been on the advisory council of the Man Asian Literary Prize since 2007 and judged the 2010 Man Asian Literary Prize.

judges, superintendents of police and district commissioners and will explore why, while they speak of the empowerment of women as a top priority, they lack the will to make a difference on the ground. Nikita also currently works at the SHM Foundation (a London-based charity that works globally to bring about positive social change through projects in the areas of learning and citizenship, health and the arts) on their Mental Health program, and is an editor of King's Review. Nikita spoke at the 2015 MLC School Prefects’ Awards Ceremony to welcome the 2015 Prefects to their roles as leaders in the school. ‘Foster leadership as a practice of constant self-reflection and humility,’ she told the girls. ‘Think wildly beyond your comfort zone, with compassion and courage… walk in the light of others, and allow others to walk in your light’.


COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

BACK TO COLLEGE DAY

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t was a very warm welcome back to MLC School for Old Girls who attended Back to College Day on Saturday 6 May 2017. Multiple generations of mothers, daughters and aunts joined Old Girls from across the years for a beautiful afternoon of reminiscing, catching up with friends and enjoying the sunshine in Café 1886. Our youngest guest was just under six months old (a prospective student) while our oldest guest was (best not to mention!).

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COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

CLASS OF 1967 50 YEAR REUNION O

n Wednesday 14 June 2017, MLC School welcomed over 50 Old Girls from the 1967 cohort who left the school in both 1965 and 1967 – the first year of the Higher School Certificate (HSC) in NSW. The joy of re-connection was a wonderful thing to witness for our current students, particularly for our Year 12 HSC students. After being welcomed by Principal Mrs Louise Robert-Smith, our Old Girls had the opportunity to meet current students and see the school as it is now, before spending

From the Head of Year 12 50 years ago, a remarkable group of young women sat the HSC for the first time. It was these women who set the benchmark for the thousands of young women who would move through MLC School, hoping and striving to achieve their personal best in the years to follow. On Wednesday 14 June 2017, the House Captains and a group of Year 12 students who are currently part of the HSC Cohort, spent the morning with the ladies from the Class of 1967. The Class of ’67 loved it, with a number of emails thanking the girls for their time and interest in the Old Girls. It was a proud moment for me to see the girls shine. Thank you to Charlotte Beckett, Mary Pilkinton and Phoebe Hunter-Mole for taking the time out to prepare a speech and present their views on the HSC, how it has changed and how their subjects were chosen. They did a wonderful job of celebrating the course. I hope our Year 12 students today will return 50 years from now, in 2067 as the Class of 2017, reflecting on their time at MLC School and what a wonderful education they had in this place that is their home away from home. Ms Sarah Tynan, Head of Year 12

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the afternoon and evening together. Our Old Girls were impressed with the full range of subjects being studied by our current students, who were, in turn, regaled with colourful stories of hilarity and mischief. Many Old Girls travelled long distances to be with each other and to visit the school, including from regional Australia and internationally, and it was an enormous pleasure for the school to make them welcome.


COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

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COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

CLASS OF 1977 40 YEAR REUNION AND CLASS OF 1987 30 YEAR REUNION 1.

2.

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t was a brilliant day for a get together on Saturday 17 June 2017 when we welcomed Old Girls back to the school from the 1977 and 1987 cohorts. As always, the school and

the Old Girls’ Union were delighted to see so many Old Girls attending. Everyone had a great day, noticing the many changes in the school and enjoying one another’s company. Mr

1. Class of 1977 40 Year Reunion. 2. Class of 1987 30 Year Reunion.

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Michael Hayes was on hand to greet his former students from the 1987 cohort and it would be fair to say that he has now reached rock star status!


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COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

CLASS OF 1997 20 YEAR REUNION AND CLASS OF 2007 10 YEAR REUNION 1.

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nne Brontë’s poem Lines Composed in a Wood on a Windy Day starts: ‘My soul is awakened, my spirit is soaring And carried aloft on the winds of the breeze’. And so it was on a windy Saturday 19 August 2017 when the Old Girls of the class of 1997 and 2007 gathered at their school in soaring spirits. The school and the Old Girls’ Union were elated by the obvious happiness expressed by our Old Girls

as they reconnected with friends and swapped stories. Two of our 1997 Old Girls brought along their beautiful babies to the delight of their classmates. Both groups toured the school and there was much pleasure in seeing what hadn’t changed like Potts Hall, the Drama Theatre and Chapel, (the 2007 Old Girls were particularly thrilled to see their photos in the F15 window and artwork in the art studio window), as well as what was new,

2.

1. Class of 1997 20 Year Reunion. 2. Class of 2007 10 Year Reunion.

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such as the Junior School, Aquatic Centre and Year 6 Centre. All agreed that the future senior centre, that was not only going to be an awesome building but will also mean much more green space throughout the campus, was a show-stopper. They all said they look forward to returning to the school for its opening. And we very much look forward to welcoming them again then.


COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

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COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

OLD GIRLS’ REGISTER CURRENT STUDENT NAME

MOTHER'S NAME AND COHORT

MOTHER'S SURNAME AT MLCSCHOOL

OTHER FAMILY MEMBERS WHO ATTENDED MLC SCHOOL

PRE-KINDERGARTEN Fedra Nikolakopoulos

Stephanie Kazacos (2004)

Alicia Suen

Valerie Cheung (1995)

Kazacos Cheung KINDERGARTEN

Imogen Bush

Marion Bush (1994)

Jones

Anastasia Countouris

Sandra Countouris (1997)

Loupis

Sophie Hong

Angela Hong (1999)

Au

Emilia Sarayar

Natalie Sarayar (1995)

Yong

Amara Sivagurunathan

Vicknesswari Sivagurunathan (1993) Sathasivam

Eloise Wong

Polly Chan (1990)

Chan YEAR 1

Ethelia Cassar

Marie Cassar (2002)

Kazacos

Emilia Ghaly

Yostina Ghaly (2000)

Guirguis

Madeleine Girgis

Chrwistina Girgis (2001)

Salib

Rachael McGuire

Dione McGuire (1992)

Seeto

Jade Scott-Rogers

Larissa Scott (1992)

Scott

Jasmin Srisathkurunathan

Manjula Srisathkurunathan (1998)

Kumar

Joanna Williams

Nicole Williams (1998)

Papamanuel

Rose Lin

Lillian Tsai (1995)

Tsai

Eleanor McKeough

Zoe McKeough (1994)

Barker-Whittle

Chloe Miller

Tamara Carlin (1985)

Carlin

Kyra Narang

Baneesha Narang (1999)

Chugh

Amritha Ravichandra

Abirami Ravichandra (1996)

Senthilkumaran

Imogen Wong

Polly Chan (1990)

YEAR 2

Chan YEAR 3

Elyssa Ghaly

Yostina Ghaly (2000)

Guirguis

Chloe Kypreos

Mariel Kypreos (1997)

Pinfold

Gauri Nathan

Ranita Nathan (1991)

Sungaran

Ava Roins

Helene Roins (1997)

Dracos

Anisha Sivagurunathan

Vicknesswari Sivagurunathan (1993) Sathasivam

Danielle Wan

Claire Lam (1992)

Lam

Aunt

YEAR 4 Abigail Bush

Marion Bush (1994)

Jones

Amaya Karunakaran

Nirosha Karunakaran (1996)

Ganeswaran

Evie Papamanuel

Francene Papamanuel (1995)

Dracos YEAR 5

Chloe Arnold

Nirusha Arnold (1990)

Olegasegarem

Isabel Baudille

Carolina Baudille (1993)

Moll

Zara Constance

Ainslie Constance (1991)

Thomas

Isabelle Lin

Lillian Tsai (1995)

Tsai

Amelia Norton

Amanda Norton (1993)

Clayton

Keira O'Connor

Pennie O'Connor (1985)

Ypsilantis

Vishaalini Ravichandra

Abirami Ravichandra (1996)

Senthilkumaran

Tiana Roins

Helene Roins (1997)

Aunt

Dracos YEAR 6

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Romy Dobbie

Yvette Dobbie (1982)

Clarkson

Isabel McKeough

Zoe McKeough (1994)

Barker-Whittle

Yianna Mitropoulos

Alexandra Mitropoulos (1988)

Tzavellas

Aunt


COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

CURRENT STUDENT NAME

MOTHER'S NAME AND COHORT

MOTHER'S SURNAME AT MLCSCHOOL

Seetha Nathan

Ranita Nathan (1991)

Sungaran

Athena Nikolakopoulos

Joanne Nikolakopoulos (1994)

Ronis

Grace Scanlon

Joanne Scanlon (1988)

Dent

Jasmine Talbot

Shelly Talbot (1990)

Harrington

Claire van der Stel

Nicole van der Stel (1993)

Tebbet

Chantelle Wan

Claire Lam (1992)

Lam

OTHER FAMILY MEMBERS WHO ATTENDED MLC SCHOOL

Aunt

YEAR 7 Annabelle Banfield

Shannen Banfield (1991)

Lubrano

Juliette Beattie

Kylie Beattie (1989)

Smith

Madison Clemens

Felicity Clemens (1991)

Hill

Julia Gough

Kylie Smith (1987)

Smith

Anna Gough

Kylie Smith (1987)

Smith

Laryssa Latt

Sophie Chan (1989)

Chan

Tina Papamanuel

Francene Papamanuel (1995)

Dracos

Sophie Thomas

Michelle Thomas (1990)

Crowhurst

Renae Varvaris

Dorette Varvaris (1994)

Mitrothanasis

Freya D'Mello

Amanda D'Mello (1998)

Navin

Grandmother, Great Grandmother

Holly Herden

Jane Herden (1991)

Adams

Aunt

Georgia Long

Kristen Long (1992)

Staas

Miranda Norton

Amanda Norton (1993)

Clayton

Lily Scanlon

Joanne Scanlon (1988)

Dent

Maya Simpson

Rani Sachdev (1982)

Sachdev

Claudine Talbot

Shelly Talbot (1990)

Harrington

Emma Webb

Melissa Webb (1986)

Allum

Hannah Arnold

Nirusha Arnold (1990)

Olegasegarem

Gabrielle Cadena

Rosemary Cadena (1982)

Empson

Grandmother, Aunt, Cousin

Kate Cartwright

Susan Cartwright (1981)

Packham

Grandmother

Anastasia Giannakakos

Elpida Giannakakos (1982)

Vlach

Erin Glover

Nicolle Glover (1986)

Haseldine

Ellena Hartzenberg

Jacqualine Hartzenberg (1989)

Cameron

Charlie Kairaitis

Heather Kairaitis (1986)

Knox

Annaliese Konidaris

Tina Konidaris (1992)

Countouris

Madison Long

Kristen Long (1992)

Staas

Paris Mitropoulos

Alexandra Mitropoulos (1988)

Tzavellas

Aunt

Mia Novati

Sarah Novati (1988)

Trollope

Grandmother, Aunt

YEAR 8

Aunt Grandmother, Aunt

YEAR 9

Grandmother, Aunt

YEAR 10 Madeleine Aitken

Karen Aitken (1982)

Ludlow

Tayla Casey

Jodie Kelleher (1980)

Kelleher

Eleni Kaloterakis

Yvonne Kaloterakis (1986)

Kostopoulos

Lily Rodgers

Rachael Rodgers (1990)

Musgrave

Zoe Scoufis

Natasha Burtenshaw (1989)

Burtenshaw

Georgia Ventouris

Hellan Ventouris (1991)

Tzavellas YEAR 11

Emily Hart

Pamela Henderson (1987)

Henderson

Stella Kochanowicz

Mary Kochanowicz (1984)

Radovan

Sienna Prowse

Sancha Prowse (1990)

Smith

Mia Caputo

Franca Caputo (1986)

Cassino

Elizabeth Hewish

Carolyn Ross (1982)

Ross

Lilian Hunt

Laina Chan (1987)

Chan

Felicia Ventouris

Hellan Ventouris (1991)

Tzavellas

Aunt

YEAR 12

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BIRTHS, CAREERS AND MARRIAGES ALYSSA GLASS (2008) WINS THE INTERNATIONAL JESSUP CUP

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ld Girl and ex-parent, Yvonne Gray (Bishop, 1978), now residing in Washington, DC, recently wrote to let the school know of the great achievement of Old Girl Alyssa Glass (2008).

Alyssa Glass 2008 MLC School Exit Photo.

Alyssa has just competed in the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition (Jessup Cup) in Washington, DC. Alyssa was part of The University of Sydney team who represented Australia as national champions at the Jessup Cup. The competition involves around 140 teams from countries across the world and is judged by three past or sitting members of the International Court of Justice.

who was awarded the Stephen M. Schwebel Award for ‘Best Oralist’ in the world championship round. Yvonne concludes that ‘as an Old Girl and ex-parent it is indeed wonderful to see the continuing achievements of students of MLC School’. More information on the event and information on the Jessup Cup can be found here: https://www.ilsa.org/ jessuphome

Yvonne says she was very proud to attend many of the moots, including all the finals and the championship final on Easter Saturday. The championship final was won by The University of Sydney team before an audience of over 800 people from across the world. An additional honour was bestowed upon Alyssa

ROBYN HOMES (WATERS, 1977) 40 YEARS SINCE LEAVING SCHOOL!

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT

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obyn has returned to Australia after 13 years abroad in the USA. She is working as a medical/clinical rep specialising in regenerative healing of wounds with human biological products in Brisbane for Lohmann & Rauscher. She is a specialist in wound care and ostomy nursing who has been

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married for 30 years to Donald (happily) and has three adult children. Robyn says she is very excited for her 40-year Reunion in 2017 (which was held on Saturday 17 June – see the photos from the day on page 14).

ilian Tartaglia (Ishak, 1996) has emailed us the lovely news that she and her husband Adrian recently had a daughter Eva who is a little sister to their three year old son James.


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KATE CORNFORD (2001) – SENIOR ADVISOR AT 10 DOWNING STREET

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aura Cornford (2006) has written to tell us of the achievements of her older sister, Kate Cornford (2001), MLC School Vice-Captain in 2001. Laura says Kate has had much success in her studies and career; currently Kate is the British Government’s Senior Policy Adviser for Health, based at Number 10 Dowling Street, London, UK. The Policy Unit is a tightly-knit mix of special advisers and civil servants, responsible for developing innovative, strategic and cost-cutting policy proposals, and ensuring the UK Prime Minister’s priorities and views are reflected across government.

ƄƄ Joined UK Civil Service in 2013, including working as Private Secretary to the Secretary of State for Health (lead Health Minister in the UK Government) ƄƄ In September 2016, she joined the No. 10 Policy Unit at 10 Downing Street as Senior Policy Advisor for Health

A proud younger sister, Laura says she wanted to bring Kate’s achievements to our attention ‘mainly to show what my older sister has been able to go onto achieve after receiving a fantastic education at MLC School’.

Some of Kate’s achievements include: ƄƄ Bachelor of Laws (Hons 1) from University of New South Wales in 2009 ƄƄ Tipstaff to Justices Basten, Tobias and Sackville in 2010–2011 ƄƄ Masters of Law at New York University in 2011–2012 ƄƄ Fellowship at Interights London, focusing on human rights law in 2012, supported by New York University ƄƄ Fellowship at International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance, focusing on constitutional law in 2013, again supported by New York University

Photo of Kate Cornford courtesy of Rotary Down Under, July 2017.

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SAPNA PATEL (2006) – BUSINESS SUCCESS FROM SKILLS LEARNED AT SCHOOL at MLC School, she remembers the Commerce trade fair in Year 10 where she set up a business, as one of the key moments in her adolescence. She recalls that it solidified her childhood dream of pursuing business as a career. She also remembers the sharp focus on technology at MLC School, which prepared her for the current digital climate and inspired her to run a technology business.

Sapna Patel says MLC School's focus on technology inspired her to run a technology business.

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apna Patel is an Old Girl who started at MLC School in Year 7 in 2001. After leaving school, she went on to graduate from both a Bachelor of Commerce (Marketing) and Bachelor of Laws from the University of New South Wales. At the age of 24, she completed a Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice at Australian National University and was admitted to the Supreme Court of New South Wales. It was around this time that she found something from school that she had long forgotten about. In Year 8, her teacher had asked the class to imagine themselves 10 years into the future and write a letter to the school as an Old Girl, detailing their postschool achievements. Envisioning herself as a 24-year-old, 14 year old Sapna had written that she had studied law at the University of New South Wales and became a lawyer. After a few years working at Ernst & Young as a Solicitor, Sapna left to start ImmiAdvisor (www.immiadvisor. com), an online platform connecting visa applicants with reviewed migration agents and lawyers around the world, as well as local jobs, products and services. From a young age she was passionate about business, technology and helping people. Looking back on her time

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Sapna credits her extracurricular participation in Speech and Drama while she was a student at MLC School as the catalyst for building her confidence and instilling a lifelong love for speaking in front of audiences. At university, she combined this love for public speaking with her passion for business and marketing, and taught Marketing as a Casual Academic at both the University of Sydney and the University of New South Wales. Utilising the public speaking skills she has been developing since she was at school, she has been able to pitch to and win contracts with blue chip companies for ImmiAdvisor. More recently, her audiences have also included over 300 CEOs at the CEO Institute Summit in 2016 where she spoke as both a speaker and panelist, as well as lawyers at the Law Society of New South Wales where she was a panelist on the topic of Technology and the Law. Sapna is the 2017 face and story of the University of New South Wales Business School, and her startup story was featured in both the Oceania Alumni and Global Alumni social media campaigns for Ernst & Young. She is the inaugural winner of the UNSW & CEO Institute Scholarship and was invited to participate in the Clayton Utz Startup program where she received free legal advice. She was also selected for the UNSW FounderLab Program, which won her no-cost technology development.


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CONNECTIONS TO MLC SCHOOL – SUSAN JONES (MEADS, 1961)

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n August 2017, Susan Jones (Meads, 1961) kindly shared with us her fascinating connections to MLC School. Stories such as Susan’s are particularly welcomed and valued as they provide insights into the history of MLC School not always afforded by the ‘official’ records.

School and was the Class Mistress of 5C for many years. After Miss Meads retired from teaching she was Rev Winston O’Reilly’s secretary for a short while (Rev. O’Reilly was the MLC School Principal from 1960 to 1964).

Susan’s mother, Enid Meads (née Huntley), was a teacher at MLC School for over 20 years. Miss Huntley commenced at the school in the late 1930s and taught History, English, Grammar, Sewing and was a Class Mistress, Susan believes it was of 5B1. Susan also understands that her mother established the Cooking department at MLC School. At a later stage, for a few years in the 1960s, Miss Huntley taught the junior girls in Abbeythorpe.

This brings us to another of Susan’s fascinating connections to MLC School – she married the son of Rev O’Reilly. Rev O’Reilly’s connections to the school are extensive themselves: mother Lillian O’Reilly (Brasnett, 1889), wife Doreen (Dorn) O’Reilly (Doyle, 1932) and daughter Rev Elizabeth Walker (O’Reilly, 1957) are all Old Girls. His great aunts are a big part of MLC School history: Dr Susannah (Susie) O’Reilly (1898) and Dr Olive Wood (O’Reilly, 1909); as is his grandfather, Dr Walter O’Reilly, who was a Foundation member of the MLC School Council.

While teaching at MLC School, Enid Huntley met, and became great friends with, fellow teacher Betty Meads. During WWII, Betty Meads’ brother was fighting in the Middle East and Betty Meads encouraged Enid Huntley to write to her brother as the men loved receiving mail from Australia. As Susan says, “the rest is history”, they married in 1942 and Susan was born in 1944. Miss Meads thus became Susan’s aunt and was known as ‘Aunty Bet’ to Susan’s school friends.

Susan says that MLC School was a very important part of her family’s life. The teaching friends who socialised with her mother and aunt were Liska Weir (Lambert, 1932 – whose sister-in-law, daughters and granddaughter also Old Girls), Sheila Armstrong (Sutherland, 1932 – part of a large, multi-generational MLC School family), Dorothy Law, Gladys Dufty, Rose Kaglar, Doris Welfare, and may others who names Susan says she has unfortunately forgotten.

Miss Meads taught typing and bookkeeping in the Commercial

Susan is also still in contact with two of her mother’s students: Alfreda

Henry (Newman, 1946) and Margaret Harvey (Eleanor Hindmarsh, 1945). Alfreda told Susan that after she was born, her mother bought her to MLC School to “show her off” to the staff and “her girls”. Alfreda, in 4th Form at the time, can remember nursing baby Susan. MLC School brought Susan many wonderful life-long friends, who still meet often for lunch, as well as a very good grounding and education for her future life. She says her best friend at school is still her best friend; Susan and Dianne Hurt (Annabel, 1961) met in 3rd class in 1953 and have been friends ever since.

MLC School sincerely thanks Susan for sharing this beautiful and fascinating story with us, and we encourage all our Old Girls to contribute to the history of MLC School by sharing their stories.

What have you been up to? We love to hear news about our Old Girls. You can let us know about anything you want to share with your classmates – engagements, weddings, babies, careers, travels, adventures. To update your contact details or to let us know what you’ve been up to, email us at oldgirlsunion@mlcsyd.nsw.edu.au

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VALE

JESSIE SOLLING (WEBB, 1933) Stephanie Stockard (Solling, 1956) has written to let us know that her mother, Jessie Solling (Webb, 1933) passed away on 19 May 2017 at the age of 100. Jessie was one of the four Webb sisters who travelled down from Moree to board at MLC School, starting with sister Charlotte (Lottie) Thompson (Webb, 1933) who enrolled in 1928, then Jessie, next Eleanor Hogan (Webb, 1941) and finally Olive Politzer (Webb, 1945). Jessie had four children, four grandchildren and one great granddaughter. She was cherished and much loved by her large family and will be sadly missed. The MLC School community sends our sympathies and condolences to Jessie’s family at the passing of one of our oldest Old Girls.

JUNE SUTHERLAND (MURRAY, 1938) June’s daughter Kate Sutherland sent us the following tribute to her mother. MLC School held a special place for Mum because it represented a significant period of her life from which she took enormous inspiration in regard to intellectual desire and curiosity in all manner of things. Our mother was an Old Girl of MLC School, enrolling in 1933 and completing her Leaving Certificate

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in 1938. She subsequently went on to the University of Sydney, residing at The Women’s College, where she gained her BA and Graduate Diploma in Education. Our father, John Ramsay Sutherland, was also at the University of Sydney and that’s where they met. All their married life they lived in country NSW, mainly in Wagga Wagga. As was her want, Mum moved to be near her family, first to Nowra, then Canberra and finally to Beechworth in Victoria. Mum went on to teach and later took on leadership roles within the NSW Department of Education in both Gunnedah and Wagga Wagga. After retirement, she began to write: her works including ‘Biography of Australian Women Artists’, ‘From Farm Boys to PhDs’ (a history of agricultural education in the Riverina) and ‘Grist to The Mill’ (a biography of the work of scientist William Farrar). Recently she commenced research on the colonial architect Walter Liberty Vernon, but time was against her with her eyesight seriously impaired. In between all this work (and rising nine children), Mum led an extremely active life within the Wagga community: District Guide Commissioner, Wagga Wagga Arts Society President, active member of the Wagga Wagga Shakespeare Society, Business and Professional Women, Toastmistress, etc. From Wagga Wagga, Mum became actively involved in the Society for Independent Scholars (ACT) which

met in Canberra. Her passion for community involvement even saw her stand for NSW State Parliament. It is now very apparent to me that Mum continued to draw upon her MLC School experience as an inspiration and guide to life; intellectually, culturally and personally. This has been evident in what she has instilled in all her nine children – we have benefited from her MLC School experience in what we do as people and in our academic achievements.

JUDITH WHITE, OAM (1942) MLC School Old Girl and a much beloved Lithgow legend, Dr Judith White OAM, passed away on 10 August 2017 at the age of 93. A tribute to Judith in the 14 August 2017 edition of the Lithgow Mercury said that many in the town had been cared for, supported by or had received the generosity of Dr Judith White. She was a GP and an anaesthetist, a councillor and a dedicated volunteer. Judith always challenged herself. In an interview for the Lithgow Mercury in 2011, at the age of 87 she gave this piece of life advice to women: ‘Apply yourself, stay focused and just go for it.’ School friends remember Judith as the all-rounder who succeeded academically (she was the 1940 Jubilee Scholarship winner), in leadership (in 1942 she was a Prefect, the Head House Prefect


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and the Mooramoora House Captain) as well as in sport (‘A’ Tennis and Netball teams and a 1942 Senior Athlete). For these achievements, Judith won the 1942 House Prize and the 1942 Old Girls’ Union Prize for Scholarship, Sportsmanship and Leadership. Judith was a Boarder at MLC School for her high school years from 1937 to 1942. In the Mercury interview she said about her time boarding at the school ‘I didn’t get homesick at all. I was amazed at all the information the school was feeding me. It was wonderful.’ After school, during WWII, Judith joined the Women’s Auxiliary Australian Air Force (WAAAF) to help in the war effort. After the war she entered university to study medicine and after six years she graduated as one of 48 women of 500 university graduates. In 1953 she applied for a six month locum job in Lithgow. She ended up staying for 67 years. Judith served as a councillor on Lithgow Council from 1977 to 1991, and from 1985 to 1988 she was Deputy Mayor. She was also a dedicated volunteer and for 64 years was committed to the Lithgow branch of Quota International (an organisation who work to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger, and to promote gender equality and empower women). Fellow members said that Judith’s commitment to the organisation was exceptional. During her membership she served in almost all positions on the club’s

executive, including four terms as president. At the same time, Judith also volunteered with the Australian Red Cross, Lithgow Legacy and the Lithgow sub-branch of the RSL. For her service to the community of Lithgow, Judith was recognised with a Medal of the Order of Australia in the 2016 Queen’s Birthday Honours List. One of Judith’s Quota friends said to the Mercury that ‘Judy White was a most generous person. Generous not only in monetary terms but also in generosity of spirit, time, knowledge and friendship’. In the same article, Lithgow mayor Cr Stepehen Lesslie said Dr Judy White was ‘one of Lithgow’s great citizens’. The Lithgow council flew the flag at half-mast to mourn her passing and a minute’s silence for her was held at the 14 August 2017 council meeting.

SHIRLEY FERNS (WILLIAMS, 1943) Margaret Milne (Williams, 1950) has written to tell us the sad news of the passing of her sister Shirley at the age of 90 in November 2016. Shirley enrolled at MLC School in 1936 at the age of six and left at the end of 1941. Margaret says that Shirley loved playing Hockey at school and as a result had many a bruised shin. She will be sadly missed by her husband Robert, son Peter,

granddaughter Nicole and two great grandsons, as well as her sister Margaret and brother Trevor and her many friends.

PAM BRIGGS (DUNN, 1943) Pam’s daughter Sue emailed to let us know that her mother Pam died on 21 July 2017. Pam and her twin sister June Higgs (Dunn, 1943) were from Wagga Wagga and were Boarders at MLC School from 1939 to 1943 Due to the threat of invasion that overwhelmed Australia during WWII, Pam’s and June’s mother moved the girls back to Wagga Wagga in 1943 to complete their Leaving Certificate. Sue says Pam and June attended Wagga Wagga High School for their last year of schooling wearing their MLC School uniforms. Pam will be sadly missed by her family and by her life-long MLC School friends.

BARBARA MCDONALD (1951) Barbara Ireland (Harvey, 1951) and Barbara McKay (White, 1951) have sent us this tribute to their dear, life-long school friend, Barbara McDonald. For the first nine years of her life Barbara was the adored only child, then her brother Warwick was born and her world changed. She shared

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her birthday with Hitler, a cause of much teasing throughout her life. Barbara commenced at MLC School in Grade 6, being the recipient of a full scholarship for the remainder of her education. Her Leaving Certificate results were excellent, especially in English, but she chose to leave the humanities and study Medicine at Sydney University.

that she had never learnt to ride a bicycle as her companions all could tour the nearby countryside by bike. She especially loved camping holidays in the Australian outback with the Yeaman family and the boys from The Kings’ School. Barb was godmother to many of her friends’ children and enjoyed their company.

After University she worked in various hospitals before commencing her wander years with various friends. They went everywhere – even Damascus – alternating trips around Europe with jobs in London hospitals.

Her mother, who lived to an advanced age, spoke to several of us one day as she was concerned about who would look after Barb when she no longer could. We said simply ‘she has lots of sisters’.

After coming back to Australia, Barb began life as a general practitioner in the Hills District and spent the rest of her life in that area becoming a much loved and highly respected family doctor. Many of her patients also became very close friends. She prided herself on having excellent diagnostic acumen which was recognised by the various medical specialists to whom she referred patients. However Barb also took time, lots of time, for a chat, even with a waiting room full of patients. She simply had no understanding of other people’s time – something her longsuffering friends came to expect. Barb’s life away from Medicine was very full, with tennis, sailing, sporty cars – she loved Alfa Romeos – dogs, books, her garden, and entertaining friends at her weekend house at Newport. Then there were clothes, more clothes, and jewellery. She always looked so smart. Barb kept on with her travels, enjoying canal barging holidays in France with good friends. Although there she found, to her chagrin,

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After retirement, Barb enjoyed working with Simon the gardener in her delightful garden along with her companion Dougal, the rescue dog. Sadly shadows gathered and it became obvious to her friends that she was suffering with dementia. Alzheimer’s disease meant Barb had to spend the remainder of her life with carers. The most marvellous woman, her sister-in-law Nerida, stepped in to look after Barb’s life and managed to keep her in her own home in familiar surroundings until eventually Barb had to be admitted to a special facility. Many of Barb’s former patients along with friends and family attended her funeral. Nerida said ‘It was the only time Barbara was not late’. With love – thank you for the memories Barb – goodbye dear friend from the Class of 1951.

RUTH NOAKES (MACPHERSON, 1953) Ruth’s life-long MLC School friend, Janet Bilinsky (Thicknesse, 1953) has sent us this beautiful tribute to her dear friend.

Ruth was born on 15 July 1936 and sadly passed away on 6 March 2017 after a brave, uncomplaining and difficult fight against leukaemia. When diagnosed with lifethreatening leukaemia she put on a very brave face and did not burden anyone else with her state of health until it became apparent to us all. Although she became very ill she was one of the most selfless and caring people, and always kindness itself to those in trouble or in need of love and support. Ruth’s passing is a great loss to all who loved her. Ruth came to MLC School (Methodist Ladies’ College, Burwood, as it was then known) in 1948 and joined her friends in 4th Class in the Junior School at ‘Abbeythorpe’, now the site of the School’s amazing Aquatic Centre. From ‘Abbeythorpe’ we crossed Park Road to the “big school”. Once there we began to branch out into different streams of academic and sporting worlds. Ruth was in Leawarra, one of the four School Houses, the others being Booralee, Churunga and Mooramoora. I was one of the lucky ones to be in just about all of her school classes and sporting activities. Ruth was a particularly fine tennis player, representing the school in the Tildesley Tennis Shield championships and gaining her School Colours for Tennis in 1952. She was also very keen on music and became the Music Officer for Leawarra House in 1952. Ruth made and kept friends easily. She remained particularly close to her school friends and took a great and continuing interest in their grown-up lives as well. She certainly was the glue that kept us all together and one of the stars of our class. We will have lots of


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memories to share when we meet at the Sapphires’ Luncheon this year on 26 October 2017.

The service began with a piper playing ‘The Rose’ and ended with the following verse:

After leaving school Ruth married Peter Noakes and a whole new and happy life opened up for her – they were soulmates and kindred spirits from the day they met until she sadly passed away. Their son, Stuart, and daughter, Catie Kenny, meant the world to them and the arrival of their granddaughter, Rosie, was the icing on the cake. Rosie has become a very talented young rider and Ruth often joined Catie to watch her at many equestrian events.

‘A beautiful lady left us today She climbed on a rainbow and went away. Hard, oh so hard to say our goodbyes. With an ache in our hearts and tears in our eyes She left us with memories to treasure and keep. And I’m sure that tonight as we lay down to sleep If we gaze from our windows at the heavens afar – Ruth will be waving from the brightest star!’

Ruth continued to play 1st Grade Tennis for many years at Eastwood/ Thornleigh and represented in the Ryan Cup Inter-District Competition. She also joined Pennant Hills Golf Club and quite naturally became a very good golfer and a member of the Club’s Grade Team. But there was another very important part of her life. She and Peter loved all boating activities, spending many happy years with their boating friends. They loved being on their large and comfortable boat (the last being ‘Moonlighting II’) and partying with their friends who also owned and moored their boats on ‘Dolphin Marina’, Brooklyn, on the beautiful Hawkesbury River. We must thank the MLC School Archivist for her great help in letting Ruth’s friends know that she had passed away and for circulating the details for her funeral service. A large number of her many school friends gathered with her family to say our goodbyes and were very touched to be invited to say our own private farewell with a truly beautiful rose.

My little great-granddaughter Maddie loved Ruth dearly, and now each night she looks for the brightest star to say good night to her friend.

the children of her sister, Adrienne Fitzsimmons (Kennard, 1949). Keith said Roslyn particularly enjoyed receiving news of the school through Lucis and was appreciative of the years of contact with friends the school provided since she left in 1954. Roslyn was dearly loved by all who knew her and will be missed.

JEANETTE (JENNY) PRYOR (GRAHAM, 1960) Jenny’s nephew James has emailed us the sad news that Jenny passed away peacefully with her beloved husband Bruce in Canberra on 19 July 2017. Jenny was much loved, greatly respected and will be sadly missed by her family and friends.

GILLIAN FLETCHER (GUMM, 1954) Gillian’s daughter Kathy has written to us with the sad news that her mother passed away on 19 May 2017. Kathy says that Gillian was always very grateful to receive invitations to MLC School reunions and other events, and always very much looked forward to her copy of Lucis.

ROSLYN STEPHENS (KENNARD, 1954) Rev Keith Stephens, Roslyn’s husband, has written to let us know that his constant companion for 62 years, died of lymphoma on 8 July 2017. Roslyn had three children and four grandchildren who all adored her. She was also a very loving aunt of

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2018 CALENDAR Old Girls are always welcome to attend MLC School events. Here is a list of events taking place in 2018. Exact dates will be confirmed closer to each event.

MAY 2018

BACK TO COLLEGE DAY

JUNE 2018

MIDDLE YEARS MUSIC CONCERT

CLASS OF 1968 50 YEAR REUNION

DRAMA PRODUCTION

CLASS OF 1978 40 YEAR REUNION

CLASS OF 1988 30 YEAR REUNION

AUGUST 2018

CLASS OF 1998 20 YEAR REUNION

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CLASS OF 2008 10 YEAR REUNION


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SEPTEMBER 2018

DANCE SHOWCASE 2018

HSC ART EXHIBITION

OGU CHOCOLATE RECESS

IB ART EXHIBITION

OCTOBER 2018

SAPPHIRES’ LUNCHEON

NOVEMBER 2018

INTERNATIONAL NIGHT

ADVENT SERVICE

MUSIC AWARDS

DECEMBER 2018

SPEECH NIGHT

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HOW TO UPDATE YOUR DETAILS HAVE YOU CHANGED YOUR NAME OR ADDRESS? Please fill in the below form and mail to us at MLC School, PO Box 643, Burwood NSW 1805, or email editor@mlcsyd.nsw.edu.au to update your details. Name:������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ Title First Name Current Surname  Surmame at School (if different to current surname) Address:���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������ Post code: _____________ Email:������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ Year of leaving (eg. 1982):������������������������������������������ Year Group (eg. Year 12):_______________ Occupation:������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� Employer (optional):������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

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DO YOU HAVE ANY NEWS? MLC School welcomes any information regarding Old Girls. Graduations, careers, reunions, engagements, marriages, births, deaths will gladly be accepted. If you would like to let us know of your MLC School lineage (for example, aunts, grandmothers, cousins, etc), please provide as many details as possible, including name, maiden name and leaving year. You can fill out this form and mail to us at MLC School, PO Box 643, Burwood NSW 1805, or email oldgirlsunion@mlcsyd.nsw.edu.au Name:������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ Title First Name Current Surname  Surmame at School (if different to current surname) Address: ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� ������������������������������������������������������������������������������� Post code:_____________ Email:������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ Phone: ______________________Mobile: ___________________________Years at school:�������������������������� Current career/studies: ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������� News:������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ �����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

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COLLEGIATE | MLC SCHOOL OLD GIRLS’ MAGAZINE

NEXT ISSUE I

n our next issue: meet our new Principal, Mrs Lisa Moloney, hear what the OGU has been up to from the OGU Chair, Ms Sue Cartwright, read about some historical MLC School ‘firsts’, as well as the achievements, careers, marriages and births that are happening in the lives of our fantastic Old Girls. There will also be photos and stories of the Sapphires’ Luncheon, Back to College Day, and the 1968, 1978, 1988, 1998 and 2008 Reunions. We very much encourage and welcome your news and would love to receive photos. Get in touch and let us share your news. We look forward to hearing from you.

Who was your favourite teacher? Let us know the teacher you loved most and why. Email oldgirlsunion@mlcsyd.nsw.edu.au with your stories and memories or send a letter to: Attn: Archivist MLC School PO Box 643 Burwood NSW 1805

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A UNITING CHURCH DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS PRE-KINDERGARTEN TO YEAR 12 | mlcsyd.nsw.edu.au Rowley Street, Burwood NSW 2134 Australia | PO Box 643 Burwood 1805 | Ph +61 2 9747 1266 | Fax +61 2 9745 3254 The Uniting Church in Australia Property Trust (NSW) (trading as MLC School) | ABN 75 549 644 535 | CRICOS No. 02328D

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