Page 1

D. M. L. C. . MESSENGER,

OCTOBER

1949


TABLE OF CONTENTS

School Song

2

Dedication

3

Editorials.

4

Professor Richard J. Jahnke

,. 4

"'The Rules We Live By"

~

5

Strips For a Script

7

Literary

8

A Child's Evening Prayer

8

The Tale of an Oak .,

8

Music and Musical Instruments In Biblical,Times........ 9 A Queer Wish

13

Lost Literature

13

Traveling

'"

'"

16

The Death of PaulBunyan

17

Baseball Slangwich

19

~

Alumni

21

Notes and News on Books

23

College Notes

21;>

Three Musketeers

Plus

27

Co-ed Notes

:

29

Locals

32

Sports

34

Humor

:

37


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ID. ~. 1. ClC.~ÂŁ1)1)enger The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is publishedfour times during the schoolyear in the months of October, December,March, and June by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is one dollar per annum. Single copies thirty cents. Stamps are not accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger"is continued after time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributionsto our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates, and friends. The aim of "The Messenger" is to offer such material as will be beneficial as well as interesting to our readers, to keep the alumni in a closer contact with the college, to foster school spirit, and to give the students an opportunity in the practice of composition and the expressionof their thoughts. Entered as second class matter at Post Office of New Ulm, Minn.

Volume XXXX

No.1

OCTOBER, 1949

THE MESSENGER

Editor Associate Editor Business Manager Assistant Manager Assistant Manager Typist Typist Alumni Notes Notes and News on Books College Notes Co-ed Notes Locals Sports Humor

STAFF

Arthur Schulz F red Radtke Alfons Woldt Fred Biedenbender James Hopman Renata Pape Marion Chossek Ruth Albrecht Margaret Gamm Wanda Herrmann Alice Reek Otto Mammel Gerald Berger Faith Jeske

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The D. M. L. C. Messenger

SCHOOL SONG Hail to the dear D.M.L.C. A great school we'll say; Hail to your colors, The old maroon and gray. U! Rah! Rah! Forward and onward, For our goal we'll try. Onward to victory Is our battle cry!


DEDICATION

We dedicate this issue of the Messenger to Professor Richard J. Jahnke, who last June completed twenty-five years of service to Dr. Martin Luther College.

Prof.RichardJ. Jahnke

"1 will sing of the mercies of the Lord forever: with my mouth will I make known thy faithfulness to all generations."-Psalm 89:1.


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

II

•

EDITORIAL

• PROFESSOR RICHARD J. JAHNKE One of the graduates in the class of 1909 at St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Lewiston, Minnesota, taught by the now Professor A. G. Stindt, held the conviction that he should prepare himself for the ministry. This lad was the son of the village blacksmith. For some reason or other the lad was called "Spike" by his mates. He cannot account even to this day for the connection between the old black horse his father owned and his having acquired its name. From the fall of 1909 until the summer recess began in 1912,he was a student here at Dr. Martin Luther College. He then matriculated at Northwestern College, Watertown, Wisconsin, where he was graduated in 1915. The youth had matured into young manhood when he, Richard J. Jahnke, was graduated from our old Seminary at Wauwatosa, Wisconsin. His first year in the field was spent as a tutor at Northwestern College. During this time he acquired a deep interest in teaching. In 1919 he followed a call to serve congregations at Palouse, Washington, Orofino, Idaho, and another at Clarkston, Washington, and Lewiston, Idaho. On August 25, 1923, the young pastor was joined in holy wedlock with Miss Lizette Saxmann. This union has been blessed with three robust sons. At the end of January, 1924, a call came to him to become a professor at an Alma Mater, D.M.L.C. His work began when 4


The J). M. L. C. Messenger

classes were still being held in what is now called Annex. That is only one of the many changes that have occurred curing hIS twenty-five years on the hill. Since coming here he has taught English, German, Science, Mathematics, Geography, and Psycholo..S. Professor Jahnke saw fit to further his education by studying for a number of summers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, Wisconsin. The unexpected death of Professor Bliefernicht in January, 1947, left a number of vacant positions in our teaching and administrative departments. Besides taking the classes in Psychology the jubilarian succeeded his departed brother as vice president, librarian, and manager of the bookstore. Teaching has been a delight to Professor Jahnke. Of special interest to him have been the many things he himself has learned and the different methods of teaching. Great joy enters his heart whenever he sees a startling green of "fuchses" seated before him. Many students and alumni can recall numerous incidents that tell of the sound humor flowing freely in his veins. Almost twentyfive classes can recall scenes of "Little Willie," "that Tante over there," or a tangent leading into a German proverb. As a teacher, all admire the man's intense interest in the subject at hand so gracefully studded with humor. As a man, his former students shall always remember Professor Richard Jahnke as a conscientious, God-fearing Christian. In behalf of the students and alumni we extend to you, Professor Jahnke, prayerful hopes that all your coming days and years may be lived in Him Who has led you to serve Him.

"THE RULES WE UVE BY" "Every man's feelings, thoughts, words, and actions are an expression of his belief." Yes, our thoughts, words, and deeds are important to our confession of being Christians. What we say and what we do in this present life is important to our obtaining our final goal-eternal life in Heaven. If we do not concede this we are indeed poor Christians. We believe that alone through Christ's death and His resurrection we are saved, not by what we do or say. Is this a contradiction to what was stated in the previous 5


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paragraph? No, there is no contradiction. Christ has paid the price on Calvary for all people's sins. What we do can not add or detract from this universal salvation. We have only to believe, through the grace of God, and we shall be saved. Yet our feelings. thoughts, words, and actions are important to our spiritual welfare. When the psalmist sings, "He leadeth me in the paths of righteousness," what does he mean? The psalmist says that God desires us to do His Commandments. These commandments were given by God in order for us to lead more holy lives. We can not obtain perfect obedience to the Law, but a Christian grows in wisdom, understanding, and a more perfect obedience to the Law daily. Each time that we Christians refuse to do what our conscience tells us to do we are endangering our faith in Christ's Justification, which the Holy Ghost has given us. If we should die in the act of committing a sin, we are endangering ourselves because we must have true repentance for all our sins-that is, we must be sorry for the wrong we have done and endeavor to lead better lives. Therefore, the more we sin, the more we are tempting God to damn us. The more we commit sin,-any thought, word, or deed, against the Ten Commandments-the more silent becomes our conscience. Since we are Christians, we are to lead righteous lives. Therefore, whenever we sin, we might cause other Christians to sin also. Weare our brother's keeper and must not let him become lax or indifferent to sin. Because we are Christians and love Christ, through the grace of the Holy Ghost, we will want to do what Christ desires of us-to do His Father's Commandments. Yes, we Christians can insist upon obedience to the Law without Puritanical principles or precepts encouraging this action. And we should insist upon this obedience. But we Christians must always remember the three-fold purpose of curbing sin1. To act, think, and speak what Christ desires us to do in love for what He has done for us. 2. To, act, think, and speak so that our Christian brothers will not be caused to sin. 3. To act, think, and speak so that we, ourselves, are not in danger of damnation. Obedience to rules is important and must be insisted upon. -F. A. Radtke, '51 6


The P. M. L. C. Messenger

STRIPS FOR A SCRIPT Before we get another name like West Hall we propose that the new girls' dormitory be given a commemorative name. Here is one suggestion that was overheardCentennial Hall. Mentioning centennial brings to mind the Centennial Bulletin Series of our Wisconsin Synod. Have any of you future teachers considered the leaflets as valuable bulletin board and civics material? Think it over. The library is open three nights a week for the convenience of the collegiates. How well we manage this privilege tells our superiors how well we deserve it. By the bye, the traditional dining-hall birthday greeting has become a two-part farce in three meals a day. Nobody can possibly enjoy what has become noise. Let's sing once a day, or aren't we so old? It must have been the Arbor Day speeches. Why? What? Well, look at the Class of '51's hardwood maple. It died. The only explanation offered was that the girls left the class and the sap left the tree. Incidentally, the Messenjer is entering its fortieth year. It began as a quarterly. Despite predictions of long ago, it is still published four times a year. At least, we students have been consistent if nothing else. "Art"

FOOD FOR THOUGHT If your nose is close, to the grindstone rough,

And you hold it down there long enough, In time you'll say there's no such thing As brooks that babble and birds that sing. These three will all your world compose: Just you and the stone and your silly old nose.

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The D. M. L. C. Messenger

A CHILD'S EVENING PRAYER Lord, Thine eyes are watching over When we close our eyes in sleep; For we know Thou sleepest never, Faithful Shepherd of Thy sheep. We are ever in Thy sight Even in the darkest night. May Thine own be safely sleeping For they slumber in Thy keeping. The above evening prayer for children was translated by the late Professor Edwin Sauer, 1887-1947. It comes from the original German text, "Herr, dein Auge Geht Nicht Vnter." Professor Sauer did this work at the request of his friend, Professor R. M. Albrecht. The latter praises this translation for the quality of its simple style and beautiful phrases. He has used it for a number of years as a closing prayer in his classroom.

THE TALE OF AN OAK IT STOOD: The time: 1883 The place: Upon a wooded bluff Yes, southwest of the city of New VIm, this lowly oak did stand. No buildings were in sight; all was wooded land. But on this four hundredth anniversary 8


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

of Luther's birth, plans were in the making-a great, great project was to be undertaken. And thusIT WATCHED: It saw the first building erected in 1884, the now so-called Annex, which then served eight students, no more. It watched each new structure as it was erected, knew the time, place, the site selected: The "turn-hall" in 1901; A professor's dwelling, the present instructor's residence, in the year '06; The boys' dormitory and chapel (music hall) in 1911;

And the greatest project of all, the administration building, the year of '28. But thenIT DIED: The time: 1949 The place: Upon a wooded bluff This lowly oak, into a mighty one had grown; but now the place where it stood was the site selected for the next new structure to be erected-the new girls' dormitory. Thus, while this tree grew in might and stature, so the college grew in population, might, and power. This tree did die, and so also may the buildings crumble; but the Word which brought about this growth will always live on. Margaret Gamm '51

MUSIC AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS IN BIBLICAL TIMES "Sing aloud unto God, our strength; make a joyful noise unto the God of Jacob. Take a psalm, and bring hither the timbrel, the pleasant harp with the psaltery. Blow up the trumpet in the new moon, in the time appointed, on our solemn feast day. For this was a statute for Israel, and a law of God of Jacob." Ps. 81:1-4 9


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

This is a psalm of Asaph. Asaph was a leader of David's choir. In this p sal m are mentioned several musical instruments. The timbrel, or tebret, is a small drum or tambourine without jingles. It was used to accompany pipes. The harp was a prominent Jewish instrument of various shapes and sizes, different numbers of strings, and played with fingers or a quill. The psaltery was a stringed instrument used to accompany the voice, and supposed to resemble a guitar. Sometimes it was called "viol." The trumpet was a wind instrument made of brass like the trumpet of today, differing but little in form or use from the cornet. The first inventor of musical instruments was Jubal. Gen. 4:19-22. "Lamech took unto him two wives: the name of the one was Adah, and the name of the other Zillah. And Adah bare Jabal: he was the father of such as dwell in tents, and of such as have cattle. And his brother's name was Jubal: he was the father of all such as handle the harp and organ." (In the Bible "organ" refers to a pipe, or any perforated wind instrument. In its modern form the organ consists of from one to many sets of pipes, sounded by compressed air, and played by means of one or more keyboards.) From the time of the invention of the first musical instruments, even from the time of Adam and Eve, for they were yet alive, music has played an important part in the lives of all people. It became part of religious ceremonies, was used for entertainment, to express patriotism, for personal enjoyment, and even to cur e. Throughout the Bible, particularly in the Old Testament, we find excellent examples of these functions of music. Miriam, the sister of Moses and Aaron, was a musician. Ex. 15:20-22. "Miriam, the prophetess, the sister of Aaron, took a timbrel in her hand, and all the women went out after her with timbrels, and with dances. And Miriam answered them, Sing ye to the Lord, for he hath triumphed gloriously; the horse and his rider hath he thrown into the sea." (dance, in Hebrew, means leaping for joy, not a measured step, for in Ps. 30: 11 we read, "Thou hast turned for me my mourning into dancing." This kind of dancing was common on festal occasions.) Vocal and instrumental music reached highest perfection in temple times. II Sam. 6 :5. "And David and all the house of Israel played before the Lord on all manner of instruments made of fir wood, even on harps, and on psalteries, and on timbrels, and on cornets, and on cymbals." (Here are mentioned instruments made of fir 10


The P. M. L. C. Messenger

wood, we call them the wood wind instruments which includes such as the clarinet, the flute, etc. Cymbals are metallic plates, sIChtly concave, used as musical instruments by striking them together. We have them in our bands and orchestras, except that the Biblical cymbals are pictured as being attached with a ribbon.) David wrote many beautiful songs or psalms especially for the services in the temple. We find a notation above many of the psalms "To the chief Musician." In I Chronicles, Chapter 25, we read about how King David had the singers and musicians divided by lot as to "who should prophesy with harps, with psalteries, and with cymbals." David was a great warrior, so many of his songs were war songs. Psalm 21, for example, is a psalm of thanksgiving for victory with confidence for further success. So also is Psalm 52, in which David, reproving the spitefulness of Doeg, prophesieth his destruction. Earlier in David's life, when he had killed Goliath, the women of Jerusalem greeted the triumphal procession with tabrets, with joy, and with instruments of music, and the women answered one another as they played, and said, Saul hath slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands. That it was common to have music at social functions during the Biblical era we gather from the complaint of Job when he says in Chapter 21:ll-"They send forth their little ones like a flock and their children dance. They take the timbrel and harp and rejoice at the sound of the organ." Music used to praise the Lord is well pleasing unto God, but it often is used where people seek only the pleasures of this world. The prophet Isaiah (chapter 5) complained bitterly. "Woe unto them that rise early in the morning, that they may follow strong drink; that continue until night, till wine inflame them; and the harp, and the viol, the tabret, and pipe, and wine, are in their feasts; but they regard not the work of the Lord, neither consider the operation of His hands." At the time of Christ, King Herod celebrated his birthday with a supper to his lords, high captains, and chief estates of Galilee. The daughter of Herodias came in and danced and pleased Herod, and he offered to give her anything to the half of his kingdom. The head of John the Baptist was asked. Although the entertainment is not described further we can picture it as debauched as that 11


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

which was deplored so by the Prophet Isaiah. That music has therapeutic value, that is a healing power, is now commonly recognized, as it is used in hospitals. This is by no means a recent discovery, for we read about it in I Sam. 16:23 that after King Saul had disobeyed God, that "It came to pass, when the evil spirit from God was upon Saul, that David took a harp, and played with his hand: so Saul was refreshed and was well, and the evil spirit departed from him." In the New Testament we do not read as much of the music of the Hebrew people. We know that it was customary that in case of a death there was a tumult, and them that wept and wailed greatly, as we learn from the story of the raising of the daughter of Jairus. In Matt. 9 we read: "When Jesus came into the ruler's house and saw the minstrels and the people making a noise." At the Lord's triumphal entry into Jerusalem the whole multitude of disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen, saying, "Blessed be the King that cometh in the' name of the Lord, peace in heaven and glory in the highest." And some of the Pharisees from among the multitude said unto him, "Master, rebuke thy disciples." And he answered and said unto them, "I tell you that if these should hold their peace, the stones would immediately cry out." Therefore, let us learn music; let us learn to appreciate good music. Let us use it often, in private meditation, for our own pleasure, in our church services, but, primarily, let us use vocal and instrumental music to praise the Lord. Psalm 150 Praise ye the Lord. Praise God in his sanctuary: Praise Ham in the firmament of his power. Praise Him in His mighty acts; praise Him according to His excellent greatness. Praise Him with the sound of the trumpet: praise Him with the psaltery and harp. Praise Him with the timbrel and dance: praise Him with stringed instruments and organs. Praise Him upon the loud cymbals: praise Him upon the high sounding cymbals. Let everything that hath breath praise the Lord. Praise ye the Lord. An Alumna 12

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The D. M. L. C. Messenger

A QUEER WISH

Before a stately mansion A car drove up and stopped, Out jumped a polished lackey, His hat, the ground it mopped. Then she stepped out sedately, A wondrous sight to see; Her pearls and diamonds sparkled So richly dressed was she. Then quickly from the porch steps The petted Sandy jumped, He rushed right to his mistress, His tail, the ground it thumped. She stretched her hands to SandyHe jumped right to her arms; She cooed-and squeezed him closer, He nestled in her arms. He stood there on the corner, A ragged wretch was he. His clothes were thin and tattered And soiled as they could be. His face was sad and lonely, His feet were bruised and bare, One look alone showed clearly He lacked a mother's care. His eyes expressed a longingThat dog, that nestling dogAnd as he turned, he whispered, "I wish I were a dog." Rhoda Lau '51

LOST LITERATURE In our English classes we study the great literature of the world-that is, we make a feeble attempt to study it. We never stop to consider what great things have been written which no one has ever seen. For example, in the field of poetry, many lines have been written which no eye has ever seen, either bcause they were accidently destroyed or because the author was too meek to have his works published. In my short life I have encountered many writers 13


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

of poetry who seldom show their writings to an eager world. Of course, their creations are not the greatest literature, but still they often soothe the weary mind. That is a purpose of poetry. Since we go to school during much of our life, school is a common topic for poets. The limerick, an easy form, has often been used to contain their thoughts. Here is a sample that a friend of mine has written: "There was a young girl named Jane Who hadn't much of a brain. When it came to her books, She gave them bad looks; And the teachers to her gave the same." Or "A Prejudiced View on Studying," which has a different .author. Here is an excerpt from it: "You may talk of intellect And of schooling's ,goodeffect, When you've naught to do but labor that takes muscle; But when you are a student With those books that are a torment, You'll change your mind on this without a tussle." Complete form will be furnished upon request. How do you feel about tests? Could you express it as this poetess does? CAUSE "The book was open, The weather was hot. The spirit was willing, But I was not! The moon was the highest I'd ever seen. I looked at the bookAnd dreamed a sweet dream. EFFECT I don't know a thingIt enters my head; Floats for awhile, And then takes wing. 14


The P. M. L. C. Messenger

It leaves my head;

See what I mean? As I said once beforeI don't know a thing. RESULT The day was cold and dark and dreary The test was long; my mind was bleary; And now I sing while I straddle the plow, Feed the pigs, and milk the cow'I'm back at the home Where the buffaloes roam, When the sky is not cloudy all day, Where never is heard these discouraging words, An "F" is your mark for today'." -D. K. But while we are discussing school life we must not forget the main event of the day--eating. One individual was inspired to compose a poem on the subject. Here 1 shall copy the beginning of it. Close your eyes and imagine a huge crowd of boys and girls on the steps of Annex, waiting for dinner. Suddenly "The bell rings The students pour Into the room Thro' the open door. First the girls (not always) Squeeze through the crowd. Boys push and yell With voices loud. Pity the weak girlThe unlucky lass. She is probably trampled By the hungry mass. Pass the potatoes! I want the bread! All else is forgotten While stomach is fed. Plates are half empty. Conversations begin. Higher and higher Rises the din . . " 15


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Perhaps some of you may have a collection of poems such as this. These are only a few of the many I have read. The next time you are studying, just think of this lost literature, and I am sure it will cheer you up or perhaps it will inspire you to write an immortal verse which will go down to posterity as great literature. Rhoda Arndt '51

TRAVELING Webster's new, entirely new, Collegiate Dictionary defines travel thus: "To journey to a distant place or to many places; make a journey including many places." Ordinarily when we travel to distant places we carry luggage. This may include anything from an overnight case to any number of large suitcases. We, as students, know of another kind of traveling, only without a suitcase. How easy it is to sit in class and gaze out of the window and think of how things look at home now with the leaves turning colors and gently' falling to the ground. Or maybe we are thinking of Christmas vacation and wondering if the roads will be icy or if we'll have a blizzard. r ernaps we are wondering what to get Mom and Dad for Christmas, and maybe you have some idea of what you are getting for Christmas. Suddenly, like the atomic bomb explosion in Russia, the instructor will tell you, "Recite Hamlet's soliloquy." At once the mind comes back and centers Its attention on "To be or not to be, that is the question." After the excitement has once more passed, the mind again buys a round trip ticket on the train entitled "The Wanderer." Pernaps your mind travels a long distance. If so, you are entirely immune to the talking, whispering, etc., about you. You think only of how lucky these people are who travel by boat, plane, and railroad to the remotest corners of the earth. You think how lucky they are in respect to seeing the world. Many of us hope to see the world, but how many of us really will? At any rate, we enjoy traveling although it may be only mentally. Of course, we have what is called short distance traveling. Our mind wanders and yet we catch snatches of class activity. We may be thinking of the statue of liberty in New York, and someone behind us wiil Whisper to someone on the side. "Does she ever have an arrogant air," meaning some girl whom you no doubt have seen but whose name you just can't recall. Perhaps you are 16


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thinking of the long span of the bridge between Wisconsin and Minnesota at Winona, while the instructor asks you to describe a certain object. Of course there is always the time you are chosen to give a report on the material just read or lectured on by the professor. Long or short distance traveling, nevertheless our mind is never where it should be. Remember, students, always keep your mind on the track of the instructor and never be called upon to explain the Copernican theory while your nund IS m Alaska or Siberia. It won't help you at all!! A "Wandering" Student

THE DEATH OF PAUL BUNYAN To those of you who were faithful followers of the Paul Bunyan discussions in last year's Messenger this article is dedicated. For the first time in history these amazing and shocking facts are about to be revealed to the public, and you, students of D.M.L.C., are among the first to hear of them. All of this came to my knowledge after checking on the reference made to one "Whiskey Jack" in one of the recent Holiday Magazines. In all humility I must confess that I, too, was numbered among those who had not yet heard about this outstanding personality. Upon further consideration, however, I am convinced that to keep this information under cover was definitely the purpose of our Michigan "friends" who wished their own Paul Bunyan to be the ultimate in lumbering prowess. I say "their own" Paul Bunyan, because we of Wisconsin no longer want him. You may have him. We lay claim to a much more powerful and outstanding character, Whiskey Jack, who as we shall readily see, was, without a doubt, the hero of the logging camps. But unfortunately for Michiganders, their scheme was foiled by an innocent magazine article writer who unwittingly let the cat out of the bag by carelessly mentioning the name of Whiskey Jack. This mere mention of the name brought on a rush to libraries all over the country, greater than the rush to California in '49, and there deep in the shelves which, due to our Michigan friends, had remained untouched for so long, the discovery of the ages was brought to light. And now here are the facts: Whiskey Jack was famous for his great feats of 17


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strength. Whereas Paul Bunyan was seven feet tall, Whiskey beat him by several feet. In the many brawls in which he took part he was never bested by any man on the river or on its banks. If there was a wedding or other festivity afoot in any of the towns which this famous pilot and his crew passed while cruising down the river, Whiskey Jack would tie up his "sticks" at the bank and never move on until that celebration was ended. Here it is interesting to note that no amount of persuasion from Paul rsunyan was ever able to change his mind. This merrymaking often lasted several days, and so the big pilot would make up for lost time by using all his strength and taking every possible shortcut over islands, sandbars, and other Obstructions. With such maneuvers as these his raft often would reach its destination several weeks ahead of schedule. In seasons of low water, if his raft ran aground on a sandbar, Whiskey Jack thought nothing at all of picking up the raft, crib by crib, and carrying it into the deeper water beyond. When the raft's proj ress was too slow to suit him, he would jump into the water himself and tow it for miles on end. One day while Whiskey was going about his work, a huge Blue Racer came out of the wood and started after him. While Paul Bunyan and the rest of the men were scattering for safety, Whiskey decided to take matters into his own hands and get rid of the snake. So he jumped across the Mississippi River and headed West. When they reached the Rocky Mts., the animal was showing signs of fatigue, and by the time they had run back over half of the continent, the beast was so exhausted that he collapsed. When Whiskey finally returned to hIS camp, he again was proclaimed a hero. For quite obvious reasons Whiskey Jack and Paul Bunyan never got along together. Whiskey said that he couldn't stand the prunes that were served at the cook shanty every single day, and Paul had no great relish for the frequent catfish steaks that Whiskey (being a real he-man) wanted placed on the camp menu. So Bunyan, knowing that it would be wiser not to clash with Whiskey, decided to leave. Thus the two parted, each to win fame in his own way, but they always remained the best of friends. In concluding, we of Wisconsin wish to extend our regrets and our heartfelt sympathy to the Michiganders for the "death" of their Paul Bunyan, but we hope that as he and Whiskey Jack remained friends 'till the end 18


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of their lives, so the Michigan people will accept their defeat in the proper spirit and still think of us Wisconsinites as their friends also. Faith Jeske '50

BASEBALL SLANGWICH Have you ever tried to explain a game of baseball to a woman? Some afternoon sit down at the radio and .listen to a great baseball game with a woman who doesn't know anything about the game. This is what will happen. It is about fifteen minutes before the game begins. The announcer is giving the lineup for the different teams and also the urnpires, The first thing the lady wants to know is, "What's an umpire?" After explaining it and then drawing a picture of the situation, it finally soaks in. Then the game begins. The pitcher is on the mound waiting for a signal from the catcher. The lady asks, "What does the catcher have to signal for?" You explain to her that the pitcher wants to know where and how to throw the ball. She then gets the idea that the pitcher must be pretty stupid. The first ball of the game iR pitched. It must have been a hard decision. The umpire called it a ball. The crowd yells, "Kill the umpire!" The next thing I noticed is that the lady turned off the radio. I asked her why she did that. She said she wouldn't listen to any murder mysteries. It was only after I got her convinced that it was only an expression used by the crowd to show their dissatisfaction that I had permission to turn on the radio again. By the time the radio .was turned on again, the first two innings were over. The first man up to bat in the third inning hits a blooper over the second baseman's head. Now she wants to know why there is a blooper over second base. After a liberal explanation she agains listens to see what will happen next. The next batter kisses one out of the park. Now she is wondering what kind of a sport baseball really is. I am about ready to give up when the next batter hits a foul ball. She now wonders who was hit in the crowd. According to me it could have been one of her relatives. There is now a man on third base. The next batter bats the man on third over home plate. She now considers baseball barbaric. There is now a rhubarb. Before she said anything I explained to her what that meant. After 19


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

this is settled we hear that the coach has sent a man to the bullpen to warm up. She now wonders if we haven't got two stations, one coming from Mexico. The next man is up to bat. There seems to be a commotion in center field. 1t seems as though the center fielder's charley. horse' is acting up. Now she asks me why I didn't tell her this was a donkey ball game. After an explanation we continued to listen to the game. By now there is a man on third and one away. The next batter bunts and the man on third trys for home. The announcer says, "It's too bad but the man on third was thrown out at home." The lady now wants to know why they can't leave the man's personal troubles to himself instead of broadcasting them over the radio. The next batter is up to bat. The man on first tries to steal second but is pinned at second after coming out of a hot box. The was too much to explain so I told her to keep her own ideas to herself. So she kept quiet until the fifth inning. The fifth inning was a deciding point of the game. The score was a tie. There were men on second and third, two away, and the count was two strikes, three balls. The announcer was talking fast. He was describing the pitcher. This is what he said, "The pitcher is on the mound. He is waiting for the signal, He is going into his windup. It looks like he is going to put everything he has on the ball." This is a, "click," the radio is turned off. I knew better than to ask why, so I picked up the funny papers and spent the rest of the afternoon reading. I found out one thing for certain that day. Never try to explain a ball game to a woman by listening to it over the radio. Kenneth Moeller '50

20


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

ALUMNI

We all remember the III Normalities who received their calls last spring. Just so they'll know we haven't forgotten them, here's a list of who they are and where they went. Edmund Baer-Nigeria, Africa Gerald Bunkowski-Twp. Acoma, Hutchinson, Minn. Orville Degner-J efferson, Wisconsin Orlan Dorn-East Bloonfield, Wisconsin William Fuhrmann-Wayne, Michigan Kenneth Kolander-St. Jacobi, Milwaukee, Wisconsin Marvin Pydynkowski-Flint, Michigan Rupert Rosin-Lower Cibecue, Arizona Erich Schmidt-Scio, Michigan Ferdinand Schultz- Franksville, Wisconsin Paul Schwartz-Green Lake, Wisconsin Adelbert Voigt-Beaver Dam, Wisconsin Francis Warner-Caledonia, Minnesota Darleen Bailey-Nielsville, Wisconsin lVleldaLrei=-Stanton, Nebraska Janet Flink-Gibbon, Minnesota Gerane Gutzke-W est ~alem, Wisconsin Ruth Haar-Montello, Wisconsin Joyce Hanke-Mankato, Minnesota Lillian Kirchmeier-Garden Homes, Milwaukee,Wisc. Ruth Klossner-s-Fairfax, Minnesota Helen Klug-Jamestown, North Dakota lone Lisius-Crete, Illinois Marilyn Ruppel-St. John's, Bay City, Michigan Lee Orda Schwecke-Valentine, Nebraska Charlyn Shoemaker-Freedom, Wisconsin Doris Tietz-Loretto, Minnesota Under-graduates who received calls from the assignment committee are as follows: II NORMALITES Joyce Kock-Green Bay, Wisconsin Jane Ring-Van Dyke, Michigan 21


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

I NORMALITES Carol Dennison-Hustisford, Wisconsin Lyla Jaus-Bethesda, Milwaukee, Wisconsin Marie Kapanke-Sanborn, Minnesota Dorothy Knoll-Swan Creek, Michigan Norma Kor_thals-Kaukauna, Wisconsin Dorothea Kuehl-LaCrosse, Wisconsin Irene Kuckkan-Fbnd du Lac, Wisconsin Jean Lau-Belle Plaine, Minnesota Dorothy Mueller-East Fork Mission, Arizona Lorraine Raddatz.--Brillion, Wisconsin Lois Seekel-Cudahy, Wisconsin Ruth Voss-Atonement, Milwaukee, Wisconsin Shirley Wiemer-Peridot, Arizona WEDDINGS Ruth Hohmann '48 and Rupert Rosin '49 were married at Peridot, Arizona, on July 15, 1949. Rupert's father performed the ceremony. Chrysta Albrecht '48 and Pastor Edwin Schmelzer, tutor here in '47-'48, were united in holy wedlock on June 30, 1949, in Glenwood, Minnesota. The date was the wedding anniversary of both his and her parents. Pastor C. Schmelzer of Riga, Michigan, father of the groom, delivered the address, and Pastor C. Albrecht, father of the bride, performed the ceremony. July 12, 1949, was the wedding date of Rhoda Sauer H. S. '48, and Edmund Baer '49. The Baers left for Nigeria, Africa, on September 7, 1949. ENGAGEMENTS Miss Arline Whitefoot ex '49, has announced her engagement to Mr. John Hoenecke. Congratulations, Tutor! BIRTHS Nadeen Marie arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Swantz, 1218 Madison St., LaCrosse, Wisconsin, on September 26, 1949. Mr. Swantz was a member of the class of 1938. 22


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Notes and News on Books To scale the staff to high success, music and reading have been especially stressed. And thus our college library so provides for Our needs. Eleven thousand four hundred four keys, opening a vast storehouse of knowledge, are now available. Daily, new ones are added that tie in with our major and minor needs. Here are only a few of the new ones which you may wish to attack during your brief intervals of rests, relaxation, and free periods: First strong accent should be placed on the numerous organ books which have recently been acquired: Easy Chorale Preludes by Scheidt, the originator of the choral preludes. This volume contains very practical work. Choral Preludes and also other prelude boo k s by Dietrich Buxtehude, who consulted, visited, and had a tremendous influence on Bach. 80 Chorale Preludes by the German masters of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; namely Buxtehude, Crebs, Krieger, Poehelb, Praetorius and others. Preludes and Fugues by Vincent Luebeck. Organ Preludes and Variations by J 0 h n Gottfried Walther, a contemporary and cousin of Bach. 6 Schuebler Organ Chorales, Bach. These are the only chorales actually printed during the life of Johann Sebastian Bach. 4 volumes of preludes by the great French composer, Cesar Franck. Preludes for the Hymns of the Lutheran Hymnal, Karl Haase. These four volumes of preludes, just recently published, will probably be used more than any other set, for it is unique. There is a prelude for every melody in our Lutheran Hymnal. 23


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Secondly, there is the question of harmony in the classroom. Various modern "methods books" have ai::;o been added: Handbook of Supervised Teaching-Hickerson, F. R., Dicke Publishing Co., 1947. This furnishes a wide variety of concrete situations gathered from the daily problems of the classroom to help those who are getting ready to teach and also the experienced teachers who desire to analyze their teaching practices and improve the quality of their work. Thirdly, ad libetum, progress to the shelf where the new books are located, and discover the primary chords struck in these scores: The Study and Teaching of American History-Thursfield, Richard E., Editor, 17th Yearbook of the National Councilfor the SocialStudies, 1946. Education in the Kindergarten-Foster, J. G., and Heddley,N.E., American BookCompany,1948. Picturesque Word Origins Great Missionariesto Africa Christian Truth and Religious Delusions President Rooseveltand the Comingof the War-1941 Shakespeare Survey Album of American History

Scottish soldier: "From what land do ye coom, laddie1" Yank soldier: "From the greatest country in the world." Scot: "Puir boy, puir boy. Ye've lost yer accent." 24


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

0LLE:GE

On Tuesday, September 13, ground-breaking ceremonies for the new girls' dormitory were held. Prof. Jahnke conducted a very short service at the site of the future dormitory. The entire student body, the faculty, and close friends of D.M.L.C. comprised the assembly. Everyone was glad to know that, by the grace of God, the dormitory so long needed and desired, was actually under way. The new dormitory is being built between Hillcrest Hall and Annex and is to be a fairly lar.ge L-shaped building. At the moment, the basement is being excavated; and judging from the number of students who watch the proceedings, it must be a fascinating process. The excavating caused some extra work for the boys. Of course, all of the dirt has to be disposed of and leveled off. Someone has to do it-and the boys have been volunteering splendidly. We all hope that with the Lord's blessing this building may be ready for use by the end of next spring. School is, in general, following the pattern all schools do at the beginning of another year. As usual, there are quite a few old faces and many, many new ones decorating the campus. Things seem to be starting a little quicker this year. On September 18 a splendid old D.M.L.C.custom was revived. A get-acquainted picnic was held for the entire school. Attendance was quite good. Group games were held with the III NormaIites in charge of the various groups. The Athletic Board put up a refreshment table which did a rather thriving business. Supper was served out of doors. Everyone went home happy-if tired. Of course, the next day there were many calls for liniment and massage. 25


The

n,

M. L. C. Messenger

This year D.M.L.C. students and faculty participated in the Community Concert drive again. The first attraction was "The Revelers," a male quartet. This program was presented on Saturday, September 24. The tentative program for the year was announced at that time. The leading feature to many was the procurement of a ballet. The Lyceum course has been dropped for this year. No other programs have been announced as yet. The various choirs are all organized. The Marlut Singers are again under the direction of Mr. Wayne Schmidt, who has been their director for the past two years. The directress of the Aeolian Chorus is Miss Mildred Pingel, a member of the III Normal class. The Literary Society seems to be "on the ball" this year. The operetta which has been under discussion for the last year or so is about to be started. Tryouts for the leading roles have already been held, and the parts have all been assigned. May the Literary Society keep its initial vim, vigor, and vitality.

A man went into the drug store to buy some medicine, but upon reaching the counter, he forgot what kind he was sent for. "What does it sound like?" asked the druggist. "It sounds like a large city." "Well, let's see," mused the druggist, "London, Chicago, San Francisco, Liverpool •.. " "That's it! That's it!" said the man, brightening up. Carter's Little Liverpools!" 26


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

TUTORS Left to right: Donald Kolander, Paul Koch, John Hoenecke Seated: Wayne Schmidt THREE MUSKETEERS ...

PLUS

Did someone say there were three musketeers on the campus? Well, anyway, they belong to the firing squad which emerges from the blue haze of the faculty room each morning for chapel. As musketeers use muskets to transport ammunition, so our three musketeers use the classrooms, textbooks and the organs to transport or impart knowledge to their students. One of OUrmusketeers is not new to all of us. Some of us were even schoolmates of his. You all know I mean the little man who plays the big instrument-Mr. Wayne Schmidt. He hails from Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, where he attended Winnebago Lutheran Academy. After completing four years of bucking, greasing, cramming and what have you, he decided to see how he would fare at D.M.L.C. He must have fared pretty well, at least on the musical end. He loads his musket with organ books and a few algebraic formulas of x2 and y2, so don't be 27


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

too surprised if he ends up with a Diapason2 or if he asks you to use the x2 pedal for expression. Aliases of his are "Schmitty" and (excuse me Mr. Schmidt) "Mr. Wayne Smythe." Our second musketeer is ashamed to call himself a Minnesotan. Just recently his residence became Alma City, Minnesota. Wisconsinites, his sentiments are still with you! He's Mr. Kolander, the shy one. He's not such a bad egg though. Just ask any II Normalite how hard he worked for the four Choclettoes he won on a scavenge)' hunt at their picnic. I haven't heard an alias dictus for him, but he has been called "Don." His ammunition consists of axioms, postulates, theorems, corollaries, Twelfth Night and other literature. His cramming was done at Marathon, Wisconsin, the first year of high school, at N.W.C., Watertown, Wisconsin, for the remainder of high school and four years of college, and at our Theological Seminary, Thiensville, Wisconsin, for three years. As the next one of the musketeers, we have Mr. John Hoenecke. He seems to have acquired a bad habit of seldom appearing at meals on time. Prof. Hoenecke 'has been trying to break him of the habit, but has met with little success so far. His alias is "Chic," but don't ask me where he got it-you know as well as I do. He battled with studies in ninth grade at Sturgis, Michigan, his home town. After one year at Sturgis, he went to Michigan Lutheran Seminary, Saginaw, Michigan, on to N.W.C. at Watertown, Wisconsin, and finally to the Seminary at Thiensville, Wisconsin. His education was interrupted by tutoring here at D.M.L.C.for the school year '46-'47. The Seniors and Normalites who were here then remember him well, I'm sure. Lest we forget, from his musket emerges the didacticism of biology, general science, and German. For further information please turn to the alumni notes. Just before this issue of the Messenger went to press, the missing link of the tutors arrived. Some of you knew him before. He's Paul Koch from Saginaw, Michigan. As would be expected, he attended M.L.S. at Saginaw. From there he went to N.W.C. for college and just began his first year at the Seminary on Sept. 13, 1949. He says he has no nickname. This statement was verified by students who knew him from other institutions. He teaches I Latin, German and general science. We welcomeall four of these tutors and hope they will enjoy their year here with us. 2S


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

The new face in the music department here on campus is that of Miss Evelyn Heidtke. Miss Heidtke's home is in Morton Grove, Illinois. She attended Carl Schurz High School in Chicago. After completing her high school education, she entered Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, where she received both her Bachelor's and her Master's degrees. We welcome her into our midst and hope she has by this time become one of the members of our "College Family." Ruth E. Albrecht '51

5

The shouts of enthusiasm over football and baseball chiming in with the school bells tell us that once again D.M.L.C. has opened its doors for the edification of students. The process of going to school and studying is a taken-for-granted prccedure, and on the whole is the hardest part of school life. But the episodes which occur between those edifying moments are really the ones which make life interesting. The coeds are no exception in this case. They enjoy extra-curricular activities almost as much as schoolwork itself. Even the more serious-minded coeds are given to raising the roof occasionally. An excellent opportunity to witness such vivacity and animation presents itself at a lively game of Broom Hockey. This sport centers about the ability to handle a broom. Because of its mildness, Broom Hockey has been classified as a girls' sport. A second reason for this classification is being that it serves as training for Future Homemakers of America. Getting back to the point, I wish to say that in the game not only the spirits are raised but also the brooms, higher sometimes than is allowed by the rules. In such a case, a foul is called, but one day it happened that the result was a broken nose. One of those serious29


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

minded coeds by the name of Dorothy Behnke was the culprit whose spirits soared to heights unknown while her broom soared to the nose of Lillian Gutknecht. Yet the game is mild even though to spectators it might appear to be a pre-training course for football players. Frequently the occasion arises when the more reserved coeds enjoy indulging in a less strenuous sport such as ping pong. Since they have no place to play, they are now studying the blueprints of the new dormitory thoroughly to see if the plans allow space enough for a couple of ping pong tables. Leaving the world of sports, we shall proceed to incidents from the classrooms not related to the acquiring of knowledge. In conducting class, the III Normals are required to have batons. The boys rushed to the music stores downtown, bought up all the batons available, leaving the .girls to make their own. Since a baton is merely a small, refined tree branch, we girls took our batons from the trees on the campus. The only disadvantages are that they look rather crude, sometimes are full of slivers, and the fact that we have to get a new one for every class because they sprout so easily. Speeches presented in English classes are rather interesting, especially when they bring out the truth. The students of the I Normal Class are still wondering whether Dorothy Behnke was bragging or complaining when she revealed her home town of Brillion has a tavern on every corner except one. That corner was reserved for the funeral home. In the dining hall some of the queerest things take place, which are far removed from eating. For instance, Lois Prueter has been reprimanded by a tablemate time and time again to remove the rust from her cup. Now Lois is wondering where she can find an effective rust remover. Rhoda Kiekbusch probably thought that Christmas had arrived and that Santa Claus had made a mistake the other day when perched upon her cookie she found two front teeth. Explanation: Her tablemate had lost his. One feature of dormitory life is the fact that dull moments are a scarcity. The motto of our dormitories could well be "Laugh and the world laughs with you, weep and you weep alone." One of the famous followers of this old saying is Shirley Mielke. I understand that she is the coffee fiend of Annex Hall, and her roommates tell me 30


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

it has been having strange and weird effects upon her. She's changing to tea next week. . A complaint from the Annex girls in general reached my ears recently. They deplore the fact that the working day of the men building the girls' dormitory begins at 6 :00 a. m. To them the purr of the machinery does not offer a very pleasant good-morning, nor is the empyreumatic odor, brought in by the balmy breezes, welcome to their noses. Ruth Grunke's roommates have been lying awake nights since they heard Ruth talk in her sleep. She broke off in the middle of an interesting sentence and her roommates are awaiting the completion of it. Hillcrest Hall has again been blessed with those little gray, furry animals called mice. Only one human casualty, . Dorothy Drost, was reported. She is now recovering from a severe case of hysterics. The coeds of West Hall have not been bothered with mice, but a good facsimile of their characteristic squeak has appeared. This was caused by Rowena Matschke's shoes which she received from Germany. They were probably part of a lend-lease program which explains the squeak. Bode Hall has acquired a new member, namely, "Herbert the Turtle." He has complete freedom of the hall from one to five p.' m. every day and seven to nine p. m. on Saturday evenings. We girls have learned to tolerate him, and, therefore, we were rather concerned one day last week when it looked as though he was drawing his last breath. For further details get in touch with "CarrotTop" Pankow. Please don't hesitate to ask her for what the "Carrot-Top" stands. Before I let too many kittens out of the bag,- so long!

Husband: "Well, my dear, I have carried you safely over all the rough places of life, haven't I?" Wife: "Yes, and I don't think you missed any of them." Will: "Will you join me in a bowl of soup?" Phil: "Do you think there's room for both of us?" 31


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Hello everybody. That long-awaited part of the year is here again. The school year has been well under way for over a month, as most of you have noticed. That's not such a long time, but there are some that already feel the need of a long vacation. There are quite a few new faces in the boys' dorm this year. Most of these new students seem to be getting along quite well. There were the few expected accidents which happen every year. A fuchs lost, looking for his room, and of course, there were also a few new students looking for other things. F'or instance, Robert Timm was searching diligently for a Latin book, "Sieben Schnitzel." I wonder if he ever found them. Let us know sometime, won't you, Robert. It's just a wonder somebody didn't lose a can of striped paint. It has happened before, as some of you might have experienced. Of course, students aren't the only new faces in the dorm this year. We also had two new tutors in the beginning of the year, Mr. Donald Kolander and Mr. John Hoenecke. They're well known to most of you by now, especially to those who have the habit of sleeping late. Now we also have another new tutor, Mr. Paul Koch, who hails from Saginaw, Michigan. Kenneth Moeller has assumed his new post as college "buck," and it appears that he is quite capable of holding the office. The new music hall inspector is none other than Mr. Donald Sebald. A new feature in the boys' dorm this year is the Normal Council. This group is composed of all Normalite boys in the dorm, and it is organized to take charge of the boys' dormitory. This group meets every week and thus far has progressed reasonably well in its efforts. After the election of the Athletic Board, the reign of confusion in the dorm finally passed away and things settled down to normal. That is, as normal as life in a dormitory can be expected to be. These are some things which still cause a little confusion. For instance, the inhabitants of Sebald's room 32


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

are quite a confusing group. By passing Allyson Schaller and John Lau, we come to the other two inhabitants of the room. As you near the room, you hear somebody giving orders in a loud, authoritative voice. When you get there and look for the big man all you see is little Gordon Stinson. For such a small fellow, he really manages to make himself heard. The last member of the room is Douglas Stindt, and he is the exact opposite of Gordon. Together they make a good team, just like Mutt and Jeff. When you walk into a room now, be careful and look at the floor first. If you notice that there are small black seeds on the floor, don't go in. Those are watermelon seeds and they're quite slippery as some of us already occasioned. They leave quite a mess on the floor too, when they have to be cleaned up. At least Doug Stindt thinks so. We have in this dormitory the most willing group of workers I have ever seen. ln a little speech, Professor Schweppe asked whether some of the boys would volunteer their services in leveling off the campus. It must have been quite a stirring speech, for all the members of the dorm have gladly "volunteered." That's all for now except that we're glad you're here, and we hope you all pass through an enjoyable and pleasant year.

"My, how you've changed! You used to black hair, and now you're bald. You used ruddy complexion, now you're pale. I hardly you, Mr. Canning." "But I'm not Mr. Canning." "Look! Don't tell me you've changed your

have thick to have a recognized

name too."

"Good morning, madam," said the repairman. "'1 understand there's something in the house that won't work." "Yes, he's upstairs in bed." 33


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

S.M.J.C.C. Champions 1949. Left to right: .Alfons Woldt, Student Manager, Howard Birkholz, .Assistant Coach, .Armin Panning, .Arnold Zimmermann, Gary Voigt, Robert Eberhardt, Paul Schwartz, John Oldfield, Coach. Seated: .Adolph Leimer, Orville Degner, Orlan Porn, Kenneth Kolander, Adelbert Voight, Howard Woldt-Ruppert Rosin, Captain,

SPORTS BASEBALL: Our sports season was rounded off in good shape last year with the conference championship ill baseball. The Maroon and Gray boys, led by Honorary Captain R. Rosin, polished off six straight foes before losing a game to Bethel. This latter, however, was not a conference game, insofar that Bethel used ineligible players. In reality, our team finished the season with a conference record of 6 wins and no losses. Letters were awarded to the following: Captain R. Rosin, "Doc" Degner, "Red" Voigt, O. Dorn, K. Kolander, and P. Schwartz. These men represented last year's III Normal class, and are therefore no longer on the Hill. We'll really miss them when it's time to pull the spokes out of mothballs next spring. A. Panning and A. Zimmerman, who graduated from high school and are now at Northwestern, also were letter winners. The only three who will be back from last year's Championship Squad are A. Leimer, H. Woldt, and G. Voigt. The prospects for next spring? Well, for one thing, there will be no high-school players on the college team. This year's crop of boys in the normal department ex84


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

•

ceeds the 50 mark. Therefore, the college team must be entirely composed of college members. There are three back from last year. But six more (for the benefit of the girls it takes nine men to make a team) must still be found. So let's see all you potential Ruth's and Gehrig's on the baseball diamond when the call is given next spring. INTRAMURAL: Before we give you the line-up for intramural program for this year, here are the final standings of last year's teams: Boys-Trophy winner, Seniors, 37 points; III Normal, 28; II Normal, 21; Junior, 19; Sophomores, 17; I Normal, 3; and Freshmen O. Girls-Trophy winner, Juniors, 27 points; I Normal, 22; III Normal, 14; Seniors, 13; Sophomores, 13; Freshmen 5; and II Normal, 3. The program this year will closely follow that of last year. The boys will begin with baseball. This will be followed by touch football, winter sports and basketball. For the spring season, there are possibilities for tennis, horseshoe, and archery. In the girls' division, something new has been added. To take the place of softball, broom hockey has been introduced. Just see to it that you keep those brooms down, girls. This will be followed by winter events and basketball. May the best team win! BASKETBALL: College basketball is looking up. As of now, last year's record is completely forgotten. Rumor has it that Coach Oldfield appears to be very optimistic for his team's chances. He expects to win two conference games this year. But now to get a little more serious. The prospects for our team look rosier than they have in a long time. In fact, the team looks better than any that Coach Oldfield has ever had here at D.M.L.C. The main reason for this is the I Normal class. P. Kock, W. Lueders, L. Bruns, and R. Otterstatter, members of our '48-49 undefeated high school team, will be out there trying. Werner Roekle played at Saginaw and Ruhnke played for Hutchinson last year. They'll also be seeking berths on the squad. These, torether with the lettermen of last year's college team, namely P. Steiner. A. Schulz, G. Berger, and G. Voigt, Coach Oldfield should be able to put together a fairly good team. Other probable candidates are H. Woldt and L. Engel. Practice is scheduled to begin in the middle of October. 35


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

The high school team will begin practice about two weeks later. The boys wi 11 have a Hi-game winning streak, and with hard work and practice it shouldn't be too difficult a job. D. Hartwig, R. Kramer, and G. Synhorst are back from last year's squad, and the boys who played on the "B" team will probably help make up our "A" this year. They include J. Kolander, N. Sprengeler, D. Kuske, M. Meihack, O. Guth, D. Gutzke and W. Voigt. Good luck, boys. And don't forget that winning streak you have to build up. ATHLETIC BOARD: Here are the results of the annual election for members to the athletic board: Members at large: H. Woldt, P. Kock Baseball: A. Wentzel, R. Manthe Basketball: O. Mammel, R. Pape Touch football: W. Otterstatter Horseshoe: W. Lueders Tennis: J. Birkholz A girls' athletic board was also elected this year. Its purpose is to assist Coach Oldfield in the girls' intramural contests. One member from each class was duly appointed. III Normal: D. Hemker II Normal: R. Werner I Normal: R. Slama Seniors: A. Harms Juniors: F. Frank Sophomores: P. Erhardt Freshmen: Beckmann

Cowboy: "What kind of saddle do you have-one with a horn or without?" Dude: "Without-not much traffic around here." 86


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

I HAVE "HUMOR

THAT 'WILL TOU~H

YOV

INDIFF'ÂŁRENTLY

WILL

•.

SHAI<' $1>11:""1:

o THE ORGAN . The noises on n.M.L.C. campus are varied 'and numerous, but the most dominating racket seems to come from the Music Hall. The various notes proceeding from the pianos and organs blend togther into one blare, any similarity. to music being purely coincidental. It is only the organs, however, on which I wish to concentrate at present. All the organs, ranging from the "tractor" action instruments to our newly purchased three manual are appreciated by the organ students of D.M.L.C. To these students I dedicate the following essay by Henry Ward Beecher. "The organ long expected has arrived, been unpacked, set up, and gloried over. The great players of this region round about, or of distant celebrity, have had the grand organ exhibition; and this magnificent instrument has been put through all its paces in a manner which has surprised everyone, and, if it had had a conscious existence, must have surprised the organ itself most of all. It has piped, fluted, trumpeted, brayed, thundered. It has played so loud that everybody was deafened, and so soft that nobody could hear. The pedals played for thunder, the flutes languished and coquetted, and the swell died away in delicious suffocation, like on singing a sweet song under the bedclothes . . . At length a fugue is rendered to show the whole scope and power of the instrument. The theme, like a cautious rat, peeps out to see if the coast is clear; and, after a few hesitations, comes forth and begins to frisk a little, and run up and down to see what it can find. It finds just what it did not want, a purring tenor lying in ambush and waiting for a spring; and as the theme comes incautiously near, the savage cat of ate nor sprinzs at it, misses its hold, and then takes after it with terrible earnestness. But the tenor has miscalculated the agility of the theme. All that it could do, with the most


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

desperate effort, was to keep the theme from running back into its hole again; and so they ran up and down, around and around, dodging, eluding, whipping in and out of every corner and nook, till the whole organ was aroused, and the bass began to take part, but uruuckily slipped and rolled down-stairs, and lay at the bottom raving and growling in the most awful manner, and nothing could appease it. Sometimes the theme was caught by one part, and dangled for a moment, then with a snatch another part took it and ran off exultant, until, unawares, the same trick was played on it; and, finally, all the parts, being greatly exercised in mind, began to chase each other promiscuously in and out, up and down, now separating and now rushing in full tilt together, until everything in the organ loses patience and all the 'stops' are drawn, and in spite of all that the brave organist could do-who bobbed up and down, feet, hands, head and allthe tune broke up into a real row, and every part was clubbing every other one, until at length, patience being no longer a virtue, the organist, with two or three terrible crashes, put an end to the riot, and brought the great organ back to silence."

(I N .....

CAP.~ MAY COMp BOT

FORD~

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38

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'"'AMP LIGHT)

AND CAR,.5 Mil'\{ ON FORE''''''''.

ee


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New Ulm Laundrv Co. 01

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Phone No.5 For Your Dry Cleaning, Laundry or Hat Work We assure you prompt and efficient service and invite you to visit our modern up-to-date plant at 107-109 So. Minn. St.

High Quality

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HENLE

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CITIZENS

STATE

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BANK Corporation


You Will Find The Leading Natio~ally Advertised

Brands

Of Shoes & Rubber

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For The Entire

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-At-

X-Ray Fitting

Expert Shoe Fitters New Ulm, Minn.

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Depend On Us We depend on you for our business. You can depend on us for your building materials. We know that without your confidence and goodwill our business would be short-lived. That is why, for the past 57 years, we have been dependable in quality and service, and price. When you grow you need more building materials and come to us because you know you can depend on us.

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ROYAL MAID ICE CREAM SUNDAES-SODAS-MALTS MAGAZINES-BOOKS-SHOE SHINE CANDY-TOBACCO Telephone 1031

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When in Need of Printing H. P. Zupfer, Prop. 103 N. Broadway


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J. C. PENNEY CO. Corner Minn. and 2nd North St. Budget your income and Stretch it far . Pay cash at Penney's where Bargains Are

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KEMSKE PAPER

CO.

Towels and Toilet Paper Portable Typewriters, Mimeograph Stencils and Ink Safes-Filing Equipment and OfficeSupplies-Desks

NEW ULM DAIRY THE HOME OF PURE DAIRY PRODUCTS

Ice Cream at All Our Accounts Phone 104 Try

LEADWAY

or

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FOODS Distributed by

NEW ULM GROCERY CO. Wholesale Grocers

"The Place To Go"

NATIONAL CAFE THE FASTIDIOUS STUDENT will find satisfactory service at

Gruodmeyer's Barber-Beauty Shop Air Conditioned Below Tauscheck & Green's Clothing Store

Phone 710


Students'

Clothing and Sport Wear

Hummel Brothers

New UIm, Minn.

14 No. Minnesota St.

SCHUCK'S TAILORS TAILORED TO MEASURE SUITS AND OVERCOATS Cleaning and Pressing All Kinds of Repairing No Deposits-No C. O. D.'s 215 N. Minn. St. Phone 498

Fesenmaier Hardware HARDWARE AND SPORTING GOODS

LLOYD E. SCHWARTZ, DDS. Dentist OfficeAbove State Bank of New DIm New UIm, Minn.

Office Phone 472

WILLIAM J. VON BANK, D. D. S. F. I. C. D. GEORGE F. KUEHNER, D.D.S. DENTISTS-OFFICE

Office Phone 237

OVER PINK'S STORE

New Ulm, Minn.

Residence Phone 797

Somsen & Somsen Henry N. Somsen Henry N. Somsen, Jr. ATTORNEYS AT LAW

Minnesota

New VIm,

A THINKING FELLOW CALLS YELLOW 24-HOUR SERVICE

YELLOW CAB PHONE

244

245

CHAMPION SHOE SHOP Across from Wilfahrt "Finest

Bros.

Kind of Repairing"


PINI(S STORE Friendly Sales People to Help You Caral King, Jr. Dresses Minx Modes Munsing and Barbizon Lingerie Swansdown Coats and Suits Jentzen's Sweaters r

Brown & Meidl Music Store and School Piano Tuning, Repairing of All Instruments Inst.ruments-c-Recordsc--Sheet Music Westinghouse Radios 308 North Minnesota St. Phone 1451 New Ulm, Minn.

Attention STUDENTS AND FACULTY MEMBERS For the Particular Man Made to Measure Suits and Overcoats Single Trousers or Single Coats Choice of 150 Different Fabrics and Styles $35.00-$65.00-All Guaranteed 20% Down-3 Weeks Delivery' Call 1946-L FAIRBANKS CLOTHINGCO.

Russell Rocl~vam 115 N. Broadway

Box 143

New Ulm, Minn.

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Buy Where You See This Sign 500 Store Buying Power

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OLSON

Dr. James R. Seifert DENTAL SURGEONS

DRUGS

Phone 125 Phone 88

Above Muesing Drug Store.

Stone

Your Westinghouse

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Dealers

For The Young Point of . View in Shoes

Alwin Electric Tel. 148

For Smart, Practical and Inexpensive

COLLEGE STYLES

"OCHS" New Ulm "Where Quality 18 Not Expensive"

w.

EIBNER & SON,' INC. Makers of DELICIOUS ICE CREAM

and QUALITY BAKERY GOODS Phone 128


For Quality and Fashion For Top Value ...

New VIm's Leading Department Store New UIm, Minn.

Phone 234-235

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WEBSTER FLOUR

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ENRICHED BAKER BOY BREAD and

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Phone 232

v.

James Tillman, Sr., Proprietor

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-

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Friendly Helpful Service at Your Command Residence Phone 150

. Office Phone 260

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PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON MINNESOTA


WHEN IN NEED OF FOOTWEAR Be Sure and Call On Us We carry a complete line of men's. ladies' and children's shoes. Our prices are always the lowest, Quality considered. We appreciate your business. Shoes Fitted by X-Ray

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MEYER THE LEADING PHOTOGRAPHER Special Prices to Students We have a complete line of frames from miniatures to 8xlO in metal or wood. PHONE 165-L

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T. R. FRITSCHE, M. D., F. A. C. S. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat GLASSES FITTED Fritsche Bldg. New Ulm, Minn.

NEW ULM GREENHOUSES FLOWERS FOR EVERY OCCASION We are prepared to fill orders for flowers at all points through the Florists Telegraphic Delivery Association Phone 45

NEW ULM, MINNESOTA The Home of Kuppenheimer Suits and Overcoats Manhattan Shirts-Stetson Hats CompleteLine of Men's and Boys' Clothes and Furnishings

Fred Meine Clothing Co.


LIBERTY CAB PHONE 770 SPECIAL RATES ON OUT OF TOWN TRIPS

PROMPT

COURTEOUS

STOLTENBURG Studebaker 218 No. Broadway

MOTOR CO.

Sales and Service

Telephone 940

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Wilfahrt Brothers One-Stop Service Station Hardware--Sporting Goods--Electrical Students Welcome

Supplies

People Who Talk About Good Food and Courteous, Speedy Service, Talk About

THE SILVER LATCH CAFE EXTRA Values Are Exclusively Yours at Lowest "Cost When Traveling By

NORTHLAND GREYHOUND 109 N. Broadway

Phone 19

Telephone729

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SCHROEDER'S Phone 268

New VIm

LANG'S MASTER BARBER SHOP Three Expert Barbers to Give Prompt and Efficient Service Elme..r--Joe-~arry

FISCHER AUTO SERVICE OTTO FISCHER, Prop. Oldsmobile Sales and Service Phone729

109 N. Broadway

New VIm, Minnesota


RETZLAFF MOTOR CO. Dodge---Plymouth Dodge Job-Rated Trucks We Service All Makes of Cars and Trucks

RETZLAFF Radio---Appliance Center Kelvinator= Philco Service at Low Cost by Three Trained Service Men

O. B. FESENMAIER~M. D. PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON 11 Y2 N. Minnesota Street OfficePhone 567 Residence Phone 466 New Ulm, Minnesota

NIENO STUDIO Graduation Pictures-Photo

Finishing

Greeting Cards Phone 247-J

Fred L. Nieno

The Coronet Jewelers Watches A. A. Kanstrup

Diamonds New DIm. Minn.


A. C. OCHS BRICI( & TILE COMPANY Executive Office and Plant Springfield, Minn.

General Sales Office 906 Foshay Tower Minneapolis

MANUFACTURE

ARTISTIC FACE BRICK Also Various Colors and complete line of

STRUCTURAL

BUILDING TILE AND COMMON BRICK

WHY IT WILL ... PAY YOU TO BUILD . . . WITH FACE .BRICK Face brick offers the widest choice of color tones, both in artistic blends and even shades. Colors and textures burned in becoming lovelier with age. A Face Brick Home offers you less upkeep over a period of years. Lessened heating cost and greater comfort in winter and summer. Greater resale value. Easily financed because loan companies prefer merits of Face Brick houses.

the known

Our Products Are Sold in the New DIm Territory by NEW. ULM BRICK & TILE .YARDS


Dr. G. J. Germann Optometrist Now Over Alwin's

Phone 420

EUGENE KOEHLER OLD RELIABLE BARBER SHOP Good Satisfactory Work Guaranteed at All Times Your Patronage Is Appreciated

Pat's Dry Cleaners, Inc. We pick up and deliver Garments insured while in our possession Quality Guaranteed Kenneth Prall Phone 115

Brewers and Bottlers Since 1864 New Ulm, Minnesota

Telephone No.1

LINDEMANN'S "The Students' Shop" Whatever the costume or occasion, there's a Lindemann teen-style just right for you. Our versions of the newest thing in footwear have a way of making any guy or gal a leader in the class.


MUESING DRUG STORE Expert Prescription Service

ARTCRAFT. PHOTO SERVICE We Have It!

Will Get It!

Or It Isn't Maae!

PHONES 52 - 341

Oswald Studios GRANT R. OSWALD,Prof. Photog. Graduation Photographs a Specialty High Quality Portraits Phone 272-J

New Ulm

Spellln-inks Clothing Store "The Place to Go for the Brands You Know"

.Nicl{lasson Athletic Co. Wholesale Athletic Goods Special Discounts to Students Located in Basement of F'esenmaler Hdwe.


--,

--------------~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~i

UNION HOSPITAL NEW ULM, MINN. A modern, well-equipped, and fireproof hospital supervised by and staffed with registered nurses.

PHONE NO. 404

H. J. BAUMANN INSURANCE AGENCY Insurance

Bonds

Hospitaliza tion

Phone 666

MAKE YOURSELF FEEL AT HOME AT

SALET'S BEAUTIFUL SHOPPING CENTER Quality Apparel for Him or Her

"YOU ALWAYS SAVE AT SALET'S"

I

I


QUALITY CLOTHING Correct Fitting and Standard Lines

TAUSCHECK

& GREEN

Geo. D. Erickson

John W. Graff

ERICKSON & GRAFF Attorneys at Law New UIm, Minnesota

Eyes' Tested

Lenses Ground

Glasses Fitted

and Duplicated

DRS. SCHLEUDER Optometrists and Opticians PHONE 87

NEW ULM

MINNESOTA

IN NEW ULM IT'S

G,",",~ The Friendly Store

FOR HARDWARE AND APPLIANCES

SHAKE CLEANERS and DYERS Phone 756

20 % Discount Cash and Carry Reconstruction, .Installation . Additions, Blowers Chimes, Harps

Moderriizmg, Maintaining Tuning, Repairs, Service, Sales

Wicks Pipe Organs

ERNEST C. VOGELPOHL 405-409 North Broadway

New UIm, Minn.


Slide-rules are accurate, true. But their accuracy is l~mitedby certain mechanical factors in their construction. In the Prescription Laboratory, however, our skilled and experienced pharmacists use equipment that is so precise that it is possible for them to weigh your signature written in lead pencil. This Nth degree of prescription is necessary to assure absolute conformity with your doctor's specifications-a conformity that is essential to your health and well-being. We have three registered pharmacists in our Prescription Department.

WALTER W. HELLMANN

ALFRED J. POLTA

ELMER A. EPPLE

,

EPPLE BROS . .:DIUUj-S PRESCRIPTION ~HONE

1~9

SPI""(.I~T' '

NEW

!.ILM.

""INN.


Compliments of

Nicols, Dean & Gregg(C• Roman F. Schnobrich, Manager

PALACE

LUNCit

~: i

H. A. Bergmeier, Prop. i New Ulm's Most Popular Lunch Room Sandwiches-Ice Cream-e-Candy-c-Sort Drtnks-c-Ctgarettes

115 N. Minn. St.

Phon~ 668 ,~

New: VIm, Minn. "

:~-

REIM & CHURCH Jewelers

. DEER BRAND BEER 1';-

1

AUGUST SCHELL BREWmG COMPANY NEW ULM, MINNESOTA

Our Best Attention Everything

of a banking nature entrusted our best attention.

to ourL_~re: receives

We shall be glad to have a share of your business, . :. - _ 2J

STATE BANK· OF NEW ULM Member Federal Deposit Insurance

Corporation


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C!Cbriutmau 1949


TABLE OF CONTENTS

PRAISE CHRIST OUR KING................................................3 EDITORIALS Truly Beautiful Music

4

The Classroom vs. Student Activities.............................. 5 Along the Line

.,. 6

LJTERARY Contemplation

8

Chopped, Chosen, Cherished

10

o

10

Little Town of Bethlehem

Christmas Preparations in Brittany

12

Thundering Hoofbeats

16

Which Newspapers Do You Read ?

17

Books I Like ALUMNI

···· ····

···· ·..·········· 22

LEAVES OF LEARNING

······23

COLLEGE NOTES CO-ED NOTES LOCALS

19

··

··25

··················28 ···· ···············31

SPORTS

· ··34

HUMOR IN CASE YOU'RE SUPERSTITIOUS

36

ASPIRATIONS OF A FEMALE STUMPER

37


119. 1M. 1L. ((. 1Me~~ÂŁnger The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published four times during the school year in the months of October, December, March, and June by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is one dollar per annum. Single copies thirty cents. Stamps are not accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates, and friends. The aim of "The Messenger" is to offer such material as will be beneficial as well as interesting to our readers, to keep the alumni in a closer contact with the college, to foster school spirit, and to give the students an opportunity in the practice of composition and the expression of their thoughts. Entered as second class matter at Post Office of New Ulm, Minn.

No.2

Volume XXXX DECEMBER, 1949

THE MESSENGER

Editor : Associate Editor Business Manager Assistant Manager Assistant Manager Typist , Typist Alumni Notes Notes and News on Books College.Notes Co-ed Notes : Locals Sports Humor

STAFF

Arthur Schulz Fred Radtke Alfons Woldt Fred Biedenbender James Hopman Renata Pape Marion Chossek Ruth Albrecht Margaret Gamm Wanda Herrmann Alice Reek Otto Mammel G-erald Berger Faith Jeske


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

PRAISE CHRIST OUR KING! Give praise and thanks to Christ, our King! For us salvation He did bring; God sent His son that we might be From sin and death forever free. Through war-torn lands and battlefields The Gospel message pierces, And faith in Him will guide us on Till peace and victory are won. Thou who hast shown Thy boundless grace, Help us to meet Thee face to face. Around and in us brightly shine The saving truth and light divine. Keep us from evil, tempting ill, And give us strength to do Thy will That with a fervent, prayerful heart We may from earth to Thee depart. We ask of Thee this Christmastide, To keep us ever at Thy side That peace on earth to every man May echo through the earth again. When Christmas bells ring out the story, Of Christ, the Savior's wondrous glory, Then let your hearts with these words ring: Praise Christ, Our King! Praise Ghrist, Our King! Frederick Bartel '52


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

L

â&#x20AC;˘

Editorials

TRULY BEAUTIFUL MUSIC "Truly Beautiful music can be written only by a true Christian." This is a statement that I read recently. I should like to state my views on this matter. In the first place, I do not think that the personality and religion of the composer should be considered in such a matter. Secondly, I am of the opinion that music can be judged only according to human standards, even 'as art and literature are judged. I avree that music is and should be used in our church services for the glory of God and the beautification of the service. As such, it is the words that are of paramount importance. When others sing His praises God is not interested in the religion of the man who wrote the music to which the words are sung. Let us consider the source of some of our music. The great German chorale "Herzlich tut mich verlangen" is an old German love song. Others are German folk songs. Some of the organ music used in our church is secular. An example is "Sheep may safely graze" from Bach's Birthday Cantata. Furthermore, are we to judge whether a composer is a Christian? I do not believe that God even thinks of our feeble attempts at music other than that they are used to His glory. I believe that God alone knows true beauty and perfection in music. Roger Wessel '50 4


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

THE CLASSROOMVS. STUDENT ACTIVITIES Just recently I read the essay "Student Activities in the College," by Alexander Meiklejohn, who says that "student activities are of fundamental importance and anyone who would cook up a college without them need hope to find little appreciation of his wares." Most colleges acknowledge student activities, such as debating, athletics, music, newspapers, literary magazines, and dramatics. Our college participates to a great extent in music, athletics, and the literary magazines (the Messenger and our first Annual.) The Literary Society, which takes up the dramatic work, was for a long time non-existent, until several years ago, when it was, fortunately, brought back to life. In order to present a play, an operetta, or some other literary program, much time and effort must be used to master the production. About a week or two before the day of presentation, the program is rehearsed every evening for two or three hours. We are asked how we can accomplish such a performance and keep up with our studies at the same time. For most of us the answer is simple. We can't! That is, we cannot prepare our studies quite as well as we could if there were no important rehearsals for a play standing in the way. But does that make any difference 'f Are we wasting time? Permit me to again quote from Meicklejohn's essay: "Not only are we trying to give college students acquaintance with a great body of knowledge; more than that, they must also acquire understanding, interpretation of what they are learning, reconstruction of what they have known. And for this process there is need of leisure of deliberation and contemplation, of a certain quiet waiting for subconscious processes to do their part. These results cannot be achieved merely by digging and grinding. In addition to the work there must be leisure; the two must be combined if the fruits of culture and intelligence are to be reached." Complete absorption in studies would not be the best kind of training, and, therefore, he says that we must have leisure time, Note that he says it twice. If our professors do not give us the leisure time by expecting not quite so much work from us, we must seek it else.where, for we feel that putting on a dramatic production will do us more good than trying to learn all the history and intricate details about an instrument which produces 5


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

a pleasing succession of sounds, or sometimes not so agreeable, depending upon the "producer." Nor do we deem it necessary to spend three hours a week to fret about Venus in the sky, when we have countless incomparable specimens here on earth. And again, does it take three hours a week to learn how to invest money and spend it wisely, when we know from experience that such process often requires no more than a minute or tWO? You may ask WHAT the good is that one achieves by taking part in a dramatic production. When we form together for some chosen plan or purpose, we gain enthusiasm, interest, a feeling of leadership, ideas from each other, and something which we just don't get in the classroom, that is, not very often. What is it that we so often hear after we're out of school? Is it the fact that the students count their extra-curricular activities in the school as having been of far greater educational value than the studies given to (although not always taken by) us in the classroom? Yes, even though we come to class not very well prepared for a few weeks, let us assure you that we are not wasting time, that we are not becoming de-educated, or accumulating ignorance. On the other hand, we are cultivating something which the "knowledge-hungry" student lacks. When our college days are over, we shall continue to be active and search for a variety of things to do, using a great deal of effort to doing more than our share. The poor student who never participates in outside activities will, perhaps, in later life do only those things which he is compelled to do and not a bit more. Of course, there are exceptions to both kinds. R. P. '50 ALONG THE LINE From time to time we hear alumni and students ask the question why D.M.L.C. has no school paper. Here is our answer. Occasions arose during the Messenger's forty year history when this question caused investigations. Each resulted in the established fact that such a move would have proved impractical for that particular time. The same reason can be given today. Why? Three years ago the campus literary organization was revived. After much struggling it is coming into its deserved position of prominence. This year the long-sought annual is to become a reality. This is an entirely new thing 6


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

for us on the hill. Cooperation and time are requisites for the success of these activities to be produced in a manner most representative of our abilities and means. Noone should be satisfied wit h feeble, half-hearted efforts. With these things in mind, we ask you, alumni and students, to consider: ,jhould the Messenger become a paper at present? ... We say no! The change would again be impractical. One innovation is enough for us at one time. Congratulations to the literary league for staging the performance of an operetta. Not only was it something different; it was good. Incidentally, much credit for its success should be given to the painters of the scenery. As already mentioned, the school's first yearbook is in the making. Its name-Excelsior. The staff was chosen by the entire student body. Our representatives are determined to give us something to remember. Professor Trapp is faculty advisor.... Reports reveal that the Audubon Screen Tours at the local high school are worth much more than the time it takes to see them. That's right; they are free. . . . There are some controversial articles in this issue to which you might like to reply. Remember, anyone can write for the Messenger. Items of humor seem to receive much favor; or perhaps you are a poet. This magazine depends upon your literary contributions. . . . Remember the terrible pictures in our commencement issue last June. A refund of thirty dollars has been received from the photo engravers. The classes of '49 have donated this money to the Messenger. Thank you! . . . With this issue eight of the present staff members s t e p from their positions. Regardless of our shortcomings, we hope that you have enjoyed the Messenger. Thanks for the valuable criticisms and the encouragement given us.... Members of the next staff, good luck. ... "Art"

7


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

CONTEMPLATION

Only three more shopping days before Christmas. Display windows of stores are tantalizing young and old with fine apparel, home tools, puppet shows, story-book characters, and Santa Claus. Countless throngs mill the streets in a search for last minute purchases for the holiday. There seems to be no room for Jesus in all the beauty of the scenes. But come with me while I follow a poorly-clad old man walking the street amidst this bugger-mugger. Within his eye we see the shining glitter of a truly happy man. He has just purchased a gift for one whom he now calls Mother. Along his way the actions of the little folks are brought to his attention. They are in ecstasy over the animated fairyland characters, toys, and Punch-and-Judy shows. He is reminded of his own children when he sees Todd, the neighbor's boy, bashfully approach a Santa Claus. This man knows very well that Todd only pretends to believe in jolly old St. Nick. It is but natural for children to pretend for themselves to be a part in the realm of the fantastic. Trudging past a dry goods store, OUrfriend sees Todd standing on tip-toes and peeking over the counter top to choose a gift for his mother while she cannot see him. There, now he has found it, a crocheted, rose-shaped center-piece for a table decoration. The man recalls the Bible story Todd told him the night before about the baby Jesus, God's gift to us, born in Bethlehem many years ago. As the clerk wraps the package in seasonal paper these words come to our friend's mind, "He who joy would win Must share it; Happiness was born a twin." 8


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Glistening flakes of snow fall softly to the ground as the man slowly starts his way home. His path leads him past the church where both he and his young acquaintance worship. The bells are ringing out the knell of parting day. Silently, we follow him into the church. As he looks toward the altar, it appears to him as if Todd were there joyfully reciting his Christmas message to the congregation. Oft has the man heard the boy tell his true impression of Christmas in the steadfast manner (If the little child of faith in these words pure and simple: "I'm glad my blessed Savior Was once a child like me To show how pure and holy His little ones might be." Soon the old man leaves the church and steps into the beautiful winter scene outside. It is no longer snowing, a sea of white lies quietly on the ground and stars are twinkling overhead. He gazes into the sky to see those most beautiful heavenly lights His min d travels to far-off Bethlehem where long ago these same stars shone down on the Child in a manger. A head is bowed, hands are folded and from moving lips comes this fer v e n t prayer: "Ah, dearest Jesus, holy Child, Make Thee a bed, soft, undefiled, Within my heart, that it may be A quiet chamber kept for Thee." Once more he begins his homeward trek. Musing to himself he thinks of Christmas, the birth of the Savior, which by truly observing we confess our sins. Why he is celebrating Christmas comes next in his thoughts. It is a profession of faith. Luther's explanation to the Second Article so beautifully relates to him that Jesus Christ, true God and true Man, has saved us from sin, death, and the devil. Already he is before his modest home. Opening the gate of his picket fence our friend steps through the snow. All the while he is thinking of the crowd in town and praying that all in it know the hope of Christmas and celebrate it with Christian courage. He lifts the latch of his door, and these words tell us what each Christmas does for true Christians: "And still new beauties may I see, And still increasing light" Through Christ, who, come to die for me, Was born a Babe that night. Arthur Schulz '50 9


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CHOPPED, CHOSEN, CHERISHED CHOPPED: From the World Encyclopedia we took this learned treatise: "In the United States, the cutting and selling of Christmas trees has become a big business. Americans spend several millions of dollars to buy between five and. ten million trees each Christmas season. About half of these trees come from Canadian forests. The kind of tree depends on the region in which it is bought, but the most popular tree is the balsam fir, because of its shape and because it lasts a long time without shedding its needles. Other trees used are the blue spruce, Douglas fir, and lodge-pole pine. Trees vary in height between 5 and 35 foot. They are usually cut in several sizes." This we learn of the Christmas tree. It is chopped. The deed is done It must now be: CHOSEN: A perfect one is picked from the group of big, little, short, unbalanced, and tall and scrawny replicas. It IS now taken home to be: CHERISHED: By all ?-Yes, by all, externally. But how different we cherish it from others! The Christmas tree, the evergreen, is a reminder to us of Christ, the everlasting tree of life. We decorate it with lights, again a reminder to us, a reminder of how God makes light the darkness of the world by the Light, the Gospel. And then the ornaments, reminding us of the many blessings God brings. us, through the Christ-Child. Last of all, we place gifts under this tree, gifts which remind us of God's unspeakable gift, the greatest of all gifts, the Savior. Yes, how much more this chopped and chosen Christmas tree is cherished by us than the world! Margaret Gamm '51

o LITTLE TOWN OF BETHLEHEM In the latter half of the nineteenth century, specifically the years covering the eighteen-sixties, one could find many examples of civil unrest and world strife. In naming a few of these one might mention the Civil War in the United States and the Seven Weeks' War in Europe. 10


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In the midst of all this strife and contention were a few bright stories. One of these stories dwells around the carol, "0 Little Town of Bethlehem." Phiilips Brooks, the author of this famous and wellloved poem, was brought up in a strict and pious home. Every Sunday he and his brothers and sisters had to memorize a hymn. These hymns were always recited to their father after he had conducted the evening devotion on the sabbath day. Knowing that these hymns would help in later life, Phillips studied them faithfully. Afterwards, when Phillips chose his profession to be the ministry, these memorizations did help him greatly. These hymns not only helped him in his church services but they helped the lad become acquainted with poetry. After his graduation from college, Phillips was installed in the Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, which is located in Philadelphia. Since he had much to do with the Sunday School, he was asked to write a poem which was to be presented in the annual Christmas celebration. As he pondered on a theme for his poem, he thought about his vacation of three years before. His vacation trip took him all the way to Palestine. Meditating on this, he remembered his vacation very clearly. He could remember that clear night when he had stood on the hills around Bethlehem. He saw clearly that beauteous night with the stars shining brightly above him jus t as they, perhaps, had shone on that first Christmas night when the shepherds watched their flocks. He saw the tiny city of Bethlehem sleep and slumber below him. And when he remembered this, he was struck with the beauty of that night, Therefore, he took as his theme "The little town of Bethlehem." With this theme in his mind, he wrote the following poem: o little town of Bethlehem, How still we see thee lie! Above thy deep and dreamless sleep The silent stars go by; Yet in thy darkness shineth 'I'he everlasting light: The hopes and fears of all the years Are met in thee tonight. For C)lrist is born of Mary, And gathered all above, While mortals sleep, the angels keep T)leir watch of wondering love. o morning stars, together Proclaim the holy birth And praises sing to God, the King, And peace to men on earth. How silently, how silently, T)le wondrous gift was given! So God imparts to human hearts The blessings of His )leaven. No ear may hear His coming, But in this world of sin, Where meek souls will receive Him still, The dear Christ enters in. 11


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o

Holy Child of Bethlehem, Descend to us, we pray, Cast out our sin and enter in, Be born in us today. We hear the Christmas angels The great glad tidings Oh, come to us, abide with us, Our Lord Immanuel!

tell:

Where Children, pure and happy, Pray to the Blessed Child, W}lere Misery cries out to Thee, Son of the Undefiled Where Charity stands watching And F'atth holds wide the Door, The dark night wakes, the glory breaks, And Christmas comes once more.

Although our church dropped the last stanza, we still use the beautiful poem in our Christmas service. After Mr. Brooks had written the poem, the organist of his church, Mr. Lewis Redner, was asked to write the hymn tune. Redner waited for an inspiration and finally he received one. One night, as he lay sleeping, he dreamed that he heard an angel choir singing. Later, when he awoke, he put as much of the melody that he could remember on paper. Some time later he harmonized it. He called it "ST. LOUIS," and he insisted that the angel melody was the melody that he had used. He then applied his work to the poem of Mr. Brooks. Such is the story behind the writing of the beautiful carol, "0 Little Town of Bethlehem." And now as the Christmas season comes upon us, we can think of the message of this wonderful carol, and sing praises to Christ, the New-Born Babe, our King! ! Frederick Biedenbender '52

CHRISTMAS PREPARATIONS IN BRITTANY "I love the time of Christmas. It always makes me feel so warm and happy inside; doesn't it, Julie?" burst out little Noma, her eyes sparkling with joy. "Um-um," I said mechanically, for Noma was always chattering about something, and this was the fifth time she had made the same statement. We were in the wooded hills of Billiers, Brittany, gathering laurel, holly, and mistletoe for Christmas decorations. "Look, there is the oak father has marked (wacked) for our hearth fire on Christmas Eve. It's really a big one this year," I said. "If you girls would talk less, you would get these gathered faster," Andre teased. 12


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"Don't be in such a hurry," was my reply. "Father said that tonight we are going to cut our oak tree," I said, purposely changing the subject. "At midnight when it's dark and cold?" shivered Noma. "Sure, that's when it is the most fun, scaredy-cat," laughed Andre. "Besides, it's supposed to bring you good luck for all next year, if the tree is chopped down at the stroke of twelve'!' "Who believes that? or she'll be a superstitious I chided Andre.

Stop telling Noma such things old woman before we get home,"

And to Noma I said, "Of course, it won't be at midnight. We'll do it just as soon as father comes back from the fishing wharf tonight." That night we dressed in our colorful holiday costumes, although we were just going to get the tree. Father, a rough Brittany fisherman, led the way, and we all followed in the order of our age. The air was clear and biting, but there was no wind. Soon we reached our destination. "Children-Noma and Julie, get away from that tree or it will fall on you," Mama continually said. She kept us all near her, worrying over us lest we get in the way of the falling tree. Before we had a chance to get cold, the tree had been felled. Now father and Jacque hoisted the tree on their shoulders and bore it homeward. Around us were several others getting their trees, but most of them, the superstitious villagers, would wait until the more potent hour of midnight. We all made a feeble effort to help carry the tree, but it was just pretense. As we trudged home, we laughed and sang carols and talked, especially Noma, who chattered to anyone who would listen. The hard snow crunched under our feet and from the trees icicles snapped, fell, and buried themselves in the snow drifts below. At home the log was set down outside the house to remain until Christmas Eve. The next evening we all gathered around the fire and helped make creches to represent the Christmas story. These santons are small, clay figures molded in plaster casts. The plaster casts which we use have been in our family since my great-great grandfather first made them. Every family in Billiers has its own distinctive set of 13


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molds. When the clay figures are dry, they are removed from the casts and painted. Father does that. He likes bright colors, and he surely uses them on our creches. "I want to put out the wheat for the birds," volunteered Andre on that early morning, the day before Christmas. "Then I get to feed the cat until she's so full she can't walk," spoke up Noma who wanted to help too. "What do you want to do that for?" "The neighbors said that if our cat is hungry and meows, we will have bad luck all next year, and I don't want anything bad to happen to us," whimpered little Noma, her wide eyes fillin.g with tears at such a thought. "Oh, that's just another superstitious custom of the village folk," I said. "It isn't really true. God always protects us and He doesn't let anything like a silly old. cat ruin a whole year for anyone. Instead of worrying about the cat, you can help me feed our cows an extra portion of hay today." All day long Mama was busy baking good things to eat. When we came in from the cold outdoors, the fire sent 'forth a cheery warmth and the smell of warm naulets and fougasse met OUrnoses. That night a delicious supper was spread before us. The table was bright with holly and mistletoe. In the center was the pan calendau with its brown crust slashed to form a cross. Noma rushed to the table and sat down before anyone could stop her. "Hey, what's your hurry, Chatterbox," said Andre. "We have to bring in the yule log first." Abashed Noma got up again. She soon regained her sunny spirits as father and the boys brought in the log and we sang Christmas carols. First three libations of wine were poured on the log. Then Mama brought forth a brand carefully saved from last year's fire. With this she lit the log. Then we each sipped some wine, as we waited for the log to catch fire and burn. After the "gros souper" the oil lamps were extinguished. Only one candle representing the Star of Bethlehem burned in the window. In the darkness we sat quiet and waiting--quiet, that is, except for Noma and the crackling fire. 14


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"You'll save the ashes from the log when it is burnt out, won't you?" piped up Noma. "The neirhbors said that if the ashes were saved in a jar, Wâ&#x201A;Ź would always be protected against lightning storms, and they said if we throw a few ashes under every bed, we will never get sick." At this I burst out laughing, while Mama corrected her. "Then isn't it true either, that if someone sits on the log, he will get sick?" "He will probably get burnt but it won't make him sick." And we were all laughing until tears came to our eyes. Noma did too, although she did not know what was funny. "Hush!" said Mama suddenly. We became quiet at once. I looked out of the window and could see that by now every house had its lights out and only the Star of Bethlehem burning. The town lay dark and silent in the fallen snow. Then came the thing for which we were waiting. Over the town rang the bells of the church. Clearly and beautifully they pealed forth a carol. As their tones faded away, people in every home began singing that carol until it was one mighty anthem rising to heaven and praising God. The n a II was quiet again. And we sat silent, too moved to break the spell. A few minutes later we were hustling around, getting ready for church. Soon we were on our way. The snow was falling gently. The wind whipped across our faces and made our cheeks glow. The chimes rang out across the valley, and the children caught the melody and sent it back again. Everywhere families were wending their way to church; each group carrying a lantern. The path across the hills and into the valley was covered with snow, so it was hard to keep on the smooth, worn trail. We laughed and talked as we plodded along. "I just can't stay on my feet," laughed Nom a , picking herself out of the snow for the third time. "Well, if you would try a little hard-oo-oops!" 1 slipped and fell too, and everyone laughed. What a merry time we had! Soon we reached the little church. Just as all the others had done, father 15


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gave his lantern to a poor, old woman who cared for the lamps while we were in church. For this service she received coins from everyone. Inside, the small organ was already playing a prelude. Father led the way to our pew, where we sat down quietly and waited for the service to begin. I was eager to again hear the story of the birth of the Christ Child. It has always made me feel happy and content. It is the most beautiful thing that has ever happened in the world. Noma snuggled up beside me on the hard bench. "I love the time of Christmas," she whispered; "don't you?" Rhoda Arndt '51

THUNDERING HOOFBEATS To the spectators at a horse show (I am referring here to the White Horse Show), the fast action, perfect training, and dazzling whiteness of the horses offer a high degree of entertainment and excitement. The riders of the horses, however, experience far more excitement coupled with another feeling, that of privilege and honor to take part in this entertainment. Just the fact of appearing before an audience does not bring this feeling. In the early morning when the riders are aroused from their bunks, after having had eight hours of sleep -if they are lucky-their first duty is to care for the horses. The horses are watered in the order in which they are placed on the picket line, each rider managing to get to his favorite horse first. Then comes the feeding. Each horse is fed a mixture beneficial to his own needs. After breakfast, the work is earnestly begun. Each rider takes the horses assigned to him to be washed; for these show horses must be kept perfectly white. The method in scrubbing the horses is very similar to the shampooing of one's hair except that with horses one uses a sponge and a hose. When the scrubbing is finished, the horse is held and rinsed. In this process, if a rider .gets a drop of water on anyone else, the free-forall is begun. The outcome is a merry soaking for one and all. 16


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It is late afternoon before all the horses are bathed. Again the horses are fed. The bridles and other tack are cleaned and the horses are brushed until they are as lustrous as silver. As show time nears, the riders are clothed in white trousers and white satin shirts with long-flowing sleeves. They mount their animals bareback. The music is heard and, to the enjoyment of the crowd, the glittering white horses parade the length of the grandstand and retrace their steps. On with the show, the riders come galloping forth in a jumping drill; the horses jumping singly and in pairs, three and four abreast. The precision drill shows many tricks of well-schooled horses performed in unison. This is followed by trick riding and a beautiful dancing horse. At last the climax of the show beckons the Roman riders standing erect on their galloping horses. First, with silver manes and tails flying, the two-horse Roman ride, next the three and four appear, and finally the great five comes thundering down the track, controlled only by the five whipping pairs of reins in the hands of the rider standing over them. They turn at the end of the track, come back and, as their bodies rise over the hurdle, the applause is tantamount to bedlam. A feeling of triumph and exaltation within the horseman's heart overshadows all previous labor, for the beautiful fleet horses under his control stir within him the emotion that this is a position comparable to that of kings. Back to their places are led the hot prancing horses. As the crowd exits, the horses are fed and the tranquility is disturbed only by the contented munching of the horses. Gail Holloway '50 H. S.

WHICH NEWSPAPER DO YOU READ? Listening to a discussion, one frequently hears, "Which newspaper are you reading?" It is indeed a very interesting question. What are the underlying causes for selecting a satisfactory newspaper? Since many of us live in this section of the country, we can discuss the various classes by actual example. 1 am not familiar with too many, but I have heard of them from people who know. First of all, when you hear someone say he reads such and such a newspaper, you might 17


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as well take for granted he doesn't mean that at all. For instance, the sports enthusiast will choose his paper according to the sports page. Thus, if someone would ask a Minnesota sports enthusiast which paper he "reads," he would probably say the "Star-Journal," which is noted for its sports page. The fact, of course, is that he doesn't actually read much of that paper. The judgment of a certain paper, therefore, is based upon only one of its sections. This then has a definite bearing upon the newspaper itself. Since our nation is so sports crazy (showing a definite lack of intellectual advancement), each or at least most of the important newspapers strive for a good sports section. For that reason they hire scores of s p 0 r t s writers and ace photographers to cover the important events. For example, glancing haphazardly through the "Star-Journal" sports section this morning, I counted nine sports writers who had contributed to the section. In fact, I believe that newspapers are judged more by the sports sections they put out than by any other single factor. I often observe the students as they read the paper in our boys' room. Invariably the first part they look at is the well-known sports sheet. This then agrees with the old saying that the newspapers have to give the public what it wants. News doesn't vary too much in papers. The essentials, which the masses read, are usually gathered from thesame sources (A.P. or D.P.). Therefore they are essentially the same. There is occasionally a "scoop" which one news service will get over against another, but this is slight. In connection with this we can also mention editorials. Years ago editorials really influenced public opimon, Editors were influential people in politics, and politicians reckoned with them. But this has changed. Newspapers have become large business establishments, and as a result of that, editors are chosen because of their administrative powers. Editorials, accordingly, h ave acquired a different hue. They have become more or less advisory articles. Of course, the policy of a paper or the party it represents has a certain bearing upon the circulation. For instance, one won't find too many Democrats subscribing to the "Chicago Daily Tribune." It is naturally very difficult to keep aloof from political factions, and they often purposely take a definite, vigorous stand. In this way they often gain a subscriber here and again lose another one there. This phase more or less regulates itself. 18


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But we haven't touched on one of the most important parts of the paper, and, believe me, it is one of the most important factors in the selection of a newspaper. If you are inclined to doubt this statement, ask ]40,000,000 people two questions about the current newspaper: first, what is KIGMY, and secondly, who is Judge Medina. Perhaps thirty-five to forty per cent of the people will be acquainted with Judge Medina. But a KIGMY-everyone knows what a KIGMY is. There are 50,000,000of them in the United States right now. Perhaps there is one in your room right now. If you are not acquainted, consult Li'l Abner. Yes, it's the comic strip. And what a page it is! Everyone from second graders to university professors reads the page. It is a proved fact that most of the country's "lights" are ardent comic-strip fans. Everybody wants to know what Blondie is doing. Everyone wants to know how Dick Tracy is going to solve the case of the white rats. For people who like the comic strip, small daily papers have no place. For instance, our "New Ulm Daily Journal" with its one-half page comic strip doesn't go over with the "funnies fiends." But the "Star-Journal," with its two full pages of comics plus a Sunday sheet, attracts many a youngster and oldster. And think of the price 8 syndicated comic strip demands and the salaries the writers get! It is about the same thing as reading a soft book. You don't have to concentrate or use your gray matter while reading. Thus we can see how a comic strip is influential in the selection of a newspaper. Thus it is evident how many factors the newspaper editors have to take into consideration in order to put out a paper which sells. And again we can see that the newspaper has to feed the public what it wants. B. R. Backer '50

BOOKS I LIKE

For a person who likes to read, it seems rather a large task to say just exactly which books he likes. Much harder is the task of saying which his favorite books are. I like most of the books I read, maybe because of the fact that I read them when I want to read them. Maybe that sounds odd, considering that to every English class 19


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falls the lot of "required" reading. "Required" reading-sounds dead doesn't it? Such reading, however, can bring one great enjoyment. For example, if a biography is suggested, it is not a difficult matter to pick up a biography which will suit one's individual tastes. A person who enjoys humor will very likely enjoy "My Wayward Parent," a person who is of a serious turn of mind might like to read a book such as "'Boss' Tweed," on the other hand, an athlete might well enjoy "The Babe Ruth Story," then again, a person of an adventurous nature will thrill to "The Autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini." If a person chooses in such a manner, the answer to "Do you like biographies?" will be an emphatic "Yes." One such pleasant reading experience may open the mind of the individual to that field of enjoyable reading called "biographies." The same method applies to reading historical materials. If one is the type of person to whom a history book seems repulsive, why not absorb a more detailed report of an era from historical novels? Research for such books is now often done in a most painstaking manner. With a bare outline of historical fact to keep one on the straight and narrow path, such a book will perhaps give a person a far more real idea of the atmosphere of an era than a genuine history text. Much of the enjoyment of a book depends upon when one reads it. Some books are seemingly "made" for certain days. The book one would en]oy on a cool and windy day may not be the book one would enjoy on a sunny, hot, midsummer's afternoon. "Now That April's There" is, for example, a book which should be read in spring if one really wishes to appreciate it fully. "Two Years Before the Mast" is a good book to read in the late fall or early winter-one's own realization of comfort will provide a welcome contrast to conditions described in the book. Summertime calls for books that aren't too heavy. such as "Pride and Prejudice" or "Gone Wit h the Wind." Then again, for fun reading enjoyment, one must suit one's books to one's mood. If, for instance, one feels quite sentimental, is enjoying a feeling of well-being, an historical romance such as "Yankee Stranger" or even "The Rosary" may prove itself enjoyable. If one feels very gay, such works as Leacock's essays or Mark Twain's works are in order. If one feels depressed, though a happy book might lift the pall, more morose books could 20


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be suitable, such as "Giants in the Earth" or "Lorna Doone." As they say, "Misery loves company." If one is in a state of nerves and is just trying to pass time in a way which will keep his mind off his problems, what could be more suitable than a good murder mystery? It has the advantage of holding the attention of a person without making his mind really work. An important factor in choosing a book is the company you'll read it in. This plays an important part if one stays in a dormitory. If one can plan on a quiet evening, serious reading is well and good. If one can plan on an afternoon of blaring radios and chattering roommates, one must choose a book that is able to hold its own. A good choice in such a case would be an adventure novel such as "The Three Musketeers" or "The Count of Monte Cristo." The things which I have just mentioned are only a few of the many things which should guide one in choosing a book that one will enjoy. If one follows these rules, one is bound to enjoy books. As a result of my choosing my books on the basis I have discussed, I like almost every book I read. Of course I have my favorites that I could and do read over and over again. Among these would be "Jane Eyre," "Vanity Fair," "The Count of Monte Cristo," "The Three Musketeers," and many, many, more. I personally think that there is something enjoyable and worthwhile in practically everything I have read. If my taste is not the best, still it is my taste, and I like it. Wanda Herrmonn '50

The Washington Biological Survey puts metal bands on wild birds to study their habit of migration. The bands say : "Wash. Biol. Serv." An angry taxpayer's letter complained, "Sirs: I shot one of your pet crows and followedinstructions. I washed it, I boiled it, and I served it. It was terrible. Stop fooling the people."

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ALUMNI

r

~_I

WEDDINGS The H. S. class of '47 is in the lime-light this time. Of that class the following were married this summer and fall: 1. Valeria Radtke to Wilbur Measak on August 27, 1949. 2. Malcolm Brandt to Gervaise Rice on September 17, 1949. The ceremony was performed in Zion Lutheran Church, Hanska, Minnesota. 3. Mary Ann Kolander to Kenneth Schnell on October 22, 1949. The candlelight ceremony was performed in St. Jacobi Lutheran Church, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Another wedding was that of Norma Just, ex '48, and Leroy Zimmermann of Sanborn, Minn. The date was June 17, 1949. She had as her maid-of-honor a classmate, lone Stre::e. BIRTHS On July 16, 1949, a son Martin Leonard was born to William Fuhrmann, '49, and Artsy (nee) Goehring, '44. I can't report the dates for these but I'll give you what I know. Mr. and Mrs. Gerhard Bauer of Goodhue, Minnesota. were blessed with a daughter this past summer. lhr. Bauer is a '47 graduate and his wife, nee Elvera Albrecht. was a member of the class of '48. A daughter, Constance Marie, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Quentin Albrecht of Snoqualmie, Washington this summer. Mr. Albrecht graduated in 'L18. Mrs. Albrecht, nee Ardelle Zietlow, was a member of the same class. MISCELLANEOUS Mrs. D. R. Ortner, nee Gertrude Stoekli, '42, of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, is in charge of the nursery class 22


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of the Sunday School at the Lutheran Church of the Redeemer, Winnipeg. She also is choirmaster the r e . They have no Christian Day School,but plan to open one for the fall of '50. Do any of you III Normals want to go to Canada?

LEAVES OF LEARNING (and the like) The snow is here, the leaves are .gone. But the leaves of learning still live on. True, the fruits, which these leaves bear, vary; their color changes, and thus, among the newer ones, we find: Memoirsof a Volunteer-Beatty, John. Luther and Music-N ettl, Paul. Mainly on the Air-Beerbohm, Max. The Lutheran Liturgy-Reed, Luther D. Notes on the New Testament-Barnes, Albert. The Story of English Literature-Patterson, R. F. Some, however, are unique in color and beauty at this time. As the Christmas carols ring out the glad cheer, so the leaves and the like from the library tell the season of the year: The oldtime message is repeated Of "Peace on earth good will to men." And to our friends at this glad season This heartfelt wish goes forth again=. "May Christmas joy be born anew, And Christmas peace abide with you." These leaves of greetings, in the form of Christmas greeting cards may be seen and bought in our library. (Sunshine Line-$.85-25 cards.) Christmas Ideals, (Vol. 5-Ideals Publishing Company -Milwaukee, Wisconsin-Cost $1.00 and $2.00), another seasonal leaf, vividly portrays this joyous time in its 76 pages of rich colorful beauty, of world famous paintings, poems, and carols. A smaller leaf, Christmas Tidings, (Cost $.50) also published by the Ideals Publishing Company,likewise con23


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tains beautiful pictures, and carols, ringing out the good cheer. Yes, and many legends and tales have been written of this time of year. A new leaf, but one containing old tales, has recently been added to our library. Its title: A Christmas Carol and Other Stories. Its author: The one and only Charles Dickens. For fun and entertainment, read the tales making up this colorful leaf. There's: A Christmas Carol, the story of Scrooge and Marley's ghost. The Chimes,a goblin story of some bells. The Cricket on the Hearth, a fairy tale of the horne. Now let our thoughts turn again to the real meaning of Christmas. We chance upon two smaller leaves of deeper hue and color, bearing greater fruit. We examine each one carefully: The Split between Roman Catholicism and Christ The Catechism of Differences As we peruse them, we rejoice, knowing that we alone can have true happiness and joy at this Blessed Season; for we have the true Word as found in the greatest leaf of all. the one that never dies but lives on forever, the one found in our homes, found under the classification Number 220 in our library-yes, The Bible!

Excavation Scene of New Dormitory 24


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Christmas is again hard upon us. This is a time of year which strikes a responsive chord in the heart of every human being. It is a time when we should pause and count the blessings brought us through the birth of the Saviour. Do we students realize what blessings have been bestowed upon us ? We are privileged every year to celebrate Christmas in its true spirit. We are allowedto give a concert, to sing our praise and thanks to God, and thus also testify of our faith to others. Is it not indeed a privilege to raise our voices in song with those of our own faith in praise and love of our Lord? Sometimes we forget things like that when we have practiced a Christmas number over and over again. We begin to lose sight of the privilege we are thus afforded. Let us keep these blessings in mind and let our love shine forth in our songs for all the world to hear. On November 16, the Literary Society presented its operetta "Sailor Maids." The audience was rather larger than expected. Everyone seemed to enjoy himself. Special notice was taken of the fine stage setting. The individual performances were also well done. If the society keeps up in the way in which it has started, we are assured of several enjoyable programs in the coming year. The student body is looking forward to the possibility of hearing a good organ recital. Mr. E. Power Biggs may be made available for a concert here. A poll has been taken of the classes to see how many students would be interested in such a program. On November 27, the annual Marlut-Aeolian-Band concert was given. The program was as follows: 25


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

I. Band

II.

III. IV.

V.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

1. March: Billboard J. N. Klohr 2. Overture: Carnival of Roses J. Olivadoti 3. Waltzes from "Die Fledermaus J. Strauss 4. Concert March: Hall of Fame J. Olivadoti Aeolian Chorus 1. GYiPsyLove Song V. Herbert-G. Trinkaus Accompanist: Dorothy Drost 2. The Nightingale P. Tschaikowsky-M.Luvaas 3. Nursery Tune with Variations Traditional-H. Wilson Accompanist: Doris Pankow Directress: Mildred Pingel Piano Scherzo F. Chopin Marvin Busse Marlut Singers 1. The Sleigh R. Kountz-Baldwin Accompanist: Bruce Backer 2. The Erie Canal... arr. by Tom Scott 3. Railroad Chant arr. by Tom Scott Accompanist: Harold Hosbach Director: Wayne Schmidt Band 1. March: Men in Gray N. K. Brahmstedt 2. Overture: "Bitter Sweet" N. Coward-D. Bennett 3. Cordoba E. Lecuona-L. Anthony 4. March of the Little Leaden Soldiers Pierne-Beeler 5. March: Noble Men H. Fillmore The Christmas program is as follows: Pre-service Christmas Organ Music Organist: Mildred Pingel Procession: Silent Night-From Heaven Above Organist: Mr. Wayne Schmidt Christmas Story F. Reuter Narration: Donald Sebald Organist: Bruce Backer Audience: Es ist ein Ros' entsprungen Organist: Roger Wessel Choir II: All Glory Laud and Honor....M. Teschner arr. N. Cain Piano: Marvin Busse Organ: Mr. Wayne Schmidt 26


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

o Praise

the Lord of Heaven A. Arensky Flower of Jesse's Rod Dutch Carol o Holy Child E. Martin Piano: Arlene Harms 6. Christmas Greetings: Carl Schweppe, President 7. Audience: In dulci jubilo Organist: Arnold Strehler 8. Choir I: God's Infant Son M. Praetorius Bells Are Ringing M. Hokanson Where Love Might Enter In L. Sateren Make Me 0 God, Pure in Heart.. J. Brahms 9. Organ: While Shepherds Watched Mauro-Cottons Bruce Backer 10. Audience: Mendelssohn Organist: Adelbert Schumacher 11. Combined Choirs: Shumm Shei E. Backer Two Carols: The First Noel Angels We Have Heard on High Hallelujah Chorus G. Haendat Piano: Marvin Busse Organ: Mr. Wayne Schmidt 12. Recession: Adeste fidelis

o Jesus,

The 1949 D. M. L. C. Messenger Staff 27


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Co-ed Notes The fast approaching Christmas season is marked by the joyous strains of Christmas songs echoing through the halls of D. M. L. C. during chorus rehearsal. Thus the Christmas spirit has envelopedthe students of D. M. L. C. and is reflected in various ways. Limiting ourselves to the co-eds at present, we find some expressing their joy of the approaching season by wearing jingle bells. Others find outlets for their happiness by knitting socks as gifts for father or brother. (???) Faith Jeske still doesn't know how large her brother's (?) foot is; she merely continues to knit and knit. If she doesn't quit soon, Doug Stindt will have a new pair of socks. West Hall also is the residence of a few knitters. Among them is Phyllis Hein, who can't figure out why, of all the "knitwits" in the room, one (LaVerne Zastrow) has to crochet. We shall now allow the domestic side of the co-ed's life to rest in peace as we move on to the more cultural aspects. The first normals, under the guidance of Professor Schweppe, are learning from experience the fundamentals of oratory. The subjects which are chosen for these orations are usually complex and deep. For example, Marie Kappelman spoke on the learned topic of "How to Reduce." For demonstration she chose Fritz Janke to be her guinea pig. As I was gathering my material, I found that reducing was quite a popular subject in all dormitories. I think the reason for this lies in the fact that the boys consistently tell the girls sitting at their tables that they are gaining weight, thereby hoping that the girls will give them their portions of fattening foods. Virginia Spaude and Lois Schumacher must be victims of this deception, for they have been on a starvation diet of soup and RY-KRISP for the last two weeks. Hillcrest is the famous domain for sleep walkers and talkers. LaVonne Uetzmann, grasping her pillow by one corner, strolled from her room into the hall muttering strange phrases. This episode was a close facsimile of Lady Macbeth's sleepwalking scene. Do you suppose LaVonne also had a bad conscience? What was in that suspicious looking bottle that Ruth Grunke bought the other day? We were beginning to wonder, but since she made the purchase at Eibner's the contents couldn't be champagne. 28


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

"Oh where, oh where has my little dog gone?" is the mournful song forever coming from the lips of Lois Gose. Can you help her find her rust-colored pet? He answers to the name of "Snookums." A generous reward is offered for his return. Generosity reigned supreme one day when the boys of the III Normal class began passing out caramels to the girls. Everything was fine until the girls one by one began to choke from the caramels which had been thoroughly peppered inside. Henceforth the confidence these girls had in men is completely shattered. A large per cent of D. M. L. C. students, including co-eds, recently turned agrarian and offered their services to the unfortunate farmers of the surrounding area. Their job was to pick up the corn which was blown to the ground by the wind. Along with the high wages and good food, we also received exceptionally sore backs. Rhoda Kiekbusch has discovered a new and different method of putting shoe laces into her shoes. She found, with the help of Robert Ha g en and a pair of pliers, the job could be done in half the time without much effort. When inquiring for co-ed notes in Annex, I am often confronted with a peculiar situation. As I come to the third floor I find a group of girls with Mabel Goede usually in their midst. Before poor Mabel even has a chance to greet me, the entire battalion of girls pounces upon her, and she remains in a gagged position until I leave. I'm beginning to think Mabel knows too much. The new improved method for teaching reading is being taught to our Normalite co-eds. The words are taught by the sight method and the ABC's are taught through song. That's why we sang the nursery tunes in Aeolian, isn't it Mickey? Was Mary Ann Erhart playing Juliet the day she fell from the ladder during operetta practice? They tell me she was hurt-physically, that is. Marion Chossek finally found out what a bare bodkin was. You might try asking her what she thought it meant, although for my sake, please don't press the subject too hard. Which reminds me, Doris Pankow is now called the "nut brown maid." DON'T ask her why. Double-faced mirrors are very convenient when two co-eds wish to apply their faces at the same time. To move the mirror while one has her back turned momentarily is, however, a horrifying experience. Rowena Matchke and Ardyce Hopp will testify to this. 29


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

The III Normal girls believe with Ben Franklin that "early to bed, early to rise" is a good motto. They, therefore, took the initiative and planned an early morning egg fry one Wednesday. I would say with the wonderful cooking skill of these girls and good-natured spirits of Professor Backer, the fry (?) was a success. There is only one question we should like to ask, "Does Bruce Backer still like eggs ?" Speaking of gatherings, West Hall ranks rather high in having dorm parties. One feat which the girls succeeded in acquiring at a recent party was the art of balancing on a milk bottle. The seniors of Hillcrest have formed a club called the S. P. S. They meet every Wednesday evening, serve tea and R,Y-KRISPand discuss politics and economics. S. P. S. is supposed to stand for "Senior's Pep Session," but don't believe everything you hear. For a reliable source on German grammar, consult Elaine Albrecht. Her translation of "I am having" into "Ich bin haben" is a proof of her reliability. Since this is my last issue of co-ed notes, I shall cease to annoy you co-eds further by my search for news items. To all I extend my thanks and appreciation for the cooperation you have shown me. Now I wish each and every reader of the Messenger a Very Merry Christmas and Joyous New Year.

When a friend came over to pay a call on Sgt. Buck, he found nine-year-old Buck Junior sitting on the front lawn. "Hello, there," said the visitor. "Where's your little sister." "Oh, she's in the house playing a duet," said the boy. "Well, why aren't you in there, too?" Young Buck gave him a look of scorn. "I finished my part first." 30

A

y


The D. M L. C. Messenger

lS

This year for the first time in a long while, the dorm has been unusually quiet on Wednesdays and Saturdays. The reason for this was a continuous stream of calls for corn-pickers. It was always fun to see the boys returning from their respective jobs, tired, and .goodexamples of old Black Joe, but they always managed to brag anyway, 'We had the best lunch, we had the most money, well, we didn't have to work as hard as you did," etc. Anyway, it helped quite a few from the pecuniary angle. The high school boys in the dorm are going to have their own basketball league this year. That is, those boys who aren't on any of the school varsity teams will make this league. Teams will be chosen and then the fun begins. May the best team win ! You fellows on the squads better be careful; maybe we can find a new star in this league. Rumors are flying and I wonder who's always denying them. "We're going to change tables tomorrow." No doubt you've all been assailed by these dark rumors in the last month or so. It seems that so far no one has been able to find the correct source of information, for so far all rumors have been wrong. Let's hope that by the time this hits the press, the tables have been changed. After all, it's getting to be quite a strain on the nerves. The first choir recently added a new arrangement to their large repertoire. Professor Backer prepared to conduct a chorale; he gave the sign and then came the surprise. The expected song did not flow forth. Instead, 31


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

the strains of "Happy Birthday" echoed through the music hall. But, as the Professor later stated, he had rather expected something to be in the wind, judging by the look on the Senator's beaming countenance. Speaking of the Senator also brings to mind the topic of Sadie Hawkins day. The man bluntly stated that he wasn't going out Saturday night unless he received a formal invitation. Again the pen proved mightier than the sword. During this week-end only fourteen fellows in the dorm went home. The cause for this has been suggested. Perhaps there just weren't enough Kygrnies to go around. Wonder who caught Art Schulz? I hear he was still running Sunday afternoon. In fact, he got to Mankato before he stopped. I'll be surprised if this stays in the Messenger because he censors this. (Dear Red, I'll see you in court. "Art.") We had a Halloween party again this year. You know the pranks we thought were new when we were preps still are considered so by our present understudies. For us, "the wheel has come full circle." Bill Birsching thought himself to really be in a soup when he found the dissected remains of a box of Saltine crackers in his bed. The Normalite boys patrolled the campus all night and reported no accidents. If you found anything upset in the morning, add two and two together. Speaking of the Normalites, have you ever noticed the dense fog accumulating in the reception room after breakfast? Its atmosphere reminds one of another "Blue Room" in the near vicinity. Several, in fact. Arnold Strehler has an announcement for all III Normals. He is now operating the Strehler Taxi Service. In return for a slight fee, Arnold will whisk to town for a snack after a grueling session over the books. Harry Fuhrmann has a letter problem. That little box on his desk gets filled in a week and then he has to put them in the gunny sack. (By the way, the box has a lock on it.) Now the gunny sack is full, and poor Harry doesn't quite know what to do with it. A little suggestion, Harry, try the incinerator. Delbert Mey didn't go to Minneapolis this week-end. For a change he really went home. 32


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

By the way, did you know that Heusch is a very generous soul? A fortnight ago he presented several packs of cigarettes to Steiner and Berger. Maybe he really shouldn't have done that because they have no use for them anyway. Wonder what they did with the cigarettes? Robert Timm burned his foot rather severely while he was picking corn, but he is well on the way to recovery. Fritz Bartel is sweeping rooms in the morning now. It wouldn't have anything to do with the Wisconsin-Minnesota football game? Too bad Wisconsin lost, wasn't it? Elroy Bartsch is another one of these early birds. One night he got up at 12:30, dressed and proceeded to wash. It took quite a bit of persuasion to get him back to bed again. It seems that Elroy wanted to be sure of acquiring a good seat at the breakfast table. Well, they don't change tables every day, do they, Elroy? While trekking my weary way through the dorm gathering the stuff and nonsense for this column, I managed to run into the inspector several times. Finally he asked me whether I was following him. To this inquiry I answered that I had started to make the rounds first. He took all the wind out of my sails when he simply stated he had started first-some four years ago. That statement stopped me last night and now it spells finis, meaning "no more."

River Scene 33


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

SPORTS By the time this issue of the Messenger reaches the press, the basketball season will be in full swing. No outand-out predictions concerning the outcomes of the games will be made by this column. We will have no team with the perfection of last year's high school squad, but both teams will win their share of games. Here are the schedules as they stack up now. The college will also play Gustavus Frosh, but as yet no date has been set. College Dec. 1-Bethany, there Dec. 3-Rochester, here Dec. 6-Austin, there Jan. 7- Worthington, there Jan. ll-Bethel, here Jan. 21-Concordia, there Feb. 4-Worthington, here F'eb. 6-Bethel, there Feb. 9-Bethany, here Feb. 13-Austin, here Feb. 17-Rochester, there Feb, 25-Concordia, here High School Nov. 23-Trinity, here Dec. 1-Bethany, there Dec. 10-Shattuck, here Jan. ll-Bethel, here Jan. 17-Gibbon, here Jan. 21-Concordia, there

Jan. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb.

31-Shattuck, there 6-Bethel, there 9-Bethany, here 14-Trinity, Armory 24-Gibbon, there 25-Concordia, here

In the intramural trophy race, it is the III Normals way out in front in both tournaments. The boys managed to capture both the football and baseball titles, and now lead the field with 20 points. And those amazing III Normal girls, who, by the way, didn't have a point last year, ran away with the broom hockey championshipthis year. Here are the present standings. We will list only those classes with points. 34


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Men

Baseball Football Total 10 10 20 . 12 5 7 12 5 7 3 6 3

III Normals I Normals Juniors Seniors Women

Broomhockey III Normals I Normals Sophomores Seniors

10 7 5 3

points points points points

A high school basketball conference has been organized in the boys' dormitory to .give those not on the varsity a chance to get a little exercise. The girls will be given something to do, also. They will be playing volleyball.

This Fad is Called Broom Hockey

35


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

I HAVE"HUMOR

THIIT 'WILL TOUCHYOU INDIFFERENTLY Wf.LL.

SHAt<ÂŁSPEAIII:

IN CASE YOU'RE SUPERSTITIOUS ... "Superstitions? Why those silly old things. Of course we don't believe them." This is what all of us would reply if asked whether superstitions mean anything to us, and yet it is surprising to note how many people actually are affected by them. Take D. M. L. C. for instance. We're all familiar with sayings like these: When a professor's hair-line is red, beware! A test will be forthcoming. Or: the "unison off and on" stop, when put down before any others, will, without a doubt, bring havoc to our organ playing. And still another: The shuffling of his cards by the professor means a short class period. I believe these three sayings show you what I mean. Now let's take a look at some of the "cures" and "good luck charms" which are being accepted by many persons of our so-called scientific age. If we want to .get off to a good start in the week, we should try not to meet a flat-footed man on Monday morning. Obviously,this is more easily said than done unless we were to keep a file and index in which we had listed the names of every individual in our community thus afflicted. "Calling all Agneses." Yes, girls, there's no way out of it. If Agnes is your name, you will inevitably go mad. Well, so what? Many of us up here feel that's the way we're heading even though we have names other than Agnes. A person afflicted with boils can try the old Cornwall remedy of undressing and creeping on hands and knees through a bramble which has grown into the soil at both ends ... if he wants to get rid of them so badly. If a child has the croup or some other throat ailment, natives of the Ozarks would advise a good dose of skunk oil as the best cure-all. No, thank you, we'll stick to aspirins. The 18th century cure for a bleeding nose went as follows: Soak a rag in sharp vinegar, burn it, and then blow the ashes up the nose through a quill. No, wait a minute! 36


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Somebodyhad the wrong idea ... either the 18th century medicine men or the people who wrote our First Aid handbook. Young girls from the Ozark hills use some beauty potions that we might heed. The fresh blood of a chicken -preferably a black pullet-is considered best for removing freckles and making the skin white and creamy. Some girls, however, prefer to rub their faces and arms with fresh cucumber pulp before retiring, while others swear by fresh tomato juice. No, we'll let you in on a little secret: They don't work! You'd better try our remedy of sandpaper followed by shaving soap. For results, just look at our faces. Ugh! Beware killing a robin. Such an act can cause a large lump to form on your right hand. What a laugh! Broom hockey will do the same thing. It is lucky to meet a man with cross-eyes, but unlucky to meet a cross-eyed woman. I might say here that we girls of D. M. L. C. don't quite agree with the first part of that superstition. The superstitions that presage death are as numerous and as ridiculous as all the others. For instance, if a bittern flies over your head, you may as well make your will. Two blackbirds sitting together on a window sill or doorstep are likewise an omen of death to someone in the house. Three sea guns flying overhead are also a sign of death. Still we can match these sayings with one of our own: One false step in going down Excelsior in winter brings the same results. Faith Jeske, '50

ASPIRATIONS OF A FEMALE STUMPER (A Political Satire) Fellow Sensibles, Gullibles and General Supporters of the Do-AllParty: I am happy to gaze upon such a large audience which has gathered at this political rally tonight. Never, since the time Dotty's Head Gear Shop held a one-cent sale on 19th century hats, have I seen such a great turn-out for any occasion. I have not come before you today to bore you with :17


The D. M. L. C. Messâ&#x201A;Źnger

conventional cliches generally spoken by political statesmen, but I have come to entertain you, to give you an. hour of pleasure and relaxation. As a candidate of the local Do-All Party, I stand on a solid platform (made of oak). This party is known for its honesty, progressiveness, integrity, speed, economy,wholesomeness, efficacy, and efficiency; in short, it's on the ball. Since I am the first woman candidate ever to enter the political arena of this fair city, my path to victory will not be easy. The "Keep-Women-out-of-PoliticsClub" is my greatest opponent, but I know that you brilliant, understanding, quick-witted, patriotic, comprehending, civicminded, intelligent, philanthropically-minded members of noble American families seated before me will overrun this club and whirl me on to victory. I know that when my speech is finished, you will be behind me one hundred per cent (pushing me out the door). Upon you, dear people, rests the welfare of Weyauwega. Your votes will decide the progress or downfall of our metropolis. Awake, arise and realize the responsibility which lies on your broad shoulders. The D. D. T. Party has again chosen Mr. Bulge E. Middle as their candidate. He has been running for political office since the end of the nineteenth century. He must, therefore, be quite well known. But r say, can you vote for such a worn-out and over-emphasized candidate as he? His successive defeats of bygone years are sufficient evidence of his incompetence. Do you want to revert to gas lamps, hitching posts, pot-bellied stoves and outdoor plumbing? No, definitely not! But Mr. Middle is your man if that's what you want. He is narrowminded, slow, old-fashioned, and disloyal; in short, he's a detriment to a public office. Can you vote for such a creep? I should say not. Now take me: I promise you lower taxes on bird houses, dog houses, bird cages, and fly swatters. What more could you animal lovers ask for? If I am elected, I shall have the streets widened for women drivers. Also the streets will be washed by the street-cleaners every month, rain or shine. The curfew will be extended to midnight for all citizens under twenty-five. I promise to reduce the number of criminals to half during my regime by increasing the police force to two competent women to replace the present incompetent man. Our present street lights which have a tendency to make people, especially women, look pale and unattractive will be replaced by violet lamps, guaranteed to give you that rosy color. These 3S


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

and any other promises which I have made, I shall try to fulfill during my tenure of office. Your votes for me will prove your loyalty to our community. Cigars, candy bars, and baby rattles will be handed out at the door as you leave. Alice Reek, '50

The department store manager's phone rang after midnight. "This is Mrs. James Smith. I just want to tell you that the hat I bought at your store the other day is lovely, and I like it better than any hat I have," said the voice. "That's fine," said the manager sleepily, "but why did you call me just now?" "Because your truck just delivered it," she said sweetly. "Your son is making good progress with his violin," remarked a musician friend of the family. "He is beginning to play quite well." "Do you really think so?" beamed the father. were afraid that we merely had become used to it."

"We

The choir was running through a new hymn. "Now don't forget," said the choirmaster, "wait untiJ the tenors reach 'the gates of hell'-then you all come in." 39


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Towels and Toilet Paper Portable Typewriters, Mimeograph Stencils and Ink Safes-Filing Equipment and OfficeSupplies-Desks

NEW ULM DAffiY THE HOME OF PURE DAIRY PRODUCTS

Ice Cream at All Our Accounts Phone 104 Try

LEADWAY

or

DEL HAVEN

FOODS Distributed by

NEW ULM GROCERY CO. Wholesale Grocers

"The Place To Go"

NATIONAL CAFE THE FASTIDIOUS STUDENT will find satisfactory

service at

Grundmeyer's Barber-Beauty Shop Air Conditioned Below Tauscheck & Green's Clothing Store

Phone 710


LIBERT"'f CAB PHONE 770 SPECIAL RATES ON OUT OF TOWN TRIPS

PROMPT

COURTEOUS

STOLTENBURG Studebaker 218 No. Broadway

MOTOR CO.

Sales and Service

Telephone 940

New DIm, Minn.

Wilfahrt Brothers One-Stop Service Station Hardware-Sporting Gocds-Electrical Students Welcome

Supplies

People Who Talk About Good Food and Courteous, Speedy Service, Talk About

THE SILVER LATCH CAFE EXTRA Values Are Exclusively Yours at Lowest Cost When Traveling By

NORTHLAND GREYHOUND Phone 19 109 N. Broadway

Telephone729

Music-Recordings-Instruments Radios and Appliances

SCHROEDER'S Phone 268

New Ulm

LANG'S MASTER BARBER SHOP Three Expert Barbers to Give Prompt and Efficient Service Elmer-Joe-Harry

FISCHER AUTO SERVICE OTTO FISCHER, Prop. Oldsmobile Sales and Service Phone729

109 N. Broadway

New DIm, Minnesota


PINKS STORE Friendly Sales People to Help You Caral King, Jr. Dresses Minx Modes Munsing and Barbizon Lingerie Swansdown Coats and Suits Jentzen's Sweaters

Brown & Meidl Music Store and School Piano Tuning, Repairing of All Instruments Ins trumen ts-Records--Sheet Music Westinghouse Radios 308 North Minnesota St. Phone 1451 New Ulm, Minn.

Attention STUDENTS AND FACULTY MEMBERS For the Particular Man Made to Measure Suits and Overcoats Single Trousers or Single Coats Choice of 150 Different Fabrics and Styles $35.00-$65.00-All Guaranteed 20% Down-3 Weeks Delivery Call 1946-L FAIRBANKS CLOTHINGCO.

Russell Rocl,"vam 115 N. Broadway

Box 143

New Ulm, Minn.

STUDENTS! PATRONIZE YOUR MESSENGER ADVERTISERS


You Will Find The Leading Nationally

Advertised

Brands

Of Shoes & Rubber Footwear

For The Entire Family -At-

Expert Shoe Fitters

X-Ray Fitting New Ulm, Minn.

J. H. FORSTER,INC. QualityFurniture-Funeral Service

Ulrich Electric o. J. Ulrich

J. W. Ulrich Sales Service Phone 180


QUALITY CLOTHING Correct Fitting and Standard Lines

TAUSCHECK

& GREEN John W. Graff

Geo. D. Erickson

ERICKSON & GRAFF Attorneys at Law New Vim, Minnesota

Eyes Tested

Lenses Ground

Glasses Fitted

and Duplicated

DRS. SCHLEUDER Optometrists

and Opticians

PHONE 87

NEW ULM

MINNESOTA

IN NEW ULM IT'S

Gtun~

The Friendly Store

FOR HARDWARE AND APPLIANCES

SHAKE CLEANERS and DYERS Phone 756

20% Discount Cash and Carry Modernizing, Maintaining Tuning, Repairs, Service, Sales

Reconstruction, Installation Additions, Blowers Chimes, Harps

Wicks

Pipe Organs ERNEST C. VOGELPOHL 405-409 North Broadway

New Vim, Minn.


Depend On Us We depend on you for our business. on us for your building materials.

You

C1n

depend

We know that without your confidence and goodwill our business would be short-lived. That is why, for the past 57 years, we have been dependable in quality and service, and price. When you grow you need more building materials and come to us because you know you can depend on us.

Henry Simons Lumher Company Dependable New DIm, Minn.

Phone 201

Earl's News Stand (Now across from SafJert's Market)

ROYAL MAID ICE CREAM SUNDAES-SODAS-MALTS MAGAZINES-BOOKS-SHOE

SHINE

CANDY-TOBACCO Telephone 1031

CHAS. F. JANNI & COMPANY Luggage-Saddlery Leather Goods--Canvas Goods 119 N. Minnesota St. Telephone No. 74 Call

SERVICE PRINT SHOP When in Need of Printing H. P. Zupfer, Prop. Phone 806

103 N. Broadway


Prescription

Druggists

Dr. A. V. Seifert

Dr. James R. Seifert

OLSON

DENTAL SURGEONS

DRUGS

Phone 125

Phone 88

Above Muesing Drug Store

Stone Shoe Store

Your Westinghouse Dealers

For The Young Point of View in Shoes

Tel. 148

For Smart, Practical and Inexpensive

COl,LEGE STYLES

"OCHS" New

DIm

"Where Quality Is Not Expensivp"

w.

EIBNI~R & SON, INC. Makers of

DELICIOUS ICE CREAM

and QUALITY BAKERY GOODS Phone 128


MUESING DRUG STORE Expert Prescription Service

ARTCRAFT PHOTO SERVICE We Have It!

Will Get It!

Or It Isn't Made!

PHONES 52 - 341

Oswald Studios GRANT R. OSWALD,Prof. Photog. Graduation Photographs a Specialty High Quality Portraits Phone 272-J

New DIm

Spellhi-inks Clothing Store "The Place to Go for the Brands You Know"

Niclilasson Athletic Co. Wholesale Athletic Goods Special Discounts to Students Located in Basement of Fesenmaier Hdwe.


A. C. OCHS BRICK & TILE

COMPANY Executive Office and Plant Springfield, Minn.

General Sales Office 906 Foshay Tower Minneapolis

lUANUFACTURE

ARTISTIC FACE BRICK Also Various Colors and complete line of

STRUCTURAL

BUILDING TILE AND COMMON BRICK

WHY IT WILL ... PAY YOU TO BUILD . . . WITH FACE BRICK Face brick offers the widest choice of color tones, both in artistic blends and even shades. Colors and textures burned in becoming lovelier with age. A Face Brick Home offers you less upkeep over a perrod of years. Lessened heating cost and greater comfort in winter and summer. Greater resale value. Easily financed because loan companies merits of Face Brick houses.

prefer

the known

Our Products Are Sold in the New Dim Territory by NEW ULM BRICK & TILE YARDS


RETZLAFF MOTOR CO. Dodge=Plymouth Dodge Job-Rated Trucks We Service All Makes of Cars and Trucks

RETZLAFF Radio---Appliance Center Kelvinator-ÂŤ Philco Service at Low Cost by Three Trained Service Men

O. B. FESENMAIER~M. D. PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON llYz N. Minnesota Street

Office Phone 567

Residence Phone 466 New UIm, Minnesota

NIENO STUDIO Graduation Pictures-Photo

Finishing

GreetingCards Phone 247-J

Fred L. Nieno

The Coronet Jewelers Watches A. A. Kanstrup

Diamonds New VIm, Minn.


\'

I


D. M. L. C. 1

MESSENGER'

l

It

~a5ttr

1950


TABLE OF CONTENTS

EDITORIALS An Opinion on Extra-Curricular

Activities

3

Deficiency in the Diet?.

5

LITERARY Glory-Folly-Silence

6

God's Grea t Love

8

Of Cars and Men (Women, Too)

9

Three Men and a Masterpiece ..

10

Vacation

...................... 11

The Last Hour of B. E. Bugg

·········13

SHAKESPEAREAN CARICATURES Hamlet and Ophelia as Present Day Lovers

15

HILLTOP FAIRY TALES The Little Green Pool Table. The Little Switchman ALUMNI NOTFJS A Dream Becomes a Reality

18 .

19 21 22

NEWS AND NOTES ON BOOKS

23

COLLEGE NOTES

25

LOCALS

29

CO-ED NOTES

32

SPORTS

·36

HUMOR Mice or Man?

39


The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published four times during the school year in the months of October, December, March, and June by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is one dollar per annum. Single copies thirty cents. Stamps are not accepted. We request payment in advance. "Tlle Messenger"is

continuedafter time of subscriptionhas expired,unless we are notified to discontinueand all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressedto BusinessManager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributionsto our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates, and friends.

The aim of "The Messenger" is to offer such material as will be beneficial as well as interesting to our readers, to keep the alumni in a closer contact with the college, to foster school spirit, and to give the students an opportunity in the practice of composition and the expressionof their thoughts. Entered as second class matter at Post Office of New Ulm, Minn.

No.3

Volume XXXX MARCH, 1950

THE MESSENGER STAFF Editor . Associate Editor Business Manager. . Assistant Manager Assistant Manager Typist Typist. Alumni Notes Notes and News on Books College Notes Co-ed Notes Locals Sports Humor . ..

..

Fred Radtke . Eldon Hirsch Fred Biedenbender ... Robert Willhite Arden Wentzel ...Marion Chossek .Joanne Draeger Ruth Albrecht Rhoda Arndt Margaret Gamm Marie Kappelmann ... Paul Kock . James Hopman . Joann Gillette

The annual mid-year change in the Messenger staff has taken place. Please check the staff list in order not to criticize the wrong people.


The P. M. L. C. Messenger

"

. EDITORIAL

â&#x20AC;˘ AN OPINION ON EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES We at Doctor Martin Luther College must be aware of one fact when we discuss the topic of extra-curricular activities. We are a combination of high school and college. First, we will discuss the need for extra-curricular activities. The classroom can not develop leadership. It can only supply the aids to obtain leadership. This leadership can be developed only in organizations and meetings outside the classroom and outside faculty dominated gatherings. Students while in the classroom seldom voice opinions which are contrary to the professor's opinions. The student is generally called upon for recitation of factual knowledge and factual procedures. What student would foolishly venture a method based upon his own ideas during some classroom periods? Extra-curricular activities are an aid to student discipline. In the proper student activities which build leadership, the conscientious, earnest students are placed in the executive positions. These are the students with good character and judgment which the student body learns to look up to and desires to imitate. Without planned leadership what is the type of student that sets the principles by which the class thinks and acts? Secondly, the basic problem which confronts D.M.L.C. is the lack of initiative in supporting an extra-curricular 3


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

program. One reason for this lack of enthusiasm is our combination of high school and college. The student agerange is from thirteen to over twenty. It should immediately becomeapparent that two definite, separate, and different programs must be established. The high-school students can not be expected to study for as long a period of time as the collegestudents. Therefore, the high school needs more activities than the college department. The college students should be expected to supply more of their own activities than the high school students. In this institution the student figure-head is the "college buck." He and the college basketball captain are the only students in positions of duty that the students look up to. In high schools, independent from higher classes, the Seniors are in charge. They are the ones with responsibilities and positions of honor. Therefore, a program of extra-curricular activities which gives the high-school students a chance to develop leadership should be formulated. Thirdly, what should this program include? In some high schools, each teacher is an advisor of one club or organization. Usually it is related to the work of the teacher. For example, the instructors in German sponsor a German club, the chemistry teachers sponsor a chemistry club, and the physics teachers sponsor a physics club. In these organizations a school subject, built on principles and theories, is correlated to the thinking of the student. He associates his pleasant experiences in the club with those in the classroom. He uses and applies his knowledge gained in the classroom long before he will be able to use it in life. Also, it supplies the student with an immediate purpose to want to learn. Additional activities can be found in other fields. Would not some students enjoy learning to play chess and similar games? There is also the possibility of establishing more traditions. Interesting events such as our Arbor Day can be organized. Such events break the monotony of dormitory life. Fourthly, let us examine our present program (?) of activities. There are only two fields of interest open to all students. One is music; the other, sports. Neither of these is capable of building leadership. Sports can, at its best, develop hero worship. The Luther Literary Society is the only organization that approaches leadership training. But this organization extends from the college department to the Twelfth Grade. This definitely eliminates any possibility of high-school students developing leadership. At present, this organization is interested 4


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

only in the production of plays, which limits the chance to develop speaking abilities to those of the cast. Some of the members never come in contact with speaking experience. Why do we not have a student committee investigate the possibilities of establishing an activity program adequate to our needs? F.A.R. '51

DEFICIENCY IN THE DIET? During the past month, the Messenger has conducted a combined high school and college literary contest. Although this was the first literary contest for many years, we did not expect to stir the very foundations of this wideawake, enthusiastic, and expressive student body. We realize that many students have extra-curricular activities which allow them little time for creative writing. There are also students who do not have anything of importance to say (until they get inside the dining hall). A seemingly large number of students say that if they only had the ability to write, they would gladly do so. Psychologists say that interest is a major factor in determining one's ability. Another important factor is the stimulation of one's inherent potentialities. Unless the student is taught how to express himself effectively, he will usually remain incapable of doing so. We wish to express our thanks to those students who participated in this contest. We also want to encourage all students to contribute articles, news, and information for future issue. If the Messenger is to serve its purpose, it must have student co-operation.

5


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

GLORY-FOLL Y-SILENCE

The glory of war is a fantasy. As weak as the effect of war upon lasting peace is the chance of men who participate in it to achieve fame merely because of action at the front. Yes, there are many anecdotes and legends of heroic deeds performed by the common soldier, but I speak now of generals, men trained to lead field action. Those in the former groups are few compared to the number of their equals; few, very few generals who did nothing but lead armies are among the really great men of all time. Consider the generals of the last war; who was the greatest? Eisenhower?路 Montgomery? Von Runstedt? MacArthur? Patton? You fight it out; few agree. I may be wrong, but my contention is that the most able in the field fell easy prey to his own government before he had a chance to show his "stuff." Incidentally, my opinion may be influenced by all these "pat-me-on-the-back" brass we have in America living on the glory of the deeds that other men's sweat and blood accomplished. Have you ever heard of "doing a Rommel." It is that name with the thunder and drums in it that is going down in my book as the ablest and best legendary-general of World War II. Field Marshal Ervin Rommel was not what is considered a successful general. A good reason for this is his relationship to the war lords holding the trump cards in his land. He was a German, not a dyed-in-the-wool Nazi. The Commander of the Seventh Ranger Division was not a winning general, yet his most loyal admirers were his men and his enemies. Yes, the latter admired


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

him most when he swept across France in '40; they were amazed at him when he took his Africa Corps only sixty miles from Alexandria. Then grim reality relieved fantasy and at Alamein the tables turned. In 1944, Rommel was powerless before the invading Americans in Normandy. These facts do not tell the story of this man of war. The cocky tilt of his cap exhibited a trait of his peasantlike cunning. With this cunning, the man could eye a situation like a crouching lion, improvise his forces to that situation, and impose his ruthless will upon those men beneath him. These talents Rommel used to convince the British of his superior strength though he had only a few forces. Look at these examples of why I choose Rommel to go down in history not as the great general but as an able and also a legendary one. He knew the R.A.F. photographed over the German lines all day; so he ordered all mobile units to drive track over track through the surrounding desert for two nights. The British pictures advised retreat before such power. Another time an attack was ordered, but Rommel had only six panzers with which to maneuver. With his offhand subtlety he had the tanks driven in large circles in an area of a few miles of the desert sands. Through the resulting dust cloud blindly charged the six tanks. Who could tell there were so few? The British retreated. Nevertheless, already in Africa the Commander could see what was coming; he knew full well Germany's cause was lost. Living on those burning sands he saw Hitler's contempt for life. His orders were: "Triumph or death!" Rommel did neither. Before Tunnis fell he was recalled to Germany. From this time he knew an Armistice with the Allies would serve his native land best. Worse still, for himself, he realized Hitler would bring disaster upon Germany. We know he was no real Nazi, but as a German he stood by the party because it had united the fatherland and removed the shackles of Versailles. But now even Rommel could not close his eyes to the callous inhumanity of atrocities such as the Gestapo terror. He said, " I conducted a clean war, but they soil my uniform." The irony of the "glory" of war was about to seize Rommel. He chose to attempt to aid the cause of German welfare by joining "Operation Valkyo," a conspiracy of army leaders and anti-Nazi civilians. They failed to erase "der Fuehrer" at Munich. In revenge, Berlin had arranged for everything. On October 14, 1944,the "desert fox" was 7


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

hunted for the last time. An S.S. car was speeding from Manfred to DIm, where it arrived late in the afternoon. The passengers carried a man from the car into a hospital. What more the world knows of Rommel's death is revealed in the statement that his funeral was held on October 17, 1944. Today the world takes account of itself and finds its "one world" peace chilled by a bitter cold war. The victors divided themselves before the spoils could be determined. Ideologies scream their precepts and breed confusion. Where are our great leaders of men with potions to quell the fears of men? Even now among all the star-spangled generals and one-time leaders of the world none can inject remedies any more grasping than the grim and dreary silence rising from beneath the earth of that one grave marked with an Iron Cross in Herrlingen's cemetery. Art Schultz '50

CONTEST ENTRIES First Place GOD'S GREAT LOVE In the world lies wickedness; We must our refuge find; He who paid our guiltiness Showed love to all mankind. By compassion God was moved To send His Only Son; As our Savior and beloved, By Him our grace is won. Jesus is our Substitute, Our helper and defense; Through His suff''ring; pain and death Our blessings are immense. Christ, our Savior, was defiled To save man's sinful race; Sinners now are reconciled, Cleansed by His precious grace. s


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Oh1 the happy Easter-tide Is filled for us with joy, For Jesus' love doth now abide, And does all grief destroy. Hasten, therefore, to the Lord, And serve Him all our days; Giving Him with one accord, Our grateful hymns of praise. Robert W. Kock '50 Second Place OF CARS AND MEN (WOMEN, TOO) My grandfather decided to take a daring step in his otherwise quiet life. He was going to buy a car 1 When this news became known, the whole village burst into a flurry of excitement. After all, not every day did someone buy a car, and this was to be the first in the county. Soon plans were being made for the closing of stores and the suspension of all industry, for this day of the arrival of the first locally-ownedhorseless carriage was of necessity a great day in the life of the community. It was no longer Grandpa's private affair or Grandpa's car. It had become the county's affair and in a measure the county's car. When the great day arrived, crowds of people lined the wooden sidewalks as Grandpa walked grandly down to the railroad station to meet the way freight that was to bring the car. Oh, it was a beauty 1 Gasps of admiration, ah's and oh's of pleasure were heard up and down the street as Grandpa drove homeward proudly though somewhat shakily with excitement. The next day Grandpa took the family for their first ride. (He had read and re-read all there was to read about driving methods months before.) Grandma was a bit nervous, the children in a fever of excitement; but Grandpa was cool and calm. HAdn't he read the Driver's Handbook? Well then, what in the world was there to worry about? Soon they were hurtling along the country road at the terrific speed of fifteen miles per hour. Grandma sat stiff and tense. "Oh. do be careful! We'll surely turn over. Watch out for that turn! We almost hit that rock. Please do go more slowly. August, don't you see that bump in the road?" The narrow country road was evidently not suited to the horseless carriage, and Grandma was thoroughly convinced that the whole "kaboodle" would 9


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

end up in the nearest ditch. I do believe she had whittled away a good deal of Grandpa's self-confidence as well, for he, too, began to show signs of nervous tension. As they rounded a curve in the road, a gate loomed up before them. Startled and dismayed, Grandpa pulled back on the wheel with all his might and shouted, "Whoa, Nellie, whoa!" Naturally Nellie did not whoa, for she was calmly watching the whole proceeding from the opposite side of the fence wondering why she should stop when it was that foolish conglomeration of steel and smoke and noise that was providing the locomotion. It took about an hour to fix the fsnce. Grandma absolutely refused to get into that "awful contraption" for the homeward trip, so she and the children went back to town in a sensible way, drawn safely by old Nellie. Several years of familiarity had altered Grandma's opinion of the car. Now cars were more numerous in the village, and several of her friends had learned to drive. She now was determined to learn how, too. This time it was Grandpa who was against the plan. Well, Grandma finally had her way, for one day while Grandpa was downtown she backed the car out of the shed and headed for Main Street. She had also read the Driver's Handbook, and she had as much mechanical genius as had the male member of the partnership. She started slowly and cautiously, but soon gained confidence. While driving down the exact center of Main Street she spied Grandpa coming out of the postoffice with his afternoon mail. He saw her, too, and expected to get a ride home. Why in the world didn't she stop? "August, I'd stop, but I don't know what to push," came floating back to him as the car went around the corner in a cloud of dust. Betsy Sitz

MEN AND A MASTERPIECE During the time of the Middle Ages, there were not many hymns written because of the lack of inspiration for the writing of sacred poetry and music. In the church services of that day there was little if any congregational singing. The Gregorian Chants were then used and had taken up that part of the service. Men seldom wrote poetry, and if they did, they used it in their own private devotions. Soon however, the religious fervor brought on by the THREE

10


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

period of the crusades inspired men to write sacred poetry and music. During this period there lived a man, probably strange to you, whose name was Bernard of Clairvoux. The story behind his name starts with the death of his mother. Bernard was the son of a knight; he had planned to become a priest however, when this death occurred he changed his mind and entered into a monastery. He did not enter this life alone; with him went four of his brothers and an uncle. Four years later he founded a monastery, which was situated in a valley of France called Wormwood. This locality was noted as a robber haunt. Bernard soon changed the name of the valley to Clara Vallis (Beautiful Valley), and thus we get the name Clairvoux. This same man was destined to become famous since he is the original author of the masterpiece, "0 Sacred Head Now Wounded." He originally wrote this great poem in the Latin language. About this time there was living a second writer named Paul Gerhardt. He picked up this Latin work and translated it into the German language. His translation was considered more "powerful and profound" than the original by Bernard. "The high priest of church music" picked up this poem one day and thought it would sound better if set to music. There upon, he took the melody "Herzlich thut mich verlangen" and wrote his famous "Passion Chorale." This man of course is Johann Sebastian Bach. Thus out of this period came a great poem and an even greater melody. It is the greatest of the passion songs and is rightly termed a masterpiece. F. Biedenbender '52

VACATION The wcrd "vacation" is one word which every student at D.M.L.C.is able to use. It makes no difference whether the student has a vocabulary or not, he still knows how to use the word "vacation." Although the word really has only one meaning, it has many different meanings at D.M.L.C.. Each student has a different idea connected with the word. The word primarily means rest. That is a correct and logical meaning for it, but how many use it as such? 11


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..

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The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Although there are probably a few students who "hit the sack" and rest during a vacation, there are many more who don't. To some who live on farms it means they can get home and breathe that good, fresh, country air. They will get to drive the new tractor Dad bought, or cook on the new kitchen stove. To those who live in town it means they will be able to get back home and see old friends and relatives. They will be able to see how it feels to help the folks by doing "odd jobs" again. These are the two general views of a vacation. There are some students who have a particular view of a vacation. First we have the type which likes to spend time sleeping. He looks forward to a vacation as a time when he can lie in bed all day and let Mom "fetch" the meals for him. The only energy he uses is that energy which it takes to dream about the good 01' days at D.M.L.C. Then we come to a few we might call the studious type. They take books home to keep themselves busy; if this doesn't keep them busy they run down to the home town library to see whether there is material there which they may be able to use. They do not use this period of time as the true sense of the word indicates. but they use it as time in which they can study as they please '''ithollt being bothered with familiar noi-es of the dorm. Although these are only two examples of people looking forward to their vacations, there are many others. We might say there is one group of people which have had their vacation planned several months. Although the people themselves didn't plan it, it is planned. Such a group is the Concert Choir. Their vacation is already laid out for them; they haven't a thing to worry about. All they have to do is ride, sing and sleep, and this is all planned in advance so a group such as this doesn't have to wonder what they will do during vacation. It seems that the idea of having vacations is unanimous at D.M.L.C. Everyone agrees, they are the most pleasant part of the school year, and as many will be observed as are allowed. That is one thing which does not require "greasing." Let the vacations come; everyone is well prepared for them.

A vacation lover, E.H. 12


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

THE LAST HOUR OF B. E. BUGG Boxy enjoyed his life. He especially liked the first hour every morning when he was wide awake, alert, and could really appreciate all that went on about him. Boxy awoke early this morning. He was very hungry. His stomach rumbled and grumbled so loud that he just could not sleep; it was too noisy. Boxy crawled cautiously out of his bed in the toe of a shoe and looked about him. By now he was fully awake and eager for another day of excitement. "Ah, what a wonderful life!" thought Boxy, stilI young and full of anticipation for all that each new day could bring. Boxy was a short, stout little fellow whose full name war Box Elder Bugg. At this particular time he was living in the wardrobe of Room 11 in West Hall. Although he was small, his three pairs of healthy legs carried him along with considerable speed. Just now, of course, his main objective was something to eat. And the sooner the better. He spied a nice, blue woolenskirt hanging above him. How appetizing it looked! He made his way to the skirt and began nibbling for dear life-but not for long. The fiber scratched his throat as it went down. "This stuff is too dry for me," thought Boxy, "and besides that pink silk blouse looks much better." He flew over to it. "Um-m, this just hits the spot!" he said to himself as he began to devour it ravenously. Before Boxy could tire of eating, a ray of light attracted his attention. The light was coming through a small crack between the doors. He crawled through. It was a tight squeeze especially after a big breakfast, but somehow he made it. Boxy looked around the room in which he now was. Nothing interested him. Then he noticed that the door of the room was open. Out he crawled, and he found himself in a long, dusty hallway. He was just strutting peacefully down the long, black. rubber rug when a troop-full of girls entered at the other end and dashed through the hall to their rooms. Boxy huddled close to the wall, for he feared being trampled upon in such a stampede. 13


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

In a few minutes a huge broom began coming toward him with such speed that Boxy was paralyzed with fright. He closed his eyes and waited-and waited; nothing happened! He opened his eyes and very cautiously peered around. There went the broom on down the hall. (Boxy didn't know it, but the girl pushing the broom had to study for a test this day, and who cares about sweeping corners in an emergency like that?) When he had recovered his wits sufficiently, Boxy meandered out into the reception room. What a funny rug! It tickled his stomach as he walked across it. For qui t e awhile nothing extraordinary happened. Boxy wandered around and explored the room to his heart's content. What fun! Boxy was just coming out from under the sofa when someone came down the stairs, walked over to the piano and began playing the most dissonant sounds Boxy had ever heard. The tones clashed and grated in his tender ears until they ached. Boxy just had to get a better look at someone who could play like that. Boxy crawled up the side of the piano onto the keyboard and seated himself comfortably on a low A below A below A below A below Middle C. Just then another normalite entered, and Boxy heard them mutter something about "not getting their modulations." So that was what she was playing-modulations! His curiosity satisfied, Boxy spread his flaming red wings and flew to the chair. What happened next poor Boxy never knew, for at the same momment, the girl, giving up in disgust, pushed back the chair and turned to leave the room. Down came her foot on the adventuring Boxy. There was a sudden crackling, sickening thud. Then silence. Boxy was no more. And so concludedthe last hour of B. E. Bugg. Rhoda Arndt '51

Little Egburt had just about exhausted his mother's patience. "Egburt," she said, "if you don't behave I will spank you right here on the street." The little fellow looked up. "But mother," he said, "where would you sit?" 14


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Shakespearean

Caricatures

Hamlet and Ophelia as Present Day Lovers Have you ever stopped to think how Hamlet and Ophelia would be as present day lovers? Perhaps it is rather difficult to imagine, but let's take a glimpse at them in present day settings. Hamlet we observe as a fellow who is rather shy. He is madly in love with his dear Ophelia, but, yet, knowing he can not confide in her, he hesitates to fully show her how deep his love is for her. Perhaps a present day rendition of Hamlet would go something like this:Pol: Ophelia, what's ailing you? Oph: Oh, Daddy, I'm so scared. Pol: What in the world frightened you? Oph: Well, just as I was sewing on my new party dress, in the sewing room, who should come rushing in but Hamlet. His jacket was open, disclosing a T shirt. His head was bare and his baggy socks were down at the heels. He just stood there with his knees knocking and looking like a ghost. I wonder what ever possessed him to come to me in such a bedraggled way! Pol: He must be madly in love with you. Oph: Oh, Daddy, I'm scared. I don't know what this means. Pol: Well, what did he say? Certainly he just didn't do that without saying anything. That wouldn't be Hamlet. Oph: No, he just grabbed me by the wrist, squeezed it tight, and then holding me far away, with one hand over his head as though he had a headache, he just stared at me for a full two minutes. I thought he'd never quit. Then he shook my arm, and after shaking his head a couple of times he sighed so loudly that I thought he'd keel over dead. Then, in the queerest way, he turned around and flew out the door. Pol: Come on, let's go see Claudius and tell him that his son has gone crazy because of love. His love will probably lead him to do more crazy things. Have you had a quarrel with him lately? Oph: No, Daddy, but I refused to open his letters, and Hi


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I simply would not let him see me. Pol: That certainly must have made him angry. I really should have advised you better as to what to do with him. I was afraid he was just taking you for a ride, and I didn't want to see my poor baby hurt. It is just as easy for us old foggies to overestimate as it is for the younger generation to be less observing. Hurry up and we'll go see Hamlet's father so we can tell him about this. We do more harm if we keep it to ourselves than if we tell it. Hurry! (These women are so slow). Poor Hamlet, he just can't make himself understood. He doesn't trust Ophelia, but yet he loves her. Ah, but here we see Hamlet and Ophelia meet. Something seems to have happened to Ophelia; could it be the influence of her father? Ham: To be or not to be, that is the question, but it is not quite so important right now; here comes my slick chick Ophelia. Oph: Hi, haven't seen you for a long time. Have you been sick? Ham: I'm feeling pretty good, thank you! Oph: Please take these souveniers which belong to you. I've wanted to return them for a long while, but just didn't. Ham: You must be kidding. I never gave you anything. Oph; You sure did! The things you said to me I shall never forget, but it seems as though you've forgotten what you said. I couldn't stand to have these things around if you still don't feel the same way. Here, take 'em. Ham: Are you sure you're telling me the truth? Oph: I sure am. Ham: Well, I did love you! Oph: Well, you certainly made me fall for you hook, line and sinker. Ham: You shouldn't have done that; I didn't really love you. Oph: Well, you sure pulled the wool over my eyes. Ham: How dare you accuse me of such things. We men are all alike. You shouldn't believe any of us. Why 16


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don't you go to a convent! Where did your Father go? Oph: He's at home. Ham: Let him stay there; that's where he belongs. Iloodbye. Oph: Oh, somebody do something for him. He's nuts! Ham: You women! Men catch on to you and know what fools you make of them. Oph: Somebody do something! Ham: 1 don't see why there should be anymore marriages. Women just lead men to distraction anyway. Why don't we all stay single. Oph: What a good mind completely gone haywire. To think that he could make such a fool of me. It's too bad he had to go crazy. Don't become worried, dear readers. Hamlet is not really mad. He is only doing this for Ophelia's own good. So far, things have turned so that it appears that Hamlet is crazy. By accident, Hamlet kills Ophelia's father, and then Ophelia's senses leave her completely. Her craziness leads her to commit suicide. What happens to Hamlet? When he finds that Ophelia is dead, he jumps into her grave. What does this mean? Of course, Hamlet was in love with Ophelia, or he would not have acted as he did. "I loved Ophelia. 40,000 brothers could not (with all their quantity of love) make up my sum." To her death bed, I don't think Ophelia realized how deeply Hamlet was in love with her. Maybe romances don't often go to the extent that one or the other party goes mad, but the course of events may not be too strange. Whether or not we have lovers like Hamlet and Ophelia, they will always be in love in their own peculiar way. Do you know a Hamlet and an Ophelia? Marion Chossek '51

Stout Woman to Little Boy: "Can you tell me if I can get through this gate to the park?" Little Boy: "I guess you can. A load of hay just went through." 17


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HILLTOP FAIRY TALES The following stories are presented for the cultural improvement of the student body and the advancement of the cause of children's literature.-Editor THE LITTLE GREEN POOL TABLE Once upon a time there was a little green pool table. This little green pool table was very old, very tired, and also very sad. Now you might ask, "Why was the little green pool table so very sad?" Because it was lonely. This little green pool table lived all alone in a big, big room. Every day many, many little boys would come to play. But he didn't have anyone to talk to. As I have said before, this pool table was very old. So, one day the little boys got together to decide what should be done with it. One suggested this, one suggested that, another said this, and still another mentioned something else. Finally, it was decided to get another pool table. Now, when the first little pool table heard this, he just creaked for joy. He didn't even mind that some of the boys lay on him, or used him for a footstool, or a cigarette holder. He was going to have someone of his intelligence to talk to! These little boys decided to meet again regularly and discuss other important topics. At this time several boys noticed that their building had a weak foundation. They called attention to this fact; but it was decided to take everything in order. They said, "Let our Daddy take care of that." And he did. In fact, he took care of everything. So in every meeting the little boys discussed the little green pool table. Each meeting a different problem arose. First, the little boys didn't know whether or not they wanted another pool table or a billiard table. Then, they asked whether or not they should buy a new one or an old one. Finally, they wondered if the conventional green felt would be all right or should they get something to harmonize with the wall-paper. At last the great day arrived. The little green pool table was very eager to see his new friend. He didn't look like much, but the little boys realized their duty and repaired him. Then he did look adorable, even to the little green pool table. IS


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The little boys again mentioned the foundation of the building. But the little boys were too busy playing pool. One day real tragedy struck. The North Wind decided to visit his brother the South Wind. He huffed and he puffed with all his might. Now the little boys' building stood right in the path of Mr. North Wind. All the little boys thought the building was safe because their Daddy had built a high fence around it. But they were mistaken because on that day their Daddy wasn't there, and the gate was open. Mr. North Wind came through the gateway and blew down the building. THE LITTLE SWITCHMAN Once upon a time there was a little man named Schamlz who worked for the Dayton, Manchester, Lincoln, and Chicago Railroad Company. For many years Schamlz was switcher for the Company. He worked nights trying to put the train on a different track. He was perfectly willing to have the train go his way. While the train was in the yards, Mr. Schamlz worked hard getting the train on his track. But when the train was readied, Mr. Schamlz would board the caboose and travel with the train. During these trips, Mr. Schamlz had time to think and read. His first desire was comic books, but he soon started to climb the ladder of literature. He progressed rapidly and promptly was reading Shakespeare. Now his greatest delight was to sit in his caboose and quote this famous man of letters. "To be or not to be, that is the question." All that glitter are not gods. "Let the gall'd jade wince, our withers are unwrung." One day he accidentally picked un a copy of the Engineer's Manual. Immediately Mr. Schamlz became interested in this instructive little book. Now our little switchman desired to become an engineer. He studied his Engineers' Manual very faithfully. He knew the various valves, dials, and levers. He even knew his multiplication tables up to seventy times seven. At last he thought himself capable of performing the duties of an Engineer. Mr. Schamlz's next move was to become a member of the Local. Unfortunately (?), events occurred which foreshadowed the climax of our hero, Mr. Schamlz. He was aware that Barabbas Babcock, en ex-fireman on the St. Louis Special, was also up for admittance into the Local. ]9


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Schamlz thought it would be an easy matter to obtain his credentials because he believed that only he had the ability to interpret the Rules. In the Spring Election, the Brotherhood chose Barabbas and rejected Mr. Schamlz as unfit for the position. Fortunately Mr. Schamlz took the whole event quite calmly. He still had hopes of running an engine. The following year his big opportunity came. Barabbas Babcock got an attack of lockjaw. Then, Mr. Schamlz took charge. The engine was fired up and the train was readied to pull out. Slowly, the steam pressure rose. Mr. Schamlz had control of the situation. The train moved faster, and the steam pressure rose again. Mr. Schamlz let off a little steam. Still the train moved faster; then, Schamlz let off more steam. The train moved faster. More steam. Faster. Steam. Faster, Phoof, Boom, Bang . . . poor Mr. Schamlz; he blew his top. The boiler couldn't take it.

Mythology had been the subject of the day's lesson. Just before the final bell, one student raised his hand. "To whom was Minerva married?" he asked. The weary teacher sighed in discouragement. "When will you learn that Minerva was the Goddess of Wisdom? She was never married."

A socialite was dining with her husband at an elegant restaurant when he left the table for a moment to talk to some friends. Just then she dropped her cigarette lighter and bent down to look for it under the table. Up stepped the alert maitre d'hotel and told her politely: "Pardon me, madam, but the gentleman is sitting at a table next to the door."

Guide: "This castle has stood for three hundred years. Not a stone has been touched, nothing altered, nothing repaired or replaced." Visiting Yank: "Must have the same landlord we have." 20


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We wish to extend our thanks of appreciation to Mrs. Harold Kramer, an alumnus of D. M. L. C. and ex-member of the Messengerstaff, for contributing the cover design for this issue. We realizethat much time and effort was used in creating this pieceof art. BIRTHSA daughter, Jean Ellen, to Mr. and Mrs. Adair Moldenhauer of Crete, Illinois. Adair graduated in 1939. A daughter, Nov. 25, '49 to Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel Arndt '32 of 221 East Sanborn, Winona, Minn. A son, Bruce Mark, on July 5, '49, to Mr. and Mrs. George H. Heckmann '41. Bruce did some early traveling when his parents moved from Barre Mills, Wis. to Collins, Wis. on July 25. Here his father helped open a Christian Day School this fall. Bruce has a brother, Gerald (age 5) and a sister, Ruth (age 4). ENGAGEMENTSMiss Fleanor Hookstead, Waukesha, Wis. has announced her engagement to Mr. Frederick Mutterer of Rockford, Minn. Both are H.S. graduates of '45 and Miss Hookstead also graduated from our college dep't in '48. WEDDINGSMiss Ruth Schnitker '35 was joined in wedlock with Mr. Hermit Stevenson of Milwaukee on June 17, 1949. The marriage took place in New Ulm. The Stevensons now live in Milwaukee. 21


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MISCELLANEOUSMiss Esther Paape '37 teaches in a country school at Kenosha, Wis. Mrs. Arthur Brogan (Caroline Rider '41) is teaching Kindergarten in the public school at Port Edwards, Wis. She has gathered interesting material for Kindergarten and is willing to share it with anyone interested. III Normalites are especially invited to write for this material. Just write to: Mrs. Arthur Brogan 550% Ninth Avenue South Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin The material is entitled Games and Play Activities for Sense Training and the Development of Reading Readiness. Mis's Doris Walther '40, who gave up teaching last spring, is presently employed at Denver, Colorado. Thanks to Mrs. Lester Krueger for sending me most of the news in this column. A DREAM BECOMES A REALITY Many students have often wished for a lasting remembrance of our school, a remembrance which they could take with them when they graduate. That has been the wish of students in the past, it is at present, and will be in the future. The opportunity to fulfill these wishes is now knocking at our door for the first time in the history of the school. This year the student body is publishing a yearbook which is known as EXCELSIOR. This name was chosen from the many entries in a contest which was held last fall for the purpose of naming the annual. The name itself will bring back to our memories the steps approaching our beautiful tree-covered campus. EXCELSIOR this year will be a brief pictorial digest of a student's life at our school. The pictures of the classes and campus scenes will bring back to our memories the many exciting moments we spent at school with our friends. Our minds will recall the time which was spent in study and practice when we see the pictures of the faculty and organizations. We will be reminded of the exciting hours which were spent in the watching of sports events when we glance at the snapshots of baseball, football, basketball, and the like. All of this material will be combined into one book, which will be a book of memories we will always treasure. 22


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NEWS AND NOTES ON BOOKS Reading, a drudgery? Never! Reading is never a drudgery unless you make it so or someone makes it so for you. The best thing to remember is to begin a book with the right attitude. Read it because you want to not because you have to. (This does not include the required books for classes.) There are books for every mood and occasion. There are books to suit every individual. A good variety may be found in the library. Just because everyone else enjoyed a certain book is no reason you must. If a book does not suit your taste at the moment, find a different one. Keep several good books on hand. If you tire of one, read the other. Is the book too difficult? Look for something easier. The library has even begun to supply their shelves wit h children's books. How much easier can you want them? Go to the library and pick out something you think you might enjoy. Sometimes a title will catch your fancy. "Kabloona," by Bontran de Poncins, would make anyone curious as to the contents, and the pictures in it add to your interest. Other books with fascinating titles are "Scaramouche," by Sabatini, "The Green Eyes of Bast," by S. Rohmer, "The Red Button," by W. Irwin and "Lavender and Old Lace." But novels aren't the only interesting books. Do your dorm parties lack vim and vigor? See the books in the library on games and parties. There are even books which contain tricks that would help to "pep up" any unusually dull study hour. Even a psychology book can prove interesting. Pick up "Psychology and Life" by Ruch and read parts of it. Skip all the technical material if you want to, and just read the case histories. Begin reading a paragraph; before you know it, you will be reading entire sections. You never know when you will run across something queer. Would you like to see a beautiful word which would clear the cobwebsout of any brain trying to figure it out? Turn to page 475. It is in the middle of a case history and goes Iike this: "pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoniosis." (Better rest your eyes awhile. No, you're not seeing things.) Try spelling that. This person did-morning 23


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and night-because it fascinated her. Perhaps you want to read something different. How's your German? Try "Waldbauern Bub" or "Das Goldene Marchenbuch." You will find, that they are interesting and fun, and at the some time they will help you appreciate the German language more than you do now. If you prefer a longer story, read "Jaalahn" by G. Harders. It will hold your interest throughout the entire story, and at the same time it will give you an excellent idea of the missionary work being done among the Indians in Arizona. Do you read the Reader's Digest just for the jokes? Why not save yourself the trouble of uselessly turning so many pages looking for the jokes? Read "Fun Fare," a complete book of jokes collected from the Reader's Digest. It was compiled by J. P. McEvoy. When you are getting this book, take time to notice some of the other humorous books such as "The World's Best Jokes," edited by Lewis Copeland. Read a few pages between some of those trying classes. A good laugh will put a little spice into the day. Try a few of these books or some others in the library. I am sure you will find that reading books is not a drudgery. R.A. '51

Trade Habit A "local pride" was dressing in formal attire and was having considerable trouble with his tie. Finally, giving up, he ran to the street and asked the first man he met to help him. "Sure," said the stranger, "I can tie it. But you've got to lie down first." "Lie down?" was the mystified query, "Yes, you see, I'm an undertaker."

Dr.: "Plenty of exercise will kill all the germs." Patient: "Yes, but how do you get them to exercise."

Then there was the girl who called her sweetheart "Tonsilitis," because he was such a pain in -the neck. 24


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C;uLLEGE

Another three months of school have quietly .slid by. Three months of toil and tribulation, crammmg for every exam and especially for those much dreaded semester tests. Many of us, recalling the immortal words of Alexander Pope: A little learning is a dangerous thing; Drink deep or taste not the Pierian spring. realized that it was time to drink deeper in our thirst for knowledge. And so a new era began. But these three months have not been all work. They have also been filled with enjoyment and activity. Let us reminisce. On Sunday afternoon, January 15, the first organ recital of the year was presented, presented by Bruce Backer and thoroughly enjoyed by all. Those having "community concert tickets" were able to see and hear Ervin Laszlo, a seventeen year old pianist, and also Mia Slavenska and her Ballet Variante at a later date. The first concert seemed to have the unanimous approval of all, but the comments and criticisms of the latter were varied. On January 30, we were privileged to hear E. Power Biggs, celebrated, nationally known concert organist and CBS and RCA recording artist, in our own auditorium. Along a lighter vein was the production sponsored by the Luther Literary League-"Talent in Six Easy Lessons" consisting of varied vocal, Instrumental. and dramatic numbers. We can now look forward to the planning and 'production of a three-act play to be given in the spring of the year. 25


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As we reminisce we also dare not fail to mention the days of ice skating, the skating races, the numerous pictures being taken and all the work done to make our first annual, Excelsior, a complete success. Yes, another third of the school year has passed and realizing the many blessings which God has bestowed upon us, we lift up our voices in praise and thanks to Him who giveth all. The Second Choir, the Aeolian Chorus, and the Marlut Singers presented the following concert: Sacred Concert Sunday, March 12, 1950 3 P. M. Organ: Prelude in C Minor F. Mendelssohn Aeolian Chorus: A Faithful Shepherd Is My Lord J. G. Naegeli arr. by W. E. Buszin Gracious God, Again Is Ended J. Schop harm. by J. S. Bach Mildred Pingel, Directress Marlut Singers: Praise Ye the Name of the Lord N. N. Tcherepnin Send Out Thy Light ... Ch. Gounod Wayne Schmidt, Director Bruce Backer, Organist Second Choir: The Crucifixion Lenten Cantata by John Stainer Soloists: Roger Wessel, Tenor Delbert Mey, Baritone Organist: Wayne Schmidt Organ Postlude: I Know That My Redeemer Lives H. A. Matthews On Thursday evening March 30, the College Choir will present its concert. This year it has been given the opportunity to tour through Wisconsin, singing songs and chorales in the various churches of our Synodical Conference. Bruce Backer, Dorothy Drost, Harold Hosbach, Doris Pankow. and Mildred Pingel will play organ numbers in the different intermissions. 26


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The program is as follows: Latin Credo Introit: We All Believe In One True God arr. by E. Backer Liebbold Commit Thy Way Unto the Lord ca. 1725 â&#x20AC;˘ J. S. Bach Motet: Come, Jesu, Come. 1685-1750 II

M. Praetorius

God's Infant Son

1571-1621

Chorale-motet:

All Glory be to God on High Frankfurt Psalter-arr. M. Lunquist Forsake me Not..; J. Rosenmueller 1620-1684 arr. Monson G. Wagner Hallelujah, Amen and Chorale 1698-1760 III

Jesus' Cross, the Death and Pain

o

Bohemian Brethren harm. A. GumpeItzheimer filii et filiae (Ye Sons and Daughters) V. Leisring -1637

Das ist ein Koestliches Ding.

G. Schumann 1884-

Motet for Missions: Mache dich auf.

F. Reuter 1863-1924

IV Bells Are Ringing . Where Love Might Enter In Shumm Shei Motet: Make Me 0 God, Pure In Heart

M. Hokanson L. Sateren E. Backer J. Brahms 1833-1897

E. Backer

Benediction

The itinerary follows: Leave New UIm-Friday, March 31. Friday, March 31, Evening-Caledonia, Minn. Saturday, April 1, Evening-Jefferson, Wis. Palm Sunday, April 2, Evening-Milwaukee City Auditorium. Monday, April 3, Evening-Beaver Dam, Wis. Tuesday, April 4, Evening-Fond du Lac, Wis. 27


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Wednesday, April 5, Evening-Montello, Wis. Maundy Thursday, April 6, Evening-Kewaunee, Wis. Good Friday, April 7, Afternoon-Brillion, Wis. Evening-Weyauwega, Wis. Saturday, April 8, Evening-Appleton, Wis.; Lawrence Auditorium. Easter Sunday, April 9, Morning-Neillsville, Wis. (2:00 P. M.) Evening-Menomonee, Wis. Monday, April 10, Evening-Minneapolis, Minn.

A young student was being taken to task for having exceeded his holiday vacation by two days. "What have you to say for yourself?" asked the dean sternly. "I'm very sorry, sir. I really couldn't get back before. I was detained by most important business." "So you wanted two more days of grace, did you?" "No sir-of Gladys."

Carpenter Boss: You certainly hammer nails like lightning. Apprentice: You mean because I'm so fast, boss? Carpenter: No, I mean because you never hit twice in the same place.

Two old farmers were driving through Tennessee, neaded south. "1 wonder what part of the state we're in now," said one. "Sparta, Tennessee," said the first one impatiently. "1 know it's part of Tennessee," said the first one, "but what part is it?" Overheard: "Who is that tutor walking behind that dish of ice cream?" 28


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Dr. Martin Luther College can now boast of another music group. This latest addition is "Curly Meyer and his Five Fatheads." The boys stay strictly with oldtime music and almost any time of the day you can hear the strain of "Tanta Anna" coming from the second floor of the dorm. If practice makes perfect, they should be among the best. I guess the fuchses will stay just as green as they were last fall. It certainly appeared that way w hen "Bunsie" Hookstead asked Clifford Buchholz the following question: "Is Sylvia Klatt Prof. Klatt's daughter?" To this inquiry Clifford replied, "No, she's his granddaughter." Bunsie, not seeming to believe, then mad e the astonishing reply, "Oh, does Prof. Klatt have children." Art Schultz got quite a laugh when they sang "Happy Birthday" to Frieda. I wonder why!! Could it be that he was thinking of something else??? Why did Prof. Backer visit the boy's dorm the other day? Some of the fuchs boys soon found out when he unexpectedly appeared and herded them off to singing class. Irwin Seifert was the most envied person on the campus a few weeks ago. It seems that Irwin was chosen as official page-turner for E. Power Biggs at a recent concert. Every day found Irwin practicing the art of page-turning, and then something happened-he stopped 29


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turning pages. Someonehad told him that Mr. Biggs plays all his music from memory. Gordon Stinson should be a very successful business man some day. So far he has tried selling Cigarettes, pop, hamburgers, and fire works, but none of these ventures has endured the acid test of time. His latest venture, that of selling fire works, backfired and went off with a bang. Willie Lueders must have the real know-how' with girls. His latest conquest comes from our rival school in Mankato, where he recently spent an enjoyable week-end. How do you do it, Willie?? Bill Birsching should try going to bed earlier. Lately Bill has acquired the habit of sleeping in a certain class. I wonder if the "whoming" of the professor has anything to do with this habit!! George Roloff has decidedto go into retirement as soon as he finishes the book he is now writing. At the advice of Tutor Kolander, George began writing a book on "How to do it." That should be a very interesting bit of literature. Right, George?? Eldon Hirsch is now known as the "vermin exterminator." It seems that the mice were rapidly multiplying in Eldon's room when he finally took steps to annihilate the pests. In a few days he had a grand total of five dead mice. How did he do it? Simply with a mousetrap and some of Engel's Wisconsin cheese. (That's about all Wisconsin cheese is good for.) Carl Klein must think that there is a shortage of tooth powder. It so happened that when Carl came to the task calling for the use of cleansing powder, he grabbed the wrong can. Only after he had used some did he discover it to be foot powder. While reading a magazine one day, Robert Heusch came upon the following question: "Who was the great bandit of Nottingham?" Most people, I am sure, would answer Robin Hood, but Ronald Manthe had a different answer. When asked to give his answer to this brainwracking question, his reply was, "John Dillinger." Who was the person that hit Prof. Klatt with a paper wad? No one seemed to confess the guilt, but Elroy Bartsch was the one to retrieve the missile after class. Try taking better aim next time, Elroy!! Herbert Kluth recently made the startling discovery 30


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that paper burns. It seems that one day as Herbie was attempting to remove some spots from a desk pad, he brought a lighted match close enough to ignite the pad. All that Herbie had to say as the fire devoured it was, "Look, it burns." The latest craze to hit the boys' dorm is airplane building. The fellows have really gone in for this in a big way. Fritz Bartel is just one of those many men that have changed since Valentine's Day. Since then Fritz has obtained quite an affection for waffles-or is it an affection for the one who makes the waffles??? Adelbert Schumacher's ambition now is to join Curly Meyer's band. His chief desire is to play after-beats on a hair pin. Robert Heusch thinks standing is much better than sitting in history class. In order that he might have more room to stand, Robert was given. sole possession of one corner. That was one time Heusch was glad to hear the bell ring!! If I have stepped on anybody's toes too hard in this column, please, take it "cum grano salis," or otherwise come to see me some time when I'm not at home. That's all for now!!

She: "Where is your chivalry?" He: "I turned it in for a Buick."

Barber: Haven't I shaved you before, sir? Customer: Nope, I got that scar in France.

Mabel: How do you like your new boss? Gert: Oh, he's o.k., but a little narrow minded. Mabel: What makes you think so? Gert: He thinks words can be spelled only one way. 31


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â&#x20AC;˘

[D-ED NDTES â&#x20AC;˘

How many of you girls like onions? Not very many I see. How about men? Ah, that's a different story. Well in that case I'll tell you something. Between onions and men the difference is slight: The smaller the size the sharper the bite. From unscientific research I've compiled The large and well rounded in both are quite mild. They affect me alike in a number of ways; The memory of either will linger for days, And irrespective of choler or size, Both onions and men can bring tears to my eyes. Though I crave them with zest to relieve insipidity, Alas, neither onions nor men quite agree with me. (Exchange) Sleep-talking seems to be the latest fad among the coeds. People tell us there are various causes for it. Some say one dreams of the things that were on his mind just before he went to sleep, while others firmly declare it comes from eating before retiring. If the former is true, we can all understand where Ardith Stroming's thoughts are when she groans in her sleep. That also explains why Carmen B. talks German in her sleep. Could that be the reason for Ginnie S. singing about "Dear Hearts and Friendly People" and Kay C. asking for her "TEE PEE" in the subconscious state? The latter reason is, no doubt, true in the cases of Mabel G. and Doris M. In strict confidence one of their roommates told me that she feeds them too much salt and that has strange effects on them. 32


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Mabel gets rather violent and f.ghts, while Doris may tell jokes, fairy tales, or tell of her past history. Cne night she declared she was going to St. Peter. And that reminds me, you Westhall girls who wanted to find out how a certain fella proposed could use this advice. Why not try some salt on Phyllis Hein ? From Hillcrest comes the sad news that Caesar (from Room 6) lost his head. No doubt from the noise. for Margie Mumm had to put on ear muffs so she could study. Has everyone seen Westhall's zoo? If you haven't, it's Room 4. They tell us it contains twelve animals. Wonder if that includes the roommates? We are wondering if Joan B. and Dorothy S. have found out whether the bridge they were arguing about is gold or silver. If you haven't yet, girls, don't worry too much about it. It might slip out in the conversation! The First Normal girls would like to extend a hearty thank you to the person who left a box of cookies in Room 113. After a strenuous Fhy. Ed. class they really tasted good. While gathering material for this column, I happened to notice the peculiar decorations Ardyce Hopp had in her room. She offered me a blotter and a little reading material and begged me to warn all of you who like to answer ads in magazines to be careful. It may be embarrassing. Right, Ardyce? We hear that Bode Hall has a cat named "Ingrid." What does Concordia have that D.M.L.C. hasn't? There must be something. 'Cause when Rhoda heard that the bus arrived, she dashed so violently to the window that she knocked a few jars over in the process. Will someone please explain to us what Ruth G. meant when she said that Hoenecke was only dressed once? (We think it had something to do with basketball.) It seems that everyone except Dorothy Behnke was eager to go home at Christmas time. Was it that she wanted to attract attention or did La Crosse have some other interest? At any rate, thanks to Rosemary's dad, she didn't miss the bus completely.

Does anyone know why Fern F. likes the song "I'm Forever Blowing Bubbles?" And could anyone tell us why Jeanette W. likes only Heinz soup? 3:~


The D. M, L. C. Messenger

If you like to figure out puzzles, ask Joyce Krueger why she calls her cat "Duo Decum." Bode Hall girls suggest that plumbers should have a special knock for the bathroom door. For details ask Hets B. or Alice. Teacher Alice had a little trouble with one of her pupils at practice school. She called the little offender to the front, told her to hold out her hand, and gave the hand a slap. Was she surprised when the little girl held out her other hand! Have you all noticed how clean the Annex steps are? Tell us, girls, do you still think it is worth while to skip breakfast? We guess that Matron Wanda knows how to handle late sleepers. Perhaps the next offender will have to wash that window with all the nose marks on it. You know, the one that faces the Boys' Dorm. Was it the music or the performer who put Joan Ohland in such a daze at the last community concert? When she left, she put her boots on the wrong feet. Annex Hall was the scene of a fashion show, or was it a beauty contest? Well, anyway, Adele Lau was the model. She wore last year's bathing suit. Is there any girl who is looking for a cooking teacher? You might see Nadine M. She specializes in fudge and coffee. And while you're talking to her ask her to what she is allergic. But do it at your own risk. From down Bode Hall way, we hear that the Third Normal Club is still having regular sessions. As you remember the purpose is to chew gum, gab, and sew. While down at Bode, I noticed that some one is running stiff competition to Van Johnson. Five times I beheld the smiling countenence of our own Senator. Some girls certainly do enjoy expensive entertainment. Take Shirley W. and Mavis B. for an example. They became engaged in a perfume fight. We all pity their roommates, especially if it was "Blue Waltz." We don't suppose that Jeanette H. will be climbing fire escapes anymore. Or did you like it out there? Are women getting more brave? Some of the First Normal boys made a test. The results were amazing! Out of the 35 girls in the class not one screamed when she opened a Sunflower Seed bag and found a dead mouse 34


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

instead of sunflower seeds. In closing, I would like to say this to any visitors on D.M.L.C.'s campus: If you see any of the girls acting rather odd, or going through weird contortions, don't be alarmed and think anything. Remember, they saw a ballet not so long ago. That seems to be all the news for now. Until next time.-keep smiling.

Cowhand: "Aren't you putting your saddle on backward, sir?" Dude Rancher: "That's all you know about it. You don't even know which way I'm going."

May: "You say you don't like your neighbor's attitude about your piano playing?" June: "Well, I can't make up my mind; she keeps telling me I ought to study abroad ?"

Poke: "What a doctor! He told me to bury myself in my work." Moke: "Well, what's wrong with that?" Poke: "I'm a concrete mixer."

35


The D. lV!:L. C. Messenger

SPOR TS Since basketball has been the talk of the campus for the last month or two, let's look over the books and see how our own teams came out. The collegeteam again had a pretty rough time of it, winning only four of the fourteen games played. They started off the season with a bang, winning three of the first four games, but then slipped back into last year's net and lost nine of the remaining ten games. The top scorer of the college team was W. Lueders, whe ended the season with a grand total of 208 points. P. Steiner was second with 120, and P. Kock close behind with 110. Maybe next year the story will be more cheerful. The high-school cagers, although not repeating last year's undefeated season, came through with a very prosperous season. They won ten games, while only losing three, and racked up a total of 584 points, or a 45 point a game average, while holding their opponents to 479 points, or 36.8 per game. The high school team won their first two games, hence bringing up the record to 18 straight victories in the last three years. Scoring honors for the high schoolteam go to D. Hartwig, who tallied 242 points for the season. Next in line was R. Kramer with 133. The high school "E" team didn't do too badly either, turning in a season:record of four wins against two losses. T. Pelzlwas top scorer with 45 points, while P. Zimmermann got 24 and R. Fuerstenau 22. Here are scores of this year's games: Eethany-43 D.M.L.C. 33 Rochester-50 D.M.L.C.-61 Austin-34 D.M.L.C.-54 Gustavus Frosh--37 D.M.L.C.-45 Worthington-55 D.M.L.C.-42 Bethel-46 D.M.L.C.-41 Gustavus Frosh-37 D.M.L.C.-45 Concordia-67 D.M.L.C.-61 Worthington-54 D.M.L.C.-59 Bethany-52 D.M.L.C.-37 Austin-56 D.M.L.C.-52 Rochester-67 D.M.L.C.-51 Concordia-65 D.M.L.C.-46 Bethel-62 D.M.L.C.-46 36


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

High School"A" & "B" D.M.L.H.S.-48-17 Trinity-34-29 D.M.L.H.S.-50 Bethany-34 D.M.L.H.S.-42-27 Shattuck-44-13 D.M.L.H.S.-38 Bethel "B"-29 D.M.L.H.S.-25 Waterville-31 D.M.L.H.~.-50-40 Gibbon-33-16 D.M.L.H.S.-43 Concordia-40 D.M.L.H.S.-45-28 Shattuck-39-36 D.M.L.H.S.-56 Bethany-30 D.M.L.H.S. 40-28 Trinity-48-16 D.M.L.H.S.-37 Bethel "B"-29 D.M.L.H.S.-46 Concordia-42 D.M.L.H.S.-63-25 Gibbon-53-22 Intramural-The classes are again going at it tooth and nail for the lead in the race for the trophy. For the boys, the I Normals, by virtue of the 10 points received in skating, took over the lead, but the III Normals are close behind, with the Juniors in 3rd place and the Seniors in 4th. Skating-After having been stalled for quite some time by the warm winter weather, the ice carnival was finally held on February 22. It again consisted mainly of dashes, relays and other forms of races. If you can recall last year's skating meet, you'll remember that the college department was verly poorly represented. This year it was an entirely different story, for when all the races were finished and the results checked, it showed that the I Normals were out in front, the II Normals were in 2nd place. while the Juniors and Seniors took the 3rd and 4th places respectively. For the girls, the Juniors had the fastest skaters, with the Seniors coming in 2nd, the I Normals 3rd, and the Sophomores 4th. The totals up to this point are as follows. BOYS I Normals III Normals Juniors Seniors II Normals

BB 5 10 7 3

o

FB 7

10 5 3

o

Skt Total 10 22 o 20 5 17 3

9

7

7


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

GIRLS I Normals III Normals . Seniors Juniors Sophomores

.

BH 7 ...10 3 0 .. 5

Skt Total

5

1Z

7 10 3

10 10 10 8

o

The volleyball tournament has just been started, and as yet too few games have been played to make any predictions. The intraclass basketball battles, for the boys, will be started sometime in March, after that the boys still have track, archery and a few other tournaments to battle away at. The girls too will have to get their sessions sometime in the near future. They then have kittenball and various other meets to fight out among themselves. The varsity baseball prospects are none too bright this year. Remember we lost almost all of last year's league-leading team through graduation, and the news that only college men will be eligible for this year's team is none too heart warming either. But I'm sure that if you attend all the home games and show the team that you're behind them, they'll do their best to uphold the glory of "Dear D.M.L.C."

38


The P. M. L. C. Messenger

Mice or Man? Throughout the annals of time the defying cry "are you a man or a mouse?" has pierced the pages of history. With this challenge many a cat has sent her Tom off to work. Today this inspiring cry "are you a man or a mouse" echoes through the halls of the boys' dormitory here at D.M.L.C. The pondering, observant student will ask, "Why the sudden increase in population?" It is believed by the senses takers that the smell of food is the chief cause. The boys' dormitory is a country mouse's dream deluxe. Where else could a mouse get such a variety of menus? A mouse can partake of a juicy morsel of old trunk leather, or he can snuggle into a dessert of plaster board between the walls. Any mouse that isn't afraid of heights might enjoy a piece of bathrobe alla Landvatter. On special occasions, when he is feeling gay, a mouse could go over to the dining hall and have a Doug Stindt special, an open-faced butter, peanut butter, jam, and catsup sandwich. It is my personal opinion that we should get rid of all the pests in the dormitory. After all, we paid our tuition first. I believe we should carry this fight for existence into the heart of the enemy. Even to the point of sending Stinson down after them. Who else is better qualified to use "a jaw-bone of an ass" at close quarters? It is 39


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

imperative that we rid the dormitory of all rodents. It is perfectly all right for students to spread rumors and misquote people; but think of the damaging effect from having our misquotations translated into a foreign tongue. If it is impossible to get rid of our little friends by hostile methods, perhaps we can kill them with kindness. It has been suggested, therefore, that we put our knowledge of psychology to good use. Our fourth floor expert on rat psychology states that we should first submit the mice to an I.Q. test. After we have obtained this information, we should stimulate their hereditary mental potentialities in order to increase their ability to learn. After an indefinite period of training, we shall have enlarged the mental capacity of this lower species to a higher state, that of dogs. We will be able to train our educated mice to know their place, and the inconveniences caused by our mousy population will be reduced to a minimum. (Some scoffers might disbelieve the possibility of educating mice. Do you know that the morning bells not only tell some students to get up but they also tell the mice to go to bed? Needless to say that any student who doesn't see these possibilities of psychology is a "nut" and should be psychoanalyzed.) Let us cooperate to eliminate this nuisance. Be on your guard! Strike while the dust mop is near! Remember, if it isn't a fuchs, it's a mouse! F.A.R.

40


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Compliments

of

Nicols~Dean & Gregg Roman F. Schnobrich, Manager

PALACE

LUNCH

H. A. Bergmeier, Prop. New VIm's Most Popular Lunch Room Sandwiches-Ice Cream-Candy-Soft Drinks-Cigarettes

115 N. Minn. St.

Phone 668

New Ulm, Minn.

REIM & CHURCH Jewelers

DEER BRAND BEER AUGUST

SCHELL

BREWING

COMPANY NEW ULM, MINNESOTA

Our Best Attention Everything

of a banking nature entrusted our best attention.

to our care receives

We shall be glad to have a share of your business.

STATE

BANK

OF NEW

Member Federal Deposit Insurance

ULM

Corporation


Yon Will Find The Leading Nationally

Advertised

Of Shoes & Rubber For The Entire

Brands Footwear

Family

-At-

X-Ray Fitting

Expert Shoe Fitters New Ulm, Minn.

J. H. FORSTER, INC. Quality Furniture-Funeral

Service

Ulrich Electric o. J. Ulrich

J. W. Ulrich Salee

Serviee Phone 180


Students'

Clothing and Sport Wear

Hummel Brothers 14 No. l\finn'sots St.

New UIm, Minn.

SSHUCK'S TAILORS TAILORED TO MEASURE SUITS AND OVERCOATS Cleaning and Pressing All Kinds of Repairing No Deposits-No C. O. D.'s 215 N. Minn. St. Phone 498

Fesenmaier Hardware HARDWARE AND SPORTING GOODS

LLOYD E. SCHWARTZ, DDS. Dentist Office Above State Bank of New DIm Office Phone 472

New VIm, Minn.

WII.LIAlU J. VON BANK, D. D. S. F. I. C. D. GEORGE F. KUEHNER, D.D.S. DENTISTS-OFFICE

Office Phone 237

OVER PINK'S STORE

New Ulm, Minn.

Residence Phone 797

Somsen & Somsen Henry N. Somsen Henry N. Somsen, Jr. ATTORNEYS AT LAW

Minnesota

New Ulm,

A THINKING FELLOW CALLS YELLOW 24-HOUR SERVICE

YELLOW CAB 244

PHONE

245

CHAMPION SHOE SHOP Across from Wilfahrt Bros. "Finest Kind of Repairing"


LIBERTY CAB PHONE 770 SPECIAL RATES ON OUT OF TOWN TRIPS

PROMPT

COURTEOUS

STOLTENBURG MOTOR CO. Studebaker Sales and Service 218 No. Broadway

Telephone 940

New VIm, Minn.

Wilfahrt Brothers One-Stop Service Station Hardware-Sporting Goods-Electrical Supplies Students Welcome People Who Talk About GoodFood and Courteous, Speedy Service, Talk About

THE SILVER LATCH CAFE EXTRA Values Are Exclusively Yours at Lowest Cost When Traveling By

NORTHLAND GREYHOUND Phone 19 109 N. Broadway

Telephone 729

Music-Recordings-Instruments Radios and Appliances

SCHROEDER'S Phone 268

New VIm

LANG'S MASTER BARBER SHOP Three Expert Barbers to Give Prompt and Efficient Service Elmer--Joe-Harry

FISCHER AUTO SERVICE OTTO FISCHER, Prop. Oldsmobile Sales and Service 109 N. Broadway

Phone 729

New--UIm, 'Winnesota---------


QUALITY CLOTHING Correct Fitting and Standard Lines

TAUSCHECK

& GREEN

Geo. D. Erickson

John W. Graff

ERICKSON & GRAFF Attorneys at Law New VIm, Minnesota

Eyes Tested

Lenses Ground

Glasses Fitted

and Duplicated

DRS. SCHLEUDER Optometrists NEW ULM

and Opticians

PHONE 87

MINNESOTA

IN NEW ULM IT'S

G,",",~~ The Friendly Store

FOR HARDWARE AND APPLIANCES

SHAKE CLEANERS and DYERS Phone 756

20 % Discount Cash and Carry Reconstruction, Installation Additions, Blowers Chimes, Harps

Modernizing, Maintaining Tuning, Repairs, Service, Sales

Wicks Pipe Organs ERNEST C. VOGELPOHL 405-409 North Broadway

New VIm, Minn.


Prescription

Druggists

Dr. A. V. Seifert Dr. James R. Seifert

OLSON

DENTAL SURGEONS

DRUGS

Phone 125

Phone 88

Above Muesing Drug Store

Stone

Your Westinghouse

Shoe Store

Dealers

For The Young Point of View in Shoes

Alwin Electric Tel. 148

For Smart, Practical and Inexpensive

COLLEGE STYLES

"OCHS" New Ulm "Where Quality Is Not Expensive"

w.

EIBNER & SON, INC. Makers of DELICIOUS ICE CREAM and QUALITY BAKERY GOODS Phone 128


A. C. OCHS BRICI( & TILE COMPANY Executive Office and Plant Springfield, Minn.

General Sales Office 906 Foshay Tower Minneapolis

MANUFACTURE

ARTISTIC FACE BRICK Also

Various Colors and completeline of

STRUCTURAL

BUILDING TILE AND COMMON BRICK

WHY IT WILL ..â&#x20AC;˘

PAY YOU TO BUILD . . . WITH FACE BRICK Face brick offers the widest choice of color tones, both in artistic blends and even shades. Colorsand textures burned in becominglovelier with age. A Face Brick Home offers you less upkeep over a period of years. Lessenedheating cost and greater comfort in winter and summer. Greater resale value. Easily financed because loan companies prefer the known merits of Face Brick houses.

Our Products Are Sold in the New DIm Territory by

NEW ULM BRICK & TILE YARDS


UNION HOSPITAL NEW ULM, MINN. A modern, well-equipped, and fireproof hospital supervised by and staffed with registered nurses.

PHONE NO. 404

H. J. BAUMANN INSURANCE AGENCY Insurance

Bonds

Hospitalization

Phone 666

MAKE YOURSELF FEEL AT HOME AT

SALET'S BEAUTIFUL SHOPPING CENTER Quality Apparel for Him or Her "YOU ALWAYS SAVE AT SALET'S"


Depend On Us We depend on you for our business. You can depend on us for your building materials. We know that without your confidence and goodwill our business wouldbe short- lived. That is why, for the past 57 years, we have been dependablein quality and service, and price. When you grow you need more building materials and come to us because you know you can depend on us.

Henry Simons Lumber Company Dependable New DIm, Minn.

Phone 201

Earl~sNews Stand (Now across from SatJert's Market)

ROYAL MAID ICE CREAM SUNDAES-SODAS-MALTS MAGAZINES-BOOKS-SHOE SHINE CANDY-TOBACCO Telephone1031

CHAS. F. JANNI & COMPANY Luggage-Saddlery Leather Goods-Canvas Goods 119 N. Minnesota St. TelephoneNo. 74 Call

SERVICE PRINT SHOP Phone 806

When in Need of Printing H. P. Zupfer, Prop. 103 N. Broadway


Buy Where You See This Sign 500 Store Buying Power

Over 60 Years of Service

F. H. RETZLAFF HARDWARE CO. Since 1887

THE LEADER IN ITS FIELD! HALF BILLION DOLLARS INSURANCE IN FORCE

AID ASSOCIATIONFOR LUTHERANS Legal Reserve Life Insurance Exclusively For Synodical Conference Lutherans Home Offiice:

APPLETON, WISCONSIN


TILLMAN'S BAI(ERY

Makers of

ENRICHED BAKER BOY BREAD and

D-LISHUS PRODUCTS Complete Variety of Bakery Goods

Phone 232 V. James Tillman, Sr., Proprietor

NEW ULM FURNITURE CO. Complete Home Outfitters BANK WITH

FARMERS & MERCHANTS STATE BANK OF NEW ULM New UIm, Minnesota SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES

-

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

Friendly Helpful Service at Your Command Residence Phone 150

Office Phone 260

F. H. DUBBE, M.D., F.A.C.S. NEW ULM,

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON MINNESOT A


Slide-ruL~ are accurate, true.

But their accuracy is

rmited by certain mechanicalfactors in their construetion. In the Prescription Laboratory, however, our skilled and experienced pharmacists use equipment that is so precise that it is possiblefor them to weigh your signature written in lead pencil. This Nth degree of prescription is necessary to assure absolute oonformity with your doctor's specifications-a conformity that is essential to your health and well-being. We have three registered pharmacists in our Prescription Department.

ALFRED I. POLT'&

WALTEB W. HELLMANN ELMER A. EPPLE

EPPLE "SR'OS. I'

,',

PRE

'PHOIJ'E'I'i9

,:D~$:i

5 C R. I

PT

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5 Pie I'" L. 1ST S \!'~;'~ 'NEW'IIL'M, MINN';


I

W~HENIN NEED OF FOOTWEAR Be Sure and Call On Us We carry a complete line of men's, ladies' and children's shoes. Our prices are always the lowest, Quality considered. We appreciate your business. Shoes Fitted by X-Ray

EICHTEN SHOE STORE New Ulm, Minnesota

MEYER THE LEADING PHOTOGRAPHER Special Prices to Students We have a complete line of frames from miniatures to 8xlO in metal or wood. PHONE 165-L

NEW ULM, MINN.

T. R. FRITSCHE, M. D., F. A. C. S. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat GLASSES FITTED New VIm, Minn. Fritsche Bldg.

NEW ULM GREENHOUSES FLOWERS FOR EVERY OCCASION We are prepared to fill orders for flowers at all points through the Florists Telegraphic Delivery Association Phone 45

NEW ULM, MINNESOTA

I

If

The Horne of Kuppenheimer Suits and Overcoats Manhattan Shirts-Stetson Hats CompleteLine of Men's and Boys' Clothes and Furnishings

Fred Meine Clothing Co.


For Quality and Fashion For Top Value ...

New Ulm's Leading Department Store New UIm, Minn.

Phone 234-235

ENRICHED

DANIEL

WEBSTER FLOUR

HIGHEST GRADE OBTAINABLE SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY LEADING DEALERS EVERYWHERE

EAGLE ROLLER MILL CO. NEW ULM, MINNESOTA


PI1VKS STORE Friendly Sales People to Help You Caral King, Jr. Dresses Minx Modes Munsing and Barbizon Lingerie Swansdown Coats and Suits Jentzen's Sweaters

Brown & Meidl Music Store and School Piano Tuning, Repairing of All Instruments Instruments-Records-Sheet Music Westinghouse Radios 308 North Minnesota St. Phone 1451 New Ulm, Minn.

Attention STUDENTS AND FACULTY MEMBERS For the Particular Man Made to Measure Suits and Overcoats Single Trousers or ~ingle Coats Choice of 150 Different Fabrics and Styles $35.00-$65.00-All Guaranteed 20% Down-3 Weeks Delivery Call 1946-L FAIRBANKS CLOTHINGCO.

Russell Rocl{vam 115 N. Broadway

Box 143

New Ulm, Minn.

STUDENTS! PATRONIZE YOUR MESSENGER ADVERTISERS __ I


MUESING DRUG STORE Expert Prescription Service

ARTCRAFT PHOTO SERVICE We Have It!

Will Get It!

Or It Isn't Made!

PHONES 52 - 341

Oswald Studios GRANT R. OSWALD,Prof. Photog. Graduation Photographs a Specialty High Quality Portraits Phone 272-J

New Ulm

Spellhrinks Clothing Store "The Place to Go for the Brands You Know"

Nicl{lasson Athletic Co. Wholesale Athletic Goods Special Discounts to Students Located in Basement of Fesenmaier Hdwe.


RETZLAFF MOTOR CO. Dodge---Plymouth Dodge Job-Rated Trucks We Service All Makes of Cars and Trucks

RETZLAFF Radio---Appliance Center Kelvinator=-Philco Service at Low Cost by Three Trained Service Men

O. B. FESENMAIER~M. D. PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON llYz N. Minnesota Street

OfficePhone 567

Residence Phone 466 New U1m,Minnesota

NIENO STUDIO Graduation Pictures-Photo

Finishing

Greeting Cards Phone 247-J

Fred L. Nieno

The Coronet Jewelers Watches A. A. Kanstrup

Diamonds New Ulm, Minn.


Low price-I

High Quality

J. C. PENNEY CO.

i

Corner Minn. and 2nd North St. Budget your income and Stretch it far Pay cash at Penney's where Bargains Are

Phone 370 For Printing and Supplies

KEMSKE PAPER

CO.

Towels and Toilet Paper Portable Typewriters, Mimeograph Stencils and Ink Safes-Filing Equipment and OfficeSupplies-Desks

NEW ULM DAIRY THE HOME OF PURE DAIRY PRODUCTS

Enjoy

Dannheim's RICH Ice Cream at All Our Accounts Phone 104 Try

LEADWAY

or

DEL HAVEN

FOODS Distributed by

NEW ULM GROCERY CO. Wholesale Grocers

"The Place To Go"

NATIONAL CAFE THE FASTIDIOUS STUDENT will find satisfactory service at

Grundmeyer's Barber-Beauty Shop Air Conditioned Below Tauscheck & Green's Clothing Store

Phone 710


New VIm Laundrv Co. 01

Otto F. Oswald & Sons

Phone No.5 For Your Dry Cleaning, Laundry or Hat Work We assure you prompt and efficient service and invite you to visit our modern up-to-date plant at 107-109 So. Minn. St.

High Quality

FILM DEVELOPING AND PRINTING Packet Prints by Pako FOUNTA,INPENS and SCHOOL SUPPLIES Have Your Prescriptions Filled Here Lowest Prices to Students

HENLE

DRUGS

REXALL DRUG STORE Phones 1003 - 1004

New Ulm, Minnesota DOUBLE SECURITY! This bank offers you Banking Safeguards, Convenience and Helpful Service

CITIZENS

STATE

BANK

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

New Ulm, Minnesota


---!

Dr. G. J. Germann Optometrist Phone 420

Now Over Alwin's

EUGENE KOEHLER OLD RELIABLE BARBER SHOP Good Satisfactory Work Guaranteed at All Times Your Patronage Is Appreciated

Pat's Dry Cleaners, Inc. We pick up and deliver Garments insured while in our possession Quality Guaranteed Phone 115 Kenneth Prall

Brewers and Bottlers Since 1864 Telephone No.1

New VIm. Minnesota

LINDEMANN"S "The Students'

Shop"

Whatever the costume or occasion, there's a Lindemann teen-style just right for you. Our versions of the newest thing in footwear have a way of making any guy or gal a leader in the class.


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COMMENCEMENT 1950 .


TABLE OF CONTENTS

COLLEGlATE CLASS OF 1950 ..

.

3

EDITORIALS A Good Mixer

7

LITERARY On Sidewalk Engineering

8

Pardon Me, Your Slogan Is Showing

9

King or Bum

12

Thoughts On Graduation Day

13

Oh, To Be A Student The "Other Side"

... 14 .. 15

SHAKESPEAREAN CARICATURES Brevity; The Soul of Wit ..

20

ALUMNI NOTE'S

23

NEWS AND NOTES ON BOOKS

25

COLLEGE NOTES

26

LOCALS

30

CO-ED NOTES

32

SPORTS

35

HUMOR The Pause That Refreshes

39

On Greek

39


1!l. .m. I.. C!C. .me!i!itnger The "D. M. L. C. Messenger"is publishedfour times during tae schoolyear in the months of October,December,March, and June b:y the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is one dollar per annum. Single copies thirty cents. Stamps are not accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger"is continuedafter time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinueand all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributionsto our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates, and fIi.ends. The aim of "The Messenger" is to offer such material as will be beneficial as well as interesting to our readers, to keep the alumni in a closer contact with the college, to foster school spirit, and to give the students an opportunity in the practice of composition and the expressionof their 'thoughts. Entered as second class matter at Post Office of New Ulm, Minn.

No.4

Volume XXXX JUNE, 1950

THE MESSENGER STAFF Editor Associate Editor business Manager Assistant Manager Assistant Manager Typist Typist Alumni Notes Notes and News on Books College Notes ...... Co-ed Notes Locals . Sports Humor

Fred Radtke Eldon Hirsch Fred Biedenbender Robert Willhite Arden Wentzel ...... Marion Chossek Joanne Draeger Ruth Albrecht Rhoda Arndt .. .. . Margaret Gamm Marie Kappelmann Paul Kock James Hopman Joann Gillette


T)1e D. M. L. C. Messenger

MAMMEL, OTTO Class President Bay City, Mic)1igan

BACKER, BRUChl New Ulm, Minnesota

BERGER, GERALD Bay City, Mic)1igan

BUCHHOLTZ, Weyauwega,

VERONA Wisconsin

DRAEGER, WANDA Waterloo, Wisconsin


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

ENGEL, LEONARD Brillion, Wisconsin

FOOTH, CLIFFORD Boyd, Minnesota

FUHRMAN, HAROLD Menomonie, Wisconsin

HEMKER, DORIS West Salem, Wisconsin

HERMANN, WANDA Zeeland, North Dakota

JESKE, FAITH Milwaukee, Wisconsin

KOCK, ROBERT Rockford, Minnesota

LEIMER, ADOLPH Truman, Minnesota


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

MEY, DELBERT Saginaw, Mic)1igan

MEYER, VERNON Mankato, Minnesota

MOELLER, KENNETH Fairmont, Minnesota

MUMM, BETTY Morris, Minnesota

PAPE, RENATA Manitowoc, Wisconsin

PINGEL, MILPRED Watertown, Wisconsin

REEK, ALICE Weyauwega, Wisconsin

SCHULZ, ARTHUR Winona, Minnesota


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

SC;HUMACJIER, Adelbert Milwaukee, Wisconsin

SEBALD, DONALD Bay City, Michigan

STEINER, PAUL Jenera, Ohio

STRE;HLER, ARNOLD Rockford, Minnesota

VETTER, ELAINE Milwaukee, Wisconsin

WESSEL, ROGER Truman, Minnesota

WOLDT, ;HOWARD Cedarburg, Wisconsin

WOLDT, ALFONS Rockfield, Wisconsin


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Editorials A GOOD MIXER In one essay I read the statement that America likes the good mixer. In order to be a good mixer, one must be on the same level as the people with whom he is associating. Since one does not always associate with the same group of people, one must be able to act, to pretend, to be a mucker!

Let us take, for example, a minister. Most of us like to see a minister who is neatly-dressed, well-mannered, friendly, who knows his Bible and who can give us the Word of God in all its truth and purity. If we would consider the greatest attribute of a minister to be that he is a good mixer, this is what we would find. On making his sick calls, he would have to take various suits of clothing with him in his car, so that if he intends to stop at the home of a poor family, he can don his old clothes and thus make the people feel that he is on the same level with them. He will have to talk their language, such as, "Oh, we ain't very particuler.-Say Joe, reach me my pipe, will ya?" When they sit down to eat, he will reach across the table as the others do. He will talk about whatever they are discussing, and he will not pretend to know any more than they do. There will come a time when he will marry a couple who invites him to their wedding dance, and he will have to dance with the bride and other ladies until the wee hours of the morning. He may have businessmen in his congregation whose interests are mainly business and nothing else. Even though he knows nothing about business, he will pretend that he does, and thus try to make a good impression. He may be invited to a very sophisticated family and he will be obliged to talk their hifalutin' language; otherwise, how can he appear to be on the same level with them? If he goes to a home in which the family makes a practice of using profane language, we might assume that our visitor will chime in with them if he wants to be on the same level with them. We can name any number of different people, point out their habits and peculiarities, and perhaps their faults, but 7


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I think it is wrong to assume that a person who visits these various types of people should try to take on their ways and manners. Although we hear of some pastors who are good mixers (in the sense that I have spoken about), we also hear of many who are not, and to those we give most credit. We can readily form the conclusion that they will not try to appear uncultured as so many people are, nor will they try to be superior to anyone else. They will act their educational age. Of the two kinds of ministers, the latter will and should also have the most respect. Renata Pape, '50

ON SIDEWALK

ENGINEERING

Sidewalk engineering is a itself. There probably were when the great pyramids of struction jobs, big and small "experts. "

profession as old as building sidewalk engineers present Egypt were erected. Conalike, are stopped by these

Their advice, for the most part, remains within their own group. It consists of muttered sentences such as, "Can't he see that it's too low over there. I could have had that pit dug in half the time." Occasionally one expert or the other feels that he has a gem of engineering technique and boldly presents his theory to the world. Of course, no one listens to him. Bits of advice fly about like snowflakes in a Dakota blizzard until the workers, knee-deep in advice, begin to show some fine artistic temperament. The final outcome 8


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is that the sideliners go away grumbling and mumbling about the grouchiness, ingratitude, and unnecessary roughness of the men. More dangerous is the heckler who has opinions on the job, the machines, the men, and the world in general. He then picks a spot where he is more or less protected from stones and begins to heckle everyone in sight. Needless to say the heckler's visits are not too long; usually he has to leave for reasons of health. On our own campus there is considerable building going on. Do you have to put yourself in one of the above classes? R.F. W.

PARDON ME, YOUR SLOGAN IS SHOWING

"Ask the man who owns one" and he will assure you that Americans follow slogans like Eleanor did the great circle routes. Anyone who wants to sell an idea or his product can easily reach the hearts of America and its purse strings if he is the proud possessor of something like "99.44% Pure." What he has may be pure "baloney" but Americans love to eat it. They have taught themselves to swallow even the bitter as long as it comes in economically packed, short and sweet phrases. Why shouldn't Americans love nicknames, watchwords and slogans? After all they are speedy, most of them paint clear word pictures, and finally their appeal to the masses makes them smack of our democratic ideals. To prove these points here are a few of the great flood of these shibboleths to success so become a part of our life that we scarcely feel the full impact of their influence upon us. When did you last say, "Duz does everything"? How has "It's Luckies 2 to I" or "They Satisfy" affected you? Who of us only a few years back didn't know that "the best tunes of all go to Carnegie Hall"? These are all examples which have come to us with advertising and the radio. Our forefathers were not immune to similar snares of brevity. Those before us followedthese calls much like today's youth looks for the comics-with an amount of enthusiasm that casts reason aside. 9


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Think back into the days of yesteryear and review a minor portion of the slogans which history makes seem modern. "No taxation without representation" is still leading peopleto believea great untruth. "Give me liberty or give me death" gave- to Patrick Henry an undeserved prominence as a champion of freedom. It has been a long time since someone said, "These are the times which try men's souls." Recall John Paul Jones' "I have just begun to fight"? Its appeal hasn't gone stale and its warning has been heeded at least by the English. Except for brief mental lapses they have been on our side ever since. During Monroe's time we had the "Era of Good Feeling" and some social groups still dub peaceful periods with the term. "Old Hickory" once became "King Andrew" and with his "Kitchen Cabinet" overthrew the "Money Monster." Politically it was established that "to the victors belong the spoils." To many the above tells the story of the West's Andrew Jackson in the White House. From those same days we have Henry Clay's better "I'd rather be right than be president" which still soothes the hearts of many for whom the grapes are sour. Some of the most popular styles of slogans of today were innovations in the days when election campaigns first became colorful. "Tippicanoe and Tyler too" aided the hard cider to bring on a Whig victory in 1840. "Fifty-four forty or Fight" and "Manifest Destiny" relate the urge of America to be bigger than its breeches before the Pacific and a war stopped us. "Remember the Alamo" spurred on the Texans against Mexico,but its spirit joined our union with the Texans. Then we had "Know-Nothings," a "Bleeding Kansas," and soon "The Little Giant" and "Honest Abe" battled for the Presidency. The rains came and "King Cotton" was defeated by a peopledetermined to carry their standard "on to Richmond" that "that government of the people,by the people, and for the people should not perish from the earth." Today, the world accepts General Sherman's metaphor, "War is Hell" as a true summary of the grim reality of it all. With the peace that followedthe Civil War a new ware of slogans swept the nation. When the Republicans began "waving the bloody shirt," the restoration of true peace seemed distant and "carpet bag governments" did a "land office business" (a remark whose use reveals the age of the user today) . Americans should be "one for all, and all for one"; so, soon President Clevelandreminded the nation that "a pub10


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lie office is a public trust." Domestic tranquility was dreamed of, but Big Business boomed while labor fought bigness and lost because of "Judicial Tyranny." The old refrain "Rum, Romanism, and Rebellion" lost the election of 1884 for Blaine and he muttered those caustic words, "God deliver me from my friends; I can take care of my enemies myself." Sounds familiar, doesn't it? In the "Gay Nineties," Bryan stirred millions with his "Cross of Gold," but McKinley, "the advance agent of prosperity," became president. During 1900, the Republicans packed the "Full Dinner Pail," but most voters could not get it out of their minds to "Remember the Maine." Not long after this "The Big Stick" took the country's reins and began "trust-busting." The term is still with us and so are the trusts. With the imperious Teddy came the "Open Door Policy" and Bryan's "cooling off treaties." Today we might more closely call the latter "cold war." War was inevitable for the world, but President Wilson used "reserve judgment" while Americans began to "ize" and "ism" the English language with "Hooverizing" and "Hooverism." To many a dreamer the words stilI sound sweet; nonetheless, the fact remains that no one ever could "make the world safe for democracy." Oh yes, the war ended, but "open covenants were not openly arrived at." Americans, however, weren't too much concerned, for they were enjoying a "false prosperity" under a "teapot dome." From the same era many will never forget "Silent Cal" who like the antique Ford "did not choose to run in '28." When the financial crash came, and Hoover couldn't give us "chicken every Sunday," Americans were still clinging to slogans. Prosperity was "just around the corner" in 1932, according to the Democrats. It wasn't. At least the cold facts of the depression in the '30's were supposedly warmed by FDR's cozy "Fireside Chats." Everyone knows that we were again called upon to protect "our nation's heritage." Out came the "V for Victory" and the cry of "Four Freedoms" (reason's impossibilities). "We did it before and we did it again" only after we learned that "you can't spell victory with an absent-T." Looking back we see that here in the land of opportunity slogans can be traced through generation after generation until Americans agree that even the "father of our country" must also have been moved by them. Generally, it is safe to classify our slogans of the past and present into three groups. Some are likely to become classic and live for all time. No one filled with the zeal for the "American 11


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Way" will deny that "all men are created equal" (even after opposing ideologies claim the same precept). As long as those words are shouted abroad no one will be hindered in his "life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness." No, there isn't much clear meaning in these two examples, but they have the necessary all-time mass appeal. Other slogans used by Americans fit only certain occasions. Let's hope we never revert to the log cabin and hard cider of "Tippicanoe and Tyler too." Lastly, we often burden ourselves with some slogans which just are "not worth a continental." What America and its people lack is obviously acquired, at any rate vicariously, through slogans. Though the danger is present, no one's spirit seems daunted by the scientific facts which prove conclusively that no one will ever succeed to "live the full life." The only sensible conclusion we can definitely arrive at in a land where people are trying to be "bigger and better than ever before" is that "what this country needs is a good five-cent cigar" and "the return of the nickel beer." Arthur J. Schulz, '50

KING OR BUM Pinch hitters in baseball are a sorry lot. I say sorry, because one day they may be the most loved person in the world and still. the next day may be considered the lowest bum that ever lived. "Cookie" Lavagetto, when playing in the World Series (Brooklyn Dodgers or New York Yankees), is a good example of what I have just stated. With two outs in the last half of the ninth, men on first and second bases, Bill Bevins "chucking" for New York, "Cookie" slammed a double off the right field fence to clean the "sacks." Thus doing he was the pride of Brooklyn and was highly esteemed and loved by the Brooklyn fans. However, the next day, faced with a like situation, with the same conditions, "Cookie" struck out. After this act he was considered a heel, an infidel, a bum, a gup who thought he was a major leaguer. He could have walked down the main street of Brooklyn shouting who he was and no one would have paid any attention to the guy. Looking at percentages, he batted .333 in 3 times at bat. But still he struck out when they most needed him. After the series 12


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was over, this fact was emphasized when the club told him they didn't need him any longer. On the other side of the fence New York's subs were hitting a "cool" .600 average, which is highly to be praised. But since New York was a "star-studded" team with such players as DiMaggio, Rizzuto, and Henrich, pinch-hitters like New York's present third baseman, Bobby Brown, were hidden. This is too often the case. These few examples can be supplemented more. Thus I say pinch-hitters are a sorry lot.

by many

F. J. B., '52

THOUGHTS ON GRADUATION

DAY

There comes a day in almost every young person's life when his chest begins to swell and his whole self feels wonderful. This is on the day of his graduation. His parents, friends, and relatives have come from near and far to witness the Commencement Exercises. How proud they all are of him! The great moment is getting closer. His mother straightens his collar and makes sure that he looks just so. The next thing he realizes he is in line with the rest of his fellow graduates, tensely awaiting the sound of the first organ chord. Now the march is starting. As he slowly walks up the aisle, his mind turns back over his years of schooling. Grade school went so fast he hardly remembers anything, except the time he was stood in a corner for writing notes to the little girl across the aisle. After grade school came high school, which had many memories connected with it. He recalls the times he raked the ballfield, shoveled sidewalks, carried chairs, and cleaned the room for his roombuck, how, just when he wanted to pitch horseshoe with the "fellas," the Normalite in his room would insist upon having his shoes shined for that "shag" to Cottonwood with his Daisy Mae. And then there were the many hours he spent in the music hall aimlessly playing up and down the C scale, being sure to have his fingers curved correctly. All four years' final tests came around. Each time he thought he never would survive, but here he was on the stage ready to receive the reward for his trials and anxieties. IH


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As he is handed his diploma his eyes become moist. All the good and bad times of school days are gone. Only the memories remain. Now he is ready to start out on a new phase of life. New joys, new hardships, and new friends will be encountered. This all seems very exciting, but deep down almost all graduates would be happy to go back to their old friends and live their school days over again. Joann Gillette

OH, TO BE A STUDENT His wits were almost at an end. They had been sharpened to the utmost. He was now just a scrubby little pencil conferring with the much-used paper. He knew all. Hadn't he been the one chosen to perform this great mission? He knew that the $750 quota for the proposed marker or monument at the entrance of Dr. Martin Luther College had been attained. The boulevard was leveled, construction was to begin in a few weeks, and it was to be completed by Commencement, June 9. Stone would form its base. The marker would be made of wood, and the givers-the 1949-50 student body, would be designated on a bronze plate. He surely hoped it would be completed in time. But that wasn't all he learned. 1950 was to be a big year in the history of the college. Summer school would begin June 26 and last until August 4, with such new courses as Educational Psychology, U. S. History to 1865, and Elementary School Art to be offered. (He was getting tired and wearing down, but he continued.) The school year, '50-'51, would be the year in which the proposed four-year course would first be initiated or begun. Thus students would grow in wisdom and knowledge and be better prepared to carry out the work of the Lord. (He stopped and pondered, then began again.) The new girls' dormitory was well under way. Next fall about 110 girls would be making their homes there, enjoying the facilities of a modern building. There was even going to be a gym! But all the other dormitories 14

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maintained, all that is, except Annex. This would contain the refectory, the hospital, piano studios, a visual education room in which movies could he shown, and a museum. The beautiful and rare stone collection presented by the Rev. Walter Hoenecke would give the museum its beginning. (The pencil gave a deep sigh as he went on to say) : In the future years markers would be placed in front of each dormitory. Centennial Hall would designate the new dormitory; Old Main, the Annex; and as for the boys' dormitory that was still undecided. Yet the other girls' dormitories would still need to be used. How he wished that a third story could be added to Centennial Hall! He had heard that the shell of this addition would amount to $25,000. Would the people give bountifully? ! The Lord had surely blessed this school and would continue to bless it. 1950-'51 would be a glorious year. He told his last words to the paper. His point touched the eraser top as he scratched his one desire-"Oh, to be a student !"

M. G., '51

THE "OTHER SIDE" To those of you who made this article possible by your antics, I dedicate my feeble attempts at literary works of art. This dedication includes those mentioned and the many others perhaps forgotten for the moment. "Do we get Harry's bus?" This was the big question on Friday, March 31. Shortly after 11 :00 a. m. the question was settled-girls in Harry's, boys in Hilly's. "We're off, kids! we're off on our ten day tour!" Our first concert was in Caledonia. We had sung there three years ago, but then we sang in the city auditorium. They have a beautiful new stone church there now and it really was different from three years ago. After the concert we were assigned our places-the usual routine. The following morning Phyllis Hein told us all about Charlie and his heat lamp. It seems Phyl had a stiff neck and Charlie's heat lamp really eased the pain. Ah, yes, Caledonia! That's the place where Hosbach was caught in a little predicament. For details see Mr. Hosbach. Hi


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Next stop-Jefferson, Wis. This was the day we were drumming up business for Rhoda Kiekbusch's father. What was that he does now Rhoda? Does he sell furniture? It was in Jefferson that Werner Roekle was showing off his driving. You should just see the limousine he had. "Odie" Leimer really was in business here too. I hear he converted Schumacher for $10. We were in Jefferson for the confirmation service on Palm Sunday also. After the service we had dinner, and after dinner there was a little time before we left, so we did a little walking. Joan 0., Doris P., Willy L., and Fritz B. came back with roses. They were "growing on the river bank," weren't they? Many of the choristers had gone into Milwaukee on Saturday night already so there was plenty of room in the buses that day. We sang in the Milwaukee Auditorium. Roger Wessel didn't sing the last section of that concert. How did it sound backstage, Rog? Milwaukee was the place several of us visited Jewish synagogues. Hosbach almost passed his hat around so that he wasn't the only one who got in. I hear Betty Neumann had company while she was home too. We were to leave Milwaukee at 1 :30 p. m. But Roy Hoenecke wasn't there yet. Did we worry about him? He just met us at Thiensville where we stopped to look at the seminary. Shirley Pchroeder recognized a desk and so she wrote a note. Didn't we see Renata Pape's picture there too? Al Woldt met us there too. He had gone home from Milwaukee. You should have seen his car! He was giving free rides to anyone who was willing to risk his life and ride with him. On our way to Beaver Dam we also stopped for a few minutes at Watertown. Mickey Pingel barged into a stranger's house in order to call her mother. We didn't have time to look over the college buildings there, but at least we saw what the campus looks like.

â&#x20AC;˘

At Beaver Dam Pastor Kirst spent some of his wit on us. We could even watch "television" there. Margaret Gamm was awakened in a unique way the morning after our concert-a dog came in and licked her in the face. Harry told us he and Hilly had a good night's sleep that night. Ask Harry about it if you're curious enough. We were taken on a tour through the Malleable Iron Range factory there. Which type stove did you pick out, Delbert? On to Fond du Lac. Who was the first person we saw there, but Herr Wayne Schmidt. We arrived quite early so most of us did some shopping. That's where Abey, Joseph, and Isaac originated their "Schnozz Act." Harry 16


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and Hilly were busy too. Joan, did you and Harry win that game of cribbage or did Hilly and I? Prof. Backer's vest popped open during the first section of that concert. So that's why his directing wasn't natural! When we were ready to leave Fond du Lac, we discovered that Harry's bus had frozen. Wisconsin weather again! That meant Hilly had to make two trips to Montello. Oh, oh,-two trips meant we rode Missouri Synod style. Montello the city of granite. Hagen-what were you and Hosbach doing in that restaurant all afternoon? And then you went for a walk down to the lake too. "Fuzzy" and Anne Schaller had quite a time with the chickens that night. They tell me "Fuzzy" also received a book of poetry too. Mmmm, "Fuzzy"-we have your number. I'm sure we all remember the "powder rooms" at Montello too. Next stop-s-Kewaunee. Our friend "Joe" Goede met us there. Isn't that the place Bob Koch had such a time with the telephone? On the way to Kewaunee, Phyl Hein finished the soakers she was making to give to her aunt. Harry thought they'd be just right for swimming. Phyl also had a nice time that night. She couldn't find her room in the house she was staying in. The next day we had two concerts. We were at Brillion in the afternoon. The sun was out and with it came the cameras. Harry was "shot" several times with "his girls." Walt Otterstatter was the center of attraction for camera fans too. It's blackmail, Walt. In the evening we were in Weyauwega. Ruth Grunke met us here. She was sick when we left, but she got in on a few days of tour anyway. Pastor Habech's boys invited a group of us over to the house after supper. Ronnie Papewho won that game of Schafskopf? Roy Hoenecke acquired the name "Partner" there. Betty Neumann and Lucy Bieberich had路 quite a time too. Stevens Point, here they come. Verona Buchholtz had all her classmates out to her house for a party that night. Rhoda Lau-weren't you hungry or don't you like coke and marshmallow candy? That's the place Don Sebald was driving around in a big Lincoln. Going to inherit it, Don '? We reached Appleton in time to do some shopping too. Many of the choir members went to see the movie "Cinderella." Joan Ohland went home with Norma Korthals that night. Did you have a nice time Joan? This was the place Elaine V. and Fred Bartel were lost in a park. As we were "trying out the building," Phyl Hein and Walt Otterstatter 17


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came in late. What was the idea of walking down the aisle with such a bashful expression? You were just getting practice Phyl. Anyway, you couldn't help it if you were up in the belfry until we started singing. "Abey" was there on time, even if he did go swimming. It was free and he wanted to see if he'd get "soaked." We were to sing for a sunrise service in Appleton and were to leave right after the sermon of the service. Harry let us down though and we had to wait for quite a while until he came. We really hit rough weather on Easter Sunday, but Harry took us carefully over the icy roads. By the waywhat happened to the boys at that one intersection between Appleton and Neillsville? At Neillsville we ate in private homes for dinner. Did any of you have the "delicacy" of ham? "Odie" Leimer got lost once during the concert. He had to walk in with the altos. We were in Menomonie in the evening. Doris P. was checking everyone in the girls' bus to make sure each one looked presentable before leaving the bus. During our concert there, Dorothy Schroeder nearly caused a catastrophe. Her place is in the second row, but she had to gain prominence by falling through the first row. After our lunch following the concert, Renata P., Doris P., Arnie S., and Jerry B. performed by singing "B-I-N-G-O." "Abey," "Joseph," and "Isaac," made use of their "New VIm bass" here. Prof. Hoenecke showed his artistic talents too. Was the drawing of Bartel and Birshing? Harry presented us with an Easter present. Thanks for the candy, Harry! Minneapolis-last stop before New Ulm. We had to sing "Where Love Might Enter In" extra well that nightthe composer, L. Sateren, was in the audience. Bruce, what was wrong with the organ when you were practicing? And who were the four that were busy in the balcony? You'll learn to stay in the bus. We almost left "Choss" in Minneapolis, too. Prof. Hoenecke taught the boys a game they could play on the bus. They tell me the boys hear all about the crops being harvested in Nebraska. Who else would say that but "Mike" Hirsch. Doris P. has a new version of "Music, Music, Music." Where'd you get the inspiration, Doris? Nadine Meyer was busy sewing on a coat button for Prof. Backer, too. That's the way to get a "drag." Since we returned from the tour we made two weekend trips. Nineteen of us went to Watertown, South Dakota. Rhoda K. was supposed to go too. What happened, Rhoda? Mickey P. got some good experience on that trip. IS


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Alice Reek was lucky too. For details see either Hosbach, Janke, Faith J. or Alice. "Mike" Hirsch was very gallant too. He washed off the back windowof the bus. Our final trip was to Buffalo and Arlington. At Buffalo "Choss" learned her lesson to listen carefully. After this she won't answer "No, thank you," before she knows what the question was. Joan, what was that booklet you were passing around in the bus? Footh had quite a celebration for his birthday too. Why was your face red, Shirley? And why did you run so fast when you saw what Prof. Hoenecke was doing as you came out of the church? At Arlington we got to see a really modern school. Joan, you and I missed out on the treat from Harry there. Delbert Mey should be able to sing "Humpty Dumpty" any day now. That's what he vocalized on between sections of the concert. He had an able teacher in Joan O. If you've waded through all this you have a small idea of "the other side" of the choir tour. It was work, but it was fun, too. Ruth Albrecht, '51 An easterner stood on the veranda of a Iittle western hotel and watched the sun go down. "That's certainly a gorgeous sunset," he exclaimed to the native sitting nearby. "Not bad," was the 'answer, "for a little place like Hoopville."

Traveling man: Waitress, all I want for breakfast this morning is two soft boiled eggs, a cup of coffee, and a few kind words. The waitress returned with his order, whereupon the traveling man said, "Well here are the eggs and the coffee, but where are the kind words?" Waitress: "Don't eat 'them' eggs." Percy: You mean to say you can tell the score of any baseball game before it starts? Flage: Why certainly. Before it starts it's always 0-0. John: My father was conductor-in fact he was too good a conductor. Henry: Railroad? Orchestra? John: Neither one-he was struck by lightning. 19


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SHAKESPEAREAN CARICATURES BREVITY: THE SOUL OF WIT in ONE ACT TIME:

917 A. D.

PLACE: a street corner in a busy metropolitan northern Europe.

city in

CHARACTERS: Master of Ceremonies (M. C.) John Q. Public (J. Q. P.) M. C.: Good afternoon, Damen und Herren of the radio audience. This is your "Der Mann Auf Der Strasse" program, brought to you by Andersen's fresh frozen reindeer meat. Andersen's fresh frozen reindeer meat is imported directly from our sister country Norway (sound of wagon wheels on cobble stone road). M. C. holds nose and says, "There goes another shipment of Andersen's fresh frozen reindeer meat, folks. Today, friends, we have chosen a question submitted by Professor C. L. Schweppe, 'Was Hamlet mad?' Here's an intelligent-looking man coming our way. Sir, do you believe that Hamlet was mad T" J. Q. P.: Was Hamlet mad? Yes. Yes! I tell you yes. Hamlet was mad, insensibly and permanently mad. Mad, I tell you, utterly mad. You ask me, "Why?" I'll tell you why I know Hamlet was mad. He was mad. He was mad. T know it. Hamlet was mad. Only I know why. I'll tell you why I know Hamlet was mad. He was mad ... Wait! Why do you look at me that way? Do you douht my word? All right. I'll explain why I know Hamlet was mad. First of all, you know his dull mother Gertrude, don't you? I always said that Hamlet took after her. He was always with her. Then they sent him away to school to get rid of him. When he came back, everyone could see that there was something wrong with him. He always kept to himself; never had two words to say to anyone. And those clothes, if you can call them clothes, I think he had them made from funeral drapings. Now you're 20


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looking at me again in that manner. I won't have it, young man. I suppose you think I'm an old busybody digging up these things about Hamlet. But, I'll have you know that I'm just proving to you that Hamlet was mad, simply mad, permanently and insensibly, insensibly and permanently mad. M. C.: But, mister, wasn't Hamlet "the glass of fashion and the mold of form"? . J. Q. P.: I've heard that one before. Don't forget Hamlet was the son of the king. Don't think that the court didn't know what side their bread was buttered on. Why, I overheard that the men only dressed according to Hamlet's style to get on the good side of the king. Then, after his father's death and his mother's wedding, Hamlet really went mad. Just think of all the insane things he said. He even called Polonius an old fishmonger. Polonius, mind you; the Lord Chamberlain of Denmark. Why, only an idiot would call the Captain's Mate of Denmark's ship of state an old fishmonger. M. C.: But, sir, what of all those famous lines that Hamlet spoke, his soliloquy, his plan to trap the king, or his courageous talk with his mother? J. Q. P.: 0, you poor boy. You haven't seen life. Why, when I was your age, even I'd have known the answer to that one. You don't know much about insane people. I can see that. Even Shakespeare ... M. C.: J. Q. P.: M. C.:

Who did you say, mister? Shakespeare. Who's he?

J. Q. P.: Shakespeare! Don't you even know him? 0, that's right.路 Well, boy, you'll meet him in a few hundred years. I bet that you don't believe that Hamlet was mad. Now, about insane people, didn't you ever hear Doctor Holstein speak about lucid intervals? Hamlet was sane for a time; then the poor boy would become depressed. He admitted so much himself. He said, "I am but mad northnorth-west; when the wind is southerly I know a hawk from a handsaw." But I still haven't told you what made Hamlet permanently and incurably, incurably and permanently, positively and absolutely mad. Since brevity is the soul of wit, I'll tell you. He loved Ophelia. Those tender charms of the poor girl just were too much for Hamlet. Then, when Polo21


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nius told Ophelia to stop seeing Hamlet, phoof! his mind just went up in smoke. Too bad, but such is life. M. C.: Say, mister, you never told us your name. J. Q. P.: Why, sir, I am Polonius, Lord Chamberlain to the king Hamlet, who left purgatory this very day. M. c.: You! Polonius? Mister, don't make me laugh. Folonius is dead. J. Q. P.: I am Polonius! Take this from this, if it be otherwise. And I tell you again, Hamlet was mad. Mad, I tell you, insensibly and permanently, permanently and insensibly mad. Hamlet was mad. I'll preach that till my living day. (Walks off stage shouting, "Hamlet is mad; mad, I tell you.") CURTAIN F. A. R., '51

A fussy old lady ordered her dinner with care. After taking several bites, she summoned the waiter. "I've never eaten such stringy spinach in my life," she said. "Madam," the waiter said kindly, "Why don't you try removing your veil?"

Traveler: The fare to the station is $1.50 and you take the luggage free? Taxi Man: That's correct, sir. Traveler: Very good, you take the luggage and I'll walk.

"Daddy," cried the boy. "One more question then," replied the tired father. "How far is it," inquired the tot, "between to and fro?" 22


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Miss Elsie Riess, H. S. '44 was united in marriage with Mr. Robert Winfrey of Phoenix, Arizona, on March 3, 1950. They have made their home at 2512 East Thomas Road, Phoenix, Arizona. Mr. and Mrs. Harold Dallmann of South Milwaukee, Wisconsin, are the proud parents of Kenneth Richard, born on January 18, 1950. Kenneth's mother is the former Margaret Wegner, class of '36. Kevin Martin arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne F. Wiechmann on April 3, 1950. Mrs. Wiechmann is the former Esther Poehler, '47. Mr. Wiechmann, who teaches at Jenera, Ohio, graduated in '48. A daughter, Naomi Ruth, was born to Prof. and Mrs. Luther Spaude on April 21. Mrs. Spaude is a 1945 graduate. A daughter, Susan Joyce, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Edward Kionka, on May 5, 1950. Mrs. Kionka is the former Alila Wiechmann, ex '45. Susan Joyce and her parents live in Lake City, Minn. Mr. and Mrs. Carl Brinkmann have announced the engagement of their daughter Karleen, H. S. '48 to Mr. Paul Schwartz, '49.


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The D lIl. L. C. Messenger

We extend congratulations and best wishes to these graduates on their engagements: Joyce Hanke, '49 to Arthur Schulz, '50. Hertha Henning, ex '50 to Harold Fuhrmann, '50. Alice Reek, '50 to Donald Sebald, '50. Valeria Rosen, Perham, Minn. to Delbert Mey, '50. Enjoy your vacations everyone, but remember-I have to have news for this column in September.

ConstructionScene - CentennialHall

24


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

NEWS AND NOTES ON BOOKS Another set of commentaries has been added to the: sets already in the library. This new set is Lange's Commentaryon the Holy Scriptures. These books are noted for their completeness and exhaustiveness. The material in each book is arranged in a convenient, orderly, and also practical way. It is easy to find that for which you are looking. Every section of the Bible is discussed from three points of view-critical. doctrinal, and practical. To prove his various arguments, Lange used the original Greek or Hebrew. He also gives the arguments of other men and discusses them quite thoroughly. In the beginning of each volume is a great deal of general information and background material-all in detail. The books, of course, have their faults too. The Greek and Hebrew are of little concern to those who do not know the languages. But as a whole this commentary should be a valuable aid to research work. Another new book in the library is The Theorj and Practice of Psychological Testing by Frank S. Freeman. This book is considered the last word in all psychological tests. It describes the various kinds of tests-i-intelligence, personality, aptitude, educational achievement, and projective. It not only gives the historical background of these tests but also complete information about them, how to use them, the value of such tests, the precautions to be exercised, and a thorough evaluation of all these tests. All the information is correct and exact. This may be a rather difficult bookto read, but future teachers ought to acquaint themselves with the book and its contents. When you have finished "plowing" through all those deep and complicated books, take a look at Some Principles of Teaching by Harold Spears. The title makes it sound involved and difficult, but just glance at the contents and you'll discover how wrong it is to judge a book by its title alone. This book is a small one with only one hundred and forty-four pages, wide margins, a large size print, plenty of space between the letters, and to complete it, there are cartoons on most of the pages. Although it doesn't seem possible that all these things are combined into one book, this book also contains excellent suggestions and sound advice concerning teaching, written in a simple style. Come into the library and get acquainted with these books. At the same time look over some of the other reference books too. Research work is much easier when you know where to find what you want. 25


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Spring is sprung! The grass is 'riz !-These are the "signs of the times" as likewise our collegelife. Thus our thoughts turn to that ever delightful subject of-food! The seating arrangement in the dining halls has just been changed as this goes to press. By the time you skim through these pages, however, you will have talked, munched, and crunched through many meals. Our collegelife may be compared to one of these meals. Our basic foods are the various subjects on which we feast and the manner in which we eat is the general routine through which we daily go to accomplish our aims. Yet there is one thing needed to make our meal complete-the dessert. Thus the outside activities become the chocolate cakes and apple pies of our school life which are always remembered when everything else is forgotten. Through the past three months many things have been tasted to sweeten our dispositions and to add spice to our life. There were the basketball tournaments which showed the all-round enthusiasm that can be displayed by the student body. Then came that long-awaited Faster vacation and the long-planned-for tour of the First Choir members. A new organ was able to be ordered, made possible through the money received from the free-will offerings of the various congregations. As the days grew warmer, Arbor Day was uppermost in the minds of everyone. On Friday, April 21, the dream became a reality and on April 22, everyone felt the results of the reality. 26


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Many further exercised their limbs, professors and students alike, at the roller skating party of the Young People's societies of St. Paul's and St. John's churches, on May 4. On the Sundays which followed, the First Choir made short trips to Buffalo, Arlington, and Mankato. One previous highlight, however, was the recording of eleven numhers of the concert, to be on sale in album form in the near future. "The Magic Flute," an opera in two acts presented by the music department of Gustavus Adolphus College, was attended by some of the students and thoroughly enjoyed. But more students had the opportunity to hear Igor Gorin, a famous baritone. This was the last of the Community Concert Series. By the time you peruse this column you will have seen the three-act comedy, "It's Papa Who Pays," presented by the Luther Literary League. You will also have received the first annual of D. M. L. C., "Excelsior," a publication to be treasured in later years. The Third Normals will never forget the day they received their calls (May 12), the last Band Concert, assisted by the Marluts and Aeolians on May 21, or the banquet given in their honor by the professors on May 29. June Night and Commencement will be the climax of their college career. They will taste of a new type of life. We wish them God's blessings in their future work! The programs of the two concerts and the Commencement program are as follows: May 21,1950 8:00 p. m. AEOLIANCHORUS 1. Without a Song Joan Ohland, Accompanist 2. Down in a Flow'ry Vale 3. Some Folks Do Arlene Harms, Accompanist Mildred Pingel, Directress Piano Solo-Etude in D Flat Doris Pankow 27

V. Youmans C. Festa S. Foster Fr. Liszt


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

MARLUT SINGERS 1. The Deaf Old Woman Song

. Davis

2.

Viking

3.

Short'nin' Bread Harold Hosbach, Accompanist Wayne Echmidt, Director

Coleridge-Taylor Wolfe

BAND 1.

March: Emblem of Unity

2.

Overture:

3.

Trumpet

4.

Three Dances from "Nell Gwyn" a) Country Dance b) Pastoral Dance c) Merrymakers'Dance

The Barber of Seville

J. Richards G. Rossini

H. Purcell

Tune

Violin Solo--Concerto

in A Minor Shirley Schroeder Marvin Busse, Accompanist

A. Vivaldi

5.

American

6.

Spanish March: Aguero

7.

With a Song in My Heart from "Spring Is Here"

R. Rodgers

March: Men of Ohio

H. Fillmore

8.

Folk Rhapsody

E. German

C. Grundman

J. Franco

COMMENCEMENT CONCERT CONCERT CHOIR a)

Make Me, 0 God, Pure in Heart

b)

Das ist ein koestliches Ding

c)

Hallelujah,

Amen

J. Brahms G. Schumann G. Wagner H. Mulet

Organ: The Nave CHORUS a)

Morning

O. Speaks Bruce Backer, Accompanist

b)

All Through the Night arr. by P. Lutkin Tenor Solo: Roger Wessel

c)

Du bist die Ruh

Franz Schubert, arr. by N. Cain 28


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

d)

Neapolitan Nights .J. S. Zamecnik Dorothy Drost, Accompanist Fr. Liszt Piano-Hungarian Rhapsody No. 14 Marvin Busse CHQRUS Welsh Melody,arr, by D. Wright a) Men of Harlech Mildred Pingel, Accompanist b) Home on the Range ... arr. by Ch. Repper Cowboy Song English Air, arr. by K. Davis c) The Cobbler's Jig Mexican Folk Song, arr. by W. Rieger d) Carmencita Doris Pankow, Accompanist BAND J. Richards a) March: Emblem of Unity .G. Rossini b) Overture: The Barber of Seville J. Olivadoti c) March: Hall of Fame. CQMMENCEMENTPROGRAM June 9, 1950 L. Boellmann 1. Processional: Chorale. Miss Evelyn Heidtke . M. Reger 2. Prelude: 0' Holy Spirit Enter In Organ : Harry Fuhrmann Assembly: (Hymn 235 St. 1, 3, 5, 6) 3. Prayer and Scripture Reading 4. Prelude: A Mighty Fortress Is Our God . G. Schaper Organ : Alfons Woldt Assembly: (Hymn 262 St. 1, 2, 3, 4) 5. Address: The Reverend Arthur P. Voss Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Ev. Joint Synod of Wisconsin and Other States 6. Chorus: On God, Not On Myself . M. Lundquist 7. Presentation of Diplomas Prof. C. L. Schweppe, President 8. Prelude: Christ, Thou Art the Sure F. Reuter Foundation Organ : Delbert Mey Assembly: (Hymn 466, All Stanzas) 9. The Lord's Prayer (Unison) 10. The Benediction 29


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Whiz! A small white object went flying through space and another startled student was brought back from the land of Nod. No! It wasn't a flying saucer. It was just a well-aimedpiece of chalk. Better sleep nights after this, Stellick!! Despite the uncommonly damp and dreary weather (which is very unusual in Minnesota), Fritz Bartel seems to have found a place where the "vetter" is pretty nice. Fire! Fire! Fire! That was the shout in the dorm the other morning. About five o'clock Norman Stellick woke up to find his bed was on fire. The fire didn't have too much of a start, so it was soon put out. I guess the Easter rabbit wasn't too kind to Lloyd Tiegs this last year. Anyhow, Lloyd has adopted the policy of being kind to rabbits, and as a result he is sharing his place in the dorm with one of those creatures. I hope Mr. (or Mrs.) Rabbit enjoys his stay among us. The collegeclub room is now open for business (thanks to the I Normals). The boys have been progressing slowly but surely, and they finally completed it with a good cleanup. Nice job, boys!! Along with the opening of the club room, we find that the pool table is ready for use. It looks swell in its new green coat, and we hope everyone takes good care of it. While the cleanup was in progress, it was discovered 110


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

that Hopman and Hulke would make good wives for someone. They really made the floor shine and they did a superb job on the furniture with that glass wax. Have you had a close shave lately? If not, just go to fourth floor and ask for Walt Otterstatter. Walt hasn't found school interesting enough so he has become a barber. His policy is "the shorter, the better." Frankie Kolander has been laid up with a sore arm lately. At least that's what he told his piano teacher. This certain piano teacher seemed to doubt Frankie's "critical condition." She called up the doctor to make sure. Prof. Backer will be glad to know that Gordon has a new explanation of what a sharp does to Gordon believes that a sharp raises a note a half That sounds a little different from what the rest class has learned.

Stinson a note. a flat. of the

Jonathan Guenther has been afflicted with a slight case of arthritis. He had some consolation, however, when he learned that over 7,000,000 other people also have arthritis. There's a person here in the dorm who never had his name in this column, and he would like to have it mentioned once. Here it is, Arnold Strehler. Herbert Kluth finally got enough of South Dakota and came back to school. Herbie has been home helping with the spring planting. I wonder what he planted that will grow in sand. "Curly" Meyer's aggregation of five fatheads, which has become quite popular, has now increased. There are now eight fatheads besides the capable leader. Bill Birsching, who is now one of the fatheads, really goes all out when he plays the piano. He played so hard that he dislocated his shoulder. Adelbert Schumacher believes in doing something up big when he does it. After telling everyone not to slam the door lest the glass break, he went out the same door and guess what happened ?-he broke three panes of glass. That brings this column to an end again. bearing with me. 31

Thanks for


,

The D. M. L. C. Messenger

, I dedicate this, my last column, to all the co-eds who are graduating, to those first and second Normalites who, like me, are going to be school marms next fall; to all those who helped me make this column interesting; and, especially, to the lucky co-ed who takes my place on the Messenger Staff. To those of us who are leaving, Jeanette Wiest passes this thought, "Even the woodpecker owes his success to the fact that he uses his head and keeps pecking away until he finishes the job he starts." And here's another, "Some cause happiness wherever they go; and others whenever they go." Let's hope we're among the first group. Does everyone know why Ra was so tired on the day of tournaments? She told us she was up all night teaching "Toot" how to make hook shots.

,..

Those girls over at Waldheim do some strange things once in a while. Donna Prausa tried sleeping in the bath tub. Was it comfortable? Maybe Shirley Schroeder could try that instead of the floor the next time she stays at Annex. Marlene A. and Eunice P. really had bad cases of "outdoor sleeping fever." They tried sleeping on the porch. But the Minnesota weather wasn't very obliging and soon chased them in to a dryer atmosphere. When Rhoda Kiekbusch sleeps, she really sleeps soundly. Two alarms couldn't even awaken her in time for the Watertown choir trip. Perhaps her dreams were more interesting anyway. Poor Vickie!

She really takes quite a beating from 32


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

her sister. Ginnie's not so bad when she's awake, but when she sleeps she gets rather violent. She nearly knocked Vickie out the other night. Marilyn Radtke was very pleasantly surprised on her birthday. She came back from classes and found a half dozen Talisman roses on her bed. That night Mary and Dorothy took her out to supper and there at Eibner's were her Mom and Dad. The next day she received a huge cake. She gave a big party, too. Speaking of birthday parties, Mary Anderson, Shirley Mielke, and Lois Burmeister also had parties. Ruth Grunke, too, celebrated hers a month late. Lois Gose was going to cut her cake at midnight. She overslept and was awakened at 4 :30 a. m. by her roommate's sleeptalking, She was pleading, "Please, Lois, give me a piece of birthday cake. I'm starved." The Waldheim girls have a new and different game. It's called "Pinchie Winchie." Ask them about it, but don't blame me for the consequences. Say Hezzy, why won't you let Birsching show us that cute picture of you? Roger doesn't mind. They say that Doris Marquardt is very faithful in doing her exercises. One night she even did them in the dark -after 10 :30. But Doris, why don't you get together with Doris Pankow. They tell me that since the tour she's found a new way of reducing. She doesn't use Kyron any more. By the way, Faith, Prof. Schweppe isn't the only one that would like to know just exactly what you look for in the park. Who or what was the strange intruder that entered Room 6 of Hillcrest? It helped itself to rolls and fruit cake, and even left its footprints in the peanut butter. The Annex and Westhall girls have an admirer. It sits outside the dorm and meows or purrs. It really creates excitement when it gets in. What's the matter, Phyl, isn't Carl good enough any more? Then you'd better explain why you came rushing into Dorothy Drost's organ room and asked if you could borrow her "Willie." I guess Shirley Schroeder had a "rip" roaring time on Arbor Day. Was her face red when she backed all the way up to Annex. 33


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

What was Alethia Uetzmann thinking about when she came down to study hall with her toothbrush? "Never a dull moment," says one of the girls in Room 2 on third floor Annex. How could there be with six people snoring and four talking in their sleep? Well, girls, the hour is growing late and news is scarce so I'll close by wishing you all a very happy vacation.

A customer's coat came into contact with an open jar of mustard. "That's a $150 suit!" he fumed. The proprietor shrugged, "You think that's cheap mustard?"

Most biologists agree that wooden legs cannot be inherited, but they aren't so sure about wooden heads.

The only thing an adolescent does not want to reform is himself.

The trouble with some people is that they practice "idollartry.'

City Child: What are those thin -s on the cow's head? Farmer: Horns. City Child: Which one is he blowing now?

Mathematics teacher: Jhnmie, can you tell me what is meant by a polygon? Jimmie: I guess it means a parrot that dies, doesn't it? 34


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

SPORTS BASEBALL: Despite the fact that only the boys from the college department could play on this year's varsity squad, Coach Oldfield has managed to come out with a very capable team. The pitching staff consists of Leimer, Steiner, and Stindt. A. Schulz and Bob Otterstatter are doing the catching, while Stindt holds down first, Lueders is at second, Wessel at third, and P. Kock at short. The outfielders are H. Woldt, G. Voigt, Schwecke, and Janke. Because of the bad weather only two of the scheduled four games have been played up to the present. Both of them were played away, at Bethel and Northwest Bible School. Our team got off to a bad start, losing both games; but since both were nonconference, there is still a chance of repeating last year's championship season. Here are the totals of the games: R H E 9 6 7 2

D. M. L. C. Bethel

201 000 000-3 011 300 00*-5

D. M. L. C. Northwestern

100 000 100-2 000 020 20*-4

R H E

5 2 8 3

On the high school team, we find Guth and Meihack on the mound, Hartwig behind the plate, R. Kramer on first, F. Kolander on second, H. Wessel at short, W. Voigt on third, while Plath, F. Panning and N. Sprengler are the outfielders. INTRAMURAL: The basketball tournament again proved to be the climax of this year's intramural battles. This year was the first time an extra game had to be played to determine the champions. The I Normals lost to an inspired Senior team 52 to 39 in the first championship tilt, but as this was their first defeat, the "Cobs" had another chance, and came through to beat the "Jacks" 41 to 29 in the second battle. The Juniors defeated the III Normals in the fight for consolation honors. In the cage tournament for the weaker (?) sex, the II Normals came out on top, while the Juniors took second place, the I Normals third and the Sophomores fourth. 35


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If time and weather permit, there is yet to be a softball tournament both for the boys and the girls. This will about round off this year's battles for the trophy. The standings up to the present are as follows:

I Normals Juniors III Normals Seniors II Normals Sophomores Freshmen

Base- Foot- Skat- Volley-EasketTotals ball ball ball ing ball 10 39 10 7 5 7 27 5 5 5 5 7 26 10 3 10 0 3 26 10 3 3 3 7 0 0 7 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

GIRLS: Broom Hockey Skating Volleyball Basketball Totals 10 10 27 0 7 Juniors 22 5 5 5 7 I Normals 10 17 0 7 0 II Normals 14 3 3 5 3 Sophomores 0 0 0 10 0 III Normals 0 10 7 0 3 Seniors 0 0 0 0 0 Freshmen BASKETBALLAWARDS: Basketball letters were awarded to the following high school and college players of the 1949-1950squads. For the college: Art Schulz,Paul Steiner, Leonard Engel, Gerald Berger, Walt Otters tatter, Willard Lueders, Paul Kock, Larry Bruns, Bob Otterstatter, and Ronald Manthe received letters, while the lettermen on the high school squad were Don Hartwig, Reuben Kramer, Gordon Synhorst, Orville Guth, Dean Gutzke, Lyle Borgschatz, Norbert Sprengeler, Walmar Voigt, Franklin Kolander, and Marvin Meihack. "Red" Mammelalso received a letter for his labors as manager. The captains for the college squad were Art Schulz and Paul Steiner; for the high school, Don Hartwig and Reuben Kramer. 37


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The D. M. L. C. Messenger

HUMOR THE PAUSE THAT REFRESHES The little old lady glanced at the clock on the kitchen range. It showed five minutes before ten o'clock a. m. Quickly she put more kindling on the fire and shoved the kettle of soup to the back of the stove, gave the cat some milk, chased the rooster off the porch and shook the tablecloth. Now she was all ready to relax in her favorite chair and listen to Ma Perkins. How restful this would be after such a busy morning. Then she got out her knitting. Perhaps she could finish the thumb of the mitten which she had been working on for so long. Now the commercial was over, and the story had started. As the story went on, her needles clicked faster and faster. "Let me see now," she mumbled to herself, purl one, PSSO and cast off six. All of a sudden her needles stopped clicking. Her blue eyes sparkled, the color rose to her cheeks, and her mouth gaped. Then-instantaneously her mouth banged shut. Wrinkles appeared on her forehead along with a scowl on her chin. "What will Faye do now?" she remarked to Bonnie the bulldog who slept peacefully at her feet. However,路 at that time the announcer interrupted the story with these familiar words, "Tune in tomorrow, same time, same station, and find out what will happen to this stranger who entered the life of Faye Perkins." The story was over for another day. Just then the door opened and her husband walked in with the morning mail. He looked at her for a moment then said, "Why Martha, whatever will you do with a mitten that has a thumb six inches long?" J. G., '52

ON GREEK Since I have never studied Greek under formal tutelage, one might arrive at the conclusion that I do not know much of that tongue. But fiction is stranger than truth (in this case) . I have been studying that glorious Muttersprache on and off (mostly), for the past twelve years. In every s"bjed that I have studied I ran across Greek. (Some people even say that I ran it down). Many teachers would answer 39


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

my questions with, "that's Greek to me." tained my knowledge of Greek.

Thus I have ob-

In recent months I have been able to increase this knowledge, and I am now ready to instruct you in TI-IE method of studying Greek. (I usually sell this course for a nominal sum of seventy-five dollars, but seeing that you have pleaded for this, I'll give it to you.) The following system of translating is known as the free method. First, make your mind a complete blank. Now, assuming that you have a vocabulary of ten thousand Greek words, we will begin. Let us take the sentence, The boys were playing baseball. We translate thus: The boys hitting, the bearded, horses, while eating, men who were, four, lightning fast baseball water, over the fence, into the hole, of grass, boys. Your question at this point is probably, "Where did you get all those words?" This is easily explained. The Greek language is highly condensed. (In fact, it's very dry.) A few words of Greek require many words of English to express the same meaning. We can readily see that this sentence, in its present condition, is grammatically incorrect. We must rearrange it. We recognize the subject, boys, immediately because the subject is always at the end of the sentence. From here on in it is a mathematical problem. You can use three possible methods to solve this problem-dice, number jar, or pinball machine. Let us use number two. First, you number all the words in the sentence to be translated. Next, have your classmates guess the numbers one at a time. \Ve now have the following: The boys hitting the ball with lightning speed hit the bearded men on the head. This caused the ball to go over the fence and hit the horses, which were eating grass and drinking water at the hole. Your second question is, "Where did you get those conjunctions and prepositions?" That is relatively simple. A "few" miscellaneous words are understood, and you must develop a feeling for the lanvuage. Since there are no adjectives and modifiers, we must add some. Our sentence is now: The boys hitting the ball with lightning speed hit the red bearded men on the head. This caused the ball to go over the fence and hit the horses, which were eating Kentucky blues grass and drinking water at the hole. But we notice that blues is plural; so, we must add 'another blue some other place. Guessing another, number, we add the word "blue'<to the word "red bearded." 40


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

By the laws of physics, we learn that by mixing blue and red we get black. So, now, we must use the adjective "Black." We use the word "lightning" and add black. Lightning is white. White plus black equals nothing. In first-aid class we learn that a baseball is a dangerous missile with rock hardness. If the ball flew over the fence and hit the horses, we can assume that the horses were killed. If that is what happened on the other side of the fence, the baseball must surely have killed the bluered bearded men. If the horses were dead, there is no sense in their eating Kentucky blue grass and drinking water. Our last step is to eliminate the irrelevent, miscellaneous facts and we arrive at our sentence-The boys were playing baseball. F. A. R., '51 A reason is an excuse that sounds logical. Diner: And I'd like to have my pork chops lean. Waiter: Yassuh, which way, suh? On mules we find two legs behind and two before; we stand behind before we find what the two behind are for. Mother (calling up attic stairs) "Freddie, are you up there T Voice from above-"No, Mother. Have you looked in the cellar?" Prof.: Take this sentence, "Let the cow be taken to the pasture." What mood? Student: The cow. Buffum: 'I'hat fellow must be an awful liar. He told me he shaves forty or fifty times a day. Scuffum: That's right-he's a barber. 41


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Supplies

People Who Talk About Good Food and Courteous, Speedy Service, Talk About

THE SILVER l,ATCH CAFE EXTRA Values Are Exclusively Yours at Lowest Cost When Traveling By

NORTHLAND GREYHOUND 109 N. Broadway

Phone 19 Telephone 729

Music-Recordings-Instruments Radios and Appliances

SCHROEDER'S Phone 268

New VIm

LANG'S MASTER BARBER SHOP Three Expert Barbers to Give Prompt and Efficient Service Elmer-Joe-Harry

FISCHER AUTO SERVICE OTTO FISCHER, Prop. Oldsmobi.le Sales and Service 109 N. Broadway

Phone 729

New Vim, Minnesota


WHEN IN NEED OF FOOTWEAR Be Sure and Call On Us We carry a complete line of men's. ladies' and children's shoes. Our prices are always the lowest, Quality considered. We appreciate your business. Shoes Fitted by X-Ray

EICHTEN SHOE STORE New UIm, Minnesota

MEYER THE LEADING PHOTOGRAPHER Special Prices to Students We have a complete line of frames from miniatures to 8xlO in metal or wood. PHONE 165-L

NEW ULM, MINN.

T. R. FRITSCHE, M. D., F. A. C. s. Eye, Ear, No~e and Throat GLASSES FITTED New Ulm, Minn. Fritsche Bldg.

NEW VLM GREENHOUSES FLOWERS FOR EVERY OCCASION We are prepared to fill orders for flowers at all points through the Florists Telegraphic Delivery Association Phone 45

NEW ULM, MINNESOTA The Home of Kuppenheimer Suits and Overcoats Manhattan Shirts-Stetson Hats CompleteLine of Men's and Boys' Clothes and Furnishings

Fred Meine Clothing Co.


High Quality

Low Price

J. C. PENNEY CO. Corner Minn. and 2nd North St. Budget your income and Stretch it far Pay cash at Penney's where Bargains Are

Phone 370 For Printing and Supplies

KEMSKE PAPER

CO.

Towels and Toilet Paper Portable Typewriters, Mimeograph Stencils and Ink Safes-Filing Equipment and OfficeSupplies-Desks

NEW ULM DAIRY THE HOME OF PURE DAIRY PRODUCTS

Ice Cream at All Our Accounts Phone 104 Try

LEADWAY

or

DEL HAVEN

FOODS Distributed by

NEW ULM GROCERY CO. Wholesalo Grocers

"The Place To Go"

NATIONAL CAFE THE FASTIDIOUS STUDENT will find satisfactory

service at

Grundmeyer's Barber-Beauty Shop Air Conditioned Below Tauscheck & Green's Clothing Store

Phone 710


Buy Where You See This Sign 500 Store Buying Power

Over 60 Years of Service

F. H. RETZLAFF HARDWARE CO. Since 1887

THE LEADER IN ITS FIELD! HALF BILLION DOLLARS INSURANCE IN FORCE

AID ASSOCIATION FOR LUTHERANS Legal Reserve Life Insurance Exclusively For Synodical Conference Lutherans Home Offiice:

APPLETON, WISCONSIN


Dr. G. J. Germann Optometrist Now Over Alwin's

Phone 420

EUGENE KOEHLER OLD RELIABLE

BARBER

SHOP

Good Satisfactory Work Guaranteed at All Times Your Patronage Is Appreciated

Pat"s Dry Cleaners, Inc. Garments Phone 115

We pick up and deliver insured while in our possession Quality Guaranteed Kenneth Prall

Brewers and Bottbrs Since 1864 Telephone No.1

New Ulm, Minnesota

LINDEMANN'S "The Students'

Shop"

Whatever the costume or occasion, there's a Lindemann teen-style just right for you. Our versions of the newest thing in footwear have a way of making any guy or gal a leader in the class.


New VIm Laundrv Co. 01

Otto F. Oswald & Sons

Phone No.5 For Your Dry Cleaning, Laundry or Hat Work We assure you prompt and efficient service and invite you to visit our modern up-to-date plant at 107-109 So. Minn. St.

High Quality

FILM DEVELOPING AND PRINTING Packet Prints by Pako FOUNTA,INPENS and SCHOOLSUPPLIES Have Your Prescriptions Filled Here Lowest Prices to Students

HENLE

DRUGS

REXALL DRUG STORE Phones 1003 - 1004

New DIm, Minnesota DOUBLE SECURITY! This bank offers you Banking Safeguards, Convenience and Helpful Service

CITIZENS

STATE

BANK

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

New Dim, Minnesota


Students'

Clothing and Sport Wear

Hummel Brothers

14 No. Minnesota St.

New UIm, Mbm.

SCHUCK'S TAILORS TAILORED TO MEASURE SUITS AND OVERCOATS Cleaning and Pressing All Kinds of Repairing No Deposits-No C. O. D.'s 215 N. Minn. ~t. Phone 498

Fesenmaier Hardware HARDWARE AND SPORTING GOODS

LLOYD E. SCHWARTZ, DDS. Dentist Office Above State Bank of New Ulm Office Phone 472

New VIm, Minn.

WILLIAM J. VON BANK, D. D. S. F. I. C. D. GEORGE F. KUEHNER, D.D.S. DENTISTS-OFFICE

Office Phone 237

OVER PINK'S STORE

New VIm, Minn.

Residence Phone 797

Somsen & Somsen Henry N. Somsen Henry N. Somsen, Jr. ATTORNEYS AT LAW

New Ulm,

Minnesota

A THINKING FELLOW CALLS YELLOW 24-HOUR SERVICE

YELLOW CAB 244

PHONE

245

CHAMPION SHOE SHOP Across from Wilfahrt Bros. "Finest Kind of Repairing"


I'

I

Slide-rules are accurate, true.

But their accuracy is

limitedby certain mechanicalfactors in their eonstrnetion. In the Prescription Laboratory, however, our skilled and experienced pharmacists use equipment that is so precisethat it is possiblefor them to weigh your signature written in lead pencil. This Nth degree of prescription is necessary to assure absolute conformity with your doctor's specifications-a conformity that is essential to your health and well-being. We have three registered pharmacists in our Prescription Department.

WALTER W. HELLMANN

ELMER A. EPPLE

ALFRED

... POLTA


RETZLAFF MOTOR CO. Dodge---Plymouth Dodge Job-Rated Trucks We Service All Makes of Cars and Trucks

RETZLAFF Radio---Appliance Center Kelvinator=-Philco Service at Low Cost by Three Trained Service Men

O. B. FESENMAIER~M. D. PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON 11% N. Minnesota Street OfficePhone 567 Residence Phone 466 New Ulm, Minnesota

NIENO STUDIO Graduation Pictures-Photo

Finishing

Greeting Cards Phone 247-J

Fred L. Nieno

The Coronet Jewelers Watches A. A. Kanstrup

..

i

Diamonds New DIm, Minn.


Compliments

of

Nicols, Dean & Gregg Roman F. Schnobrich, Manager

PALACE

LUNCH

H. A. Bergmeier, Prop. New Ulm's Most Popular Lunch Room Sandwiches-Ice Cream-Candy-Soft Drinks--Cigarettes

115 N. Minn. St.

Phone 668

New UIm, Minn.

REIM & CHURCH Jewelers

DEER BRAND BEER AUGUST

S(~HELL BREWING COMPANY

NEW ULM, MINNESOTA

Our Best Attention Everything of a banking nature entrusted our best attention.

to our care receives

We shall be glad to have a share of your business.

STATE

BANK

OF NEW

ULM

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation


TILLMAN'S BAI{ERY

Makers of

ENRICHED BAKER BOY BREAD and

D-LISHUS PRODUCTS Complete Variety of Bakery Goods

Phone 232 V. James Tillman, Sr., Proprietor

NEW ULM FURNITURE CO. Complete Home Outfitters BANK WITH

FARMERS & MERCHANTS STATE BANK OF NEW ULM New UIm, Minnesota SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES

-

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

Friendly Helpful Service at Your Command Residence Phone 150

Office Phone 260

F. H. DUBBE, M.D., F.A.C.S. NEW ULM,

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON MINNESOTA


Depend On Us We depend on you for our business. on us for your building materials.

You cxn depend

We know that without your confidence and goodwill our business would be short-lived. That is why, for the past 57 years, we have been dependable in quality and service, and price. When you grow you need more building materials and come to us because you know you can depend on us.

Henry Simons Lumber Company Dependable New DIm, Minn.

Phone 201

Earl's News Stand (Now across from Saffert's Market)

ROYAL MAID ICE CREAM SUNDAES-SODAS-MALTS MAGAZINES-BOOKS-SHOE

SHINE

CANDY-TOBACCO Telephone 1031

CHAS. F. JANNI & COMPANY Luggage-Saddlery Leather Goods-Canvas Goods 119 N. Minnesota St. Telephone No. 74 Call

SERVICE PRINT SHOP Phone 806

When in Need of Printing H. P. Zupfer, Prop. 103 N. Broadway


A. C. OCHS BruCK & TILE COMPANY Executive Officeand Plant Springfield, Minn.

General Sales Oftlce 906 Foshay Tower Minneapolia

MANUFACTURE

ARTISTIC FACE BRICK Various Colors and complete line of

STRUCTURAL

BUILDING TILE AND COMMON BRICK

WHY IT WILL ..â&#x20AC;˘ PAY YOU TO BUILD . . . WITH FACE BRICK Face brick offers the widest choice of color tones, both in artistic blends and even shades. Colors and textures burned in becoming lovelier with age. A Face Brick Home offers you less upkeep over a period of years. Lessened heating cost and greater comfort in winter and summer. Greater resale value. Easily financed because loan companies prefer merits of Face Brick houses.

the known

Our Products Are Sold in the New Dim Territory by NEW ULM BRICK & TILE YARDS


PINKS STORE Friendly Sales People to Help You

Caral King, Jr. Dresses Minx Modes Munsing and Barbizon Lingerie Swansdown Coats and Suits Jentzen's Sweaters

Brown & Meidl Music Store and School Piano Tuning, Repairing of All Instruments Instruments-Records-Sheet Music Westinghouse Radios 308 North Minnesota St. Phone 1451 New Ulm, Minn.

Attention STUDENTS AND FACULTY MEMBERS For the Particular

Man

Made to Measure Suits and Overcoats Single Trousers or Single Coats Choice of 150 Different

Fabrics and Styles

$35.00-$65.00-All 20% Down-3

Guaranteed

Weeks Delivery

Call 1946-L FAIRBANKS CLOTHING CO.

Russell Rocl{vam 115 N. Broadway

Box 143

New VIm, Minn.

STUDENTS! PATRONIZE

YOUR MESSENGER

ADVERTISERS


You Will Find The Leading Nationally

Advertised

Of Shoes & Rubber For The Entire

Brands Footwear

Family

-At-

X-Ray Fitting

Expert Shoe Fitters New Ulm, Minn.

J. H. FORSTER,INC. Quality Furniture-Funeral

Service

Ulrich Electric o. J. Ulrich

J. W. Ulrich

Service Phone 180


UNION HOSPITAL NEW ULM, MINN. A modern, well-equipped, and fireproof hospital supervised by and staffed with registered nurses.

PHONE NO. 404

H. J. BAUMANN INSURANCE AGENCY Insurance

Bonds

Hospitalization

Phone 666

MAKE YOURSELF FEEL AT HOME AT

SALET'S BEAUTIFUL

SHOPPING CENTER

Quality Apparel for Him or Her "YOU ALWAYS SAVE AT SALET'S"


-

MUESING DRUG STORE Expert Prescription Service

ARTCRAFT PHOTO SERVICE We Have It!

Will Get It!

Or It Isn't Made!

PHONES 52 - 341

Oswald Studios .~

GRANT R. OSWALD,Prof. Photog. Graduation Photographs a Specialty

<

High Quality Portraits Phone 272-J

New Ulm

Spellhrinks Clothing Store "The Place to Go for the Brands You Know"

Niclilasson Athletic Co. Wholesale Athletic Goods Special Discounts to Students Located in Basement of Fesenmaier Hdwe.

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1949-1950 DMLC Messenger Vol. 40  
1949-1950 DMLC Messenger Vol. 40