Page 1


CONTENTS

Literary

............................................•....................................... 2

The Great Event Bright Day

'..................... 2

;

,

Martin Luther the Reformer

4

:................. 6

The War to End All Wars

10

People Are Funny

12

Privilege, Yea, A Blessing

13

Editorial

15

o Give Thanks

, Unto the Lord

,

15

Alumni 'Notes

19

Exchange

19

College ,Notes

20

New Students

:

22

Co-ed Nates

,

23

Locals

~

25

Sports

27

Humor

29


THE GREAT EVENT Of all the times of the year fall the most beautiful and joyful. It time for the small-grain farmer. It time for him, because it is at this and threshing take place.

still seems to be about truly is an important is the most important time when harvesting

Threshing in South Dakota is one of the most cheerful times on the farm. It is great and wonderful for all, young and old alike. It seems very good to a farmer to see load after load of bundles roll up to a threshing machine and, in return, to see load after load. of grain be hauled away by truck. I had the opportunity this summer to do this kind of 'work for about three weeks after spending most of the summer in summer school. I will try to give you a little bit of an idea of just how we do it out there. We had a thirty-inch machine which needed eight teams of horses, eight men and eight rubber-tired trailers with racks. Well, sooner or later, but finally, we had eight of each. Don't ask me where they came from, but we acquired them somehow. We were from sixteen to about thirty years of age, but we worked and lived together as one big happy family. I suppose about the best place to start is in the morning, about 6 :00 (war time). Well, there we were, sleeping on three mattresses which were lying on the floor. (Please don't think we slept this way the' entire three weeks. For 2


one week we slept in an air-conditioned farm house. I don't mean one with the windows knocked out, but one with genuine air-conditioning. You didn't think we had that out in South Dakota, did you ?) All of a sudden somebody was stirring in the other room. It must be the boss. By 6 :1'5 we were all up, dressed and in the truck, ready for a three-mile ride to the place where we were threshing. Don't ever think it isn't cold so early in the morning, because it is. When we arrived at the farm place, we all jumped off the truck and slowly walked over to the barn. . There we noticed our horses were, patiently awaiting their feed and harnesses. During the night a few of them may have broken loose but usually nothing serious 'would happen. As soon as the horses were fed and harnessed, we all walked to the house, washed and stepped into the kitchen-to a very tasty breakfast. I don't know how some of them did it, but some of them seemed. to be walking in a daze through everything except breakfast. After breakfast the horses were watered and hooked up to the trailers. Usually there were. about two empty racks onto which we would all crawl, so we wouldn't have to walk out into the field. This made four teams to a rack. We always got to our destination without any trouble. During the day everything was just about the same. You just kept loading, driving up to the machine, resting a little, unloading and then starting all over again. Of course, about 10 :30 everybody was looking forward to dinner .. We quit at 1 :00 (war time) table always was a pleasant sight. wife felt good to see a group of fellows come to her table and eat You can be sure we enjoyed every

for dinner. The dinner I'm sure the farmer's healthy, hungry, young her well prepared food. bit of it.

After dinner we usually had to rest up a little, so it was about 3 :00 by the time we got started. In the afternoon we did the same thing we did in the morning. That's right; we hauled some more bundles. About 5 :00 lunch was 'brought out by the grain truck. After this everything seemed to work better, because it would start to cool off after this and our stomachs were filled again. 3


We usually quit about 8 :30 in the evening. By this: time the sun was just slipping beyond the horizon. As the last fellow would be unloading, from a distance you could see his silhouette against one of our many beautiful sunsets. By 9: 15 the horses were all fed, unharnessed and we were all just about ready for another of those super meals. In the evening after supper, a few of the fellows got out their clarinets and saxophones and played a few popular songs. By 11 :00 all was quiet again. All were- sleeping. Most of our days were very much like this one. There was, of course, 'always a little moving going on. We moved from field to field and from farm to farm. Some moves were short and some were longer. The longest one was fifteen miles. On this move we would sing, talk, smoke and sometimes just listen to the clanking chains of the tugs, the thumping ,of the horses' hooves, the singing of the birds: and quietness of the prairie. We moved in the morning, afternoon and at night. We didn't like to move at night, because it was too' hard to see where we were going. But yet, we never had one accident all season. 'Some days there would be a little excitement when a team would run away, or when a few horses would get loose in the barn at noon. As a result of the latter a few harnesses were often torn. Sometimes there would be a flat tire too.. These were quite rare, fortunately. Even though threshing is about the hardest work on a large farm, it is always looked forward to as the big event of the year. It truly is the greatest event of the year for the farmer. " Quentin Albrecht

BRIGHT DAY In the state of Minnesota there is a lake by the name of Minnetonka. Many of you have maybe at one time or another spent a week or two vacationing at this most beautiful lake. Little, however, did you think that there was an Indian legend connected with this lake. 4

"


For those of you who have never heard this legend, I will now take the time and pleasure to relate it. The legend concerns itself with an Indian brave, a member of the Ojibwa tribe. His name was Bright Day. On 'a certain day we find large 'boulders on the top of on the prairie to the south, Indians. Smoke was rising Sioux campfires.

Bright Day lying behind some a high cliff. Below this cliff, were the tepees of the Sioux into the air from the many

Bright Day was on. his first scouting mission. As he looked down at the large Sioux village, no fear came into his heart. He had not been sent out on this mission, but had gone on his own accord in order that he might do some deed that would gain him the respect of his people. At night he could not build any campfire for fear of bemg discovered. With the cunningness of a fox he had slipped by the Sioux scouts. As he sat on the top of the cliff, he could hear the beating of a drum and the laughing .voices of children playing. He could see colored spots moving about below him. Watching the Sioux, he did not notice how close he had now come to the edge of the cliff. In order to see more clearly, he leaned forward. Suddenly he lost his balance and fell. When he finally came to, he knew he was helpless. He knew there was nothing to do but wait and see what would happen. He lay in the brush all night. When morning carne, he heard voices coming towards him. Was he frightened? He certainly was, but he was determined not to let the Sioux know about it. When the Sioux came upon him, they were greatly surprised. No signs of friendliness were shown by them. One of the Sioux, however, stepped forward and pointed to the clan insignia painted on Bright Day's face and then began to speak very rapidly to his fellow-warriors. Bright Day noticed he had the same clan insignia painted on his face. He knew then that he and the Sioux were from the same clan and that the Sioux had to protect him. After the Sioux finished speaking to his comrades, Indians lifted him up and carried him to their village. the village he was given food and medical attention. several days he lay weak and very sick. He finally 5

the At For re-


gained his strength. He was allowed to walk wherever he wished in the camp, but he was not allowed to return to his people. While he was in the Sioux village he, like all good men, fell in love with the Sioux chief's daughter. He knew she liked him because she had once smiled at him. He tried hard not to love her because he knew it would do him no good. The laws of his tribe and also of the Sioux forbade such a marriage. Poor Bright Day, the more he saw her the more he loved her. One night he secretly went to her lodge. He begged her to join him. He told her they would go a great distance into the forest where they would never be found. Finally the maiden said she would go with him, so they crept out of the camp. In the morning they camped on a peninsula reaching out over a beautiful lake. Between the two of them there was nothing but love. When the Sioux became aware of the fact that Bright Day had run away with one of their maids. they were furious. With their bows drawn they followed the trail of Bright Day and the maid. At the same time, however, the Ojibway war party was coming from the north in search of Bright Day. They would not accept the Sioux maid into their tribe. Bright Day and his maid had no means of escape. Neither feared death and neither wished to live apart from each other. They looked at the sky blue waters that sparkled in the sun's rays, and then they walked together straight into this lake. The sky blue waters closed quietly over them. That my friends is the legend connected with one of Minnesota's most beautiful lakes, Lake Minnetonka. Harold Goede

MARTIN路 LUTHER THE tEFORMER Martin Luther, the leader of tf,e Protestant Reformation in Germany, was born in Eisle en, Saxony, 1483. He attended two Latin grammar schoo s. One was at Magde6

I


burg, and the other was at Eisenach. He had to bear many hardships while going to school. One day while Luther was singing in the streets of Eisenach, to acquire his subsistence, his clear voice attracted the attention of Ursula Cotta. He was taken into this home where he received a mother's love. In this refined home Luther enriched his knowledge of the German language and his uncouth manners became highly polished. Luther also received his first musical training in this home, which in later years he cultivated to a great extent. All this training was to prove very beneficial to Luther in his later life. We surely can see the hand of God that led Luther into this home. In 1501, Luther entered the University of Erfurt, which was one of the best at this time. Luther matriculated as a student of raw. He was a very assiduous student, and, in 1505, he received his Master's degree in philosophy. However, Luther was not at peace in the university. He often wondered what would become of my soul if I should die. During his studies at Erfurt, Luther became very sick. Again the anxiety of his soul terrorized him. A friend of Luther's had died very suddenly and this also made him conscious of death and the judgment. A severe. thunderstorm came up when Luther was traveling from Mansfeld to Erfurt. A bolt of lightning knocked him to the ground and then he vowed that he would become a monk. Luther's father was very angry, but Luther faithfully kept his vow. He entered the cloister of the Order of St. Augustine in 路1'505. Luther took his life at the cloister very seriously. The most ignominious duties and punishments were inflicted upon him there, yet he undertook them cheerfully. In 1507, Luther was ordained a priest. The University of Wittenberg had recently been founded by Elector Fredrick the Wise, and through Staupitz, the dean of the faculty, Luther received a call to be professor. He was called to the chair of philosophy in 1508. In the following year Luther was made bachelor of divinity. He now had an opportunity to interpret the Bible in public. Luther's teaching attracted attention and he became very popular. After the school year was concluded, Luther was transferred back to the University of Erfurt again for three years. In 1511, Luther was sent to Rome, as a traveling companion to a higher official, who had gone as a representative 7


for the Augustinian Order to uphold their cause before the Pope. Again we see God's hand, which led Luther to Rome. This journey to Rome was very beneficial to him. He might now by personal observation learn to know what Rome, the center of the Roman Catholic Church, was really like. During these years the fundamental doctrine of justification by faith was beginning to develop in Luther. In 151'2, Luther became a Doctor of theology, upon which occasion he took an oath to adhere to the Holy Scripture. He then received a call to the University of Wittenberg to interpret the Scripture. Thus Luther was forced to delve into the infallible Word of God. At this time Pope Leo X was building the splendid and magnificent St. Peter's Cathedral in Rome. Leo X didn't have the money to lilnance this edifice so he relied upon the selling of indulgences to furnish the necessary means. John Tetzel was the most vigorous salesman of Saxony's domain but the Elector strictly forbade Tetzel to enter his. territory. 'The Elector didn't want all the money to be carried out of his land, however, Tetzel sold his indulgences. in a bordering town. Luther at this time was not only professor at the university, but was assisting the pastor of Wittenberg and therefore had charge of the pulpit and the confessional. When his parishioners came to confess (some, didn't come at all) they simply told Luther they didn't have to repent and showed him their indulgence slips, because they had purchased forgiveness already. It was Luther's duty to attack this falsehood of selling indulgences. Luther wished to express his opinions on this. question publicly and thereby have a public discussion among the other theologians and scholars to determine its legality. Luther accomplished this by nailing his ninetyfive theses or propositions on the doors of the Castle Church at Wittenberg on October 31, 1517. These innocent theses were soon translated into different languages. In two weeks they had spread throughout whole Germany and in six weeks over all of Europe. The Reformation had begun. The effect that Luther's ninety-five theses produced on the German people and even on whole Europe was momentous. The Pope summoned Luther to Rome. In those, days many paths led to the Holy City, but none returned. It appeared as if Luther's doom was sealed, but God did not forsake His. servant. The Lord had shaped the political 8.

j


situation in such a manner that the Pope needed the help of the Elector of Saxony. Thus the sentence against Luther was not executed. Luther was then to appear before Gajetan, the papal legate, at Augsburg in 1518. Cajetan demanded that Luther recant. Luther said, "Unless I am proven wrong from Scripture I will not and cannot recant." Cardinal Cajetan became angry and dismissed Luther. This was the first controversy with Rome, and with God's help Luther stood firm. Another attempt was made to get rid of Luther. Karl von Miltitz was sent to Wittenberg to arrest Luther and bring him to Rome. When Miltitz reached Germany and saw to what extent the movement had progressed, he dropped his former intention and acted as mediator between Luther and the Pope. Luther promised not to write against the indulgences, as long as his opponents remained quiet. Dr. Eck, a prominent theologian, challenged Luther's, friend and colleague, Carlstadt, to a debate. It was clear that the attack of Eck was really directed at Luther. Again God forced Luther to come to the foreground. God wanted the great work of the Reformation, which was started, carried to a great victory. So in 1519, Luther engaged in a disputation with Dr. Eck at Leipzig. This debate, in which Luther denied the divine institution of popedom, brings about the (final and complete separation of Luther with the papal authorities. Luther was continualj,y gaining more influence and prestige among the German people, the scholars and the nobility. Even the newly elected emperor Charles V was a friend of Germany. All these things strengthened Luther; but, above all, God's "\Yord Was on his side. In 1520, Luther wrote three potent writings. 1. An Open Letter to the Christian Nobility of the German Nation. 2. The Babylonian Captivity of the Church. 3. A Treatise on Christian Liberty. With these three reformatorial writings the breach between Luther and Rome was widened. On December 10, 1520, Luther burned the papal bull, outside of Elstergate gate at Wittenberg. This was the' climactic ad. All relations with Rome were now severed. The Pope immediately outlawed him. In April 1521, Luther was summoned before the Diet of Worms. Safe conduct was granted to him, although it didn't mean much to break a safe conduct pledge' given to 9


a heretic. Luther went boldly to Worms, and he absolutely refused to recant. When on his journey home Luther was secretly taken captive by Elector Fredrick the Wise and taken to the Wartburg. It was here where Luther accomplished the greatest work of his entire life. He started and completed the translation of the Greek New Testament into German. In March 1'522, Luther returned to Witten": berg to correct the false teachings which Carlstadt and others had introduced in the church. Luther preached with vehemence and the serinons took effect. Order was restored in Wittenberg again. The Peasant War was a very serious affair. The peasants listened intently when Luther declared equality of men before God, and they misconstrued his statement. The peasants soon began to rob, murder, and steal. Luther then encouraged the authorities to strike down the revolt. The nobility followed his advice and the revolt was subdued. Thus Luther saved the Reformation from developing into a revolution. In 1529, at the Diet of Marburg, Zwingli and Luther met. They disagreed on the question of the Lord's Supper. Again Luther stood firm and would only adhere to the'Bible. The purpose of the Marburg Colloquy was frustrated and the two factions couldn't unite. Charles the V called the Diet of Augsburg in 1530. All of the Lutheran teachings were drawn up. Then Luther's confession was submitted to the emperor, and thus the evangelical church was founded. Luther started the translation of the Old Testament at the Wartburg in 1522 and completed it in 1532, at Wittenberg. Luther wrote and accomplished many more great works, which we can't enumerate. The great reformer died in 1546, at Eisleben. '

THE WAR TO END ALL WARS On November eleventh, 1918, many people believed the permanent peace of the war to end all wars had been signed. It was an international conflict, costing thousands of lives, and bringing devastation to many lands and people. Many people became very prosperous, while countless others sac10


rificed dearly. People hated war and wanted a lasting peace. Today, only twenty-seven years later, we are already speaking of this war as World War 1. The lasting peace had faded away and given place to another more terrible and fierce dissension among the nations of the world. In the very near future, on December seventh.. it will be four years that our country entered the most ravaging war of all .time. We speak of it now as World War II. Once again the cry went up for lasting peace; a peace that would.unite the whole world on a brotherly level, and bring harmonization among all people. How long will the peace last '! There are some who believe this war is the war to .end all wars. They want the ensuing peace to last forever. That belief, too, has already been quelched, since we read in newspapers and heard over the radio that some countries were already preparing for a third international strife long before the present peace 'was signed. This would again throw a damper on our second attempt for a lasting peace, Be this as it may, it is of no importance or significance to us Christians. As Christians, we all know the answer, for there can be only one answer in every believer's heart. That is and must be, that there will be a constant antagonism for supremacy among world powers until the end of time. In Luke chapter 21, verses 9 and 10 we read: "But when ye shall hear of wars and commotions; be not terrified: for these things must first come to pass; but the end is not by and by. Then said he unto them, Nation shall rise against nation and kingdom against kingdom." The same condition prevailed in ancient times between the Greeks and the Romans.

•

Let us not believe that this will be a lasting peace, or that there will be no more international struggles. For, no matter how strong a nation may be, there will. always be powers uniting to oppose that nation and gain worldly power and dominion for themselves. Modern science has brought warfare to a literal "slaughtering" of mankind. All future wars will be more destructive than the past because of the new discoveries made by science. The Lord blessed man with a brilliant mind to make these discoveries. What was meant for man's good, has been turned into destruction against himself. . Kurt R. Petermann 11


PEOPLE

ARE FUNNY

The job I had during the summer vacation proved to be very interesting to me I worked as a waitress in a wellknown restaurant in my home town I was able to see many different people during the course of one day, for we were usually extremely busy during the "rush-hours." The certain incidents which I remember best are those I observed in customers who came in repeatedly. I remember one lady in particular. She was middle-aged, single, and wore much too much powder. She came in around nine-thirty every morning for several weeks. She usually ordered coffee and three doughnuts, but she didn't wait until someone took her order. She invariably came right up to the counter and gave her order, no matter how busy. we were. She always took a table' in the middle of the restaurant instead of taking a booth, and she stayed thereuntil she had gone through all the daily papers that were: available. One thing she always did was very annoying to us. She never asked for extra cream for her coffee, but. she always went behind the counter and helped herself to some more cream. After we noticed that, we gave her an extra amount of cream, but once-in-a-while she still helped herself to more cream. She seemed rather stingy, too. We charged the same for one doughnut as we did for two, but she insisted on paying only half the amount for the: third doughnut. This is probably an extreme case, but it proved to me that some people are funny. Another lady who came in several times always asked whether this or that item on the menu was good or not. I can't imagine how she could expect most people to be that honest about something of that nature .. Furthermore she: always seemed to like the meal she finally ordered. An elderly gentleman, on whom I once waited, told me he wasn't fussy and that I should order for him anything I. pleased. That job didn't appeal to me, but I did it anyway. When his dinner was served, he really seemed satisfied with it and he even rewarded me for my services. . People as a rule were patient when we were too busy to wait on them immediately. However, there always seemed to be some who had to stare at us every time we; passed them, even though they could plainly see that we. were doing our best .. These 'stares always seemed to imply' that we could wait on them immediately if we wanted to. 12


Since the war was still going on during most of the summer, and since there were greater shortages, we could very easily observe how the people reacted to these shortages. We found most of our customers to be very agreeable. They were satisfied even if they couldn't get just what they wanted. I, myself, had the experience of having 'many people tell me they were surprised to find the amount and kind of meat we were able to serve there. They also said that many other places did not serve any butter. Still some people were never satisfied. There were always some people who could only complain about the kind of food we were serving. They said they could get plenty of this or that in other restaurants. We often wondered where they could find such restaurants, because we knew that our place was getting a large allotment of meat, On the whole I have come to the conclusion that most people are pleasant and understanding, and that they can always be very "funny." J. Westerhaus

,PRIVILEGE,

YEA, A BLESSING

, A Christian education is a privilege and a blessing. As students of a Christian school one of God's great blessings to us are our teachers. There are few jobs demanding more persevering efforts than the one of being a professor. As students with only immature minds and uncertain judgment, we can have at best but a slight perception' of the work and responsibility which such a position implies. The requirements are not limited by any means to mere endeavors .. It would be feebly stated to say that a professor's job isn't an easy one: It takes God-given wisdom and understanding to train and guide young persons-to' keep them 'in the ways of the Lord. How much patience is demanded! Over and over we must be told-to .remember this and not to do that. 13


It isn't always the easiest thing in the world for even a professor to surmount those careless remarks sometimes made by students. This takes courage. Youth is often thoughtless and. outspoken.

Not only are our teachers interested in our education in things temporal but they are just as earnestly concerned, and more so, about our spiritual welfare. More faithful, sincere teachers-there are none. They just don't come any finer. Let us ever be conscious of the blessing we have in our Christian education and hold our teachers ,the treasure that they truly are. This we can do first of all by simple obedience. Besides this, we are to serve and honor them and hold them in love and esteem. So says the Fourth Commandment, Scripture tells us to obey them that have the rule over us (Reb. 13 :17). We are also told in Scripture that the elders that rule well are worthy of double honor (I Tim. 5 :17) that is, they are to be regarded and treated with more than ordinary honor. And in 1 Peter 5:5 we are told that young people are to submit themselves unto the elder.

VIe are also to hold our, superiors in love and esteem. This exhortation we read in Paul's first epistle to the Thessalonians, chapter (Jive: "We beseech you, brethren, to know them which labor among you, and are over you in the Lord, and admonish you; and to esteem them very highly in love for their work's sake." Here Paul also has reference to our behavior toward our teachers. Weare, to recognize their office and treat them accordingly. This simply implies reverence and respect. Our teachers are. over us in the Lord, and therefore we are told in Paul's admonition to esteem them exceeding abundantly, and their work should be the motivation for such love. And then 'finally we can pray for our teachers; and what is more, we should remember them in our prayers. We are entrusted to their care. Their responsibilities are great. If we heed the admonitions of Paul, the work of our teachers will be made easier. They will be able to perform their work joyfully and we shall be evidencing our consciousness of the blessing which is ours. Hilda Wollenweber

14


EDITORIAL

o GIVE

THANKS UNTO THE LORD

On August 15, 1945,the President of the United States revealed to all peoplethat the Japanese people had unconditionally surrendered to the Allied powers. No sooner had the president's words been broadcasted than the people all over the country went hysterical with joy. Over many radio programs we heard that we should thank God for having brought this dreadful war to an end. To many people these words, "give thanks to God," did not mean much. To us Christians these words had a great deal of meaning. The Psalmist says, "0 give thanks unto the Lord for he is good: for his mercy endureth forever." In these days of victory we ought to consider whom we are thanking and what reasons we really have for thanking him. The Psalmist in Psalm 13'6 tells us whom we are to thank and why we should thank Him. We read in the first verse of this Psalm. "0 give thanks unto the Lord, for He is good; for His mercy endureth forever." The Lord mentioned in this verse is the same Lord that says, "I Am That I Am." He is not the inconceivable Being which the Masonsclaim as their god. He is the God. Besides Him there is no other God. In Exodus 20 :2, He 15


told the children of Israel: "I am the Lord thy God." we plainly see that He is the one true God.

So'

In these days of victory and peace we want to thank our Lord, "for he is good." Not only does the Lord give us every good and perfect thing, but He is good. He is good in Himself. Thus seeing that He is good, He is then the source 'Ofall good. He can reveal to us His great goodness' and mercy. In the Old Testament times, God revealed His mercy to the children of Israel. He was the God of Israel. It was this God that permitted His people to suffer in Egypt for many years. Finally He revealed His mercy to His people. lie slew all the first-born of Egypt and led Israel out of that land. With His outstretched arm and His strong and powerful hands He protected His people, After leading the Israelites out of Egypt, He did not leave and forsake them, but for their sakes destroyed both Pharaoh and his army. During the day and during the night He continued to show the Israelites His mercy. For forty years He poured a countless number of blessings' on them. He destroyed all their enemies. Finally, He led them into, the Promised Land of Canaan. Throughout the whole history of the Israelites we see the great and boundless mercy of God as he revealed it to his people. Today He reveals His mercy to you and to me. During the past four years of terrible war, He has guarded and protected our land, Our country, our cities were not destroyed. No bombs smashed our homes, our churches and schools. Who went hungry? Who went naked? Now he has finally given us the victory over Japan. What wonderful blessings these things have been for us. What a gracious revelation of our Lord's mercy. If we all stop and consider these things we will then pray with all our hearts" "0 give thanks unto the Lord for He is good." . The Psalmist also adds, "for his mercy endureth forever." Just as He has helped His people Israel in the past, just as He has abundantly blessed and given us the victory over our enemies, so He will even in the future turn all things to our good. Of this we can be certain, the Lord will always bless and help us, "for his mercy endureth forever.': The Psalmist tells us a second time, "0 give thanks unto the God of gods: for his mercy endureth forever." 16


Now let us look at this God from a different point 'of view, i.e., as the God of gods. He is the God of 'whom we read in the lfirst verse in the Bible, "In the beginning God created heaven and earth." God is the Creator. As the Creator He rules over all things, He is the Judge and Ruler of all. He is the God, "who alone doeth great wonders." These great wonders of God were revealed in the creation of heaven and earth. The whole creation is a revelation of God's mercy. As long as heaven and earth remain, so long will His mercy endure, He is the God of gods. His mercy, which He reveals to us, as God of gods endureth forever. In the third verse of this Psalm we are told, "Give thanks unto the Lord 'of Lords: for His mercy endureth forever." This is the Lord who has given us His boundless mercy and grace through Jesus Christ. This Lord whom we want to thank and praise is our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. The Lord showed His mercy to us by sending His Son to this earth to die for us in order to free us from our sins. We have His promise that He will always strengthen and uphold us in our faith in the Saviour. The Lord's mercy endureth forever. In these days of victory and peace and throughout our whole lives, we have many reasons for thanking the Lord. May these words of the Psalmist reveal to us what a gracious and merciful Lord is ours and what great love" grace , and mercy He has shown to us. .Then we too, can pray, "0 ' give thanks unto the Lord for he is good: for' his mercy endureth forever." Harold Goede

17


tB. 1M. 'I. ((. 1Mcsscngcr The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has expired, unless we' are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. ",_II business com.munications should be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends. The aim of "The Messenger" is to offer such material as will be beneficial as well as interesting to our readers, to keep the alumni in a closer contact with the college, to foster school spirit, and to give the students an opportunity in the practice of composition and the expression of their thoughts. Entered as second class matter

at Post Office of New DIm, Minn.

No.1

Volume XXXVI SEPTEMBER 1945 THE MESSENGER STAF.F Editor Associate Editor Business Manager Assistant Manager Assistant Manager Typist Alumni Notes Exchange ~ College Notes Co-ed Notes Locals Sports Humor

Harold Goede Albert Nolting : Walter Bonitz 路 Glenn Felch Quentin Albrecht Ruth Hohmann Elaine Bogenschneider Marie Meyer Lorna Gerlach Chrysta Albrecht Kurt Petermann Robert Moldenhauer Carroll Trettien , 18


ALUMNI NOTES The ceremony in which Lois Knutson and Odnar Hjelemand were united in holy wedlock took place in the Minnehaha Lutheran Church, Minneapolis, Minn., June 30, 1945. Mrs. Hjelema;nd is a H. 'S; graduate of 1944. Jacquelin Carol, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Bode, was born August 25, 1945. Mrs. Bode, Glenda nee Schultz is a H. S. graduate of 1944. Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Muenkel became the proud parents of a son, Eric Paul, September 15, 1945. Mr. Muenkel graduated in 1941, while his wife Alice nee Kanetchy is a graduate of '43. Mr. and Mrs. Martin Roehler of Wayne, Michigan, are now the parents of a baby girl born September" 29, 1945. Mr. Roehler is a graduate of '43. . Miss Ruth Hoppenstaedt, a H. S. graduate of '45, is now attending classes at St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minn. Two H. IS.graduates of '45, Carryl Stelljes and Frances Temple, are in nurses' training at the Northwestern Hospital, Minneapolis, Minn. 'Mr. Richard Grunze and Miss Arlene Voeltz entered the state of holy matrimony June 23, 1945. Mr. Grunze is a graduate of '44. Jean Marie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Heine Schnitker, was born September 16, 1'945. Mr. Schnitker is a graduate of 1938. July 28, 1945, was the date set for the marriage of Ruth M. Ulrich and Marvin G. Wels, recently discharged from the navy. The former is a H. S. graduate of '43.

EXC~ANVE For the sixty-first time the doors of D. M. L.' C. have swung open to welcome both new and old students. This year the doors had to swing farther apart than ever before, to admit close to three hundred students. Never before has D. M. L. C. had an enrollment to equal this. 19

•


I become more astonished each day, for it seems each day so far a new face confronts me. The old students walk about as new ones, for there are so many you must learn to know and like. It really is quite a problem. We all hope the new students will learn to love and appreciate the D. M. L. C. campus as much as the rest of us do. Most of you only have a few years to spend here, so in yourspare moments take a walk along the road and view our beautiful surroundings. It seems D. M. L. C. is not the only school in the Synodical Conference whose 'enrollment broke the record. The Spectator of River Forest tells us of their record. In addition to the sixty student teachers, Concordia College houses 465 students. It seems they are suffering in the same manner as D. M. L. C.-too little space. We need not explain what is meant by this, for we are living under similar conditions. The College Reporter of Mankato State Teachers College tells us of a similar situation. Their enrollment comes up to 359. There too the question of space is of the utmost importance. We welcome every new student, though we may not as yet know you, and sincerely hope your stay on the D. M. L. C. campus will be an enjoyable and profitable one.

COLLEGE NOTES On September 18, Dr. Martin Luther College began its. sixty-first school year. The enrollment is approximately 300, a large increase over last year for which we all are thankful. A temporary girls' dormitory is under construction and will be completed about November 1. This will house thirty-six girls, who are now 'living in two classrooms -in the Administration building. All of the other girls' dormitories and the boys' dormitory are filled. A hearty welcome is extended to all the new members of our student body and a sincere wish for a pleasant school year. All of the classes are having picnics and outings. The weatherman has even cooperated with us, for a change, and 20


given most of us pleasant days for the picnics. I think most of us were wishing we were III Normals on October 6, when they took advantage of more lenient rationing and had a steak fry. The student organizations are also in full swing. Our band has again been organized under the direction of Prof. M. Albrecht. The enrollment shows a considerable increase over last year's. A beginner's band has also been organized under the direction of Robert Moldenhauer. The Aeolian Chorus and Marlut Singers are considerably larger this year also. Eunice Sauer is the Aeolian Chorus directress; and Prof. M. Albrecht is the Marlut director. We hope these 'organizations will continue to do as well as they did last year. At present they are preparing for a joint concert to be held in early November .

.

The faculty has arranged for another series of lyceum numbers to be presented during the year. The season ticket for students is sixty cents. The numbers all appear to be very interesting, so let's everyone of us buy a season ticket. Let's show the faculty we appreciate their efforts to provide entertainment for us, and maybe more will be forthcoming. The program for this year is as follows: October 10-Lecture and pictures on Canada and other parts of northern North America by Ben Ferrier. October 29-Apollo concert artists featuring Sperandeo, pianist and Giavanni Sperandeo, tenor. November 13-Doris entertainer and lecturer. January 8-The

Elsa

Eaton Mason, famous sculptor,

famous "Ethel Hanley Marionettes."

February 15-"The Kilties" and a wee bit 0' the Scotch. Main features will be Scotch ballads, popular numbers, and native impersonations. April 1-The Polomene Potters with an interesting demonstration and lecture on pottery. There have been several additions to the They are Mrs. Karl Mittelstaedt, piano and tor; Miss Cassie Erickson, piano instructor; cus Albrecht as tutor. A hearty welcome them, and may God bless their work. 21

teaching staff. organ instrucand Mr. Mar: is extended to


Kurt Petermann is president of the student body and "dorm buck." Walter Bonitz is music hall inspector, and "Joe" Goede is "mail-shagger." The following is a list of the new boys enrolled for the. ensuing school year: II Normal-Howard Zessi n, Saginaw, Michigan. , I Normal-Gerald Cudworth, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin; Delbert Mey, Saginaw, Michigan; Wayne Schmidt, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin; Walter Sievert, Mobridge, South Dakota; Roman Walz, Bowdle, South Dakota; Arnold Wentzel, St .. James, Minnesota; Oswin Herrmann, Zeeland, North Dakota. 12th Grade-Archie Patzer, Jamestown, 'North Dakota; Paul Schwartz, Ixonia, Wisconsin. 11th Grade-Reuben Riemers, Morris, Minnesota. 10th Grade-Norman Barge, Jasper, Minnesota; Earl Bohlen, Carona, South Dakota; Don Brisso, Hadar, Nebraska; Henry De Wall, St. James, Minnesota; Walter Grams, New Ulm, Minnesota; Gustav Harms, St. James, Minnesota; Roland Ohlmann, Valentine, Nebraska; Ronald Ott, Morgan, Minnesota; Wilfred Trapp, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 9th G.rade-Karl Bauer, Echo, Minnesota; Frederick Biedenbender, Appleton, Wisconsin; Jerome Birkholz, St. James, Minnesota; Robert Buss, Stanton, Nebraska; Richard Danner, Rhinelander,' Wisconsin; Roger Hagen, New Ulm, Minnesota; Richard Herrmann, st. Paul, Minnesota: James Hopmann, Ormsby, Minnesota; Leroy Hulke, Wood Lake, Minnesota; Frederick Janke, New Ulm, Minnesota; Melvyn Karnitz, Belle Plaine, Minnesota; Paul Kock, Goodhue, Minnesota; Erwin Lengling, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Leroy Lentz, Watertown, South Dakota; Willard Lueders, Faribault, Minnesota; Bertram Naumann, New Ulm Minnesota, Judd Nelson, St. Paul, Minnesota; Robert Otterstatter, Tomahawk, Wisconsin; Armin Panning, Gibbon, Minnesota; Harlan Ratike, Truman, Minnesota; Willard Redernske, Watertown, South Dakota; David Schmidt, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Floyd Schwecke, Gibbon, Minnesota; Edmund Seifert, Minneapolis, Minnesota; David Schmiel, Lakefield, Minnesota; Melvin Wendland, Valley City, North Dakota; Dennis Wetter, Delano, Minnesota; Robert Willhite, New VIm Minnesota; Ronald Young, st. Paul, Minnesota; Arnold Zimmermann, Wood Lake, Minnesota; Val Jean Zoellmer, Truman, Minnesota. I 22


CO-ED NOTES •.

another beautiful Minnesota Here it is again-yes (that could cause some argument) fall! . Now with fall . comes the ringing -of school bells, our return to the school routine, and long hikes in the woods. Your co-ed columnist has been out hunting -for colorful autumnal leaves and berries. She's even found interesting bits of news \on her hunt about the campus. Anyone who has been here before, surely by this time has noticed the increase in the co-ed population this year. There are 45 at Annex Hall, 31 at Hillcrest Hall, 11 at Waldheim, 34 in the "barracks" and 15 at Bode Hall. Besides these, quite a few room downtown and of course, we,can't forget our regular "downtown girls." It seems our teachers will have to be more specific in their- assignments was told to review all her old music, among which there happened to be some we could classify as "noise." She had a valid excuse. She was merely doing as her teacher told her. Did anyone notice Tutor Albrecht's new hairdo-or did he change it back again? Lois 0., what did you have LO do with that? Usually girls scream when a mouse approaches, but the-Annex girls have a "Mickey Mouse." They all seem to get along with her, too. The II Normal girls are. really planning ahead for their careers as teachers. At least they must be "brushing up" on games they might have to play with their school children (such as "London Bridge Is Falling Down"). Or is there so much joy in memories? We'll have to give "15 big ones" for the girls who are to live in the "barracks." Although they do have a lot of fun now, we hope they can soon move into their permanent quarters. A group of "Bode Hallers" really had 'a good time one Sunday afternoon. A ride on a: wagon is fun' for a change, instead of one of these high-speed vehicles, isn't it? The girls from Hillcrest Hall really must be "short." In one night they blew out 4 or 5 or ? fuses. An "elec. trician" who had been called asked, "Did you stick a penny 23


in there?" . cheap."

Calmly , they answered,

"No, we're not that

Three girls from the third floor of Annex must think those who live on the second floor aren't clean enough. You'd think they'd take the easy way out, but the hard way through the ceiling proved more exciting. If anyone hears groaning from Bode Hall, don't be alarmed! Bernice M. is reading her "Book of Boners" again! Mary L. really put on an act for her roommates. Could it be the after-effects of those garlic pickles? I

. Anyone ask "Fooz" what "matter" expression on her face.

is and watch the

Ann S. apparently doesn't have much team spirit. At least, it's very unnatural to play on your opponent's team. The Seniors from Hillcrest Hall really had fun one morning-and ambition.' They got up early and went out on an egg fry. Hungry? I hope L-- doesn't tell any stories on herself next time she talks in her sleep. Did you know there is a "pair of twins" over at Waldheim? The two Elaines were both born on the same day of the same year. Only their last names are different, One of the Elaines said, "I guess we'll have to find brothers to change that." "Mickey Mouse" really knows how to get places-especially football games! Our co-eds really have been playing softball hard. The first day two bats were broken. Speaking of broken bats, D. Wendland killed a bat the other night. More power to her! Why does Shirley Bleck run around with her pillow at night-s-for protection? . -' . r Lois F. and Norma J. were eating plums. Lois complained because they were hitter. That didn't bother Norma. She said, "Oh, I even eat the stone, just like a nut." If you want to know the typical routine of a co-ed, just consult the diary of "Mickey Mouse"! 24


It never pays to. trust a male to mail a letter. ask Marie A. about that.

Dawn S. can sleep through anything-even in her room.

Just

a "storm"

I hear they have some pretty good parties in the closet of room 9 of Hillcrest Hall. What a place! Dorothy S. and Artis H. really must have wanted to drive out some .dreaded insect by fumigation .. For what other reason would they spill 5 bottles of medicine and a bottle of perfume? When I had found this much news, the "hunting" season was over, but I'll have more for you again next time. By that time I suppos-e we'll all be wishing for heating pads to warm up our toes when we crawl into bed, and the snow will be flying. . I'll see you all again then. .

. LOCALS On September eighteenth the time had once again come for all those inquisitive enough to find out what hidden secrets lie between two covers of a book to return to their humble four-nooked abodes. For some it was just the same old routine on opening day; for others it was something entirely new. Old cronies had much to tell; and new faces had much to learn. Old man weather was batting the other way that day. Weary travelers penetrated the unwelcomed rain to help unpack the necessary accommodations that are used by those seeking an education. Over a hundred boys, weary and wet, waded through the downpour, lugging their water logged suitcases and boxes to their rooms. The enrollment for the year 1945-'46 exceeded last year's high by about twenty per cent. We have a total enrollment of 306 students. The last of everything is practically used up. There've been some, changes made as always; every new year brings in a new army of occupation. This par25


ticular army inspector has a standing army of one man. Nevertheless, he holds his position well. He is kind and amiable, giving everyone a fair -chance. Some, ere long, will perhaps bear a perpetual' grudge against him for his unexcelled ability in writing absentee cards for practice periods. Introducing to you, Mr. Walter Bonitz, our music hall inspector. ' The Marult Singers have increased their membership over last year. The first meeting and rehearsal brought many newcomers. We have approximately forty-five singers in this group which is being directed by Prof. M. Albrecht at the present time. Some of the fellows are complaining about too much kicking going on during the playing of the football games. Another invading army has come from pur Theological Seminary at Thiensville, Wisconsin. He is our tutor, Marcus Albrecht, of Bowdle, South Dakota. He has the call to assist our teaching staff, due to the large enrollment. He: teaches geometry, German, and Latin. The fourth floor of the new dormitory, end room, has solved the housing problem for him. The Candy Store again is operating on a rationed basis .. Eat ice cream for your health, and candy when you get it .. To those who serve you: be kind, be patient, be patronizing, We'll do the best we can. Two mascots have again been scouting the campus and even the dormitory floors. One is a dog and the other is a kitten. The latter prefers to be a stumbling block between one's feet. and the former prefers to meet one face to face on a landing. Another new wave of occupation took place on the Athletic Board. The wave of new occupants were elected by secret ballot in a recent poll. The new members and managers are as f'ollows: football, Kurt Petermann; basketball, Harold Goede; baseball, Robert Wolf; tennis, Kenneth Kolander; horseshoe, Jerome Spaude, The members at large are Gerhard Bauer for two years and Robert Kolandr r for one year. Some recent alumni visitors on the campus were R. Gnmze, P. Nolting, R. Poetter, and E. Kionka. We also had several alumni visitors who served our country during the war. They were H. Schweppe, R. Tempel, G. Duin, and 2.6.


N. Welke. The latter has expressed his desire to return and complete his Normal course. He hopes to be discharged in the very near future. Our new temporary dormitory is being erected west of our administration building. The latest report is that it should be finished by November first. 1

I

R. Moldenhauer is assisting Prof. M. Albrecht in conducting the second band. Prof. Albrecht has the regular band and the beginners) band. . Class picnics are again almost a thing of the past. Some classes enjoyed excellent weather, while others' dashed about between showers. "

Less than a month of school has passed up to this time. Consequently, not too much news is to be had yet. Most of the fellows are still in the process of "warming up." According to the latest report, the process is speeding up rapidly. This is all for now.

Until next time, so long.

SPORTS The sports' of this year consists of intramural activities. The boys occupy their time in touch football and softball. The girls play horseshoe, softball, or tennis.

I

1\

The enlargement of the student body has created a problem in our sports activities. Each student is required to have two hours of exercise a week. That means he has tv play two 'games a week. There are five football teams, five softball teams, and ten softball games for the girls. We have one gridiron. The rest of the athletic field has been divided into two sixty-foot softball diamonds and five forty-five-foot diamonds for the girls. When all these games are in progress, the fielders are playing in each other's territory. The students are making the best of it under these circumstances, and by the cheering that is heard from the athletic field one can say they are having a good time. 27


The captains of the football teams are K. Kolander, R. Kolander, G. Voigt, R. Moldenhauer, and A. Nolting. Four games have been played thus far; Each game is just as thrilling as tackle football. There are very few runs in' touch football; it depends mainly on passing. A team has to make twenty yards, instead of ten, for a first down. The weather has been quite cool these past days. This is fine football weather, but poor weather for the softball players. Many of the players are suffering from sore arms. The captains of the softball teams are H. Albrecht" 'A, Wentzel, R. Wessel, R. Scherzer, and W. Bonitz. They coo.have played very few games. They play on sixty-foot diamonds. Last year they played on forty-foot diamonds. Nobody could get a hit if the pitcher had any speed to speak of. With the sixty-foot diamonds the pitcher has to be 路more accurate, and it also gives the batter a chance to get more hits. A new sport has been entered on the list of girls' games. This sport is horseshoe. 'Several of the girls, who have been playing softball for many years, decided to make a change. They are putting their two required hours in the playing of horseshoe, and before the winter snows come, we should have some expert women horseshoe players. 011 the campus. The captains of the girls' softball teams are C. AIhrecht, J. Hanke, V. Huth, A. Zietlow, L. Albrecht, G. Gutzke, M. Mumm, E. Baker, H. Kuske, and D. Winter and L. Schwecke co-captains. Because of the late start of school this year, we have had little chance to get any games played in any sport. I will tell you the outcome of the games in the next issue of The Messenger.

28


JOKES Eager little Fuchs, . Trying hard to learn. Needn't learn the fire-drill, 'Cuz they're too green' to burn.

Freaks! "I know a fellow who swallows swords." "Huh, I know a fellow who inhales Camels!" Bacteria is the rear door of the Cafeteria. Cistern is the feminine element of a Negro congrega-. tion ; that is, brethern and cistern. If all college students who slept in class were placed end to end-they'd be more comfortable. Little Harry stood in a street car, sniffing and rubbing his nose. A lady near him said, "Haven't you a handkerchief, sonny?" Said Harry, "Yes, Mom, but I don't lend it to' strangers." A woodpecker sat on a Fuchs's head And settled there to drill. He drilled away a half a day And finally broke his bill. The elevator and alarm clock have' done more than any other invention to help men up in the world. Two ants were running, along at a great rate across it cracker box. "Why are we going so fast?" asked one. "Don't. you see," said the other. "It says, 'Tear along dotted line!' "


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TABLE OF CONTENTS Poets' Corner

'......

2

Literary

5

The Christmas Spirit

5

Forerunners Of The Reformation

:..................................6

"I'll Be Home By Christmas, Mom"

12

If That Tree Could Talk

13

"Literary Trash"

14

Moonlight On A Pen

15

Our First Night

16

"Stonewall" And Hortense

17

With The Wild

19

Yeppii!!

21

Editorial

22

Let's Quit The Beefing

22

The Music Department

23

To The Alumni.

24

Why?

26

Alumni Notes

29

Exchange

30

College Notes

32

Co-ed Notes

34

Locals

37

Sports

40

Humor

'

42


POET'S CORNER IS THIS GOD'S WORLD? When I have fears the world has gone awry And ponder o'er the state of man's affairs; When "kill and kill" becomes the battle cry I bow my head in silent, fervent prayers. In this world God labor'd to createA world engulfed with seas of crimson hue? I think of wars and wonder if too late Will grass be moist with only dew. And yet in strife emerges love and hopeAnd sacrifice and faith and comradeship. These things for which we foolish mortals grope Are here at last within our very grip. 0, God,I pray we hold these virtues fast, So peace on earth will be mankind's at last!

ON THE KNEE OF EXPERIENCE I knelt on the knee of experience And asked for the power to see The fears and the pains and the heartaches That some time might come to me. I begged for the gift of foreseeing The troubles that might lie in wait, I pleaded a chance to avoid them And thus thwart my predestined fate. Experience, wise and all-knowing, Refused to take heed of my plea, Contending that men worth the living Should live out their full destiny. For life isn't all song and laughter, There's grief, disappointment, and pain; We welcomethe sunlight with gladness Because of the clouds and the rain. The sum and substance of living Means taking the fun with the strife: It's making the best of the bargain, And making the most of your life. 2


Last night I passed a little house Perched on the side of a hill, The curtains were up, I glanced inside, You know, as passers-by will. A group sat around a table In a room all cheery and bright, And a child was cutting a birthday cake With six tiny candles alight. This, I thought, is exactly How the boys wish it to be; This is the way they picture it From far places across the sea. Yes, this, I thought, is America, Taking all things in stride, The lights on a little child's birthday cake In a house on a little hillside!

BEAUTY Beautiful eyes are those that show Beautiful thoughts that burn below; Beautiful lips are those whose words Leap from heart like songs of birds; Beautiful hands are those that do Work that is earnest, brave, and true, Moment by moment, the whole day through. A.W. WIND The trees, their branches writhing Against a slate-gray sky, Are helpless slaves of the driving wind, Whose voice is shrill and high. He swirls among their branches. His laugh grows wild and loud. The little bushes cower Beneath their wint'ry shroud. 3


He pauses at a little hill; His voice is low and sad, As if he mourns the dying year, And can no more be glad. Then with a shriek he's off again To plague the trees once more, And make the little bushes cow'r As he had done before.

HAPPY EIGHTEEN We were eighteen jolly gals Full of vitality and pep. We've had loads of grand old times We'll not forget you bet! We'll miss the good old room, Our bedroom, six by four, Our chiffoneur the chalk tray, Six inches, no less, no more. We've joked and sung together, Put cracker crumbs in beds. We've bawled, and consoled each other Then laughed till we were "dead," And now we're leaving here . To be put into rooms for two. We happy eighteen partners Bid you a fond adieu. Dawn Storm


THE CHRISTMAS

SPIRIT

Once again that grand and glorious time of the year has come, Christmas. Everywhere you hear the familiar "Merry Christmas!" People are gay and joyous. They hurry about getting ready for the holidays. Churches and schools have prepared beautiful programs. Everyone seems to have acquired the jolly spirit; even those who are ordinarily pessimistic have, to some extent, submitted to the Christmas Spirit. Christmas, for the world, means a jolly time of excessive eating, drinking and making merry. There is an exchange of gifts, decorations of holly, a Christmas tree and other festive decorations, symbolic of Christmas. There is a certain amount of gaiety, yet there is no meaning behind these outward appearances. But for us Christians, Christmas means the 'beginning of Life; for on that Christmas Day, nineteen hundred and forty-five years ago, God brought forth His Son, made of a woman, to save us from sin and eternal damnation. "For unto you is 'born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord." (Luke 2 :11). For it was Jesus Christ who was born in a manger in Bethlehem to open the gates of heaven to those that believe in Him. It was a beautiful star that shone over this manger announcing to the world the arrival of that promised Messiah, who should save mankind from sin. This same star is represented on the top of our Christmas trees. This is the meaning Christmas has for us. 5


We join the world, in so far as being especially gay and joyous, for we have something about which we can be joyous. We exchange gifts as a symbol of good will. We too follow custom and decorate our houses with holly boughs, wreaths and Christmas trees. But as Christians, our Christmas Spirit is much deeper and penetrates to the very heart. As we hear the familiar Christmas Story (Luke 2 :1-14) over and over again, our hearts fill with pride and praise, and we rejoice, joining the "multitude of heavenly host praising God, and saying, Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men." Gerald Cudworth

FORERUNNERS

OF THE REFORMATION

Before the days of the sixteenth century, in which the world saw God's great Reformation, it had already witnessed preludes of things to come. These preludes were led by men whom we call "Forerunners of the Reformation." The most prominent of these forerunners were Savonarola, John Wyclif and John Huss. These men were far above the minds of other men of their respective times; but even they did not hold a true knowledge of the cardinal doctrines of Christianity. Perhaps God did not want these men to carry out His Reformation thoroughly; for in these times there were things He let happen that would not have contributed to a church reform . .We shall now glance into the life and works of the three great "Forerunners of the Reformation." On the twenty-first of September, 1452, in Ferrara, Italy, Savonarola was born. Girolamo Savonarola's parents were wealthy; but the worldly life of his home did not appeal to him. At the age of twenty-three, without the consent of his parents, he entered a Dominican convent at Bologna. Little did people realize he was to become the greatest of Dominican orators or the man who has given us one of the most beautiful expositions of Psalm 51. At this convent, he became acquainted with the Bible, the works of Thomas Aquinas and also those of Augustine. Six years after being ordained a priest in Florence, he was urged to return and be made prior of St. Mark's Convent. This was in 1489. 6


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The next nine years filled Florence and Italy with the personality of this man. By his influence, he stirred the hearts of the pagans in that city and country to become Christ-loving people. The former at this time was ruled by the Medicifamily. Even the society changed its course. The churches overflowed,convents became filled and profane amusements were at a standstill. Love for the Saviour, love and good will to men were an outcome of his preaching. To picture what he had to work with, one man stated, "For Christ's sake people are becoming fools." After a time, Alexander VI (pope from 1492until 1503, when he met his death by drinking a poisoned liquid which he prepared for an enemy) commanded Savonarola to cease ministering unto the people. He did so for a time, but the pleadings of his followers brought him back. The pope then attempted to bribe him by offering to him a seat of a cardinal.路 Savonarola wanted not the red cap of a cardinal but one of martyrdom. For this, the death sentence was pronounced upon him. On Palm Sunday of the year 1498, St. Mark's was assaulted. This forerunner and two intimate friends were captured and imprisoned. After a six weeks trial, "with torture," they were condemned to be hanged and their remains cremated. On May 23 of that year, these three monks met in prayer and, later that day, their ashes were carried to sea by the flow of the Arno River. Such was the end of the last great Forerunner of the Reformation, of whom we know the least. We are now carried back into the fourteenth century for the life of the first man actually to ridicule the evil doctrines which had already been brought into the Church. This man's name was John Wyclif and he carried on most of his work in England. Not much of his youthful days is known but it is presumed that he was born approximately 1324. At an early age, he entered Oxford. It was from Latin translations that he learned much about the Greek classics and the New Testament. He also excelled in scholastic discipline and philosophy. Wyclif became a Master of Arts at this school,and in 1365 was placed at the head of Canterbury Hall. Five years later, he met in a controversy with ecclesiastical authorities. A new archbishop replaced him with a monk as the head of the hall. The pope was appealed to; 7


but the verdict returned against the favor of Wyclif. It was during this time he was made a Doctor of Theology and with it obtained the right to lecture. When Pope Martin V demanded feudal tribute to be paid him of England, Wyclif was drawn into ecclesiastical politics. The Parliament of 1366 declared the king could not make the country subject to a foreign power, and therefore, would not allow the tribute to be paid. Wyclif led this opposition. He here stated that he believed the church and the state should 'be separated. From Scriptures, John Wyclif learned that things allowed by the papal power were evil. He proved by the Word that the mendicant orders of monks were not based on God's Word and were also a danger to the state. The vices of these beggars were also opened to the eyes of the people. These accusations set aglow a torch between this man and the monks which lasted until his death. . His zeal to oppose the papal demagogues became greater after he had served on a committee in the Netherlands at which papal emissaries were present. After Wyclif became more and more outspoken, he attacked the doctrine of transubstantiation. As the church taught it, it seemed to him a way of saying the priests held the power to create the Creator. He also saw no sense in not giving the bread and wine to the laity. In his main writing, "Trialogues," he set forth these views on the Lord's Supper: "The bread and wine remain such, but are jointly in a figurative and sacramental sense the body of the Saviour, which believers receive spiritually." He also wrote a thesis on this subject. He could not carryon his teachings without meeting opposition. The mendicant orders claimed to hold nineteen heretical passages against him. To account for these, Wyclif was ordered before the archbishop in 1378. But authorities, fearing popular opinion, only declared that no one should defend his teachings. They commanded him not to lecture on subjects which were being disputed. These decisions only helped to bring more people to his side; for after this dispute, he wrote Latin and English letters to the cornman people and the nobles. The "earthquake synod" of 1382 declared him a heretic. Commons, however, would not allow the churchmen the power to arrest a heretic. 8


Immediately after this synod, Wyclif retired to his estate. From here he sent out Lollards, priests of his mind, to carryon his work. He also was able to finish some of his writings. His translation of the Bible-from the Latin Vulgate -was being widely distributed among the nobles and many of the middle class. Again he was ridiculed by the clergy; but they could not stop the distribution of the Bible. Even as Luther's Bible had bearing on the German tongue, likewise did Wyclif's translation have effect on the English. December 31, 1384, brought to an end the life of "The Morning Star of the Reformation." But his remains found no rest in the grave. The Council of Constance, years later, condemned him a heretic. The condemnation ordered his books burned and his remains to be uncovered. Martin V, in 1427, commanded the corpse to be exhumed, burned and the ashes cast into the Swift River. The papacy could not extinguish the flames set in the hearts of the discontented Christians. We see this clearly in the fact that, although they were persecuted, their ideas spread and flourished into the hearts of men even in foreign lands. The country, to which Wyclif's ideas spread mostly, was Bohemia. In this land, before its church became part of the Pope's at Rome, it enjoyed many liberties and rights. The forerunner who led the unsatisfied people was John Huss. The year 1369 is the year in which John Huss was brought upon this earth. July the sixth is celebrated as his birthday. This day, however, is not the day on which he was born. In the early Church, the day of a martyr's death was chosen as his birthday, namely, unto eternal life. Unto humble parents was he given and in a home so poor next to nothing is known of it. At sixteen, he entered the University of Prague, where he received a Bachelor of Arts degree, one of Bachelor of Theology,and in

1396 the coveted Master of Arts degree. By 1402 he was made rector of the university and at the same time the ordained minister of Bethlehem Chapel. That he believed the people should have the Scriptures was shown by his preaching in this chapel; for he ministered unto them in the Czechlanguage. 9


While Huss was becoming known unto the world, the great schism in the Catholic Church was occurring. It began in 1378 and lasted until 1477. During the time Gregory XII ruled part of the church from Rome and Benedict XIII the rest from Avignon, King Wenceslaus (he was formerly Emperor Charles IV, but because of the life he led was deprived of his imperial crown by a former pope) supported the man at Rome. When he saw that his plans were not furthered by this, he ordered the church dignitaries of Bohemia to take a neutral attitude. He expected the same of the university, but only the Bohemians rallied to his side. Huss and others influenced the king to issue a decree constituting three votes for Bohemians in university matters, while the other nations should have but one, collectively. This unwise and radical action brought to an end the fame of this institution. By many Huss was blamed for its corruption. Before these things had happened, the teachings of Wyclif were grasping a foothold in Bohemia. At first. Huss was contrary to most of them. But Jerome of Prague, an extensive traveler, great orator, and a man ridiculed by the ecclesiastics, brought to his attention the "Trialogues." After a study of this work, Huss took a different stand and used many of the traits of Wyclif in his future work. Huss' greatest gift of God was oratory. He made use of this in his sermons at the Bethlehem Chapel. When he began his ridicule, he only attacked the vices of the laity. This was looked on with favor by the hierarchy. As time wore on, he became bolder and soon was attacking everyone from the pope to the lowest monk. For this last move he finally won the confidence of the people. Riots became numerous in the great city because of the constant differing of church and state. Huss fearlessly declared the Bible the true code of Christendom and that church councils and the commands of the pope ought only be obeyed when they agreed definitely with the Bible. The greatness of these declarations were belittled by the amount of slander and abuse he carried with them. The year 1411 brought a great change in the religious condition of the land. Sbinko, Archbishop of Prague, died. He had been a hindrance to Huss since the latter's attack on the clergy. The people now were treading the path of Huss' ways. 10


The next year, three students were burned at the stake for opposing the sale of indulgences. In a public demonstration, they were carried to Bethlehem Chapel, where Huss eulogized them as martyrs. The church felt it had taken enough from Huss and, as a result, he was excommunicated by Pope John XXIII. The interdict was also pronounced against Prague .. Huss was asked by the king to leave the city and to stay at a castle of a friend until conditions grew better. At this castle he finished his great work, "De Ecclesia" ("On the Church"). In this book he set forth his beliefs. 1) The Bible is the ultimate authority of the church and its constitution. 2) The system of hierarchy in the church is confounded because it is based on the earthly Roman Empire, not on Scripture. 3) The church should not rule the nation, but every nation should have its own church. In 1414 Emperor Sigismund asked the pope to call a council to clean out heresy and counteract the schism. Huss, eager for harmony, left reluctantly for Constance under a vow of safe-conduct by Sigismund. Upon his arrival, he was given all liberty but soon was captured by his enemies and thrown into a Dominican dungeon. Sigismund would have opposed this only to be told that if he did, the council would dissolve. With this yielding, the fate of this Bohemian forerunner was sealed. The proceedings began and Huss was delivered to a castle on the Rhine. Here he was chained for seventythree days, poorly fed, and tortured with disease. About this time his friend, Jerome, came to Constance to help him; but he also was captured and given beastly treatment. On June 5, 1415, Huss was once more tried. He denied thirty-nine sentences against him, would not recant and boldly demanded a fair trial. He explained he must be proved wrong by the Word of God. On July 6 of that year, he. was formally sentenced to burn at the stake. When he protested, they sheared him of his priestly garments. While yet cursing him, they delivered him to the secular authorities. With his hands tied on his back to the stake and a chain about his neck, straw and wood were piled around him until only his head showed. Again he was asked to recant, and again he heroically refused. As the torch was applied, he began to chant, "0 Ghrist, Thou Son of God, J1


have mercy upon me." The third time he said this, wind blew the flames into his face and he died. His ashes were gathered and the ground on which they had lain was carried away and both were thrown into the Rhine. Unrest and revolutions followed the death of these forerunners. Many sectarian churches were developed, but none found the true way of the Church. God, however, did not let his people be discontent very long. Hardly had the last forerunner died, when He sent His chosen vessel, Martin Luther, to be the Great Reformer. God led Luther to combine the best doctrines of these men and also to revive the Church, to be again that of the Open Bible. Arthur Schulz

"I'LL BE HOME BY CHRISTMAS,

MOM"

In a small, cheery village in the United States an elderly lady is sitting in her front room. It is Christmas Eve, and in the opposite corner of the room is a beautiful Christmas tree. The tree is bedeckt with beautiful colored lights, ornaments, and tinsel. Underneath this tree we see a beautiful display. The story of Christ's birth is before our eyes in a beautiful arrangement of statues. In another corner of the room is a fireplace with the yule log burning. The Christmas tree lights and the crackling log in the fireplace are the only lights in this cozy little room. Outside the snow is gently falling, and when our character looks outside she witnesses a scene of ravishing beauty. The light from the starry heavens falls down upon the freshly fallen snow producing a blanket studded with thousands of little glistening diamonds. And at different intervals an evergreen trimmed with snow rises as the monarch of all. . In a distance we hear a sweet tinkling bell. Plodding slowly through the snow comes a team of horse's drawing a sleigh filled with a group of merry youngsters. The entire outdoor life looks upon this group as the arrival of a noble family. All nature is still. Echoing through the silent night are the melodious voices of the youngsters singing the harmonious melodies of the Christmas carol. They are singing the French carol "Noel." As they come closer 12


we hear the beautiful strains of "0 du Froehliche." When this gay group passes by the window, they are singing "Joy to the World." After they have finished "Adeste Fideles," far in the distance we hear the immortal German carol "Stiile Nacht." The eyes of our character are filled with tears. Yes, there is joy in those tears but some sorrow seems to predominate. This lady is thinking back, to 1942, 1943, and 1944. She remembers the letters that her boy had sent to her. Each year he had written, "I'll be home by Christmas Mom," and each year she sat alone. In March of this year he also wrote home, "I'll be home by Christmas, Mom"but this mother's boy fell on Okinawa. Yes, in this season of joy and sublime beauty, this mother is thinking of her boy who has not come to her. However, in conclusion may I say to this mother that her boy has gone home-home to his Father in heaven. Wayne Schmidt

IF THAT TREE COULD TALK I was born in the beautiful region of Northern Wisconsin. In this heavily-wooded, inviting locality, I had many friends and neighbors. We grew up side by side, and for many years shared the hardships of winter and the joys of summer. I saw the light of day in the spring of the year, when all things in nature come to life after the winter's nap. The first few years were years of striving for life, but then followed the years of youth. During these years, I learned how to stand on my "two feet," like my brothers who stood straight and unmovable before the mighty winds and storms. Yearly, a few inches were added to my stature; I grew taller, and my trunk waxed stronger. My limbs became straight and strong, and finally, I was able to support some of my little friends who used to come and visit me during the vacation months of summer. They played in my yard which was home to them. My experiences during the many years varied with the seasons. I saw the fisherman pass by telling his friend of the "big one that got away." The tourists from the 13


large cities came and spent many happy hours of leisure on the lake near my home. The hunter tracked his game along the trail that winds near the place where I stood and

watched the passing parade. Ah, those were the good old days! One day in late autumn, however, tragedy entered my life. A man came up to me, knocked me down, tied me with a rope, threw me into a train and sent me to the city. There I was put on the auction block to be sold to the highest bidder. I was 'bought for a price and made to serve in a large auditorium in which many people gathered. There I was given the place of honor, the center of attraction. I was clad as gaily as an Arabian caliph. This was new to me, for I had lived in reality, whereas this was an artificial gesture. The snow was deceptive; the icicles were flatterers, and the lights were fraudulent. The snow in myoId home was soft and fluffy; the icicles crystal clear, and the twinkling reflection of the moon by night, and the sun by day, showed how magnificent a Christmas tree is in its natural habitat. Walter Bonitz

"LITERARY

TRASH"

When you become a freshman, you feel the peak of success has been reached by you; but then you begin attending classes. What are you forced to do-especially in English? Yes, you guessed it. Mr. Shakespeare comes along with "The Merchant of Venice." "Literary Trash!" Of course, you accepted this work as a matter of fact; but when you reach the all-important tenth grade, again you are confronted with "Willie" Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar." "Literary Trash !" Some of the elite may enjoy his works, but the normal person seems to rebel when "Willie" is placed before him. But the tenth grade marches on; and although it was a hard struggle, you made it, and look forward to your eleventh grade at D. M. L. C. The new year rolls around, and once again you meet your English professor, this time with "Willie's" "As You Like It." "Literary Trash!" That year when you feel nothing can come between you and graduation, who should mar your path but "Willie" and his dramatic tragedy, "Macbeth." Graduation found you relieved and thankful, especially when it 14


If you are fortunate enough to continue, either at D. M. L. C. or another college, you will again find "Willie, the Shake" present in your curriculum. "Literary Trash!" Have you ever considered, though, why all of Shakespeare's works are required in your English course? No? Could he be included to make it hard for the struggling scholar? Maybe some day when you are out in this wide and rugged world, you will realize that the meager amount of knowledgeyou have retained from your labors on Shakespeare are the factors which will make or break you. Why, the question on "The Quizzy Kids" program, which was worth a 'couple thousand dollars, had to be on "Literary Trash" is beyond you; but then, after the buzzer has sounded, it is too late, and you know you should have studied more in your classes-including "Literary Trash." But you thought you would get by, and maybe you did. But, did it pay in the long run? No! So, when you go home this Christmas for that long awaited vacation, don't forget to take along your books, and include in them "Willie's Literary Trash." D. Mey came to your compulsory English course.

MOONLIGHT

ON A PEN

When hearts like the day are tired and rest, They with the day then are bathed In the quiet cold gold of the moon. The rough and mad rushing of daytime's exertion Comes to a gentle soft stop In the quiet cold glow of the moon. The sharp ugly angles of human creation, The ungainlinesses in nature's vast kingdom Soften and smoothen and mellow In the innocent stare of the cold golden moon. Like 'an urn of cool oil she hides from the day In the shade on the other side, But at night she pours out The honey-dew liquid, The sweet golden liquid, And washes away The sharpness of day, The smooth mellow soothe of the moon. 15


And yet you excite, you cool Queen of Night, You cause hearts to burn, seduce tongues to spurn The reality of day and the sun For the dreamy soft smoothness From your lips you let run. Adventures, slick temptress, Reminder, Beguiler, Restrainer, Deceiver. Great Guardian of. mystic black night, With your all-seeing sight, Your conquering might, Your glowing gold light. But you can't give life. What your consort, the sun, bold, husky has done You can but nurse and entice into sleep In your cradling arms With your mystic gold charms. Yet silvery-fingered, golden-tressed maid, You are a great wonder in God's great creation, And if it were not for the Son of the living, true God. Who as man for all men and as God, Lived life to the full and died death for us all, We surely must die And must despise Or idolize .Or not e'en see Bright shining thee. But now we must be singing With hearts unbound aringing, "To God alone be glory For the salvation story."

OUR FIRST NIGHT There are many nights that live in our memory! One of ours will be our first night in our new home. At last we have allowed Professor Stindt to get his cabinets and room back. Professor Schweppeseems happy to be back in his room also. It is very strange to sit at my desk where I usually sat in my bed. And that brings me to the "Happy Eighteen." The first night we met we were 16


all complete strangers. Soon we were just a big happy family. All sitting in our beds at night, hair up, cream on -oops, sorry girls-I didn't mean to disclose our beauty secrets. (No comments from the boys, please.) We certainly had a wonderful time over there. Then came the long awaited change. The boys put up our beds, watched us make them, and then we were alone! It seemed so strange with only two in a room-so

peaceful and serene-until I heard someone scream! You know, (I)ce (s)cream, you (s)cream, we all (s lcream for (I)ee (s)cream and Art Schulz had arrived! We all rushed madly for him, for the ice cream, of course. When we had settled again, each in her own room, I found I was so lonesome with only two in a room that I took my three (wool) dogs to bed with me. I tapped out a message to Miss "Snow" in the next room. I listened for a reply. It came-from all the other rooms. You see, it is definitely not sound proof. For if one girl moves in bed at night, the other girls feel it all along the way, because the beds are against one continuous pipe. An individual puts in an interesting night that way. Between nightmares, you turn yourself over only to begin again: Do you know when the leaves turn? Yes, the night before a test. Therefore my roommate and I were studying madly when our lights went out. The switch is regulated by remote control! We simply had to know how many chapters Luke had, so we opened the window and stuck our heads out. By moonlight we found it had twenty-four. Shivering, we crawled back into bed. Both of us got that answer right on our test, too! Students wouldn't be students if they didn't complain, and we are no exceptions. However,I know if you ask any of us, we shall tell you we thoroughly enjoyed that first night in a lovely room of our own. Mary Lange "STONEWALL" AND HORTENSE Talking to an eminent doctor one day, I was told an incident concerning "Stonewall." "Stonewall" was the nickname for Richard. The doctor explained that "Stone17


wall" had obtained that name on account of his physical characteristics. He was weak, unproportioned, usually sick, and, quite often, silly. As one can see, these are the opposites of his predecessor's traits. "Stonewall" Jackson was a great soldier. Hortense is a fictitious name, since the doctor preferred not to mention her real name. Hortense had big blue eyes, dark brown hair, most of it curly, and a great big nose. Now "Stonewall" was deeply in love with Hortense. Wherever he went, she was sure to go. During the course of the day, "Stonewall" had certain periods for doing certain things. One of these, his book-reading, was always held around ten o'clock. A peculiar thing about this time was that he usually ate about four sandwiches during that period. His sandwiches were rather unorthodox. Usually they were made up of a salad containing sour cream interspersed with chopped up pickles and onions. Nevertheless he considered them quite precious. He never would have thought of giving one to Hortense because, first of all, he thought they were too precious; and he knew Hortense would become sick. This particular summer day, "Stonewall" was sitting on the couch on the summer porch. He was having his reading period; and. of course, Hortense was sitting beside him. While he was reading (he usually read Paul Bunyan stories), he was also eating one of his sandwiches. Hortense, at this moment, seemed to be entirely in the same world as he was. She was looking out of the big bay window. Nevertheless, "Stonewall" kept on reading. In the course of time, he had eaten three sandwiches and was trying to down a fourth. Yet, on account of inattentiveness and sleepiness. "Stonewall" gradually dozed off. When he woke up later on, he discovered that Hortense was lying on her side. Springing to his feet, he thought that perhaps she was sleeping. Yet, he could not wake her. Thereupon he called the doctor. When the veterinarian had arrived and examined her, he pronounced the dog dead. He explained that she must have eaten something which was spoiled because she had died from food poisoning. "Stonewall" explained that he had left a sandwich on the window sill. Jerome E. Spaude

18


WITH THE WILD

Realizing that some of our readers are going to be teachers, who will some time during their course of teaching get into a discussion about the non-domesticanimals of various regions, I take it upon myself to expound on some of the general things regarding some of the wild life of . Northcentral South Dakota. These creatures are distributed over a large area of our great continent and may be in your community too. If we were to go out there in summer, we would see numerous large game birds, but to the average traveler the animals would be seemingly non-existent. They would be hidden in their underground dwellings or blended in some intricate color scheme. However, with the winter season here, we'll go out there when these animals are in the climax of their beauty. Winter is here, the snow has fallen and before us lies an endless white blanket reflecting the rays of the sun, which is now far in the south. We travel on horseback over the blinding sea of snow looking for traces of the weasel, the fox, the rabbit, the deer, the badger, the mink, the muskrat or the coyote, all of them inhabitants of our region. The footprints are our only clue, as each animal has a distinct pattern which can be distinguished at a glance by . the experienced hunter. The trapper makes these distinctions primarily by the size and shape of the foot and claw of the animal. The experienced hunter can determine under what conditions the animal is traveling, merely cantering leisurely along, pursuing its prey or being pursued, as indicated by the pace or manner of running. Each animal has a stride of its own. This is an interesting study and almost "a must" to the successful trapper. We see our first good prints and, following them, we see several narrow pathways leading from one underground dwelling to another and often to three or four more, sometimes as far as a mile apart, these little travelways lead off and fan out into a complexnetwork of seemingly confusing pathways. We have recognized the footprint and picked the most lived-in dwelling place of the animal. This choice is made as a result of experience, developedby careful study. Now 19


if we were able to enter this residence, we would find its entrance almost closed with hay and, going into it deeper, we would find a large den or room covered with green hay. This is the living room of the animals, the number of the inhabitants depending on the season. We see another passageway leading off into another room. Before we reach it, however, we encounter several sharp turns. This next room has a rather ingenious ventilating system; and why not? This is the home of the skunk. This animal is carniverous, and weighs from six to sixteen pounds and attains a length of eighteen to thirty inches. It has a gregarious

tendency; often as many as fourteen are found in one den. The most valuable ones, from the trappers' point of view, are the large, narrow-striped creatures. The white stripes are cut out of the fur by the fur companies. We resume our travel over the plain and by an unusual stroke of luck we meet the villain of the northwest, the most heartless of our local carniverous creatures, the coyote. His atrocities are rather serious and to him the hunter means almost certain death. If the coyote gets into a flockof sheep, he'll kill all the way from three to twelve of them, eating the choice cuts from the backs of the first two or three and killing the rest for the sport of killing. He's extremely curious when one meets him in the open like this; and, acting from experience, we travel around him in the course of a large circle, closing in ever nearer to the animal who through mere curiosity sits on his haunches and watches us. Under these conditions, and in this manner, we can get near enough to get a good shot if we so desire. He can be overcome most readily if' he is driven from the wind, as he cannot get sufficientair this way and fatigues much sooner. He has to be warm before he can do any effective running. He can be overcome in the first few yards of the chase if he is cold and not loosened up. However, if he is warm and in a good running position, he can go as fast as thirty-five miles an hour. In pursuing this animal, one must consider his logical course of escape and then pursue it in a very cautious manner, as the animal will invariably do some illogical thing, not as a matter of ignorance but to confuse its enemy. He is shrewd and daring and one of the most challenging and interesting animals to hunt. It would be a long course and take considerable time to touch on all the creatures found out there. I assure 20


you it's not like a zoo. It takes patience, time and skill to find these animals and study their behavior under various conditions. It's interesting to note how shrewdly and cunningly they evade the hunter. We know that these, His creatures, are under His care and disposition to use as He sees fit to further or retard the interests of man or whatever purpose He deems them to serve. R. Walz

YEPPII!! Some noon after dinner, or some evening after supper, when returning to your respective dormitories, you may observe a very strange sight. Somebodycomes up to you and asks, "What's that cloud of smoke down there 7" Closer observation reveals a fellow flourishing a fag in one hand and a slip of paper in the other. You won't have to ask because, as soon as he is within shouting distance, he will let you know of the great news that has just arrived in the late mail. Yep, he feels plenty big and proud. His countenance beams, his step is fast. When his mouth is not holding a fag, it is shouting forth the glad tidings. He walks down the halls, and into nearly every room, publicizing the great news. He is now a man. He has just received a smoking "per." The chap is congratulated by those on all sides. It is more than interesting and amusing to cast an eye in his direction throughout the followingdays. The first few days of this glorious dream, he is almost a chain smoker. The poor fellow wants to show everybody that his dream has (finallycome true. It is very hard on him and on his fags at first. But soon he lets up on his smoking considerably because he can't take it and his pocketbookis almost "M.T." Soon everybody knows about his long waited-for smoking "per," and he needn't propagandize it any longer by means of a constant smoke halo about his glassy-eyed face. He soon learns that it is not such a wonderful thing but just another of man's bad habits. Homer Albrecht 21


LET'S QUIT THE BEEFING!

Nothing is more provoking and disgusting than to be reproved from sources that just "love" to criticize for the mere sake of criticizing. Such people are constantly harping on, and finding fault with, others, and the abominable thing of it is that they only criticize and do nothing on their part to help matters. If they would only see that they are criticizing themselves and are doing nothing about themselves. For the last couple of years the interest toward, or in, the school paper has been .nil, The number of contributors to each issue in proportion to our enrollments is disgustingly low. Every new student is bombarded with the same question: namely, "Will you write an article for the next Messenger?" Like simpletons, most of us rear back and "let fly" with the same old line. "I can't write. What should I write about? I haven't any time!" What an encouragement to the editor! What a picture of willingness and lively imagination. We are puppets in the hands of selfish laziness and content with our lot. The staff is willing to concede that the last Messenger "stunk," as we say. As a staff we heard remarks of all 22


the feeble articles in it. We grant you each and every complaint. But let's cut out the incongruous criticism, and let the wagging tongue yield to the busy pen. By our attitude we are simply making public proclamations of our own literary sterility. None of us claims to be a literary artist. Nevertheless, we all possess some ability. All that is asked of us is that we strive to do our best in whatever we write. The staff is our representative and is willing to help us. These are the facts. It's up to us to change them. let's quit our beefing and either put up or shut up! K. Petermann

So

THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT What is developing in the music field today? What makes it such an outstanding subject not only here, but everywhere in the world? Is it really having an effect upon the minds of the human race? Yes, it does have that and even more, which is proved by numerous incidental portrayals. Imagine how emphatically a bit of music stilled the raging heart of Saul as David played on his harp. This world is too modern in many respects. Think of all the literary trash appearing in music, over which the majority goes wild. I dare say that there is that same modern ideal implanted somewhat in my mind, but the greater enjoyment ought to be a feeling for ever-popular arrangements living on and on throughout the world. Such ideals are very well shown in the numerous early composers whose names need not be restated here. Sad to say, I cannot think of any outstanding composers from our immediate past. Indeed, there are none compared to the music masters of centuries past. Give the modern song three months and it's melody remains only in the vague background of our ever-failing memory. Consider our own Dr. Martin Luther College with "heaps and gobs" of musical knowledge?! Do we hear the continued rumble of "swing" and wild popular echoes? Ah yes, they have their moments, 'but for emphatic reasons the dominating power lies in classics. The beginners groan when they are led on to the practice rooms to sweat and suffer under their first little compositions,not always real2J


izing how a little enthusiasm might well develop into surprising success in a comparatively short time. Lack of needed interest is probably the main reason why new students don't take extra practice periods. Rather, they have trouble with the inspector to get the required periods squeezed in. Of course, the fear of facing the hard-driving instructor helps the pupil observe his regular practice periods. This is especially true this year, since the organs and pianos barely suffice one practice period per pupil daily. Might I suggest a whole-hearted consideration for new organs and other items? Not the year after you and I graduate nor after conditions make it imperative, but now, just as soon as possible! How can anyone expect to send out a finished product without sufficient material with which to work from the beginning? Then the beginner will be more highly induced to get everything possible out of this subject and not considering every possibility of overlooking a practice period. The goal of many minds has been reached only by continued practice and struggle. Gerald Bunkowske

TO THE ALUMNI It is an easy thing to criticize and complain about the work of another person, but when we ourselves have to do it-well, that's an altogether different proposition. Experience has proved this to be the case. For the past several issues complaints have reached our ears that many of you alumni were not satisfied with our work. Yes, we also realize this fact that the Messenger could have been better; and we admit it. We not only admit this fact, but we are willing to be corrected. Now many of you might say, "Well, what has this to do with us'!" Well, my dear alumni, it has a great deal to do with you. For it is you from whom we seek correction. Seeing that many of you are "beefing," let us see whether you can do just as well by correcting. Some of you may now ask, "How can we do this?" To you who ask this question, the following answer is given. The Messenger staff is working hard to put out our school paper. Up until now, they have had very little co24


operation from both the student body and you, the alumni. Considering the conditions under which they have been laboring, I think they have done a grand job, even if some of you do not have the same opinion. We know very little about what you, the alumni, have been doing or are doing. I know that many of the members of your classes would like to know where you are, how you are and what you are doing. This information can be obtained by us only if you send it to us. vie wish you to know that no one will think you to be "uppish" if you do this. We ask you to send us all the information that you can about your work, your family and your life in general. If you will do this, we can print it and thus allow your

former classmates to liind out about you. This is the first .step in which you can help the staff in their effort to make the Messenger a better paper. The second step concerns itself about suggestions. Many of you have been complaining about the paper and yet have never in any way attempted to show us a way in which we could 'better it. We ask you to send to us any suggestions that you may have for the betterment of our paper. We guarantee you that all suggestions which you will send to us will be fairly considered. We now arrive at the third and final step. You can help us if you will, in some of your spare time, write an article for our publication. You all don't have so much work that you can't write an article for at least one of our issues. I was told a short time ago that to write this article would result only in a waste of paper and ink. I have written this article in spite of this, on behalf of my staff, for the simple reason that we know you will not let us down. Our faith in you is a summons. We are summoning you to help us in the betterment of not only our paper but also your paper. Many of you have been complaining; now let us see you give us a little co-operation. Are you going to let the Messenger down? The Editor

25


WHY?

Many people seem to enjoy the task of being a judge at some kind of a dispute. At a dispute, evidence is given by both parties, and then it is the judge's duty to decide who is correct. How often does somebodyjudge something without investigating the matter first? It is done occasionally, 'but a fair decision can not be given if such is the condition. Some time ago, I had the opportunity to go to a place I had never been to before. The report I got wasn't very good. The place happens to be in the state of Nebraska. Just mention the name Nebraska, and some people start running already. On my way out there I traveled in Minnesota, Iowa and' finally I arrived at my destination, Nebraska. Fortunately, I traveled during the day, so I had the chance of looking around a little and seeing what I was entering. As I traveled westward, I saw the small Minnesota farms, their small fields of corn, and every once in a while a straw pile. Many farms were typical autumn pictures as one sees on a calendar. SoonI started to travel southward. As I went farther south, I saw fewer straw piles. Instead of small grain, everything was corn. One corn/fieldwas right next to another. Probably for some of you readers, this doesn't seem odd, but it did to me. I had seen large cornfieldsbefore, but never before had I seen so many large cornfieldsright next to each other. Finally I reached Sioux City. From here I traveled by car the remainder of the way into Nebraska. The roads were very good. As we drove along, we could see a group of well-painted farm buildings tucked away in the folds of the hills. All around the buildings are large shade trees. The roads wind through among the hills, and the creeks wind down the sides of the hills, down into the valleys and then on to some larger river. Some of the places reminded me a little of the road and scenery between Winona and La Crosse, only here we have the Missouri River flowing beside the road, and there we have the Mississippi River. Everything is on a little smaller scale. After I was there for a while, I had the chance to look around a little more. We drove along an old road in .the 26


Elkhorn Valley. The thing that impressed me especially was the sand on the road. It wasn't gravel; it looked just like whitewashed sand. I was told then that this land had been flooded and this sand was left there when the waters subsided. They also told me that there were some hills of sand like that farther along. We drove out there, and there they were. There were acres and acres of just plain fine sand. A little grass grew on this soil. The cattle that grazed on these lands were called "sand-hill cattle." Most of the cattle appeared as if they would make plenty of good beef steak. Since I had just come from Minnesota, as soon as I got out there, I noticed something lacking in the colors of autumn. Here in Minnesota there are many oak trees. Because of this, there usually is an abundance of red in the Minnesota autumn. In Nebraska, they don't have this. In the evening as the big red sun is setting, the sun's rays are reflected from many shades of golden leaves .• No two leaves seem to have the same shade of gold. I could tell you how wen I was treated and how hospitable the people are there, but I won't. I'll just say it was all very enjoyable. Now that I'm back here again, I must say that I am looking forward to the time when I'll get the chance to return to this place. Why do so many people judge a place without looking it over first? Why? Quentin Albrecht

27


I).

Jfl. lL.

C!C. :搂Mcsscnger

The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends. The aim of "The Messenger" is to offer such material as will be beneficial as well as interesting to our readers, to keep the alumni in a closer contact with the college, to foster school spirit, and to give the students an opportunity in the practice of composition and the expression of their thoughts. Entered as second class matter

at Post Office of New Ulm, Minn.

No.2

Volume XXXVI DECEMBER 1945 THE MESSENGER STAFF Editor Associate Editor Business Manager Assistant Manager Assistant Manager Typist Alumni Notes Exchange College Notes Co-ed Notes Locals Sports Humor

Harold Goede Albert Nolting Walter Bonitz Glenn Felch Quentin Albrecht Ruth Hohmann Elaine Bogenschneider Marie Meyer Lorna Gerlach 路 Chrysta Albrecht Kurt Petermann Robert Moldenhauer Carroll Trettien 28


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ALUMNI NOTES Prof. and Mrs. Martin Albrecht became the proud parents of a baby girl, Kathryn Marie, on November 3, 1945. On May 18, 1945, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph E. Swantz were blessed with the gift of a son, Stephen John. Mr. Swantz is a graduate of '38. A son, James Raymond, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Duehlmeier of Nicollet, Minnesota, on July 19, 1945. Mr. Duehlmeier graduated in 1935. . Ruth Engelhardt, graduate of '44, is now teaching grades three and four in St. James' School, Milwaukee, Wisconson. The new primary teacher of Christ School, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, is Cloe Fenske, ex. '44. Artcy Goehring, also ex. '44, is now teaching the upper grades of Calvary School, Thiensville, Wisconsin. Adelia Falk, graduate of 1942, moved from New London to Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, and is teaching the fifth grade in St. Peter's School. The new teacher at St. Matthew's School, Iron Ridge, Wisconsin, is Walter Huber, who formerly taught in Sebewaing, Michigan. He graduated in 1931. The First Lutheran School, Manitowoc,Wisconsin, has Anita Kutz as its new primary teacher. She is a graduate of 1943. Raymond Riess, graduate of '35, moved from Cibecue, Arizona, to Bylas, Arizona, because of ill health. The new teacher at Trinity School, Neenah, Wisconsin, is Ruth Smith, graduate of 1944. Lucille Rengstorf, ex. '45, is now teaching at St. Martin's School, Winona, Minnesota. Wilbert Miller, graduate of '41, replaced Raymond Riess at Cibecue, Arizona. One member of the new teaching staff at St. John's School, Baraboo, Wisconsin, is Margaret Lau, ex. '44. Geraldine Boelter, graduate of '39, and Ruth Schnitker, graduate of '35,路are the new teachers in St. Paul's School, Tomah, Wisconsin. 29


Mrs. Lois Burow, nee Fredrich, graduate of '41, is teaching the intermediate grades in St. John's School, Jefferson, Wisconsin. The primary teacher in Zion School, Sanborn, Minnesota, is Alila Wiechmann, ex. '45. Because of illness, Corinthia Reier, graduate of '43, resigned her position as primary teacher of Trinity School, Bay City, Michigan. Henry Krenz, graduate of '39, is the teacher of the upper grades of the St. Paul's congregation, Norfolk, Nebraska. . Two young men recently discharged from the army are Harold Fuhrmann, H. S. graduate of '43, and Robert Temple, H. S. graduate of '39. A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Willard Raabe of New DIm, Minn., on Nov. 22, 1945. Mr. Raabe is a former D. M. L. C. high school graduate. Aug. 4, 1945, was the date set for the marriage of Marie Johnson and Martin W. Lsi tzke. The latter is a graduate of '43 and is now the teacher and organist at the Mt. Calvary Church, Kimberly, Wisconsin.

EXCHANGE We have just celebrated the festival of Thanksgiving. Truly we have much to be thankful for this year. Our country is again at peace. God has protected our country from want and destruction, and for all this we are thankful. However, there is something more that we should be thankful for, not only this year, but at all times. God has given us schools where His Word is taught in all its truth and purity. He has given us good and faithful teachers who are at all times seeking our salvation, and leading us closer to our God. For this we also are thankful. Because we are thankful for these schools and teachers, we should in every way give them our support. In a recent issue of "The Black and Red," this very thing is touched upon. The author is a student of theology, and his interests lie in the church. "Our schools are not an organization so


outside of the church, but a part of the church. Many people have the idea that our schools do not come up to the standards of the state schools, but if these people would look into our schools, and take the time to talk to the teachers about their work they would not have ideas such as these any longer. Our schools are not something that is unnecessary, or something that is a burden to the church. They are a part of the church that is of the utmost importance. The pupils of our Lutheran schools measure up to the pupils of state schools in every respect. "What is the reason for this? The reason is the teacher. The teachers of our schools do not teach because it looks like an easy job. This may be the case in public schools, but we see the need of Christian teachers to guide the souls of young children, Our teachers have a personal interest in the life of every child they are teaching. They are working in God's kingdom, building the well-founded churchmen of the future. "In the hands of a God-fearing teacher. each child is like a piece of clay. A piece of clay they are to mold into an implement of the church. The work is not at all times easy, for the clay may contain pieces of glass on which the potter cuts himself. Things like this do not bother him. He is looking forward to the finished product, and not at the pains that may 'be inflicted while he is working. If the clay will be correctly molded the first time, the teacher will mold and remold until the desired product is completed.

"When we look at a beautiful piece of pottery, we admire the form, design and color. How often do we think of the potter? Yet, if he would not have taken the time and patience, the product would not be there. The teacher does not expect praise for the work he is doing. for his praise is to see the child being led closer to his God. However, we must give to the teacher all the help and cooperation that is due him. It makes no difference whether we are pastors, teachers, laymen or pupils, we all have work to do in the kingdom of God. Let's all do it." We at Doctor Martin Luther Collegeare studying to be teachers. We are to be the potter who is to shape the lives of our pupils. Our teachers are instructing us in every field so we may go out into the Kingdom of God and successfully carry out this work. Let us all pray God that the efforts our teachers go to will not be in vain. We pray also that we may absorb all the necessary things and thus go into the field as a credit to our parents, school and teachers 31


COLLEGE

NOTES

The Christmas Holidays are again here and with them the usual joy and happiness. This year it is especially joyful, for peace on earth reigns again. All the students are preparing to spend the holidays at home. The various dorms are having parties, the Christmas wreaths are in the windows, the girls are caroling, and, in general, a Christmas spirit prevails throughout the campus. To catch up on college notes, we'll have to go way back to October 25, when an interesting movie was presented to the student body. It was the life of Franz Schubert. On October 29 was our second Lyceum number. We were entertained by Giovanni Sperandeo, a tenor, and his wife, Elsa Sperandeo, a pianist. The program didn't meet our expectations, however. Had there been more musical numbers and less talking, I think the majority of us would have enjoyed it more. Doris Eaton Mason, famous sculptor, was on our next Lyceum number. It was held November 13. Miss Mason chose Ruth Timm to be modeled. There wasn't a very good resemblance in the model, but it was probably due to the fact that Miss Mason's time was limited. She did tell us many interesting things, however, in the art of sculpturing. November 20 was a great day for the 36 girls living in the Administration Building. It was then that they moved into their new dormitory. Their patient waiting and uncomfortable living conditions were not in vain, for everyone agrees they have a pretty swell dorm. They were also given a free day to move, which was another reason to make the rest of us a little envious. On December 9 the Band, Aeolian Chorus, and Marlut Singers gave the following program: 1. Band K. L. King 2. Fughetta J. Stainer-Righter 3. The Merry Widow Selection Lehar-Yoder 4. Stout Hearted Men Romberg-Yoder

1. March: Bombardier

32


II.

Aeolian Chorus

To a Wild Rose MacDowell-Ambrose Das Vergiszmeinnicht Folksong Weiszt du, wieviel Sternlein stehen Folksong Spinning Song Ruminn-Stickles Accompanists: Elsie Zierzow, Eldonna Timm Directress: Eunice Sauer

1. 2. 3. 4.

III.

Marlut Singers 1. Dedication Franz-Enders 2. When Johnny Comes Marching Home Cilmore-Nieh 3. The Donkey Serenade Friml-Stothart Accompanist: Wayne Schmidt

IV. Band 1. March: Shenandoah

2. 3. 4. 5.

t

•

,.

~

Edwin F. Goldman When Irish Eyes Are Smiling Ball-Teague That's an Irish Lullaby Shannon-Teague The Post Medical Officer March Saverina The National Anthem

The Christmas program to be held December 18 at 8 :00 p. m. is as follows: 1. Pre-Service Christmas Organ Music Carolyn Bathke 2. Processional 3. The Christmas Story F. Reuter Narration: Harold Goede Organ: Eunice Sauer Piano: Eldonna Timm 4. Assembly: All Praise to Thee (No. 12 in folder) Organ: Elaine Bogenschneider 5. Choir I: 1. Singt und klinget ueberall (fourteenth century arr.) E. Biedermann 2. Away in a Manger G. Schroth 3. Sing We All Noel... C. York 4. Presentation of Christ (Motet of the eleventh century, six voices) J. Eccard 5. Praise God in His Holiness (Psalm 150, six voices) D. Vandenberg 6. Address: Professor O. Naumann 33


7.

Assembly: Now Sing We, Now Rejoice (No. 7 in folder) Organ: Robert Moldenhauer 8. Choir II: 1. The Great Doxology D. Bartniansky 2. The Angels at the Manger Folk song, arr. by Luvars 3. The Virgin's Lullaby M. Hokanson 4. Behold I Bring You Good Tidings J. Guss Organ: Carolyn Bathke Piano: Mary Lange 9. Organ: The Infant Jesus P. Yon Marie Meyer 10. Assembly: Hark the Herald Angels Sing (No.6 in folder) Organ: Walter Bonitz 11. Combined Choirs: And There Were Shepherds F. Reuter Organ: Eunice Sa-uer 12. Recessional

CO-ED NOTES Uh, uh, uh, don't touch that dial, listen toThis is station C-O-E-D, the "Friendly Station," again bringing you a resume of the latest developments in the feminine social world at D. M. L. C. Since our last broadcast, we've lost two loyal members. of our sex. Betty Wagner and Ruth Hohmann have gone out as "school-mams." Betty went to Hutchinson, Minnesota; Ruth's destination was Stanton, Nebraska. She seems to be a loyal member of that state now. At least a letter received from her would lead" one to infer that. Quote: "And who says there aren't hills? From one hill here in town, you can see practically all of the town and many miles besides. Yes, I think some of these places may have air-conditioning too. South Dakota isn't the only one so equipped."-Unquote. (See Q. A.'s article in the last Messenger.) Isn't there a song entitled "Them Days Is Gone Forever"? The Senior girls succeeded in reviving an Eliza34

,

•


bethan custom at least for a few hours. Can't you imagine them asking their mirror, "Mirror, mirror, can you say

...

~

Where should I put my black patch today?" I think our English professor is glad "them days is gone forever." Due to a vacancy down at Bode Hall, a II Normal girl descended from the Annex. Of course, she had to "goose the moose," the solemn ceremony of initiation at Bode Hall. She was also told that everyone must polish her shoes every night! That's why Doris Mehlberg has been wearing such a shine lately! lone Strege must think herself really brilliant. She even tried to get into the II Normal class already. "Was her face red !" Lois Naumann and the Mack girls really picked "snazzy" names for their beds. They are "Mary, Queen of Scots" and "Bothwell," respectively. Mary Mumm and Joyce Hanke wanted to be different. "Duffy" is their bed's name. "Ardy" Zietlow must have been in a big rush to sit down. Krraack! Too bad Elaine Rademan's glasses were in the way.

"

It seems that all the halls have been bothered with mice. The girls from the "Ad" Building report that one night eighteen girls were after one mouse. Poor thing! Eleanor Hookstead is official "mouse-catcher" at Bode's. She gets her mouse even if she has to step on it. The girls of room ten in Hillcrest Hall have the real system though. All five of them look for the victim. When they finally catch sight of it, they all emit a blood-curdling scream that would make Lincoln roll over in his grave. The mouse slowly surrenders to a place under the bed, rolls over, and dies. Wouldn't you have heart failure if five Paul-"ine" Bunyans screamed at you at once?

Here, readers, is a problem for you. Why did "Fooz" call the organ stop "bourdon" instead of "Bourdon"? I wonder why Bernice Mundstock decided to sit on the floor in Methods! 35


Does anyone need a haircut? The "Normal Barber Shop" at Hillcrest has cheap rates and, I believe, excellent workmanship. Waldheim has a unique set of names for their rooms. "Concentration Camp" is, of course, the study hall. The room at the end of the hall is "No Man's Land." Because there is always a battle for overshoes there, the small entrance is called "Battle Area." The room in which they wash their dishes is "K. P. Duty." For some unknown reason, they do not wish to disclose the names of the other rooms. The inhabitants of room six, Hillcrest Hall, wanted to become sweet in an "Overnight Wonder Course." They tried sleeping on sugar. Norma Just will either be a great singer or boxer. When she isn't singing in her sleep, she's boxing with "Ardy." Lois Naumann must be taking art lessons. But why do you draw barns? I don't think Prof. Palmbach includes that in his course! Why do parties always put one in such a peculiar mood? As an after-effect, someone always tries to scare someone else. "Lil" and "Dot," don't look so innocent. Lois Vertz was "reelly scaired." Even our sedate Hilda Wollenweberwas affected by the Halloween Party. Doris. Mehlberg can just he happy that it was only a stuffed dummy lying on her bed. I'll bet Professor Schweppe had a tiny feeling of chagrin the day he made the faux pas of calling on "Miss Snow" instead of "Miss Storm." Just got his weather conditions mixed up. "What is watered stock?" was the question put to the II Normal class. Several answers were given, but each proved incorrect. "Cubbie" raised her hand. She knew the answer. "That's when they water the stock before they s'hip them to market, so they weigh more." Darlene Timm left a vacancy in the I Normal class, but Carryl Stelljes has returned to D. M. L. C. to fill in the ranks again. Three girls from Bode Hall must enjoy nocturnal "jamaparades." Something different anyway, 'n so? 36

•

•


Tuesday, November 20, was a great moving day here. From 10 :00 a. m. to 4 :00 p. m. one could see someone moving something or other into the new "barracks." During the morning the girls moved their "stuff." (That's the most fitting word I could think of to cover such a variety of things.) In the afternoon, thanks to the boys of the Normal Department, the furniture and beds were moved. I'm sure you all appreciate this Thanksgiving present, because you've been waiting so (im)patiently for its completion. We even have an aviatrix in our midst. is "all up in the air."

"Dot" Winter

Can you imagineLois Vertz not saying, "Anna"? Eunice Sauer working trigonometry problems? Room one in the Annex taking up light housekeeping? Doris Mehlberg not giggling? "Red" Albrecht not sticking up for the "city of murders" ? Some girls not getting mail every night? The telephone room in Annex not crowded after Sunday dinner? "Cal" Bathke not jumping on the bed at the sight of a mouse? "Otter" and Carroll Trettien without earrings? Lee Orda Schwecke not talking in her sleep? Shirley Bleck sitting on the fire escape, having a chat with ... (censored) after study hour? In behalf of the staff and myself, I hope you all have a "Merry Christmas" and a "Happy New Year." I see our time is up now, but you'll tune in again next time, I "hope-a-hope-a-hope." Just remember "same time, same station."

LOCALS My last column for you Before I bid you all adieu. Any resemblance to lyricism is purely accidental. I never did get beyond rhymed couplets. I prefer blank verse (literally translated). 37


Enthusiasm is again running high as the vacation spirit once again saturates the atmosphere. Already shipments of remuneration are pouring in. The last minute packing is done, and we're off. What a relief and rest. Lodge number 23. (Not Free Masonry-it cost money to build.) Located at First and Office Streets. Buy your night's lodging, and get room and board free. Excellent service, clean surroundings. Open to servicemen. For further details, inquire of Ted Pape, U. S. N.

Fire Away! Release of ammunition increased the invasion of student hunters. A hazy smoke-screen of sulphur covered the cornfields and marshes. Bombardment continued. Through the haze-target sighted-fire away! The shell exploded. Extract of the pheasant's last words, "'Lead' me alone."-Another dead-duck, here comes the target!Enough points saved to make a wonderful discharge from the frying pan. Whatta blow! Result: Sievert was sporting a discolored eye for quite a while. (Pity the other fellow.) Place: Athletic ifield.-Head-on collisionwith an opponent in a rough and tumble football game. A deep gash accompanied the blow. By the looks of things, he's seeing his way clear again. An eyeful! Severed from its source of nourishmentformed like a shoe-we have the remains of part of a tree. Not losing all of its youthfulness, it staged a comeback. At least that is the report we 'have from Pape when a shoetree reciprocated and broke his glasses. All particles of glass were removed without injury. Traffic seems "stilted" as everyone watches and waits for crutch-bearing Dick Kramer. X-rays showed a cracked bone in his ankle, received in a football scrimmage. He is getting along nicely now without the aid of the two props and hopes to participate in basketball practice soon. Paul Bunyan had nothing on Al and Bob (Wolf). Rumor has it that they hitch-hiked to the cities in search for blades. A scissors would also have made an improvement already. 38

,.


}j; 1'

_

~~~~~~~~~~~~

What's the Difference! Purely mechanical-as simple as all that. So Fuerstenau claims the difference between the German "Mahler" and "Maler" is one letter. Never Give Up! Several senior boys tried to frighten their "weaker" classmates by the presence of a snake in their lab desks. The snake seemed to 'be up to the prank. It got itself lost in unused space underneath the table top. Past, but not forgotten. No one knew, but it was up and coming.-Time passes on.-Four days later it had successfully succeeded in climbing out of its pit and emerged into daylight. Educationally inclined, it put its appearance in the III Normal science class where it was first noticed by our lecturing professor. Uninterested, it passed out underneath the door into the hall. Being skeptical about its causing further disturbance, it was retrieved by its tail by our professor. Relentlessly dropped into the waste basket, it failed by an inch to make another debut. What became of it is unknown. Big event-Normal boys excused from afternoon classes. Time to clear our ad building of its housing facilities. No work is dull with a large group. "It gives" pranksters in every bunch-II Normals no exception. Bauer was the victim. While moving a "locker," he was found inside, adding his weight to the already cumbersome load. Your Choice With winter so near at hand, skating is beginning to predominate in bull sessions. In the course of the session, the tutor asked how skating was around here. Someone replied that you could skate for miles on end. Pape queried, "Which end?" Which Is It? Talking in your sleep is a common occurrence. He who talks other than English is definitely a, "furriner." Nevertheless, Latin seems to be the talk of the day (or rather night). Auditors say that Bert has been working on the conjugation of "amo." This may be the result of one of two things: conscientious Latin preparation, or . (this part has been censored). 39


Can you imagineZessin up for breakfast? W. Schmidt playing "swing"? Mack not getting a telephone call? "Joe" without his Deckel? Naumann wearing his own cap and ear muffs? Bittorf eating without "ketch-up"? Ohlmann not getting a letter a day? Harms not talking? I hereby end my career as editor of this column. The best of luck to my successor, and a blessed Holiday Season to you all.

SPORTS

"Ugh, take it easy coach, after all we are only human." That is what you would hear if you would come into the gym some fine afternoon. Basketball is here and so is the back-breaking, muscle-straining calisthenics. Boys love basketball, but oh! those workouts that prelude the playing. The coach is a swell fellow until-"Okay guys, line up. Pus'h ups twenty-five times! Ready! One, two, three, etc." One drill after another until the tongues are hanging out, eyes are bulging, and muscles aching with fatigue. Well boys, that is basketball. Basketball-? The season started with a bang. A good crop of material showed up. Quite a few boys returned who were on last year's team and the new material is very promising. So boys, watch out! no position is cinched this year. The coach will have quite a job on his hands when he has to pick his first team because he has many players of equal talent. Thanks to the tutor, the first days of practice went off with everyone being dog-tired, but on the way to being in top condition. He helped the coach in directing calisthenics and the fundamentals of ball handling. With drilling like the fellows are receiving and with the love of the game which each of them have, we will have a swell season.


Girls Softball

C. Albrecht D. Winter L. Albrecht J. Hanke A. Qietlow J. Gutzke E. Baker V. Huth M. Mumm H. Kuske

W 8

L 0

6 6 6 .4 3 3 2 2 0

2 2 2 4 5 5 6 6 8

Boys Football The football and softball season is over, but here are the standings of the teams: W L T 0 0 R. Kolander ............8 2 0 K. Kolander ............6 5 1 R. Moldenhauer ....2 1 5 A. Voigt ................ 2 1 0 7 A. Nolting .............. The following boys were chosen by the captains of the various football teams to play in an All-Star game. The game was scheduled for Wednesday afternoon, November 7, at 1 :00 P. M. After a good clean battle, Robert Kolander's team came out on top with a score of 13 to O. A Voigt, Capt. R. Kolander, Capt. E. Schulz K. Petermann G. Bauer W. Trapp P. Schwartz M. Retzlaff R. Zimmermann A. Schulz J. Spaude C. Spaude R. Panning R. Otterstatter T. Kuske M. Brandt R. Reimers C. Footh J. Gerlach M. Ulrich C. Dietz G. Voigt W. Sievert K. Kolander H. Zessin D. Lindloff D. Kock P. Kock 41


HUMOR

Termite's Nightmare: I dreamt I dwelt in Marble Halls.

* * * * *

Prof: What is a myth? Biology Student: A female moth.

* * * *

*-

Englishman: Your sky here is clearer than in Londonr New Yorker: Naturally! We have skyscrapers.

* * * * *

History of a Man

A man is a worm. He comes, squirms around a bit. and then some hen gets him.

* * * * *

I ate a little hotdog; I rolled my eyes above. I ate a half a dozen more, And died of puppy love.

* * * * *

She (thoughtfully) : Why do so many women rest their chins on their hands when they're thinking? He (brutally): To keep their mouths shut so they won't disturb themselves.

* * * * *

Farmer Joe: Potato bugs ate my whole crop in ten days. Farmer Moe: They ate mine in two days and then roosted in the trees to see if I'd plant more. Seedman: That's nothing! Right now there's one over there going through my books to see who has ordered seeds. for next spring.

* * * * *

The decline and fall of a test tube: Splash! Crash! Cash!

* * * * *

Sophomore: Do you know what termites do? Fuchs: Naw! Sophomore: That's right.

* * * * *

Little Willy in the best of sashes Fell in the fire and was burned to ashes. By and by the room grew chilly, But no one likes to poke up Willy. 42


"Is a chicken big enough to eat when it's two weeks old ?" "Of course not!" "Then how does it manage to live?"

* * * * * "When I stand on my head, the blood rushes to it. Why doesn't it rush to my feet now?" "Your feet aren't empty." * * * * * First Fuchs: And what are you doing now? Second Fuchs: Buying old wells, sawing them up, and selling them for post holes. * * * * * Coach: What's his name? Manager: Osscowinsinski! Coach: Put him on the first team. Boy, will I get even with the newspaper. * * * * *

The old alumnus, at the pre-game rally, was disparaging the skill of the modern football players. "When I was in college," he boasted, "I helped Harvard beat Yale for three years straight I"~ "Is that so?" queried the quarterback politely. "And which team were you on?" * * * * * Rooky: Don't you find that horseback riding gives you a headache? Riding Master: Oh no; quite the reverse. * * * * * "Now listen to reason," said the friend; "why don't you take a taxi home?" Great tears welled up in the drunk's eyes as he replied: "Sh' no use, pal, sh' no use. M' wife wouldn't let me keep it in the house." * * * * * Magistrate: Do you claim that this man hit you with malice aforethought? Plaintiff: You can't mix me up as easily as that, your honor. I said he hit me with a Ford, and I stick to it! * * * * * Nothing irks a genuine college boy any more than shaking out the envelopefrom home and finding in it nothing but news and love. * * * * * Always borrow from a pessimist-he never expects it back anyway. 43


"If the President gets the job?" "Undertaker."

and Vice-President :I<

:I<

:I<

:I<

both die, who

:I<

Student: Have you "Lamb's Tales"? Li'brarian: This is a bookstore, not a meat-market!

*

:I<

:I<

:I<

*

There are no coarse jokes in the movies because they're all screened.

* * * * *

An absent-minded business man on his way to the officethought he had forgotten his watch. He then took it out of his pocket to see whether he had time to go back and get it.

* * * * *

What students come to the library for: To borrow something. Look it over. For the latest scandals. Wait for the next class. For study?

* * * * * Senior: Did you take a shower? Fuchs: No, is there one missing?

* * * * * A sign before a shoe shine parlor: "Your pedal teguments artistically illuminated for the infinitesimal remuneration of five cents."

* * * * *

Prof: "There's a student in the class who's making a fool of himself. Now when he's finished, I'll begin I"

* *

* * *

Ho: When I drink coffee,I can't sleep! Bo: That's queer. With me it's just the opposite. When I sleep, I can't drink coffee.

* * * * *

Patient: If my wife wants to know what's the matter with me, what shall I tell her? Doctor: Just tell her you're suffering from syncopation. Patient: Syncopation? Doctor: Yes. An unsteady movement from bar to bar.

*

:I<

* * *

The tragedy of a flea is that he knows for a certainty that all his children will go to the dogs! 44


Wartime Hazards! A little puppy doggy Walked in a grocery store. The grocer threw a sausage Upon the grocery floor. He said to Fido, "Eat it!" Said Fido, "I decline. For in that piece of sausage Is an old friend of mine!" Too Much for Him! Traffic Cop: "Whatcher name ?" Red-light passer: "Aloysius Sebastian Cyprian." Traffic Cop (putting away book): "Well, don't let it happen again." "Do you know what termites do?" "Naw!" "That's right!" She (thoughtfully): "Why do so many women rest their chins on their hands when they're thinking?" He (brutally): "To keep their mouths shut so they won't disturb themselves." "Did you know they had to fight the Battle of Bunker Hill over again ?" "No, why?" "It wasn't on the level!" Englishman: "Your sky is clearer over here than in our London." New Yorker: "Sure, we have skyscrapers!" Written on a bomb: "Listen to this one-it'll Visitor: "What's in here?" Guide: "Remains to be seen! Termite's Halls !"

nightmare:

This is the morgue."

"I Dreamt 45

kill you!"

I Dwelt in Marble


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ADVERTISERS I

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QUALITY CLOTHING Correct :Fitting and Standard Lines

TAUSCHECK

& GREEN

Geo. D. Erickson

John W. Graff

ERICKSON & GRAFF Attorneys at Law New Ulm, Minnesota

Eyes Tested

Lenses Ground

Glasses Fitted

and Duplicated

DRS. SCHLEUDER Optometrists

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PHONE 87

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Modernizing, Maintaining Tuning, Repairs, Service, Sales

Wicks Pipe Organs ERNEST C. VOGELPOHL 405-40D North Broadway

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Phone 370 For Printing and Supplies

KEMSKE PAPER

CO.

Towels and Toilet Paper Portable Typewriters, Mimeograph Stencils and Ink Safes-Filing Equipment and OfficeSupplies-Desks

NEW ULM DAIRY THE HOME OF Pure Dairy Products

Ice Cream Phone 104 Try

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COLLEGE STUDENTS at popular prices Ball-Band Rubbrrs and Overshoes

Betty Barrett Shoes for Women

WICHERSKI

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NEW ULM Phone 246


EPPLE BROS. DRUG STORE We Feature Parker, Eversharp and Sheaffer Fountain Pens and Automatic Pencils Also Yardley, Helena Rubinstein and Dorothy Perkins Toiletries A Registered Pharmacist in charge of our Prescription Department at all times E. A. Epple

W. W. Hellmann Registered Pharmacists

EARL'S NEWS STAND News-Magazines-Shoe

Shining

THE BOOTERY Expert Shoe Fitting by X-Ray Tel. 449

123 No. Minnesota

CHAS. F. JANNI & COMPANY Luggage-Harness Leather Goods--Canvas Goods 119 N. Minnesota St. Telephone No. 74 When in Need of Printing Call

SERVICE PRINTING Phone 806

CO.

H. P. Zupfer, Prop. 103 N. Broadway


NEW ULM STEAM LAUNDRY

I

Otto F. Oswald & Sons

Phone No.5 For Your Dry Cleaning, Laundry or Hat Work

I

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We assure you prompt and efficient service and invite you to visit our modern up-to-date plant at 107-109 So. Minn. St.

High Quality

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HENLE 'DRUGS REXALL DRUG STORE Phones 1003 - 1004

New Ulm, Minnesota DOUBLE SECURITY! This bank offers you Banking Safeguards, Convenience and Helpful Service

CITIZENS

STATE BANK

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

New Ulm, Minnesota

I,


E. G. LANG, D. D. S. Office Above State Bank of New Ulm Res. Phone 1172

OfficePhone 472

PALACE

LUNCH

H. A. Bergmeier, Prop. New DIm's Most Popular Lunch Room Sandwiches-Ice Cream-Candy-Soft Drinks-Cigarettes

115 N. Minn. St.

Phone 668

New Ulm, Minn.

Reim & Church Jewelers

Brown & Meidl Music Store and School Musical Merchandise Piano Tuning, Repairing of All Instruments Certified Teachers in Voice and Instrumental Baldwin Pianos-Gulbransen Pianos All Standard Makes of Band and Orchestra Instruments 308 North Minnesota St. Phone 1451 New VIm, Minn.

RETZLAFF MOTOR CO. COMPLETE SUPER SERVICE General Overhauling, Electrical Service, Body and Fender Repairing, Car Painting, Bear Wheel Aligning, Brake Drum Honing and Grinding, Acetylene and Electric Welding, Radiator Flushing and Repairing, Washing, Greasing


w.

EIBNER & SON, INC. Makers of

DELICIOUS ICE CREAM and QUALITY BAKERY GOODS

Phone 128

ENRICHED

DANIEL

WEBSTER FLOUR

HIGHEST GRADE OBTAINABLE SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY LEADING DEALERS •

EVERYWHERE

I

I EAGLE ROLLER MILL CO. NEW ULM, MINNESOTA

I

I I


A. C. OCHS BRICK & TILE COMPANY Executive Officeand Plant Springfield, Minn.

General Sales Office 906 Foshay Tower Minneapolis

MANUFACTURE

ARTISTIC FACE BRICK Various Colors

Also and complete Une of

STRUCTURAL

BUILDING TILE AND COMMON BRICK

WHY IT WILL ... PAY YOU TO BUILD . . . WITH FACE BRICK Face brick offers the widest choice of color tones, both in artistic blends and even shades. Colors and textures burned in becoming lovelier with age. A Face Brick Home offers you less upkeep over a period of years. Lessened heating cost and greater comfort in winter and summer. Greater resale value. Easily financed because loan companies merits of Face Brick houses.

prefer

the known

Our Products Are Sold in the New Ulm Territory by NEW ULM BRICK & TILE YARDS


You Are Welcome at

OLSON 'DRUGS Phone 88

WEILANDT & STEGEMAN Contractors and Builders Correspondence Solicited V>'orI.Done in Any Section of the Community Plans and Specifications Furnished Estimates Cheerfully Given Office 1100 Center St. Auto Glass Replaced to Order Phone 571

DEER BRAND BEER AUGUST SCHELL BREWING COMPANY NEW ULM, MINNESOTA

Our Best Attention Everything

of a banking nature entrusted our best attention.

to our care receives

Vie shall be glad to have a share of your business.

STATE BANK OF NEW ULM Member Federal Deposit Insurance

Corporation

For Smart, Practical and Inexpensive

COLLEGE STYLES

J. A. OCHS

& SON

The Bee Hive -

New DIm

"\Vhere Quality Is Not Expensive"


MIJESING Drug Store EXPERT PRESCRIPTION

ARTCRAFT We Have It!

SERVICE

PHOTO

SERVICE

Will Get It!

PHONES

MONTGOMERY

Or It Iso't Made!

52 - 341

WARD CO.

Wearing Apparel Furniture and Hardware Satisfaction Guaranteed

203-207N. Minn. St. Phone 1700 New VIm, Minn.


INHOFER . RAUSCH BAI(ERY

D路LISHUS PRODUCTS

Phone 232

NEW ULM FURNITURE CO. Complete Home Outfitters BANK WITH

FARMERS & MERCHANTS STATE BANK New Ulm, Minnesota Member Federal Deposit Insurance

Corporation

Friendly Helpful Service at Your Command Residence Phone 150

Office Phone 260

DR. F. H. DUBBE, F. A. C. S. I

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON NEW ULM, MINNESOTA

II. I

I


WHEN IN NEED OF FOOTWEAR Be Sure and Call On Us We carry a complete line of men's, ladies' and children's shoes. We appreciate your business. Our prices are always the lowest, Quality considered.

ATHLETIC SHOES OUR SPECIALTY Shoes Fitted Free by X-Ray

P. J. EICHTEN SHOE STORE New VIm, Minnesota

MEYER THE LEADING PHOTOGRAPHER Special Prices to Students We have a complete line of frames from miniatures to 8xlO in metal or wood. NEW VLM, MINN.

PHONE 165-L

T. R. FRITSCHE, M. D., F. A. C. S. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat GLASSES FITTED New VIm, Minn. Fritsche Bldg.

NEW ULM GREENHOUSES . FLOWERS FOR EVERY OCCASION We are prepared to fill orders for flowers at all points through the F'lorists Telegraphic Delivery Association Phone 45

NEW ULM, MINNESOTA


HENRY SIMONS LUMBER COMPANY Established in 1892 For 53 years we have served the community of New DIm with building needs. YEAR AFTER YEAR DEPENDABLE SERVICEQUALITY MATERIALSRIGHT PRICEWe save the home builder dollars in real values!

Henry Simons Lumber Company Phone 201

Dependable Marvin Earl, Mgr. New Ulm, Minn.

PINKS STORE Friendly Sales People to Help You Caral King, Jr. Dresses

Air-Step

Shoes

Munsing and Barbason Loungerie Swansdown

Coats and Suits

WILLIAM J. VON BANK, D. D. S. F. I. C. D. DENTIST Residence Phone

Office Phone 237

New Ulm, Minn.

797

DR. THEO. F. HAMMERMEISTER Physician and Surgeon OfficeOver State Bank of New DIm


LINDEMANN~S

.

If you want to be admired, praised and commended for excellent judgment in style and comfort, select your next pair of shoes at

"The Students' Shop"

EUGENE KOEHLER OLD RELIABLE

BARBER

SHOP

Good Satisfactory Work Guaranteed at All Times Your Patronage Is Appreciated

PAT'S DRY CLEANERS We pick up and deliver Garments insured while in our possession Quality Guaranteed Phone 115 Kenneth Prall

Drawers and Bottlers Since 1864 Telephone No.1

New Ulm, Minnesota


SCHUCK'S

TAILORS

TAILORED TO MEASURE SUITS AND OVERCOATS Cleaning and Pressing All Kinds of Repairing No Deposits-No C. O. D.'s 215 N. Minn. St. Phone 498

ROBERT

FESENMAIER,

INC.

HARDWARE NEW ULM, MINN.

H. J. BAUMANN INSURANCE AGENCY Hospitalization Bonds Insurance Phone 666

HENRY GOEDE STUDIO We Make PHOTOS of Merit Most Reliable Studio in Southern Minnesota A Trial Will Convince Students'

Clothing and Sport Wear

Hummel Brothers New UIm, :Minn.

14 No. Minnesota St.

SOMSEN, DEMPSEY & SOMSEN Henry N. Somsen W. H. Dempsey Henry N. Somsen, Jr. ATTORNEYS AT LAW

Minnesota

New VIm,

ROYAL MAID ICE CREAM STORE "Make Our Store Your Headquarters"

CHAMPION SHOE SHOP For tho Best Repairing in Town 517 Center St.

Courteous Service


Buy Where Yon See This Sign 500 Store Buying Power

"YOU BUY BETTER BECAUSE WE BUY BETTER" F. H. RETZLAFF HARDWARE CO. Since 1887

AID ASSOCIATION FOR LUTHERANS Legal Reserve Life Insurance Exclusively For Synodical Conference Lutherans APPLETON, WISCONSIN THE LEADER IN ITS FIELD!


Compliments of

DOTTY DUNN For Courteous and Efficient Service Eat at the

saVER LATCH CAFE HERZOG PUBLISHING

COM'PANY

- : - Printing of Distinction -:Office Supplies and Furniture NEW ULM, - MINNESOTA

r--~,2.'

'._-

I~YICTORY .~, ~ ~ q, ~

BUY UNITED STATES

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UNION HOSPITAL NEW ULM, MINN. A modern, well-equipped, and fireproof hospital supervised by and staffed with registered nurses.

PHONE NO. 404 See

CRONE BROS. CO. For Young Men's Clothing and Furnishings THE FASTIDIOUS STUDENT will find satisfactory

service at

Grundmeyer's Barber-Beauty Shop Air Conditioned Below Tauscheck & Green's Clothing Store

Phone 710

SALET'S DEPARTMENT STORE-NEW

ULM, MINN.

EVERYTHING TO WEAR FOR HIM OR HER WEAR SALET'S FAMOUS FOOTWEAR

Highest Quality and of Course "YOU ALWAYS SAVE AT SALET'S"


Delicious Home Made Sausages

CITY MEAT MARI(ET New VIm, Minnesota

Quicker Service


A CHILDREN'S CHRISTMAS SONG From heaven above to earth I come To bear good news to every home; Glad tidings of great joy I bring, 'Whereof I now will say and sing: Luther wrote this Christmas' hymn for his children for the Christmas of 1534. The Chrrstrnas season had brought its accompanying hustling and bustling into the home of Martin Luther, too. Katy, as Luther called his wife, had her hands full, as did the other women. The lot of rocking the small babe in the cradle fell to Luther. Now a man, especially a man of Luther's musical talents, doesn't just sit and mutely rock a cradle. The rhythmic movement soon instigates the feeling of complete contentment; a feeIing that becomes so Irrepressibte that it soon manifests itself in the humming of a melodysometimes something old, more often something entirely new. In the case of same, the melody will gradually fit intself to a lyriceither old or original. The result of Luther's rocking the babe was Vom Himmel hoch. Luther had the unusual custom of preparing for his family a special Christmas service on Christmas Eve, 'and it was for such a festival that he wrote this Christmas hymn. By his orders, the first seven stanzas of this 'hymn were sung by a man dressed as an angel, whom the children greeted with the eighth and following stanzas. The hymn was first published in GeistUche Lieder, D. Mart. Luther, where it was coupled with the folk-tune, Ich kmnm' aus f'rembden Laden her. The melody, perhaps by Luther himself, with which this hymn is now universally sung, first appeared with the text in Gelstliche Lieder, auffs neu gebessert und gemerkt, zu Wittenberg, Gedruckt zu Leyptztk durch Valten Schumann, 1539. The design bordering Vom Himmel Hoch on our cover, is a reproduction from the title-page of the first evangelical hymnbook of 1523, which contained but eight 'hymns. Vom Himmel hoeh is sung by congregations an over the world during the Christmas season. It has been sung by small children (and grownup children as well) generation after generation, and it has been translated into languages of every country where Christian truths are proclaimed. Unlike "A Mighty Fortress," this hymn taints little of the formal majesty and strength so often found in the works of Luther, but is purely tender and childlike. The thoughts and the language are those of a child, and only as a child can one truly appreciate them. Ah, dearest Jesus, holy Child, Make Thee a bed, soft, undefiled, Within my heart, that it may be A quiet chamber kept for Thee. My heart for very joy doth leap, My lips no more can silence keep; I, too, must sing with joyful tongue That .sweetest ancient cradle-song: Glory to God in highest heaven, Who unto us His Son hath 'given! While angels sing with pious mirth A gtad new year to all the earth.


D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

llumbtr

~nrd! 1946

;Number 3


TABLE OF CONTENTS LITERARY What I Like Most About Lutheran High School

2

Boys Are That Way

3

A Crucifixion Incident........................................................ 4 Der Kerper ..

5

My Experience On Palm Sunday

6

On Humility

7

Prej udice

8

Ye Shall Know Hereafter

10

Lord, Thou Art Shepherd

10

EDITORIAL

;;

A Comment

12

Gossip

13

ALUMNI N'OTES

17

EXCHAN:GE

20

COLLEGE NOTES

23

CO-ED NOTES

27

LOCALS

31

SPORTS

35


WHAT I LIKE

MOST

ABOUT LUTHERAN

HIGH

SCHOOL

(From MilwaukeeSentinel, January 14, 1946) The late Lois Krueger, senior at Lutheran High School, wrote the following prize winning essay. Were Lutheran High a different type of school,I would find an essay on this topic rather difficult to compose,for I have been here only five months. This being the type of school it is, however, I feel certain that my views will be the same at the close of the year as they are now in the beginning, for I have attended one Lutheran school, and I find the characteristic which was most outstanding in that school also shows itself here, as it surely must in all our parochial schools. This outstanding characteristic is a beautiful spirit of oneness. It is not the conventional "school spirit" of which every school is eager to boast, but it is a spirit that flows along silently in the hearts of the students, a spirit better felt than expressed by words. ONENESS-it is a oneness in faith, oneness in principles, the type of oneness which springs from daily common religious fellowship. Such a spirit cannot leave one unaffected, especially one who enters a school of this kind for the first time, and it cannot fail to be appreciated by such a student, for it is this spiritual oneness that makes a strange school seem to "belong" to him almost immediately, that changes strange classmates into familiar fellow students with whom there is a commonbond. It is this spirit which prompts a closer union between instructor and student, greater discipline and respect, and which awakens a greater faithfulness toward duty in the student. 2


It is this spirit which has made the previous year-my first year of such school life--my happiest and most progressive one, both mentally and spiritually, and which promises to repeat itself in this present year-the spirit which once I have tasted I wouldnot be without. The late Lois Krueger's prize winning essay on "What I Like Most About Lutheran High School" was selected from 375 entries. Lois passed away Christmas day after an illness of several weeks. The MilwaukeeSentinel's first place award of a $25 Victory bond will be presented to the Lutheran High SchoolLibrary for a book memorial to her name. Lois Krueger was a student at Dr. Martin Luther College during the schoolyear 1944 to 1945.

BOYS ARE THAT WAY Summer was blooming in all its beauty and fields lay tinted with .green carpets of grain that stretched their rolling endlessness as far as the eye couldsee. The sun slowly descendedtowards the horizon far in the west as down the dusty road two youngsters in the prime of their mischievous age aimlessly wandered. Finally, their attention fixed on a large pile of rocks and immediately the boys walked around it, closelyexamining every crack and crevice of this pile of refugees from cultivated lfields. The boys were hunting. Their little guns dangled carelessly at their sides. Suddenly they pouncedupon a group of the rocks, rolled them away and revealed an oil-furred black and white animal. They beat it with their toy guns, breaking both of them and in several minutes had killed this strange creature. They stood glowing with pride, picked up their prize and in all haste started for home, eager to display their game. Dusk had engulfed the expanse and a chorus of pheasant cocks sounded through the early dawn of night as the weary boys returned. They entered the porch of the house at a rather tactless time. 'their sister's beau was there, and the boys hadn't been aware of a certain odor, that hung heavily about them, until they entered. Sis didn't see them and didn't smell them but, needless to say.the boys couldn't enter the house any farther until her beau left. They made their way into the dog house and stretched out on the golden bed of straw and soon dropped their weary lids. 3


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Hours later the boys were awakened by the barking of the dog who wanted to get into his little den. Fearing the wrath of the whole household which was long asleep, the boys took their prize and made for the chicken coop. Unfortunately the noise awakened Gramp who was always worried about his chickens being stolen.Gramp, in longdrawers and slippers and with the double barreled shot gun in hand, made a weird looking spectacle as he made his way across the moonlit yard to the door of the coop. He cocked both hammers of the gun and gazed fixedly into the dark barn, stooping over to see up to the roosts. The dog close at his heels didn't expect him to stoop and touched him with his cold nose. Gramp was extremely tense and excitedly pulled both triggers. There was a blasting noise followed by a confusion of cackles and feathers. The two boys lay shaking with fear in one corner of the coopand Gramp with his gun in hand made double time for the barn. The rest of the confused household rushed to the coop and found the two frightened boys amidst the remnants of a disturbed flock of chickens, seven of which were killed. Seeing the skunk the boys had killed, mother complacently put two and two together and took her two boys back to the house amidst a mass of praise for saving the rest of the flock from this beastly night marauder. R. Walz A CRUCIFIXION INCIDENT

At this time of the church year, we Christians turn our thoughts to Christ's passion. Once more we figuratively make the journey to Calvary and witness Christ's crucifixion and death. There are many small incidents involved in the crucifixionstory, but we do not always consider them deeply. One of these incidents is recorded in Mark 15:39. In this Bible verse, the words spoken Ibya Roman centurion are recorded. They were spoken when Christ died. These words are, "Truly this man was the Son of God." It is interesting to delve speculatively into the history of this man and his relation to Jesus. The Roman centurion probably had been a soldier for some time and had been promoted to his present position. He was, therefore, not young but closer to middle age. He must have been courageous, loyal, honorable, and honest. He did not know of Jesus until he was given the task of capturing Him, and thus was present during the trial, the 4


scourging, and the mocking. The centurion had witnessed many crucifixions of various people but never one like this. Jesus was so meek and so willing to suffer! When Jesus died, the centurion could not keep from saying, "Truly this man was the Son of God." He had seen many other men die-in battle, in the arena, at their posts-but never in the way Jesus died. He felt that here was something happening that was not human, but divine. The sky had darkened; the earth vibrated. Surely this man was the Son of God! The Roman centurion seemed to know nothing about the life or teachings of Jesus. He didn't know the name of Jesus but said, '.'This man." Suddenly, however, when Jesus died, he saw the innocence and righteousness of Jesus. Yet there was so much that he had missed! He had been with Jesus the whole day but he had not known the story of salvation. He is to be pitied. Neither had he realized who God is. His mind had been too muddled with pagan ideas. He had not understood for whom Jesus suffered and died, and why Jesus did this. He made a wonderful confession. Yes, he is to be pitied because of what he had missed. We, Who live on this earth much later than the time of Christ and Roman centurion, have the full Gospel for salvation. We have our Lenten services which bring these truths to us again. The Gospel was given to us, and we have the opportunity to use it for the welfare of ourselves and others. Lucile Langacker DER KOERPER Als ich durch das dunkel Zimmer ging, schlug mein Herz, denn alles war so still und furchtbar. Meine Beine ffrhlten sich sehr schwer, und auf einmal stiesz ich gegen einen Stuhl mit meinem Fusz. Langsam stand ich auf, denn ich 'hatte meinen Riicken weh getan: Im nachsten Augenblick traf ich etwas Andres und ich schrie leise "Au I"~

denn ich dachte, dasz ich meinen groszen Zeh gebrochen hatte. Es war, als ab ich es in meinen Knochen fiihlen konnte, dasz etwas Schreckliehes geschehen wiirde. Meine. Backen waren heisz, meine Stirn war nasz, und meine Lippen waren trocken. Ich hielt meine Hand vor mir, denn ich wollte mit meinen Fingern fuhlen, wohin ich ginge. Wenn ich nur Katzenaugen hatte l Auf einmal fiel mein Mund weit auf; denn gerade vor mir war ein Skelett, aus 6


dessen Kehle f'ortwahrendes ein leises Geschrei hervorkam. Ieh konnte meinen Ohren nicht glauben. Ich wuszte, dasz mein Gesicht bleich war, und vielleicht stand mein Haar auch zu Berge. Der Kopf des Skeletts war grosz, sein Hals war lang und scharf wie ein Messer, und ich konnte zwei grosze Zahne in seinem Mund sehen. Ich wollte gerade da sterben, aber dann kitzelte mich meine Nase und statt zu sterben, nieste ich. Ich fiihlte mieh sehr krank und begann meine Nagel zu beiszen. Kraftig' nahm es meinen Arm, und als ich laut schrie, wachte ich auf. Es war nur ein Traum. Elsa Klein

MY EXPERIENCE ON PALM SUNDAY My story starts in the afternoon of Palm Sunday, when our machine-gun platoon, together with a rifle company, formed an objective-an over-head on the main railroad line to Gladbeck. We reached this place with very little opposition, and the word was passed down that we were to

go into a small town by the name of Werne. The rifle company was split into three groups with about forty men in each group. Our machine-gun platoon went with one of these groups into one side of the town, but the other two groups met with great opposition. We got into town and ran for a bombed-out school-house. While we were waiting here, two truckloads of "Jerries" came driving past the school-house in which we were. We were ready to open fire on them, but the lieutenant gave us orders to keep low. Our observers had spotted three German tanks at the edge of town. After it turned dark, the platoon leader sent us over to a large house to check for "Krauts." He chose three of us to do this. We had to practically "feel" our way through the rooms, our guns ready in case anything moved. As we went down the cellar, we heard something move, which made the moments a little more tense. But after we investigated a little further, it turned out to be a harmless cat that had found its shelter down there. This task being finished, the rest of the men came over. That night we had guards posted at every entrance. There were two of us on guard at each door, but everyone was as quiet as a mouse, and to make it a 'little more thrilling, the doors and floors would creak as the wind was howling. That night the Jerries pulled out of town, and we took over the rest of the town in the morning. This little episode shows 6


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that the Hand of God was over us even over there. N. H. Welke ON HUMILITY Augustine said, "Humility is first, second,and third in Christianity." There it is. Another fact concerningthis so important virtue in man all ready to be mentally pigeon-holed-stuffed into a mental pigeon-hole already filled to overflowing. Yes, we are pretty well supplied with an amply lucid conception of what humility is. The efforts of our teachers in the classroom, our pastors on the pulpit, and Christian periodicalshave left us far from ignorant of those concepts of which humility is composed. Mere knowledge of the virtue is not enough. It is the practical application which is so sorely and grossly lacking. I don't intend this to be an erudite exposition. I don't feel capable of thoroughly expounding a topic such as this. What I do want to do is to jot down a. few thoughts, not statistical data or other forms to be filed away, but thoughts to foster thought. Then, remember, you really aren't so very much! We oweall our natural gifts to God. You cannot exalt yourself knowing that you are nothing, absolutely nothing, of yourself. For your own sake, realize it. Realizethat you know that you are the object of undeserved, redeeming love. Self-exaltation surely seems grossly out of place when we consider how "He humbled Himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross." (Phil. 2 :8). How can we flaunt out knowledge,talents, and wit in contrast to the Almighty washing the feet of His disciples? But consider. In the first place, Godhas commandedus to be humble. Shall I stop? I cannot. It is necessary to go on. It is given as the last of the divine commandsto us in Micah 6 :8. We read, "And what doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?" In the Old Testament as well as in the New, it is an essential characteristic of true piety, or of the man who is right with God. "God humbles man in order to bring him to Himself," (Deut. 8 :2-3), and it is when men humble themselves before Him that they are accepted. (I Kings 7


21 :29, II Chron. 7 :14). When I say true piety, I like to think of the Christian spirit of Luther-pious, but not pietistic. This by no means implies that we should be slavish or servile; nor should we be leary about maintaining a right estimate of ourselves-our gifts-or with proper self-

assertion when called for. Oh, be ye humble, ye sons and daughters of Zion,be ye humble in Christ. Glenn Felch PREJUDICE

What is prejudice? One hears the word quite frequently. Just recently I chanced to find a definition which explains prejudice quite aptly. Rachel Davis Du Bois states: "Prejudice is being down on what you're not up on:' This one statement quite readily tells us why we have an instant dislike for certain people, why we are prejudiced. and why certain peopleand things "rub us the wrong way." I doubt that there are many who have not heard someone refer to cigars as "smelly old things." If one probed into the matter, he might find that most men who make such a statement have at some time tried smoking a cigar but gave it up after turning a sickly green 'hue about the mouth and enjoying whatever accompanies such change of color. That tall, angular lady, with the desire to appear only average in height, will quite vehemently declare that "hats having tall, peaked crowns are ridiculous." Of course, many men will readily agree with her and then proceed to say that "all women's hats are ridiculous." We find the comics overflowingwith such ridicule. Most of the comic strips are produced by men. and a great many of the hats are also produced by men. The men who produce them are however,much more imaginative (usually the dreamy type: but often having rather "nightmarish" ideas) than such as are confronted everywhere by the "creations." We cannot expect the men to enjoy the women's hats, because they are not "up on" this bit of fun the women enjoy. â&#x20AC;˘ There are, of course, some prejudices which are the results of extensive experience and constant and cautious contemplation. I am of the opinion that these are more 8


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often the exception than the rule on our great list of prejudices. Each time we make a new acquaintance, we judge him by those things which we like about him balanced against those we do not like about him. If he is well-versed in foreign affairs and goes into a long discussion of war news and foreign policy-which we, by the way, turned off on the radio so we couldget "hep" on "what gives" with "Frankie" and those newest "jive tunes"-we call him a "bore" and are prejudiced against him. We, because of our lack of interest, are not up on the news, so we are down on those who are in the know. It certainly "rubs us the wrong way" if someonecomes along with some new possession, a car for example, and flaunts -it before us just when we discovered that we are behind with the rent and also owe the butcher, the baker, and the candlestickmaker. It will probably even drive us to comment that we wouldn't have that Buick, or LincolnZephyr (whichever the other fellow has) even if it were given to us. The car had done us no harm, but we are down on it because our financesare not up to it. We are prejudiced against foreigners, perhaps because they speak a language which we don't understand. Certainly, the average person dislikes the man who talks "like a walking dictionary or encyclopedia,"because that person cannot keep up with the man's pace. A businessman is justified, then, in being prejudiced against the Jews, because he is not on to how the Jew manages to gain so much profit. Another man is prejudiced against cock, tail parties, because he is not "up" to drinking so much as his neighbor can without having a hangover the next morning. His close relative is he who is so prejudiced against liquor that he attempts prohibition of the sale of liquors. This man's very good reason for his prejudice may be that he 'has someonedn his acquaintance who cannot see it without "imbibing too freely." If he's not up to it, or if his acquaintances are not up to it, they must be down on it. "It has to be up or down,it has to be this or that" and that is prejudice. M. Goehring 9


YE SHALL KNOW HEREAFTER

We do not know the reason for This universal strife, We only know that God,somehow, Controls each human life. And it may be the tears we shed Are one unbroken strand Of shining pearls in His design; Some day we'll understand. We do not know the reason why Our dear friends have to part, We only know when God comes in He fills the lonely heart. It may be in our loneliness He lifts us by His hand To greater blessings than we lost; Some day we'll understand.

LORD, THOU ART SHEPHERD He was an old man, hobbling along the dirty streets of lower Chicago. His clothing was tattered and torn; his shoes had seen their better days long ago. He hobbled along slowly with the aid of a crooked stick which he used for a cane. No one noticed him; no one even stopped to give him a dime for a cup of coffee. He was utterly alone and had no place to go. He 'had no home anymore; no loved ones; he had no one. But he had had someone. He had had a lovely home in the exclusive residential section of Chicago. He had held an important job in a major defense plant. He had a loving wife and two children whom he loved dearly. He had had everything he wanted. Life had been complete-that is, almost-he had never gone to the church of God. Oh, he knew about God; he knew about Christ. But he didn't think that church was worthwhile. If he had all these things, where were they now? Why was he thus hobbling along the dirty streets, dressed as he was? . The answer? It's not a pleasant answer. Many things in this world are not pleasant but we have to bear whatever misfortune or crosses God places upon us. Our particular character had several grievous misfortunes. 10


First, with the close of the war, the defense plant had closed down. He was out of a job, and, being an old man, what was he to do? And, then that same day, the day he lost his job, his beautiful home caught fire and burned to the ground, taking with it, in its course of destruction, his wife, and his children, and all his earthly possessions. AU in one day his entire world had been shattered. The little money he had, soon was gone. His appearance became poorer daily. Slowly his features became haggard and he needed a cane to help him hobble the streets, searching for something to do; some kind of work in order to make enough money on which to' live. And thus we find him on this particular day. A man without friends and without the faith in God. As he ambles aimlessly along, he at length approaches a church. A sudden desperate hope seizes him. Something inside of him compels him to go inside the church and pray to God, asking Him for forgiveness and help. Slowly and hesitatingly, he mounts the steps of the church and crosses the threshold. It is very quiet inside. From somewhere, he

didn't know where, came the soft strains of an organ, playing hymns of praise of the Aimighty, The sunlight streaming through the colored windows gives a peaceful atmosphere. Our friend feels a complete restfulness creeping upon him. Slowly he advances toward the front of the church. Reaching the altar steps he suddenly flings himself down and prays. Yes, he, for the 'first time that he can remember, prays to God. He prays for forgiveness for being such a fool and refusing to worship God in his heart and in church. He also prays earnestly for help, help from the Inevitable wolf who was sitting on his doorstep. We can rest assured that God will answer this man's prayer and that He will take this newly-won soul into His fold! guarding and protecting him from all temptations of evil. -Cudworth

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J r'1 L:J

A COMMENT

A friend of mine, going to a nearby 'town, was picked on a highway some time ago. The people that picked him up were eager to strike up a conversation, and it wasn't long before my friend revealed the fact that he was a student at Dr. Martin Luther College. Whereuponthe lady in the car frowned and asked if they stiH have such poor sportsmanship at D. M. L. C. The man then briefly related an incident when he brought a group of boys to play here in some form of competition in which poor sportsmanship was exhibited on our side. It was at this time he formed his opinion of our school regarding sportsmanship. This incident may have occurred several years ago. Schools can be accused of worse things than poor' sportsmanship; however, we should conduct ourselves so that no one can draw such conclusions. All one has to do is attend the afternoon class games to witness such misconduct. It's in these class games that poor sportsmanship has its start and grows also showing its ugly head in out-of-school competition. It is here it should be, and must be, checked. There is bound to be rivalry where there is competition, but it can be a sublimated rivalry. up

A poor loser is a poor sportsman. Someoneis going to lose and someone ds going to win, and regardless of how good one is in any sport, defeat at some time is inevitable. 12


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One can't win in every contest! It is best to adjust oneself to an occasionaldefeat,-with a grin. It's more fun to win and everyone should start any form of competitionwith the intention of winning and hold fast to that conviction until the contest is won or lost and not before. One can win and exhibit poor sportsmanship, too. What is good sportsmanship? It's conduct becoming to a sportsman involving honest rivalry and graceful acceptance of results. We have many good sportsmen here at this institution. Are you one? I know it's not sportsmanship that wins a game, but a team can go undefeated for a seasonand if their sportsmanship or that of their supporting group, is not what it should be, their supposedhonorable record doesn't mean a thing to anyone but themselves-and even that is questionable. Don't justify an unsportsmanlike deed with that old excuse: "It's part of the game!" That's the bad thing about it; it usually is part of the game. This concerns all students, girls and boys, in competition or merely observing. It is your responsibility to be a good sportsman; a better sportsman; yes, the best sportsman! R. Walz

GOSSIP

One day a professor stepped before his class and started to talk about Edgar Allen Poe. Suddenly he turned to one of the eminent male members in the class before him and bluntly asked him to define gossip. The young male student, after recovering from the shock of the question, cleared his throat and gave the followinganswer: "Gossip," he began, "is something which the girls like to do." The poor fellow was nearly mobbed by the opposite sex. After the class had again been restored to order, the professor turned to the girls and asked them if the truth hurt. There was a dead sitence. By this little incident, we do not wish to imply that the members of the feminine sex are aU gossips, but, of course, they will have to admit that they do outdo us males in that respect. 13


We come into contact with people of all sorts every day, and through some of these people we hear a lot of things about other people. We call this gossip; yet, do we really know what gossip is? Gossip is really idle talk, not always true, about other people and their affairs. You probably are a tact with salesmen and you probably hear quite petitors. Fifty per cent

businessman. You come into conothers, and through these people a deal of gossip about your comof this is probably untrue.

I am a student, ah yes, one of those poor little "fellers" that sits in classes for six hours a day and learns nothing. Nothing, did you say? Ah, my friend, how wrong you are! Do you know that I learned something today that very few people have learned? Why, yes, I learned that a certain student hasn't polished his shoes for a whole week! Mind you, a whole week ! No, of course not; the professors didn't teach me that. A certain member of my class did. She told me she has been watching that fellow's shoes for a week and in that time they haven't even seen a cloth for dusting them. Why, of course, that was gossip! Is that so odd? You see, my friend, college students are not different from any other person. They eat the same way, they talk the same way, and they gossip even better! Well, if I don't see the dawn of another day, you will know the reason why. You say you think I am putting this too strongly. No, my friend, again you are wrong The fact that a person should not gossip can never be put tO'Ostrongly. During the war, posters were hung up throughout the country warning the citizens of 'Our country to be on the alert for gossip and gossipers. How many men lost their lives because some foolish gossiper couldn't keep his mouth shut? How many homes have been disrupted because of foolish people spreading idle stories about the affairs of others in which they were not concerned? The answers to these two questions would show us that the numbers would run high into the hundreds and thousands. We could continue to cite incidents where the gossiper has caused destruction, but I think these two mentioned above can cover our cause for the present. My friend, do you still think I put it too strongly? Before, I stated that college students could gossip better than the average person. Yes, I know, they should be a 14


little more cultured, hut a human being is a human being, whether he is a student or a blacksmith. What do they gossip about? All right, you asked for it. Here are just a very few examples. A group of girls just came out of a certain class. Immediately one girl said, "My goodness, John mustn't have gotten up in time again. Did you see his hair? Oh-h-h!" At another time a group of boys were g-athered in a room having one of those grand

"bull" sessions. A fellow sitting in a slouched position started to talk about another fellow. Again the gossip lines started to buzz. Oh, that is just childish gossip, you say. Did you ever stop to think what this childish gossip could develop into? No? Well, think it over, my friend. By this time most of you, my. readers, are probably saying to yourselves, "What is this fellow trying to do, get rid of some steam?" If that is the way you wish to put it, go right ahead. It is your privilege. But before you go any farther, I wish you would stop and reconsider a few points. What are these points? They are few and simple. Firstly, do you yourself like to be gossiped about? Secondly, are you sure that the gossip you spread is true, or is it one idle story after another? Thirdly, would you be willing to say these things in front of the person about whom you are spreading them? If you can truthfully say "Yes" to all these questions, which I doubt you can, then you can say that I am trying to rid myself of some steam. My dear readers, let us all from this time on make life a great deal happier for ourselves and our friends by putting a stop to this endless spread of gossip. Editor

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1!l. j$l. 1. C!C. j$lessenger The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time- of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends. The aim of "The Messenger" is to offer such material as will be beneficial as well as interesting to our readers, to keep the alumni in a closer contact with the college, to foster school spirit, and to give the students an opportunity in the practice of composition and the expressionof their thoughts. Entered as second class matter at Post Office of New DIm, Minn.

No.3

Volume XXXVI MARCH1946 THE MESSENGER STAFF Editor Associate Editor Business Manager Assistant Manager Assistant Manager Typist Typist Alumni Notes College Notes Co-ed Notes Locals Sports Humor

Harold Goede Roman Walz Quentin Albrecht Gerald Cudworth Delbert Mey Louise Pape Helen Fennern Lois Albrecht Lorna Gerlach Chrysta Albrecht Glenn Felch Wayne Schmidt Carroll Trettien 16


Looking back to those who have previously walked on our campus, we shall see what events have taken place in their lives. Marriages

Milton Emkow, H. S. '42, and Elaine Brinkmann, H. S. '43, were married in Truman, Minnesota, on January 6, 1946. The attendants, former classmates of the bride and groom, were Naomi Gerlach, H. S. '43, Norman Lindloff', H. S. '42, and Carolyn Bathke, '46. George ("Rocky") Battermann, H. S. '45, and Eleanor Mueller, were married last summer in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. "Rocky" is serving in the U. S. Army and is now stationed in Camp Beale, California. Pastor John Raabe, H. S. '30, of Milwaukee,Wisconsin, and Lorraine Anne Muenkel exchanged marriage vows on January 25, 1946, at the St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Caledonia, Minnesota. The marriage of Pastor Waldemar Schuetze, H. S. '27, and Mrs. Erma Fleischer, H. S. '35, the widow of the late Pastor Marcus Fleischer, was solemnized by the groom's father, Pastor Martin Schuetze, in St. Paul's Lutheran Church in New Ulrn, Minnesota, on February 22, 1946. Richard Grunze, '44, played the wedding music. The attendants were Pastor and Mrs. Armin Schuetze of Thiensville, Wisconsin. 17


lone Huebner, ,44, and Pastor Delmar Brick were united in holy wedlock on January 2, 1946, in Manitowoc, Wisconsin. Former classmates of the bride who were present were Marie Gurgel, Myron Hilger, Elizabeth Tabbert, Gerald Gutzke, and Helen Gross. The new couple made their home in Kimberly, Wisconsin. Due to the shortage of teachers, Mrs. Brick is teaching school in Menasha until the close of the school year. Marvel Fuhrman, teacher at Rhinelander, Wisconsin, is engaged to LeRoy Dreier of Norwood, Minnesota. A July wedding is planned. Installations Pastor and Mrs. Emil ToepeI's new home is now in Onalaska, Wisconsin. Mrs. Toepel is the former Eunice

Stern, ex. '42. Pastor and Mrs. Art Kell of East Fork Mission, Whiteriver, Arizona, has accepted the call to Battle Creek Michigan. Mrs. Kell is the former Hildegard Schuetze, ex. '29. Pastor Ervin Binger, H. S. '26, of Hutchinson, Minnesota, has accepted the call to Whiteriver, Arizona, where he will take up the duties of Pastor Kell. Pastor Christian Albrecht, H. S. '18, of Johnson, Minnesota, has received and accepted a call to start a new mission in Glenwood,Minnesota. He and his family had resided in Johnson ten years. Mrs. Albrecht is the former Clara Mundinger, ex. '19. Births . A son, Dale Keith, tipping the scale to nine pounds, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Ervin Walz on October 17, 1945. Mr. Walz, '43, is a teacher in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Pastor and Mrs. Karl Pingel of Bay City, Michigan, were blessed with a son, Bruce John, in November, 1945. Mrs. Pingel is the former Lois Vangel, '40. On April 13 of this year, Ruth Manette, daughter of

Mr. and Mrs. George H. Heckmann of La Crosse, Wisconsin, will celebrate her first birthday. Gerald. 18

Ruth also has a brother,


Campus Visitors

Capt. and Mrs. Edgar Duin of Washington, D. C., were visitors on the campus in February, Capt. Duin expects his discharge towards the end of the year. Mrs. Duin is the former Dorothy Froehlke, ex. '40. Mrs. Richard Grunze, nee Arlene Voelz,visited friends on the campus on February 17, 1946. Servicemen Private Vernon Sprengeler, H. S. '45, is now stationed in Germany. He left the U. S. on December 10, 1945, and reached his destination in eleven days. Some places of interest that he has seen are the following: Bremen, Hanover, Magdeburg, Berlin, and Eisleben. Vernon states that the Red Cross is very good to them. Right now he is on guard duty and has a lot to do with explosives. Miscellaneous Miss Ethel Giziewski,ex. '24, is a Teaching Supervisor at the Children's Hospital in Milwaukee,Wisconsin, where Gertrude Gieschen,also a graduate of '24, is MedicalRecord Librarian.

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Too often it is common among us, as well as among other students, to gripe about conditions in school. In the W. S. S. F. (World Students Service Fund) News Release. there are several illustrations which, I am sure, would give ample cause to gripe, if causes for griping can be found. The W. S. S. F. was organized during World War I to help education seekers of war-torn Europe. In the last war it developed into an international affair. In the third bulletin they sent us, interesting data concerning conditions in the University of Athens and also in universities in China, the F hilippines, and Czechoslovakiawere written.

Here are some of the conditions in Athens. In the best student center, as many as thirty students were studying in an averaged-sized room. Desks were rough boards. The students were pale and undernourished. On the beds in the dormitories there were but two blankets and no sheets or pillows. A room for six people contained two chairs. One nail on the wall near each bed was enough for a boy's whole wardrobe. The students lived on one meagre meal a day. This consisted of beans cooked in olive oil. In one year, 742 students contracted tuberculosis due to undernourishment and exposure. In China students and professors walked ninety days, averaging thirty miles a day, until they reached Kunming, where Peking University and two other evacuated univer20


sities united to form the Southwest Coordinated University. In their dining-rooms the only furniture consisted of a few rickety tables. Conditions were unsanitary. Damp rooms, with little .light, held crowded rows of double-decker bunks. Books were very scarce. China 'has doubled her university enrollment since 1937. However, in China only one out of 6,500 attends college. By way of comparison, in the United States, one out of 150 attends college. Post-war plans for education in China are as follows: From universities and colleges they wish to turn out 237,000 technical experts, 232,500 doctors in the same time, and 31,000 graduates of arts, law, and commerce. In the Philippines, the greatest and best university was destroyed. Before its destruction, it had 7,500 students and -714 professors. Of their thirty-six other collegiate schools, many have also been destroyed. Only 36,000 vol-

umes of the 733,000 in the National Library were not destroyed. Ninety per cent of laboratory equipment of colleges and universities was destroyed. In Czechoslovakia,students' sleeping-quarters are overcrowded. As many as thirty are in one small room. There are no beds, but only mattresses. They are in desperate need of books, food, and clothing. Weekly rations for the individual in Czechoslavikiaare 3% pounds of black bread, % pint of milk, 1% ounces of butter, 1 ounce fat, 1 egg, etc. Have we really cause to gripe? Concordia Seminary at Springfield is celebrating its hundredth anniversary this year. Starting in the October issue of their paper, The Springfielder, they are publishing a brief history of their school. Copies of the October and succeedingissues will be placed in the "Exchange Shelf" of the Library. Why not read these interesting articles and become better acquainted with the history of one of our Synodical Conference institutions? In the February, 1946issue of ConcordiaTeachers College paper, The Spectator, there is an editorial entitled, "For Better Relations.". The author tells us how more friendly terms can be maintained among the students. He says that too often we misuse our powers of speech. We often judge fellowstudents without goodbasis. The article is well worth reading. Perhaps it fits our school,too. 21


:..

In the February CollegeReporter from Mankato Teachers College, there is an interesting discussion on "How should college co-eds dress?" It states that at Wisconsin University a survey was taken on what co-eds should and should not wear. Among the "should nots" were slacks, snow suits, and navy pea-jackets. "The average girl wears too much make-up," was a comment by one of the judges. "Neither should make-up be applied in public, including hair-combing." Neatness, simplicity, and originality keynote the judges' 'likes, while too much jewelry, blue-jeans, and sweat-shirts are frowned upon. Another article of interest comes from The Spectator. "The Church Views This World of 1946," is the topic. It says that in the new post-war era the church is not receiving the place it should. The author states that "the world is regarding the Church as merely a set of fine ideals, which is, however, entirely useless in guiding human society." As future workers of the Kingdom,it is our duty to inform our people of the correct relation between the Church and the world. We must correct the mistaken belief that the Church adapt itself to present phases of society and thus, consequently,take a minor role in the individual's life. Austin Jr. Collegepaper, The Silver Scroll, has an interesting article appearing in the issue of February 8, 1946. The topic is "Junior Colleges Show New Trend in Education." It tells 'a little of the background of our school system, and also the development and purpose of Junior Colleges. This paper you will also find on your Exchange Shelf.


....

C OLLEG E. NOTES Since the last issue of the Messenger came out, there have been some changes made in the staff, and to yours truly 'has fallen the job (or should I say pleasure?) of reporting the college activities. After spending two weeks at home, the students of our fair college came back to school full of vim, vigor, and enthusiasm for the schoolwork that confronted them. OlI YEAH! That seems to be the dream of every professor, but alas! such dreams do not seem to materialize! Every returning pupil seemed to retain a clear bright vision of the home he had just left, and concentration on schoolwork was definitely hard. To counteract this nostalgia, the faculty arranged for a Lyceum number January 8. Ethel Hanley's marionettes did the trick; everyone seemed to enjoy watching the fascinating puppets perform. The evening was thought well worth while by young and old. On January 11 a movie, "Captain Fury," was presented. Due to an impending book report, your columnist was not present, but reports seem to indicate that the play was generally well-likedby all. Sunday, January 27, was an important day for three of the musical organizations here at D. M. L. C., for on that day the concert, previously scheduled for December 9, was presented to a large audience. I wonder why it is that the Marlut Singers and not the Aeolian get the encores. Anybody have an answer? The following program does not 23


mention the encore given by the Marlut Singers: I.

II.

BAND 1. Thumbs Up, U. S. A 2. Fughetta 3. Softly, As in a Morning Sunrise 4. Stout Hearted Men

King Stainer-Righter Romberg-Teague Romberg- Yoder

AEOLIAN CHORUS 1. Weiszt du, wie viel Sternlein stehen

Folksong 2. Das Vergiszmeinnicht Folksong 3. To a Wild Rose MacDowell-Ambrose 4. Spinning Song Reimann-Stickles Accompanists: Elsie Zierzow, Eldonna Timm Directress: Eunice Sauer HI.

MARLUTSINGERS 1. Dedication Franz-Enders 2. When Johnny Comes Marching Home , Gilmore-Wick 3. The Donkey Serenade, from "The Firefly" ' Friml-Stothart Accompanist: Wayne Schmidt IV. BAND 1. The Post Medical OfficerMarch Saverino 2. The Merry Widow (Selection) Lehar-Yoder 3. When Irish Eyes Are Smiling Ball-Teague 4. That's an Irish Lullaby Shannon-Teague 5. March: Shenandoah Goldman The hand and Marlut Singers were under the direction of Professor Martin Albrecht, A collection taken for the benefitof the band willbe usedto purchasenewinstruments. Another movie was shown February 5, and from certain happenings at the very beginning of the film, we are led to assume that there are three boys here at D. M. L. C. who would like to be in the movies-at any rate, their shadows were on the screen. Better luck in the future, boys; maybe next time you will be advertised before your appearance. Despite a few complaints that the movie was hard to understand, the general conclusion seems to be that "Foreign Correspondent" was well worth the fourteen cents admission. Our second Lyceum number since Christmas vacation was given February 15, when a Scottish quartet entertained for approximately two hours with interesting facts and 24


notes about Scotland and with renditions of many popular Scottish songs. Some of them were "Comin' Through the Rye," "D' Ye Ken John Peel," "Road to Mandalay," and "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling." These songs were presented, some as solos by the first tenor and baritone, and some as four-part songs. One song, sang by the narrator, had a catching refrain and the students joined in singing it through two or three times. A very interesting part of the program was the playing of the bagpipes as the piper walked about through the aisles of the auditorium. Everyone was well-pleased with this number and would like more like it. "Zenobia," with Andy Hard co-starred with an elephant with a long memory and a loving disposition, was shown February 19. While the plot was a little shallow, there was food for thought in the movie, and the emphasis on the Declaration of Independence was quite fstting, A movie, "Courageous Mr. Penn," was shown March 8. Apart from the historical interest, the general opinion was not too favorable. March 12 was a big day for music lovers here at the college, for at 8 p. m. Miss Ramona Gerhard, staff pianist of station presented a fine program here at the col-

weco

lege auditorium. The following numbers were played: GROUP 1 Prelude in D Major Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring Gigue Rhapsody in B Minor

Bach Bach-Hess Bach Brahms

GROUP 2

Trois Eccoseaises Chopin Etude in E Major Ghopin Polonaise in A Flat Chopin Variations of "Mary Had a Little Lamb" in styles of different composers Ballantine GROUP 3 Caprice Kohnanyi Clair de lune , Debussy Polichinelle Villa Lobos Two Cuban Folk Songs Lecuona Tico Tico ' Brazilian Folk Song Schizzo Fuga Fire Dance DeFalla 26


GROUP 4 Warsaw Concerto

Addinsell

Another red-letter day for the students of D. M. L. C. came March 16. On that day the students all enjoyed a

holiday from the cares and worries of school. On March 24 a sacred concert was given by the D. M. L. C. Band, Choir II, Aeolian Chorus, and Marlut Singers. The following numbers were presented: I. AEOLIAN CHORUS 1. Lord Jesus Christ, My Life, My Light Nuernbergisches Gesangbuch 2. 0 Dearest Jesus, What Law Hast Thou Broken Crueger-Bach 3. If Thou But Suffer God to Guide Thee Newmark-Bach Directress: Eunice Sauer II.' MARLUT SINGERS 1. Christ, the Life of All the Living Darmstadt 2. Jesus, I Will Ponder Now Vulpius-Bach 3. Thou Wilt Keep Him in Perfect Peace Williams III.

CHOIR II 1. In Thee, 0. Lord, Have I Trusted Handel 2. Soul, Be Still... Franck-Wacker 3. Lord Jesus, May Thy Anguish, Pain Franck 4. Upon the Cross Extended .Isaak 5. From the Throne of His Cross (from "The Crucifixion") Stainer Organ Accompanist: Mary Lange

IV.

CHOIR AND BAND The Heavens Resounding

V. BAND 1. Fughetta 2. 0 Sacred Head, Now Wounded 3. Lamb of God VI. BAND, CHOIR, AEOLIAN CHORUS, MARLUT SINGERS A Mighty Fortress Is Our God

26

Beethoven Stainer Hassler Decius Luther


--------------------------------------------

- - - --

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Oh, I'll just have to call Mabel, and see what she's doing. 708, please. Buzzzzzzzzzz! Oh, hello, Mabel? Oh, I'm fine, too, but did you hear about Lucile Langacker? She wasn't feeling at all well the other day. Mrs. Mueller thought she had spring fever. Yes, I thought it was queer, too, because "it isn't even spring." Mrs. Mueller has a good remedy, though: take two aspirins three times a day. If you ever get that disease (and you get it every spring, don't you?) you'll know what to do. Uh huh, I suppose you've heard all about Lee Orda Schwecke's appendix operation, too. I suppose she wanted to start the fad again this spring. Remember how Alice Reek started it last spring? Lois Martins? She fell on the ice and hurt her ankle and head? And even broke her glasses? The poor glasses. lone Strege had an accident with her eye, too. It all happened at Waldheim. There was a box of candy sitting on the table. When the red piece of candy was gone, lone immediately gasped, "Where's that piece of red candy? I had my eye on that!" I really don't know what would have happened had it not been for Vera Huth. She's always so thoughtful. She knew the solution-"Quick! Give her eye back to her!" Talking about candy, that reminds me of Valentine's Day. "Cal" Bathke and Bernice Mundstock received identical boxes of candy. And, by the way, was it delicious! 27


Just a minute, Mabel! Lois Vertz just called, but be sure to hang on. What did you want, Lois? Okay, I'll tell her.

Hello, Mabel? Lois said she heard me mention that delicious candy, and she wanted me to tell you something that's really good-her hamburgers. She says it's the onionsthat make them especially tasty. You know, I wonder if that's why she's been talking in her sleep-s-and she always says the queerest things. The other night it was her German poem. "Steiny" talks in her sleep, too? Maybe it's because she's not used to the new bed in their room. The two Mack girls have a double-decker now. Or maybe it's because they still have mice at Hillcrest Hall. Lois Albrecht told me they'd really appreciate a donation of a mouse-trap I'll have to ask Dorothy Leininger. Maybe she has an extra one. Really? I can just see "Gertie" Lehne catching a squirrel in their room. Those aren't the only animals they've been having up there. One of the professor's dogs got up into Room8. Yes, that little spotted one, that's just too cute for anything. Isn't it queer? Nothing like that has been happening at Waldheim lately? Ardelle Zietlow told me it's been so quiet over there since ... Elaine Rademann went home. No, she didn't go home for good, but Lois Fuhrman did. They had a party for her the day before Valentine's Day. Esther sen went home, too. So did Helena Horst. That left a vacancy down at Bode Hall, so Ruth Albrecht moved downwith Frances Riegel. lone 'Strege is still living alone though, isn't she? One night the girls tried to pull a good joke on her, but it backfired. She's so hard to waken, so they put a clock with a loud alarm under her bed. It was set for 4 a. m. Sure, it went off,'but it woke everyone except lone. She concentrates on her sleeping as hard as Norma Just on her reading. "Norm" sat down in a rocking chair with her book. Of course, she didn't notice until after she was comfortably settled that she was trying to read the hymnal. Talking about music-Doris Mehlberg is bound to be a musician. We all had to laugh so! She was trying to do 28


.

....

harmony in the fourth position, Oh, that's right, you never took harmony, did you, Mabel? Well, there are only three possible positions. But as "Red" Albrecht said, "Harmony is first learning some rules and then learning how to break them," Maybe Doris had something there! She has? From the "Roman" age? I didn't know Eldonna Timm went out for waltzes that much! But isn't itpeculiar how girls suddenly become interested in things they never thought of before? Take Evelyn Mueller, for instance. She's so involved in Goethe's works now, she doesn't know when she'll ever finish all of them. Oh? Somehow I could never become enthusiastic about Shakespeare. Not to change the subject, Mabel, but why did Elaine Bogenschneider and Vera Huth ever start taking exercises? I heard they got the idea from Doris Tietz. She really goes to it. The only thing she hasn't quite mastered yet is standing on her head, but she's trying. Of course, I don't know, I was just talking to Marilyn Ruppel on the phone, and she was telling me all about it. And, do you know what Lois Albrecht told her? It's such a mystery. Well, Marie Meyer woke up one morning, and she had a big black and blue mark on her leg. No, it wasn't there the night before! Maybe it was Lyla Johnson who got rough, but I wouldn't doubt if it was "Fooz." She always has been wanting to practice First Aid on someone. She always has to 'be the "model" in Red Cross class.

I, I

Say, Mabel, when do you think we'll have Arbor Day this spring? Yes, but if Alice Reek's dreams were true, we would have had it March first already. Yes, that was a good dream, too. Gan you imagine Ruth Timm only being able to say, "facultas, ... -tatis, f."? That's as impossible as Alice never asking for next week's "per," or Vera Huth not blushing when someone mentions kohlrabi. Oh, have they? I know that one basketball game between Pape and Mueller was a good one. That overtime was over ten minutes, wasn't it? Yes, I heard that Marceline Fairchild came and is living in West Hall. And "Emma" Schmidt is the new girl in the I Normal class. She's quite a talker. 29


But did you hear what Shirley Bleck heard down in the dentist's office? A lady was complainingbecause the cavity in her tooth hurt so much, and she wanted the dentist to pull it out. Yes, I thought so, too. You are? I wouldn't worry about it. Just write to Mr. Agony of Weyauwega, Wisconsin. He gives advice in all subjects. Some of the girls tried it and even got an answer. But I must hang up now. Be sure to call me soon, Mabel. I just don't know how I'd keep up with an the latest news if it weren't for the telephone. Okay! So long, Mabel.

. I

â&#x20AC;˘

"

..

30


--~--------------

-

-

I've been thinking. Why shouldn't I start this column with the annual "Spring is here?" It saves the "racking of brains" for an original opening. I never really thought about this "racking of the brains" business. Do you suppose that it has anything to do with that torturous means of torturous torture especially peculiar to earlier years? Nevertheless, spring is upon us with all its accompanying scented breezes. Ask Eugene Spaude, Carlson, Gerhardt Voigt and that crowd how a skunk fits into this picture! Along with the slushing of the waters of the melting snows (another sign of spring) comes to our ears the slushing of water (and mops) in the halls of our dormitory as 11th, 10th, and 9th graders wield the aforementioned weapons in an attempt to keep our floors clean. General spring housecleaning is not only a chore to be found in the domestic household. March 6th marked the deadline for us to have our rooms scrubbed and waxed. Results were varied. Spring fever, evident in nearly everyone, is probably responsible for the obligation Karl Bauer feels to sound "reveille" mornings. Our "Little Boy Blue" blows his horn every once in a while. (Blue because his brother has left him to go home for a physical.) "Ozzie" Herman has theoretically been doing a, little waking in the morning, too. 31


Right? He does that between practicing his violin or polishing his dog-collar! 'Nuff said about spring. Now for things in general. Mice (sorry to say) have practically run the boys out of the first floors. (Hyperbole, I suppose.) Bittorf must learn not to leave them in wastebaskets after killing them! Moldenhauer cut a hole in the box his mouse was in and held a can next to it for it to run and fall into. Water was the means of death employed. Birkholz just came in again for the second time after the mythical "Sieben BUcher." Fear not, Birky. your day will come. Someone asked Goede in Public Health what pediculus capitis meant. "Dunno," Joe said, "it's over my head."

Pediculus capitis is the head louse. Scratch, scratch! As a curb for "hot times" in our dorm, new fire extinguishers have replaced the old hoses. Along under the heading "New Things" also come our new boys. Norman Welke, first out of the Army and the European theater, is my next door neighbor. An honor for both, of course. "Who is this 'Honk King' fellow? What's he like?" one fuchs asked me. "King Kong" or Leonard Berth is a Navy man. He left here in '43 to help straighten things out in the Philippines. He's a Second Normal and is doing all right. Harry McFarland has left the Army in the lurch to straighten us out on our political views. He served in the Orient. You should see the Chinese house-gods he acquired. They make very unique book-ends. Harvey Witte, 11th grade, has returned. He left us at the half last year. Norman Otto from Clements, Minnesota, is now among those tiled in the Freshman ranks. Cudworth, his "buck," is probably the best one to ask if you want to know more. Bud Trettien and Larry Bruns were granted permission to grace our dorm during the absence of their families. In other words, they've lived with us for a week. . Who didn't notice Bunkowski's singe of eye-lashes and brows after Christmas? Moral: Don't start fires with kerosene! 32


Ursel Seidel won the $25 door prize at the Lyric a while back. I haven't any use for the stuff, anyway! Mamma Welke must remember to take Baby Robert's (Buss) sucker out of his (Robert's) mouth before he goes to sleep at night! We took his picture, then removed the tonsil-remover. Robert Kolander, in choir: Let's move ahead.

Whose?

Why does Bert Naumann meander over to Hillcrest way so often? Oh, that's right-his mother. My apologies, please! Somebody ask Lentz what it feels like to be awakened in the morning by being shaken until you're "dead awake." Did Ronald Pape really have a bloody nose in Biology, or was the bloody handkerchief merely a prop? With Carlson directing in his seat and Prof. Janke singing a different tune, what must singing in sophomore German be like? ! Recent reports inform us that Canada is still to the north of us! Ask R. Sharlemann to tell you what LeRoy Lothert has been dreaming of late. Incidentally, LeRoy likes to descend steps sitting down. A telephone call on Wednesday afternoon, March 6, has led Ken Moeller to believe that he is the proud uncle of twins. Our recreation "wreck" room is now under the control of the Seniors. I'm very glad to report the success of this system. New cues and balls appeal to the billiard sharks and novices alike. Now what makes the Kolanders' backwards every so often?

electric

clock run

Of course, you all know that Lentz and Judd Nelson tried to start a chickenpox epidemic. I guess we foxed 'em. About 5 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, March 5, Clifford Eugen, Norman, Ollie Larson passed away. (Refer to Locals, Easter issue, 1945). Murderer and pallbearer, Bill Trapp, cremated the remains in the college incinerator that very afternoon. Bill broke him (he was a large clay grass33


hopper with electric green eyes) while cleaning. What's Q. Albrecht going to say ? I think he owneda part of him.

~r ou know, of course, that he is teaching at Fulda, Minn.) The Fi;st Normal boys have pretty welllaid aside their given names for new and sometimes shorter appelations. Wayne Schmidt 'is "Emma" to Prof. Bliefernicht and hence to his classmates. Prof. Stindt is responsible for Arnie Wenzel's-"Andrew." Gerald Cudworth is very appropriately known as "Isaac." Do you know why? Others are: Walter Siebert-"Willie"; Wolf-"Wolf"!! Albert Nolting-"Charley"; Walz-"Tiny"; (get the connection?). Bunkowski is "Bunk" and Delbert May is "Ghandi." Guess that does that. Enuf for this issue. I'm tired. Felch P. S.-Ken Moellersays 'tis a mistake-not twins. Salzwedeltalks Latin in his sleep. Doesn't seem to be much point in it.

34


Hello, everyone! This is your new sports editor ready to bring to you a report of the athletic activity up here on the hill. I will serve you in this capacity for a number of issues. It is my hope that this section of the Messenger

will be of interest to all our readers, serving as a review of activity to the students and bringing the highlights of the sports world at D. M. L. C. to the alumni. Basketball was the talk of the campus for the last few months. We had no college team again this year but the high school squad furnished some good games for us. I know that you are anxious to hear all about it. Stand by, here it is! We take up the thread after Christmas and find the first game is a runaway for our boys. The visiting team was Winthrop High School. The Luther squad really had the "bucket eye" that night and rang up a total of 46 points against Winthrop's total of 11. Lindloff was high scorer for D. M. L. C. with a total of 10 points. Mensch followed him with seven tallies to his credit. The next game on the schedule was with Gibbon. Although the lads from Gibbon furnished stiffer competition than Winthrop had, our varsity was on top at the end of each period. The score at the half read 17-12in our favor. By the end of the game Luther had raised its score to 36. Gibbon was not very far behind with a total of 29. The scoring for our team was quite evenly distributed. 36


Our next game was played against the New Ulm Brick and Tile Co. Our boys trailed at the half way mark by a 22-18 score. The squad got into the stride in the second half and came out on top 44-38. This was the last game of the season for Art Schulz who injured his ankle shortly after the game. The varsity took to the road for its next tilt. Concordia at St. Paul served as our host and handed our boys their first defeat after Christmas. In the 'first half it was anybody's game. The first period ended in a 7-7 tie. The half way mark saw the score at 21-20. Coming on the floor in the second half, St. Paul edged out into the lead by a larger margin. Five goals against our five points in the third quarter and ten tallies against our four in the last period iced the game for Concordia. The Luther team was very weak on the free throw line in this game. In fifteen attempts our boys succeeded in making only lfive count. The final score, which stood at 41-29, found our points fairly well divided among the team members. The archrivals of D. M. L. C. appeared in New Ulm to be defeated by our team. The Bethany five got off to a good start and held a one point lead at the close of the first quarter. Luther then managed to find itself in the winning at the close of the rest of the quarters. Both teams fought hard for this game and a total of 39 fouls was recorded, Luther committing 21 and Bethany 18. Only 14 free throws were tossed successfully by the two teams. The ifinal was in our favor by a 37-25 score. Lindloff led our scorers by making 11 points. Mensch had 9 markers and Kolander 8. The remainder was divided as follows: Dietz, 5; Voigt and Kramer, 2 each. Gaylord was the tussle. The game was played on the Gaylord floor. The lead changed hands quite often in this tilt. The Gaylord squad, however, ended on 'the upper half of a 25-21 score. The half found our boys in the lead 9-6. Coming out from 'behind in the final period Gaylord outscored us and took the game. Everyone on our squad was held to a few points. . Traveling over to Gibbon for its next tilt Luther College defeated Gibbon for the second time. The first quarter ended in a tied score. The second period found our lads scoring 13 points and holding 'Gibbon down with 2. From thn on Luther had clear sailing winning at 42-29 outcome. Lindloff, the "dead-eye" of our squad, counted 17 points 36


for himself at the end of this game. Our boys entered the home gym floor, more determined than ever to win this tilt and avenge an early season defeat. Trinity High School of New Ulm had copped the first meeting by a 29-27 final. In the records we find a total of 40 fouls committed between the two squads. The first quarter ended in a 12-12 score. By the half Luther had compiled a total of 20 points against 17 for Trinity. The third period was the jackpot for our boys-the score 32-22. Trinity was not going to give up without a fight and came back with "lots of fire." Although the Trinity lads scored six points in the last quarter, it was not quite enough to overcome our early lead. The final read at 42-38. The scoring for Luther: Lindloff 13; Kolander, 10; Voigt. Mensch, and Kramer, 5 each; Dietz, 3; and J. Spaude, 1. Traveling to Fairmont, the Luther squad suffered a "shellacking." The Fairmont team, one of the strongest high school squads in the state, handed us a 68-35 defeat. It was a field day for one Fairmont forward who rolled up 23 points. The boys from Fairmont held an undisputed lead throughout the game. Kolander led the scorers for our side with 10 points 'to his credit. The last game of the season was rather uninteresting in the first three quarters. Concordia held a substantial lead at the end of each period. The score at the end of the first quarter stood at 13-9. The halfway mark found Concordia ahead 27-16. Going into the last period with a score of 42-27 in favor of Concordia, Luther put on plenty of steam and made a good comeback. Although D. M. L. C. scored 18 points in the last period, Concordia went home with a 49-45 win in its back pocket. Lindloff went on a scoring spree in the game, sinking a total of 22 points. With the completion of the season seven letters were awarded. Kolander, Lindloff, and Voigt, among the forwards received awards. Mensch, center, and two guards, Dietz and Kramer, also were award winners. Our team manager, "Joe" Goede, was the seventh man who earned a letter. Our team played 13 games this year and won 9 of them. The opponents scored 432 points against us and our boys compiled a total of 412 points. This last number was divided among the team members as follows: 37


Player Lindloff Kolander Mensch DietzVoigt Kramer Frey A. Schulz J. Spaude

:

Games 11 13 12 13 12 12 7 6 8

Points 127 77 72

46 36 36

25 23 8 7 2

H. Albrecht 8 D. Koch 1 Besides interscholastic competition, intra-mural was also a part of the athletic program. Among the 'boys, a regular schedule was concluded and all are awaiting the tournament. In regular play a close race was staged for first place between Normal II and 11th grade. Normal II finally emerged on top. Since varsity members are permitted to participate in the tournament, the 11th and the 12th grades are tournament favorites. The girls have also found relaxation in basketball and volleyball. Especially in basketball have there been interesting matches. A play-offfor the girls is also in line.

38


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COLLEGE STUDENTS at popular prices Ball-Band Rubbers and Overshoes Betty Barrett Shoes for Women

WICHERSKI

SHOE STORE

NEW ULM Phone 246


E. G. LANG, D. D. S. Office Above State Bank of New DIm Res. Phone 1172

OfficePhone 472

PALACE

LUNCH

H. A. Bergmeier, Prop. New Ulm's Most Popular Lunch Room Sandwiches-Ice Cream-Candy-Soft Drinks-Cigarettes

115 N. Minn. St.

Phone 668

New VIm, Minn.

Reim & Church Jewelers

Brown & Meidl Music Store and School Piano Tuning, Repairing of All Instruments All Standard Makes of Band and Orchestra Instruments 308 North Minnesota St. Phone 1451 New VIm, Minn.

Compliments of

DOTTY DUNN RETZLAFF MOTOR CO. COMPLETE ~VPER SERVICE General Over hauling, Electrical Service, Body and Fender Repairing, Car Painting, Bear Wheel Aligning, Brake Drum Honing and Grinding, Acetylene and Electric Welding, Radiator Flushing and Repairing, Washing, Greasing


NEW ULM STEAM LAUNDRY Otto F. Oswald & Sons

Phone No.5 For Your Dry Cleaning, Laundry or Hat Work We 'assure you prompt and efficient service and invite you to visit our modern up-to-date plant at 107-109 So. Minn. St.

High Quality

FILM DEVELOPING AND PRINTING 25c per roll FOUNTA路INPENS and SCHOOL SUPPLIES Have Your Prescriptions Filled Here Lowest Prices to Students

HENLE

DRUGS

REXALL DRUG STORE Phones 1003 - 1004

New DIm, Minnesota DOUBLE SECURITY! This bank offers you Banking Safeguards, Convenience and Helpful Service

CITIZENS

STATE BANK

Member Federal Deposit Insurance

New Ulm, Minnesota

Corporation


WHEN IN NEED OF FOOTWEAR Be Sure and Call On Us We carry a complete. line of men's, ladies' and children's shoes. We appreciate your business. Our prices are always the lowest, Quality considered.

ATHLETIC SHOES OUR SPECIALTY Shoes Fitted Free by X-Ray

P. J. EICHTEN SHOE STORE New DIm, Minnesota

MEYER THE LEADING PHOTOGRAPHER Special Prices to Students We have a complete line of frames from miniatures to 8xlO in metal or wood. PHONE 165-L

NEW ULM, MINN.

T. R. FRITSCHE, M. D., F. A. C. S. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat GLASSES FITTED Fritsche Bldg.

New VIm, Minn.

NEW ULM GREENHOUSES FLOWERS FOR EVERY OCCASION We are prepared to fill orders for flowers at all points through the Florists Telegraphic Delivery Association Phone 45

NEW ULM, MINNESOTA


w.

EIBNER & SON, INC. Makers of

DELICIOUS ICE CREAM and

QUALITY BAKERY GOODS

Phone 128

ENRICHED

DANIEL

WEBSTER FLOUR

HIGHEST GRADE OBTAINABLE SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY LEADING DEALERS EVERYWHERE

EAGLE ROLLER MILL CO. NEW ULM, MINNESOTA


Tillman's

Bakery ~

Makers of ENRICHED

BAKER BOY BREAD and

D路LISHUS PRODUCTS

Complete Variety of Bakery Goods

Phone 232 V. James Tillman, Sr., Proprietor

NEW ULM FURNITURE CO. Complete Home Outfitters

BANK WITH

FARMERS

& MERCHANTS

STATE BANK New Ulm, Minnesota Member Federal Deposit Insurance

Corporation

Friendly Helpful Service at Your Command Residence Phone 150

Office Phone 260

DR. F. H. DUBBE, F. A. C. S. NEW ULM,

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON MINNESOTA


MUESING Drug Store EXPERT PRESCRIPTION SERVICE

ARTCRAFT We Have It!

PHOTO Will Get It!

PHONES

SERVICE Or It Isn't Made!

52 - 341

MONTGOMERY WARD CO. Wearing Apparel Furniture and Hardware Satisfaction Guaranteed 203-207N. Minn. St. Phone 1700 New Ulm, Minn.

For Courteous and Efficient Service Eat at the

SILVER LATCH CAFE


SCHUCK'S TAILORS TAILORED TO MEASURE SUITS AND OVERCOATS Cleaning and Pressing All Kinds of Repairing No Deposits-No C. O. D.'s 215 N. Minn. St. Phone 498

ROBERT

FESENMAIER,

INC.

HARDWARE NEW ULM, MINN.

H. J. BAUMANN INSURANCE AGENCY Insurance Bonds Hospitalization Phone 666

HENRY GOEDE STUDIO We Make PHOTOS of Merit Most Reliable Studio in Southern Minnesota A Trial Will Convince Students' Clothing and Sport Wear

Hummel Brothers 14 No. Minnesota St.

New UIm, Minn.

SOMSEN, DEMPSEY & SOMSEN Henry N. Somsen W. H. Dempsey Henry N. Somsen, Jr. ATTORNEYS AT LAW

Minnesota

New Ulm,

ROYAL MAID ICE CREAM STORE "Make Our Store Your Headquarters"

CHAMPION SHOE SHOP For the Best Repairing in Town 517 Center St.

Courteous Service


You Are Welcome at

WEILANDT & STEGEMAN Contractors and Builders Correspondence Solicited 'Vorl. Done in Any Section of the Community Plans and Specifications Furnished Estimates Cheerfully Given Office 1100 Center St. Auto Glass Replaced to Order Phone 571

OLSON DRUGS Phone 88

DEER BRAND BEER

AUGUST SCHELL BREWING COMPANY NEW ULM, MINNESOTA

Our Best Attention Everything of a banking nature entrusted our best attention. We shall be glad to have

a share

to our care receives

of your business.

STATE BANK OF NEW ULM Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

For Smart, Practical and Inexpensive

COLLEGE STYLES

J. A. OCHS

& SON

The Bee Hive -

New VIm

"Where Quality Is Not Expensive"


--

-----

LINDEMANN'S

for a .,Dressy Easter"

- - - and for school, too! If you want to be admired, praised

and commended for excellent judgment in style and comfort, select your next pair of shoes at

"The Students' Shop"

EUGENE KOEHLER OLD RELIABLE BARBER SHOP Good Satisfactory Work Guaranteed at All Times Your Patronage Is Appreciated

PAT'S DRY CLEANERS We pick up and deliver Garments insured while in our possession Quality Guaranteed Phone 115 Kenneth Prall

Brewers and Bottlers Since 1864 Telephone No. 1

New Ulm, Minnesota


Henry Simons Lumber Company Established in 1892 For 53 years we have served the community of New DIm with building needs. WE SAFEGUARD YOUR INTERESTS AT ALL TIMES OUR AIM IS TO SERVE YOU BETTER THAN ANYONE ELSE CAN In price, in service, in help Some promise much just to get business We can afford to promise only such things as we can and will live up to Our business has been built up on DEPENDABILITY Marvin Earl, Mgr. New DIm, Minn. Phone 201

PINKS STORE Friendly Sales People to Help You Air-Step Shoes Caral King, Jr. Dresses Munsing and Barbason Loungerie Swansdown Coats and Suits

WILLIAM J. VON BANK, D. D. S. F. I. C. D. DENTIST Residence Phone

OfficePhone 237

New Ulm, Minn.

797

DR. THEO. F. HAl\fMERMEISTER Physician and Surgeon OfficeOver State Bank of New Ulm


, ~~--,

Buy Where You See This Sign 500 Store Buying Power "YOU BUY BETTER BECAUSE WE BUY BETTER" F. H. RETZLAFF HARDWARE CO. Since 1887

AID ASSOCIATION FOR LUTHERANS Legal Reserve Life Insurance Exclusively For Synodical Conference Lutherans APPLETON, WISCONSIN THE LEADER IN ITS FIELD!


QUALITY CLOTHING Correct Fitting and Standard Lines

TAUSCHECK

& GREEN John W. Graff

Geo. D. Erickson

ERICKSON & GRAFF Attorneys at Law New Vim, Minnesota

Eyes Tested

Lenses Ground

Glasses Fitted

and Duplicated

DRS. SCHLEUDER Optomctrlsts

and Opticians

PHONE 87

NEW ULM

MINNESOTA

SHAKE CLEANERS and DYERS Phone 756

20 % Discount Cash and Carry Modernizing, Maintaining Tuning, Repairs, Service, Sales

Reconstruction, Installation Additions, Blowers Chimes, Harps

Wicks Pipe Organs

ERNEST C. VOGELPOHL 405-409 North Broadway

New Vim, Minn.


UNION HOSPITAL NEW ULM, MINN. A modern, well-equipped, and fireproof hospital supervised by and staffed with registered nurses.

PHONE NO. 404 See

CRONE BROS. CO. For Young Men's Clothing and Furnishings THE FASTIDIOUS STUDENT will find satisfactory

service at

Grundmeyer's Barber-Beauty Shop Air Conditioned Below Tauscheck & Green's Clothing Store

Phone 710

SALET'S DEPARTMENT STORE-NEW

ULM, MINN.

EVE~YTHING TO WEAR FOR HIM OR HER WEAR SALET'S FAMOUS FOOTWEAR

Highest Quality and of Course "YOU ALWAYS SAVE AT SALET'S"


â&#x20AC;˘, "-

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

, t

.((ommen cement

jl umber


·

. .

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Class of 1946............................................................................

2

III Normal Class History

6

Class Will

]1

Class Activities

··················13

Senior Class History

····

Senior Class Activities

···· ···· 15

Senior Class Will. Literary

14

········ ..16 ············ ············21

Farewell

21

Die Mutter

22

Geography

····

22

Growth of the Symphony A Hike To Of Studies What's

·

·

23

··

25

······..··..·..····26

Cookin'?

····..·28

You Cannot Serve God and Mammon !...

29

Editorials

···· ···

Criticism

···..·..···..······..·31

Give Us Bread 1.

···· .. ··

Alumni Notes Exchange College Notes

····..31 ··33

····..·..··37 ··········· ..··· 39 ··..·..····· ···42

Coed Notes

51

Locals

·········· ..·······54

Sports

····

Humor

···

56

··..············· ..·..·..60


CLASS OF 1946

Class Motto: Thy Way, Not Mine, 0 Lord Class Colors: Blue and Gold Class Flower: Pink Carnation Class Officers President-Kurt

Petermann

Vice President and Secretary-Carolyn Treasurer-Bernice

Bathke

Mundstock

FAREWELL

Farewell, dear Alma Mater, We bid thee all this day. Our thoughts, Oh, Alma Mater, With thee shall ever stay. We leave thy red brick structures, Thy rooms with desks and slate, Where we, as future teachers, Have studied long and late. We leave thy dear professors Who strove so hard and long To lead us from all errors And teachus right from wrong. We leave thy cherished friendships That mean so much to all, That will in time of hardships Be pleasant to recall. We ask Thee, Heavenly Father, To bless us on our way, That we may never falter To serve Thee every day. THE GRADUATES 2


_____ -.:.

CAROLYN BATHKE Minneapolis, Minnesota

ELAINE

BOGEN SCHNEIDER

Kewaskum,

Wisconsin

WALTER BONITZ Mellen, Wisconsin


...

-------.)

MARCIA GOEHRING Hazelton, North Dakota

MARIE MEYER Milwaukee, Wisconsin

-----------

ROBERT MOLDENHAUER Milwaukee, Wisconsin

I

~-----------+


.:._------------.:.

BERNICE

MUNDSTOCK

La Crosse, Wisconsin

KURT PETERMANN Milwaukee, Wisconsin

~~---------

EUNICE SAUER New UIm, Minnesota


III NORMAL CLASS HISTORY

On September 1, 1939, thirty frightened, eager, young hopefuls met in Professor Janke's room to receive their first schedules. Those thirty members were Conrad AIthen, Ruth Bentrup, Elaine Brinkmann, Orlan Devine, Donald Engel, Harold Fuhrmann, Norma Fuhrmann, Naomi Gerlach, Bernice Gieseke, William Gieseke, Gerhard Hintz, Philip Janke, Ethel Kreck, John Kuehne, Howard Larson, Paul Lindemann, Lois Mack, Victor Marxhausen, Donald Meier, Duane Miller, Robert Moldenhauer, Gerhard Mueller, Patrick Murphy, Theodore Pape, Clarence Peil, Merlin Salzwedel, Kenneth Sanville, Eunice Sauer, Aron Valleskey, and Ruth Ulrich. At our first class meeting we chose Pat Murphy to be our first president. Our vice-president was Kenneth Sanville. We decided on red and white as our class colors. Under the leadership of Floyd (Joe) Mattek, our Freshie basketball team became the undefeated champions in the minor league. As for entertainment our first picnic was practically a flop because the weather proved untrustworthy, but we made up for it in our second one in spring. June came, and we realized that we had surmounted the first hurdle without any serious mishaps. And so to vacation. In September 1940, as sophomores, we again assembled to get at the business of learning. Several of our classmates had decided not to return. These were Conrad AIthen, Bernice Gieseke, Ethel Kreck, Victor Marxhausen, Duane Miller, and Merlin Salzwedel. There were, however, new members in their place. These were Carolyn Bathke, Eugene Bode, Orlan Dorn, Fred Froelke, Louise Kasper, Fred Kiekhafer, and Lorraine Weber. As president, we chose Donald Engel. Again our class basketball team was champion in the minor league. The usual number of picnics were had, and, needless to say, were greatly enjoyed. By 1941 the business of assembling was getting to be old stuff. We had a number of new members in the class, and also some had dropped out. The new members were Arlo Horst, Bernice Mundstock, Paul Priesz, Lowell Tews, Elmer Uhlig, and Thelma Kunde. Those who forsook us were Eugene Bode, Fred Froelke, Harold I,uhrmann, William Gieseke, Louise Kasper, Lorraine Weber, and John Kuehne. Pat Murphy left to join the Navy. Aron Valles6


key was elected president and our class colors were changed to blue and gold. Besides the usual picnic excitement, we discovered quite an original way to amuse ourselves on the night of the banquet. This secret is locked .n the archives of our class. In 1942, only Thelma Kunde, Lowell Tews, and Clarence Peil deserted us. Harold Fuhrmann returned, and as new members, we initiated Karl Langnickel and Mavorette Lenz. This year our president was Gerhard Mueller. The vicepresident was Bernice Mundstock, our first female officer This year marked a glorious victory for us in basketball. Our team won the intramural basketball championship. We again had two picnics, the last of which marked the final informal gathering together of our senior class. On Friday, June 11, 1943, after four years of serious study and lots of fun we were graduated. Professor Burk played the processional in his incomparable manner. Professor R. A. Fenske of Mobridge, South Dakota, was the speaker for the occasion. With many regrets and, also, hopes for the future, our class disbanded; some to return to finish the cause and become faithful workers of the Lord in Lutheran schools, and the others to choose a different life profession. In September 1943, eight of us returned to study to become teachers. Those who left were Orlan Devine, Gerhard Hintz, Howard Larson, Donald Meier, Pat Murphy, Kenneth Sanville, Lowell Tews, Karl Langnickel, who left to serve Uncle Sam in his navy. D. Engel was inducted into the army. Harold Fuhrmann and Fred Kiekhafer joined the AAF. There were several of our students who decided to study at River Forest to become teachers. These were Ruth Bentrup, Lois Mack, and Aron Valleskey. Then there are those who by now have settled down to a comfortable married life. Those are Louise Kasper, Elaine Brinkmann, and Ruth Ulrich. The eight of us who returned were Robert Moldenhauer, Eunice Sauer, Gerhard Mueller, Mavorette Lenz, Bernice Mundstock, Paul Lindemann, Carolyn Bathke, and Orlan Dorn. Three of our class left to become pastors. Those are Philip Janke, Paul Priesz, and Victor Marxhausen. The new members of the I Normal class were Kurt Petermann, Walter Bonitz, Roberta Bryce, Oriette Hauge, Elaine Bogenschneider, Arlene Voelz, Eilene Burmeister, Harriet Bode, Ruth Kuhnke, Marcia Goehring, Marjory Siedschlag, Everene Schlichter, Delores Becker, and Marie Meyer. 7


A short time after our year began, Orlan Dorn was requested by the government to change his life's profession. The day before he had to report for induction we gave him a farewell party, a skating party, with Professor Martin Albrecht as our chaperon. After the party we saw him off at the train, singing many of our pep songs. It was a sad

farewell because he was the first boy of our class to be inducted during the school year. During the summer of 1944 our boys were requested by the authorities to attend summer school at Watertown, Wisconsin, for eleven weeks. After this summer course, our boys claimed to be more than ready to enter into their second year of college. This second year brought with it many changes. Those who left were M. Siedschlag, E. Schlichter, R. Kuhnke, H. Bode, R. Bryce, E. Burmeister, and P. Lindemann. Kenneth Born was an addition to our class. At Christmas time our class showed its inventive genius by decorating the hallways of the administration building. After Easter we received another addition to our class. This was Luther Kolander who was graduated from Northwestern College at Watertown, Wisconsin. Later on in spring we gave the III Normal class a farewell picnic with Professor Voecks as chaperon. Although it rained, we had a very good time, playing all the traditional picnic games. On June 8, at 4 :00 a. m. some of us dragged ourselves out of bed and some of us just came to decorate the auditorium for the Commencement Exercises. After the graduation, the boys had a week's rest before attending summer school again. The course was about the same as the summer before which only helped to broaden the mind. We began our III Normal year with nine in our class. These were C. Bathke, E. Bogenschneider, M. Goehring, E. Sauer, W. Bonitz, R. Moldenhauer, K. Petermann, M. Meyer, and B. Mundstock. Luther Kolander left us to take a teaching position at Lutheran High in Milwaukee,Wisconsin. O. Hauge, D. Becker, K. Born, M. Lenz, and G. Mueller left us to take positions as teachers in our grade schools. This year proved by far to be the most enjoyable we ever spent. We began our flurry of entertainment by havs


ing a class picnic with Professor M. Albrecht as chaperon. We didn't do much more than sit around and reminisceand eat. In spring the II Normals gave us our farewell picnic. The food was good, and fun was had by all. Our chaperon was Professor Backer. Many thanks to the II Normal class for going to all the trouble for us. As in previous years, the faculty invited us to a banquet given in honor of the graduates. This was the last time our class and the members of the faculty, as a whole, got together in an informal meeting. We wish to thank the faculty for the time and trouble that was put into the preparation for the banquet. We certainly enjoyed it. When June 7 dawns, the day we have been looking forward to for a long time, we will reluctantly bid farewell to college life. It will be a day of mixed emotions. We will be joyful because at last we are stepping over the threshold of our youth to enter as young men and women, our life work-the service of the Lord. We will be sad because this morning marks our last day on the campus of D. M. L. C., and the last time that we will mingle with our many friends. May the motto that has guided us in our past years be uppermost in our minds throughout our future.


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THIRD NORMAL CLASS WILL The time has now come for us to bid farewell to our beloved school, our teachers, and our many friends. Therefore, we the class of '46, after much contemplation, have appointed the following to be heirs of our most valuable possessions. I, Carolyn M. Bathke, do will and bequeath my position as matron of Bode Hall to whoever is sought to fulfill the task, my soft-spoken voice to Doris Mehlberg, my ability to quickly move my fingers in playing Bach and twisting my hair to Lorna Gerlach, the better half of my room, with the latest modern conveniences, to E. "Hooky," my frequent episodes with tiny gray creatures to anyone who is able to exterminate mice, and to all future organ "A" students, a share of my bravery in the dark. I, Elaine Bogenschneider, do hereby bequeath my matronship of Waldheim to Elaine Rademann and all the grey hair that goes with it. To lone Strege I bequeath my ability to wake up in the morning and to the Pape sisters and Dorothy Prausa my hunger at mealtimes. I, Walter Bonitz, bequeath my position as Music Hall Inspector to anyone who is prone to listen to the cacophony of vibrating strings, the pounding of pedals, and the unceasing yet inexcusable complaints of artistical ivory amateurs, my front seat in Professor Bliefernicht's classroom to "Emma" Schmidt, and my "laundry shaggers" to anyone who desires to room with them. I, Marcia Goehring, hereby will my ability to sleep to any nighthawks who may frequent the premises of this institution in the future. To Dorothy Bauer, I will my ability to use hammer, nails, wallpaper and paste, and the privilege of practicing the afore-mentioned hobby when and where she feels free to do so. To whoever likes flowers least, I will my ability to plant seeds so deep that they don't grow. To Margie, Ev, Gert, and Dot, I will my "corn-ish" remarks-it will be well to keep them among "home-folks" because I get that from my "fodder." I will the use of the pronouns: they, you, he, she, and it, to the next egotist. The missing two (I and we) have been used to such extent that they are too threadbare for circulation. I will my ability to bore things (people) to the woodpeckers-a-that will relieve you of the noise of their incessant pecking. 11


I, Marie Meyer, being of sound mind and body (?) do hereby bequeath several of my possessions and duties to various well-known individuals. To Eldonna Timm I leave such valuable articles as forks, knives, spoons, and frying pan. It is my hope and desire that she well prove to be an able custodian of such indispensable dormitory utensils. With great sorrow and regret I hand over my fire-building duty to Marjorie Maltz. Because she has been my understudy for one year, I am confident she will successfully build a roaring fire with the help of only one match and one candle. To Elsie Zierzow I will my ability to weave my way out of the maze of steps and benches when the auditorium is dark. I also hope her hearing abilities will serve her better than I was served by mine in order to avert many a growth-stunting scare while practicing. To Lyla Johnston I will my fear of electricity and all that goes with it, with only one aim in mind, that she will not take so many chances. To Lois Fuhlbrigge and all the other summer school girls, I am rather undecided as to which of the two things I should give them-luck or sympathy. I, Robert Moldenhauer, bequeath my ability to quit smoking to Joe Goede; my job as "Synod boss" to Glenn Felch; my "Trailblazer to the Home of the Woods" to Quentin Albrecht; my bass horn to "Fritz" Biedenbender ; and my toast and eggs breakfast to anyone who feels anemic. After much thoughtful consideration, I, Bernice Mundstock, being in a generous state of mind bestow my phobia for "A" to the future III Normal Class; may they enjoy playing for chapel as much as I did; also I leave to them the little black lunch pail with its luscious peanut butter sandwiches to sustain them during their time at practice school. To Lois Vertz I leave my vacancy for cleaning the study hall, may she have the pleasure of cleaning it as often as she did this year. To the succeeding matron of Bode Hall I leave the pleasure of arousing the sleepyheads at 6 :30 and again quieting the noise-makers at 10 :30. To Chrysta Albrecht, the future inhabitant of my room, I leave my book rack which has served as a faithful storehouse for much knowledge; however, may she carry her knowledge elsewhere to relieve it of a part of its great burden. I, Kurt Petermann, bequeath my "frequent" change of glasses to anyone who can laugh it off; my ability to "sweep" the basketball floor during a game to "Dick" Kraemer; my roommate, Arthur Schulz, to anyone who 12


wants his room kept clean; and the rug in my room to anyone who can't afford a dustpan. I, Eunice Sauer, being supposedly of sound mind and body, do bequeath the following possessions to whom it may concern. To some unsuspecting girl, I bequeath my beloved baton, and the Tuesday and Friday night rehearsalsand the concerts. May she have stronger nerves than I. To Lois Albrech t Ilea ve my devotion to my brown canine brother. May she perform her rites as High Priestess of Turpy with due honor and respect. To my sister Rhoda, I will my passion for Bach, and to Anne Schaller my ability to "catch on" to what William Shakespeare says in his plays.

ACTIVITIES CAROLYN BATHKE ROBERT MOLDENHAUER Class Vice-President and SecreBand 7; Marlut Singers 5; Basetary; Matron of Bode Hall 1; Phi ball 4L. Captain 1; Special Choir 5; Messenger Staff 2; Phi Delta Gamma Rho 1. Sigma 1; Director of Band-III; ELAINE BOGENSCHNEIDER "Synod Boss" 3. Matron of Waldheim 2; Special BERNICE MUNDSTOCK Choir 3; Aeolian 2; Messenger Class Treasurer; Matron of Bode Staff 1; Phi Gamma Rho 1. Hall 1. WALTER BONITZ KURT PETERMANN Music Hall Inspector; Marlut Student-body President; Class Singers 2; Baseball 1L; Messenger President; Marlut Singers 3; Pres. Staff 2. 1; Messenger Staff 2; Special MARCIA GOEHRING Choir 2; Baseball 3L; Athletic Board 2; Pres. 1. Aeolian 1. EUNICE SAUER MARIE MEYER Special Choir 3; Aeolian 3; MesBand 6; Special Choir 3; Aeolian senger Staff 2. 4; Directress 1; Phi Delta Sigma 1. 13


SENIOR CLAE:SHISTORY 1942-1946

CLASS MOTTO: Jesus Lead Thou On CLASS FLOWER: Violet In September, 1942, a new group of recruits, somewhat dazed, arrived at the gates of D. M. L. C. This group included Delroy Aswege, Fred Aufderheide, Lillian Bode, Melda Brei, Curtis Dietz, Philip Frey, Joel Gerlach, Gerane Gutzke, Harold Just, Harris Kiecker, Ruth Klossner, June Lindemann, LeRoy Lothert, Ruth Mack, Vernon Meyer, Arthur Priesz, Elizabeth Redemske, Marcus Retzlaff, Charles Riess, Jonathan Schaller, Lyle Schmeling, Harold Schultz, Gerald Seevers, Jerome Spaude, Ronald Strelow, Kenneth Weindorf, Harvey Witte, and Dorothy Winter. Philip Frey was elected president, Jerome Spaude became his assistant, and H. Kiecker was appointed to take care of the finances. When the class reassembled in September, 1943, these four were not present to answer the roll call: Delroy Aswege, Harris Kiecker, Ruth Mack, and Charles Riess. But this loss was compensated by the addition of eight new classmates: Dorothy Bauer, Carol Buss, Alberta Carlin, Joyce Hanke, James Krueger, Lucile Learman, Lois Naumann, Robert Scharlemann, and Doris Tietz. At a meeting of the class, Lillian Bode was elected to the head position of the class, with Gerane Gutzke placed second in power. Harold Just became the treasurer. For entertainment, the class held a class party in the Annex and a picnic at the Flandrau State Park. After three months of "weary" vacation, forty-one "happy" students appeared at D. M. L. C. At the assembling of the class, three classmates were not present: Harold Just, Lyle Schmeling, and Arthur Priesz. The new faces in the class were those of Juanita Groth, Robert Kock, Kenneth Kolander, Lois Krueger, Gertrude Lehne, Margaret Luehring, Ruth Mack, Natalie Mueller, Mary Mumm, Adelbert Voigt, Dale Wendling. Robert Scharlemann was chosen to represent the class, with Kenneth Kolander as his adviser and bearing the burden of the financial department. Two picnics were held, both at the State Park. At the end of the ~irst semester, the class held a farewell party for Harvey Witte, who left here to work on the farm. At the end of the basketball season, the junior boys won the class tournament from the sophomore boys and the junior girls from the sophomore girls. 14


In September, 1945, a class of hopeful graduates wended their way toward D. M. L. C. The new members of the class included: Dorothy Leininger, Evelyn Mueller, Archie Patzer, Paul Schwartz, and Lee Orda Schwecke. Those no longer with us include Juanita Groth, Lois Krueger, Alberta Carlin, and Gerald Seevers. The class officials this year included Jerome Spaude as president. His aid was Jonathan Schaller, and Joel Gerlach became treasurer. At the time of this writing, the class has held one picnic. J. Schaller

ACTIVITIES J. LINDEMANN Concert Choir, 2. M.MUMM Aeolian, 1. L. BODE N. MUELLER Concert Choir, 1; Aeolian Chorus, 1. J. KRUEGER M. BREI Marlut Singers, 1. C. BUSS K. KOLANDER Band, 2; Basketball, 2; Baseball, C. DIETZ 1; Concert Choir, 1; Marlut SingBasketball, 2; Baseball, 2. ers, 2; Athletic Board, 1. P. FREY Marlut Singers, 1. RKOCK Band, 2; Marlut Singers, 2. J. GERLACH Band, 3; Marlut Singers, 1. L. NAUMANN Concert Choir, 1; Aeolian ChoG. GUTZKE rus, 1. J. HANKE Concert Choir, 2; Aeolian ChoA. PATZER rus, 1. Band, 1; Marlut Singers, 1. G. LEHNE J. SCHALLER D. LEININGER Class Vice-President. 1; Aeolian Chorus, 1. Band, R SCHARLEMANN L. LEARMANN Concert Choir, 1; Marlut SingBand, 1; Aeolian Chorus, 1. ers, 3. M. LUEHRING H. SCHULZ Aeolian Chorus, 1. P. SCHWARTZ L. LOTHERT Basketball, 1; Marlut Singers, 1. R.MACK R STRELOW Aeolian Chorus, 1. R KLOSSNER L. SCHWECKE Aeolian Chorus, 1. V.MEYER Band, 3; Concert Choir, 1; MarJ; SPAUDE lut Singers, 2. Band, 4; Concert Choir, 2; Marlut Singers, 1; Athletic Board, 1; E. MUELLER Class President. Aeolian Chorus, 1. F. AUFDERHEIDE D. BAUER Band, 1; Aeolian Chorus, 1.

Hi


E. REDEMSKE D. WENDLING Band, 1; Concert Choir, 1. Band, 2. M. RETZLAFF D. TIETZ K. WEINDORF Concert Choir, 1; Aeolian Chorus, 1. D. WINTER A. VOIGT Band, 4; Concert Choir, 2; AeoBasketball, 2; Baseball, 2; Mar-lian Chorus, 1. Iut Singers, 1.

SENIOR CLASS WILL

I, Fred Aufderheide, will to Martin Schuetze the ability to come to Chapel on time and to keep the Boys' Room in tip-top condition. I, Dorothy Bauer, do hereby bequeath my acquired knowledge as a snake-charmer to Lois Vertz, and I hope she may enjoy it as much as I have; and I leave my great liking for practice periods and my ability of never missing any to whoever may have fallen into the same predicament. I, Lillian Bode, not quite sane of mind, do hereby bequeath all of my broken test tubes, thistle tubes, and my Bunsen burner (which always went out when Melda Brei or Jerome Spaude opened his mouth) to the next owner of Locker 50. To some future unfortunate senior who takes German, I leave all of my free periods. May that person always be supplied with a deck of cards. I, Melda Brei, having a well-balanced mind, do hereby bequeath my ability of "thumbing a ride up the hill" to "Red" Hohenstein; my Bunsen burner to Marcy Fairchildmay it always burn as brightly for her as it has for me; my ability of always knowing who are the partners in a "Schafskopf" game to Carol Retzlaff. I, Carol Buss, do bequeath to Lorraine Raddatz the combined bottle and can opener; to the Toop sisters, the hammer; to Verona Buchholtz, my indispensable butcher knife; and to "Hank" Maltz, my "sarge jacket." I, Curtis Dietz, do will to Martin Schuetze my ability to play "at" basketball under Coach Voecks; to Larry Bruns, the job of furnishing a taxicab for the boys from the dorm; and to Bud Trettien, the job of trying to keep the Boys' Room clean as possible. 16


I, Phil Frey, being of sane mind, will to Ken Moeller my "campus" days; to Don Mensch, all my height; to Don Lindloff', my "studious" nature; and to Malcolm Brandt, my "exceptional" marks in chemistry. I, Joel Gerlach, hereby will my ability to resist the wiles of "fagging" to Willard Redemske. I will my ability not to kick about meals to all future boys in the dorm. I, Gerane Gutzke, bequeath my skill in making "paper dolls" during classes to Shirley Bleck and Lois Vertz. A nice new spatula goes to Professor Palmbach, if ever he breaks or loses his old one! The rubber stopper that I accidentally melted in chemistry lab, plus all my broken test tubes, go to Dick Danner. I, Joyce Hanke, hereby ending my high school career, will my ability to devour "Black Cows" to Marion Toop, my great love for country life to David Schmidt, and my half (?) of "Duffy" to Elaine Mack. I, Ruth Klossner, being sane so far as I can see, do hereby bequeath my ability to play "Schafskopf" to Liz Redemske, who has tried so often. I will some of my height to Vernita Bleick. To any senior of next year, I will my ability to burn holes into my clothes with hydrochloric acid in chemistry lab. May he be as fortunate as I was. I will to Dick Danner a pillow for sleeping in church; may he in the future be more comfortable. I, Robert William my ability of working tions in sports (and I liking for drawing (if

Kock, bequeath to my fuchs Karnitz crossword puzzles, my future ambiwish him much success), and all my any).

I, Kenneth Kolander, will my power to keep from snoring to Elroy Schultz; my job as tennis manager to anyone who has enough ambition to pull out the weeds; my pipe (which I never used) to Lawrence Levorson, so that he can practice blowing square smoke rings. I, James Krueger, will my Latin knowledge to Bruce Backer; my campus days, to Kermit Biedenbender. I, Lucile Learman, hereby will my moody disposition to anyone who can make better use of it. To the best of my ability I, Gertrude Lehne, do hereby surrender my last will and testament in this, my senior, 17


year: To anyone gifted with the evil habit of chewing gum I will my ability to have Professor Sauer bring the waste paper basket to him as he did to me for the disposal of the same. May he appreciate the service as much as I did. I, Dorothy Leininger, will my great chemistry interest to Professor Palmbach; my intense poetic ability, to Dawn Storm; my height to Donald Mensch; my ability always to keep my room neat, to Lee Orda Schwecke, hoping that she will make use of this ability next year. I, June Lindemann, being of absolutely sound mind and body and in a state of complete healthfulness, bequeath my chicken laugh to Carolyn Weller; also my ability to shuffle and deal cards according to Hoyle goes to Dave Schmidt; and a cheery good morning for each school day of the next year goes to Lawrence Hartwig. I, LeRoy Lothert, hereby will all my love for snakes to Melvin Wendland. To "Ted" Kuske I bequeath all my enthusiasm for sports and my ability not to play basketball in my sleep. I, Margaret Luehring, hereby will my jar of "Vicks" to anyone at Hillcrest who gets a cold; and to Evelyn Mueller, my Indian blanket. May she ever keep warm with it. I, Ruth Mack, give my last will and testament before breathing away my senior year. I hereby will to Elaine, my sister, my thoughts of future homes in Missouri and Illinois; and to Mary Mumm, my upper bunk in room four. I, Vernon Meyer, do bequeath to a well-known and distinguished character, Reinhard Bittorf, my ability to get up at least before the fourth bell; and to romeo Eugene Spaude, my bashfulness; and lastly, but not in the least a trifle, my many practice periods to some ambitious fuchs. I, Evelyn Mueller, will to "Kenny" Kolander all my extra three-cent stamps, in the hope that it will help to make him a better mailman; and the outer half of our bed, "Old Ironsides," to the shortest "inmate" of room six for next year. I, Natalie Mueller, do hereby will my favorite pastime of watching the squirrels play, from the English classroom, to GinGin who also enjoys nature; my clothes hangers to Marjorie Mumm; my mattress to anyone who likes sleeping in a hammock; and my black nail polish to "Mickey Mouse." 18


I, Mary Mumm, having reached the ripe old age of seventeen and seeing I am graduating from dear old Dr. Martin Luther College, leave this will: My ability to chew gum at all times to my successor, Marjorie; my ability to work chemistry problems to Jean Lau; my German vocabulary to Jerome Birkholz. I, Lois Naumann, being above the capacity of a moron, do bequeath my possessions thus: To Bertram Naumann, I will my ability to take practice periods on time; to Joyce Koch, my right "hook" for cheerleading; to Lois Vertz, mv "quiet" temper. Let it be known, to all those involved that I, Archie Patzer, will my job at Eibner's to Vernon Meyer; and the ability to keep quiet, to the girls in chemistry class. I, Elizabeth Redemske, bequeath to Marion Petersen my privilege to kick that dog 'I'urpie out of our room any time he comes in to molest us. To lone Strege I will my ability to come back on time whenever I go home for a week-end. All my German vocables go to anyone that can make use of them. I, Mark Retzlaff, will to Martin Schuetze the right to chew gum in Professor Schweppe's classroom; to Bud Trettien, my proved ability of driving a car; and to Larry Bruns, the ability to get along with the girls of the sophomore class. I, Jonathan Schaller, hereby will to Robert Scherzer all papers which he may deem important, and to John Janzow (with the hope that he can enjoy it, if that's possible) I bequeath the three full hours of "Friendly Time" each Saturday. I, Robert Scharlemann, mente sana et corpore sano, will to my fuchs Zimmermann a little of my "present-mindedness." My worthy (?) roommates I leave to whoever

wants them; my frequent erubescence, to Professor Bliefernicht; and finally my extraordinary love (?) for outdoor sports I pass on to some book-worm. I, Harold Schulz, will to "Udo" my front seat in chemistry class and also my locker in the Boys' Room. I also will to Walter Grams the ability to climb the hill two or more times every day. I, Paul Schwartz, bequeath to my fuchs, Willard 19


Lueders, my ability to keep quiet and study during study hours; and my power to get up at first bell, to Merlen Salzwedel. I, Lee Orda Schwecke, hereby will all my musical talent to Mary Lange; my understanding of German to Dorothy Leininger; and my greatest ambition, to study, to my fuchs brother, Floyd, and his roommate. I, Jerome Eugene Spaude, presumably being of sane mind and good health, do hereby bequeath the following relished items to the said persons: To Paul Gerhardt Albrecht, also known as "Deutsch," I do bequeath the ability of always coming to breakfast at fourth bell; to Eugene Spaude, my illustrious cousin, the ability to study now and then and to Phoebe, my beloved haircutting equipment. I, Ronald G. Strelow, hereby duly will to Alvin Spaude all my hard-earned German papers; to Robert Scherzer I will all my chemistry work; and to any of the new fuchses I will my many steps up the College Hill. I, Doris Tietz, will my front seat in every class to "Little Learman," and my ability to write letters to "Mickey." May she answer every letter as well as I didn't. I, Adelbert Voigt, will my ability to keep quiet during study period to my fuchs, Richard Danner; my athletic ability, to Reinhard Bittorf; my ability to refrain from girls to James Carlson. I, Ken Weindorf, being of "sound" mind (I think) do bequeath to Ken Moeller my "southern hospitality"; to Don Lindloff "butts" on all my "fags"; to Don Mensch my "campus days"; and to Malcolm Brandt, my "pin-up" pictures.

I, Dale Wendling, hereby bequeath my Democratic leanings to Professor Schweppe; also my great knowledge of "Deutsch" to whomever it may concern; my great knowledge and understanding of women to Lindloff. I, Dorothy Winter, being of sound mind (?), do hereby bequeath all my band music folders to Phoebe. My full schedule goes to some unfortunate newcomer to D. M. L. C. May he or she appreciate it as much as I did. My ability to get the "old ones" goes to anyone who WOUld, as I, rather play "Schafskopf" than go to classes. 20


FAREWELL On June 7 of this year, three boys and six girls will walk down the aisles in the auditorium of our fair school for the last time. Yes, these are the graduates of our Third Normalite class. For these nine people this will be the day of days, fer on this day they will see their dreams and hopes come true. For three long and hard college years these nine people have labored in preparation for this day. These years have been hard ones, because they were carried on through war years. Although there was a war on, these young people continued with their studies. Finally, they have been declared ready to go to work in the Lord's vineyard. On this day they will receive a diploma. This diploma does not only mean to them that they have finished their work at D. M. L. C., but it means that they have now been accepted as the servants of the Lord to work among the little folk in His vineyard. We who will remain at D. M. L. C. for a while are sad to see you leave. We have known you and lived and gone to school with you, and it is these thoughts that Jill us with remorse at your departure. However, we are also filled with joy, because we know that now you will go out to do the Lord's bidding as we some day also hope to do. At this time of departure, our prayer for you is that our dear Lord will bless you and your work; that He will cause His face to shine 'upon you and give you peace; that 21


He will guard and protect you from all dangers of body and soul, and that He will be your present help in every need. To you, on this your day of graduation, we extend our heartiest congratulations and best wishes. Oh, that the Lord would guide your ways To keep His statutes still. Oh, that the Lord would grant you grace To know and do His will. Editor DIE MUTTER

Den ganzen Tag arbeitet die Mutter. Fruh morgens steht sie auf und macht fur die Familie das Fruhstuck. Nach dem Friihstuck backt die Mutter Brot und Kuchen. Sie reinigt das ganze Haus. Dann macht sie ein wunderbares Mittagessen. Am Nachmittag naht und flickt die Mutter. Sie naht schone Kleider fur die Schwestern und flickt die Socken des Vaters und der Bruder. Oft geht die Mutter nachmittags in die Stadt. Sie kauft viele Sachen fur das Haus und die Familie. Dann macht sie das Abendbrot. Abends sitzt die Mutter mit den Kindern und hilft ihnen mit den Schularbeiten. Endlich singt die Mutter die kleine Schwester zur Ruhe. Nachdem wir aIle zu Bett gegangen sind, geht sie auch zu Bett. Aber sie schlaft nicht, sondern sie denkt an den nachsten Tag. Spat, betend, macht die Mutter ihre Augen zu. W. Schmidt GEOGRAPHY

Do you want to know the answers, Where to find the world's financiers? Where the Oder River flows? Where to find perpetual snows? Where do we find the Himalayas? We get our rubber from Malaya. Why do we note Yantze Kiang In the province of Siang? Where the well-known Hudson flows? Where long-stapled cotton grows? Why is Greece non-agricultural? What makes Sevastopol sepulchral? 22


Where is civilization slow? What products grow around the Po? What country owns the Gobi Desert Where the people go besert? What mountain tops are not explored? What means the Norseman's term "fiord"? What country exports mostly p-iper To farther lands and to its neighbor? A city is known for making maps, Latin America for taking naps, Minnesota for 10,000 lakes, Wisconsin for the cheese it makes. What city is known for woodtoy-making? What building's height is so breath-taking? Why sheep are raised in Turkestan'? These answers are all known by man. Where can these answers all be found? Above, upon, or in the ground? The students look and look and look And find them in their GEOGRAPHY book. Ruth Timm H. S. '47

GROWTH OF THE SYMPHONY

Franz Joseph Hayden is called the Father of the Symphony. His pioneer attempts to compose a sonata for orchestra-the musical form commonly known as a symphony-earned him that title, which Mozart lovingly reduced to "Papa" Haydn in his references to the great musician. His symphonies, which number 104, are all short and jolly pieces full of fun and play. The best known of them are the "Surprise" Symphony, the "London" Symphony, the "Clock" Symphony, the "Oxford" Symphony, and the "Military" Symphony. Unique in character is the "Farewell" Symphony, which opens with every instrument of the orchestra in action, and decreases in volume as player after player leaves the stage until a last lone violinist sadly ceases to play and departs, leaving the conductor alone on his podium. 23


The devoted admirer of Papa Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, was himself a no less notable contemporary in the field of symphonic composition. He was, in fact, perhaps the greatest musical genius the world has ever known; his first symphony was written at the age of eight. We need, however, make mention only of the last three that came from his pen and which were composed in the short space of six weeks. These are the Symphonies No. 39 in G Minor, No. 40 in E-Flat, No. 41, or "Jupiter." Next upon the symphonic horizon appears the giant of them all, the originator of modern symphonic composition: Ludwig von Beethoven. His harmony was a hundred years ahead of his time. His 'first two symphonies show somewhat the influence of Haydn and Mozart; but with his famous Third, the Eroica, he broke all ties with those two Masters and started down an unknown trail never before explored, the trail of musical romanticism, which assumes that music must be expressive of more than the mere beauty of form typical of the classic age. It is a curious fact that Beethoven's odd-numbered symphonies-with one exception-are considered his best, and that with his evennumbered symphonies he took a rest, as it were, before starting another Masterpiece. Omitting from consideration Symphony No.1 which bears the stamp of the classic age, we proceed first to the Third Symphony, already mentioned as the Eroica. This work was dedicated to Napoleon Bonaparte; but when he declared himself Emperor, Beethoven tore up the title page and wrote: "Composed to celebrate the memory of a great man." This is considered by some as his greatest symphony, and Beethoven has indicated that it was his favorite. The next odd-numbered Symphony, the immortal Fifth, became very familiar and popular in wide circles during the late World War because of its four opening bars which represent the letter "V" (for victory) in Morse code. The Symphony pictures man's struggle with fate, and with the stirring, powerful fourth movement Beethoven presumes to show who is the master. The exception granted above to the distinction of the odd-numbered words of Beethoven is the Sixth Symphony in F Major, known as the Pastoral Symphony. It takes us into the country, through which Beethoven so much loved to wander. In his music he describes his joy at arriving in the country, a brook, the merry gathering of the country people, a sudden storm which drenches their merry frolic, 24


and finally the thankful feelings experienced after the storm. The Seventh Symphony in A Major is subtitled: The Dance Symphony. It is not actually written in dance

form, but is so called because of its rhythmic regularity. The list closes with grandeur in the Ninth, the Choral Symphony, so named because Beethoven in the last movement fitted his music to ~chiller's "Ode to Joy." Because of the fact that this is the composer's lest and most elaborate symphonic work, it might be thought to deserve top honors among them all; but because of its length, its difficulty, and its need for a chorus of no mean ab.lity, it is seldom performed and therefore is not generally known. (To be Continued) Jonathan Schaller A HIKE TO ...

*

During Easter vacation, 1 had a chance to make my first trip to northern Wisconsin. As you probably all realize, a student does not always have an abundance of money, so he must get along without the stuff. It was just this that a classmate and 1 did. From New Ulm to our destination was about 350 miles, or about $8 to $10 in train fare. (We counted in dollars.) Since we wanted to go, anyway, we decided to hitch-hike. We realized (due to the statements of Frof. Bliefernicht) that it is against the law, but everybody does it, so we did, too. We left here on April 17 at approximately 8:00 a. m. We thought we were having very good luck when we got to Minneapolis by 10:00. Large cities are a curse for hitchhikers. It took us one and one-half hours of streetcar riding to get to the other side of St. Paul. By noon we were in Hudson, Wisconsin, and we had even gone across a toll bridge. (1 wonder how often it has been paid for?) Now we were in the home state of my fellow "law-breaker." He was, naturally, quite proud of his home. 1 am, too. As we moved farther north into his state, 1 could see why he was proud of his state. It was very beautiful, but I am sure it is still more so now, because at that time things weren't so green as yet. The only thing 1 can't still understand is how the poor farmers there can make a living on their farms. 1 saw many large, beautiful farms surrounded by trees. I saw large herds, but when 1 looked at the land, 25


I could hardly see how they could raise the feed for their dairy cows. I'm not used to seeing such yellow clay and sandy soil. Where I come from, it is black. I was told that this soil produces very well, so I'll have to take the word of the one who told me. The farther north we got, the fewer farms we saw, but we saw more trees. The people around here may think they have quite a few trees, but up there the trees are really thick. This is the part of northern Wisconsin I fell in love with. Vast areas of forests dotted with beautiful sand bottom lakes aren't anything to be ignored. The name of the place to which we went is Rhinelander. We got there in one day. The next day we looked things over a bit. I was favorably impressed by the beautiful Lutheran church there. It is really worthwhile stopping to look at. I also saw a little of their large paper mill. Now I can explain to my pupils the difference between pulp wood and wood pulp. There is a difference. It seems that most students are asked to help along in the church choir when they come home for a vacation. We did, too. (I guess they just needed a tenor and a bass pretty badly, or something!) We enjoyed it very much, just the same. (We even wore gowns!) On Sunday, April 21, we started back for our dear school. Did you ever get a ride on a motorcycle when you were hitch-hiking? Well, we did. Quite an experience!! We stayed over night at Menominee, Wisconsin, and we got back to New Ulm on Monday, April 22, at 2 :00 p. m. We had a very enjoyable vacation (even if it was too short), and I now am a staunch supporter of northern Wisconsin. My classmate didn't even have to highpressure me. It is really a very wonderful vacation spot. * By request of an ardent reader. Q. Albrecht OF STUDIES Yes, we certainly do hear a great deal "of studies" during the schoolyear. In fact, what else do we come to school for, but to hear of studies, and when hearing of them, we naturally settle down to work and try to rid ourselves of studies-for a while. 26


In Sir Francis Bacon's essay on "Studies," we are told that studies serve for delight. Perhaps they did for him, and I'd venture to say that even in the present day there are students who take delight in certain studies-history, for instance. Bacon said that the chief use of studies for delight is in privateness and retiring. I can just picture him in retirement, studying with great enjoyment a ccmic book, if they had them in his day. I often heard a teacher remark, "He (or she) doesn't know a thing about his lesson, but if I'd ask him something about "Superman" or about the comic strip in last evening's paper, he could tell me all about it, with all the details." Bacon also says that studies serve for ornament, the chief use being in discourse. For instance, a student may know a great deal of science, and he can make himself the ornament of the class by rattling off a string of words which no one understands but himself and the teacher (?). If this utterance of words is so long and contains beautiful phrases and clauses, the class might sit and look in awe and wonder, just as they might look at an ornament on which there are beautiful trimmings. Bacon's third use for studies is for ability, that is in the judgment and disposition of business. So if you do a lot of studying, you'll do well in business. nut there are many people who, in their younger life, neglected their studies more or less-mostly less, and they, of all people, have the greatest success in business. I'm not asking you to follow their steps, but too much studying isn't good either, especially for those who labor far into the night, trying to burn the candle at both ends. My roommate once told me that she learned in English class that sleeping is merely a habit, but she thinks, too, that it's a rather nice habit to get into once in a while! We all know that Bacon was a great and a learned man, and if you believe the things which he wrote in his essay on "Studies," and apply the correct interpretation, you will also believe the following what he wrote: "To spend too much time in studies is sloth." So, my dear fellow students, don't worry about your studies. The best way is to get them overwith in a hurry so that you can have more time for recreation! Renata Pape 27


WHAT'S

COOKIN'?

"Mamma's little baby likes shortnin' bread." I am sure we have all heard this song at some time. Has it ever dawned on you how true this statement really is? Mamma's little baby likes shortnin' bread best as his or her own mamma prepares it. It makes no difference how delicious somebody else's may be; none can compare. In our own homes, we have heard this from the children: "The beans are too salty," or, "Did we have to have carrots again?" When they leave home they sing a different tune. Now it is "Home, home on the gas range where Mom is cooking carrots." At 'first, it was hard for us to accustom ourselves to somebody else's way of preparing food. However good it may be, we find many of our students trying to imitate their favorite cook. When one enters a dormitory, especially after study hour, some pleasant (?) odor will greet him. After two hours of mental labor, everyone is as hungry as a woman on a diet. Oh! for a piece of toast with homemade strawberry jam. Who cares if we do exceed the minimum daily requirement of charcoal'! (How about it, Room 10 in Hillcrest Hall ?) One room may be enjoying toast and jam, but surely there must be a variety. Yes, what is that enticing odor that meets our nostrils? Let's go and investigate. Now we hear k-r-r-unch, k-r-r-unch like a hundred mice. Here is a group enjoying steaming soup and crackers. Nobody thinks about the person that has to tidy the room the next morning, for they are all enjoying themselves immensely. The girls very often prepare complete meals (maybe because of our feminine interests). Often during the year we have "dorm" parties. A group of girls does the duties of a dietician, cook and dish-washer combined. Not only for parties do we use our skill (if it may be called that), but sometimes we prepare meals in our rooms with what utensils are available. One Saturday night we did this in our room. Our first course was tomato juice. Delicious pheasant, mashed potatoes, steaming gravy, and buttered carrots followed. To complete the meal, we had delicious bing cherries and coffee. Aren't you hungry? A way down the hall we can often smell hamburgers "with." Ask Lois Vertz for the recipe. 28


Even though the boys do not usually prepare complete meals, they also try their hand at the culinary art. They enjoy the sweetness of a "catch" of candy. Did you ever taste any of Elroy Schultz's? But he isn't the only one who can cook. As I hear it, D. Mey is one of the best chefs in the boys' "dorm." Val Jean Zollmer knows the tricks of the trade, too, so hamburgers are a specialty in W. Schmidt's room. Toast, soup, hamburgers, and ice cream head the list as an after chapel "snack." Another one who could readily don the chef's cap is Homer Albrecht. All in all, mothers, maybe you will be relieved of the duties on the home front next summer if your sons and daughters keep up the practice. Nevertheless, no matter how much the students imitate their favorite cook, they are always ready to enjoy her meals once more. I'm sure there is no complaining now. All like to go into the kitchen and say, "What's cookin'?" Eleanor Hcokstead

YOU CANNOT SERVE GOD AND MAMMON. There are many people in this sin-laden world today who are extremely wealthy. They have everything that money can buy. They have no want. Nothing, as far as worldly goods are concerned, is beyond their reach. But before we can discuss the top.c further, let us first define the word "mammon." The word comes from the name of the Syrian god of riches, Mammon. It has that same meaning today-wealth-worldly gain. The word itself is not a pretty word. It suggests greed and heathenism, a love for the materialistic things of this world. When we hear it used, we cannot help thinking of Matt. 6 :24, where Christ says, "No man can serve two masters. Ye cannot serve God and mammon." There are many people who are wealthy and who go to church. There are many, too, who go to church just because it is a nice place to go; or perhaps they would make a better impression. But all wealthy people are not heathens or hypocrites. 'There are many whom God has blessed with power and riches, and to whom He has endowed the wisdom and faith to use these blessed gifts with care and intelligence. These are God-fearing Christians who use their 29


wealth to the glory of the Lord. They would gladly give all to be with Christ in heaven. These take the attitude of Job. He was a very wealthy man, and God had given him everything. He was also a God-fearing man who 'firmly believed in God and in the coming Messiah. God, in order to test his faith, took away all his riches and covered him with sores. But Job's faith was well founded. He said: "The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away; blessed be the name of the Lord." Job 2 :21. But there are others, like the rich man who came to Jesus and asked Him what he should do to inherit eternal life. Jesus answered the young man that he should sell all his possessions and follow Him. This the young man could not do, for he was very rich. We know, however, that Christ did not mean this; but He wanted to show this young man that he had not kept the commandments as he should have. He loved mammon more than God. Thus he served mammon rather than God. Luke 18 :18ff. But one doesn't necessarily have to be wealthy to serve mammon. He can be the exact opposite, extremely poor, or just a man of mediocre means. Many times the poor man is a more faithful server of mammon than the rich. He loves riches and materialistic things more than Christ and eternal salvation. He would rather serve mammon and have worldly goods, than serve Christ and have eternal bliss in the glory of Christ. You cannot love riches and God. For if you love God, you will realize that with a love for riches, you can hardly enter into the kingdom of God, for Christ says: "It is easier for a camel to go through a needle's eye, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God." But if you look upon your riches as gifts from God and use them as such, believing firmly upon the Gospel of Christ and eternal salvation, you will find that you are serving God, and not mammon. Would to God that more people would love Christ and serve Him only, using their wealth to further . the Kingdom of Christ here on earth! G. Cudworth

30


EDITORIAL

â&#x20AC;˘ = CRITICISM Welcome back, my friend. I see you have kept your date with me. It is time for another discussion, so light up your pipe and let us get to work. Seeing as we discussed the topic "Gossip" last time, let us go down the same line and pick out another thing which everyone likes to do. How often during a single day don't we hear a person criticize a certain thing or another person? Criticism is another thing which people find is very easy to do. Of course, criticism is of two types, positive and negative. By positive criticism we mean criticism which will benefit a person and urge him on to do better. By negative criticism, we mean just the opposite. The majority of all criticism made by people is negative. Yes, my friend, it is a sad thing, that people just don't feel right unless they can do injury by criticizing someone else. As we go over the matter, we find four types of people who criticize in the negative manner. Those that get a "bang" out of it; those by whom it has become a habit; those who criticize in order to seek revenge; and those who do it and never realize that they are doing it. Let us look into the first group. Into this group we have placed those who criticize because they get a "bang" out of it. These people do not mean any harm by their 3l


criticizing. They think it is a joke, and they get a feeling of contentment to see someone else get angry or suffer because of their criticism. Take John for an example. John was a nice all-around fellow. He was liked by everyone. However, John thought it a good joke when he could make his friend Joe angry. Joe had a beautiful picture of a little girl and her cat. He thought the world of this picture. John might be in the mood for a joke, so he would start to criticize the picture from every possible angle. Joe would at first take it, but in the end he would become fighting-mad. When John thought that he was satisfied, he started to laugh and finally tell Joe he was only having some fun. Now, we can't say that John meant to do any harm. He was out for fun, and the only way he thought he could find it was through criticizing Joe's picture and thus watch Joe's anger kindle. To any person who is like John we say, "Watch out." Better stop doing that, because some day someone will not consider it a joke and a catastrophe is liable to take place, with you as the center of attraction. We come now to the second group. These people are really to be pitied. They have criticized so much that it has become a second nature to them. We all have come into contact with them. No matter what they see or hear, they have something bad to say about it. I personally think they really don't want to do it, but that they don't know how to keep from doing it. A man came up to me and said he didn't mean to criticize everything, but he just couldn't help it. He said that when he heard or saw something why, as soon as he would start commenting on it, he would be criticizing it. 'To any person in this group we say. let your motto be, "Think first, then speak." We believe that if you stop to think before you speak, you will be better prepared to overcome your habit. Before entering into the third class, let us consider number four first. These people are the most innocent of all the criticizers. They say something and never realize they were criticizing. One day I walked with a lady. This lady was in a fine business. As we were walking, she started to talk about a man who was in the same business in which she was. She talked about the way in which the man's business was being run. She said that his ideas were 18th century ideas and that he didn't know how to run his business. Now, I wouldn't say that this lady fully realized that she was criticizing. She said it in all innocence. To these people we can only say that they should be on their 32


guard when speaking. Now we come to the worst criticizers of all. Thesepeople are malicious in every way, or they would not seek revenge through criticizing. They are not to be sympathized with, and they should be treated with the severest measures. Many lives have been ruined or destroyed by people getting revenge through criticism. From henceforth, let us stop our criticizing. If criticizing must be done, be sure it is for the benefit of a person and not for his ruination. Editor GIVE US BREAD!

The war of nations is over, but now the people of the world face a foe far greater than the wrath of men. Here in America we do not know what starvation means. It is a foreign thing, and we can hardly grasp its meaning, unless we see its devastation for ourselves. "Give us bread," cry the mouths of hungry millions. We hear the cry; we have bread. It is a gift of God. We . have by no merit of our own been placed in our position of plenty. Let this serve as an ample reminder to us in America, that starvation could come to us, too. Let us use these gifts of God as He has used them with us. We have had record productions of food for years, yet today the world needs a total of almost twenty-two million tons of grain, and has a total of fifteen million tons, which means a deficit of seven million tons of wheat and bread grains. One can read this in almost any paper, but in the next column one can also read statements by our President, expressing the opinion that there is no necessity to place the nation back on rationing programs such as were invoked during wartime. No necessity at all-just millions staring death in the face, with shrunk and empty stomachs. The President speaks for the people he represents. In the weeks since the government has asked the people to conserve bread, there has been a very heavy consumption of bakery goods in our country. One might say, "What will the slice of bread I save mean?" If each one of us had saved a slice of bread since the request was made, twenty million bushels of grain could have been saved. This would result in preserving millions of lives. 33


We just made another loan (?) to starving Britain which should ease our conscience three billion dollars' worth. There are organizations in the United States that are doing splendid work in preparing for and carrying out relief to the distressed. These organizations appeal to us, as citizens of this great land of plenty, to give. As Christians, we should do all in our power to aid our suffering fellowman. Let us consider that America may not always be the land of plenty. Even now in many newspapers one can see "Forecast No Rain," "Crop Reports Not Favorable." No rain may mean no food for our millions. I recall the days of the drought. We would watch and pray for the long tardy rain. Often our hopes would soar, as flashes of the brightest sheet would race their crooked course across the endless space called sky, and leafless trees and withered plants would stoop down low as if to pray before the. storm, but our expectations passed. We ate the bread off other's soil. R. Walz

34


119. JM. 1.. C!C. JMe55enger The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends. The aim of "The Messenger" is to offer such material as will be beneficial as well as interesting to our readers, to keep the alumni in a closer contact with the college, to foster school spirit, and to give the students an opportunity in the practice of composition and the expression of their thoughts. Entered as second class matter

at Post Office of New Ulm, Minn.

No.4

Volume XXXVI JUNE 1946 THE MESSENGER STAFF Editor Associate Editor Business Manager Assistant Manager Assistant Manager Typist Typist Alumni Notes Exchange College Notes Co-ed Notes Locals Sports Humor

Harold Goede Roman Walz Quentin Albrecht Gerald Cudworth Delbert Mey Louise Pape Helen Fennern Lois Albrecht Lorna Gerlach Erdeen Baker Chrysta Albrecht Glenn Felch Wayne Schmidt Carroll Trettien 35


ALurvlN' NOTES

ENGAGEMENTS AND MARRIAGES Professor and Mrs. Fenske of Mobridge, South Dakota, announce the engagement of their daughter Chloe, ex '44, to Franklyn Boehm. The wedding will take place S("l11..; time this summer. Albert Bruessehoff, '45, Winona, Minnesota, and Valeria Thalman, ex '45, plan to be married on June 23. Artcy Goehring, ex '44, who has teen teaching at Thiensville, Wisconsin, the past year, will marry Will.rm Fuhrmann, a former student, some time this summer. Alma Oswald, H. S. '33, and Lemuel Swanson were married in St. Paul's Lutheran Church in New VIm on April 26. Donald Zimmerman, '45, now at Marinette, Wisconsin, and Emily Becker, ex '45, have set June 16 as their wedding day. SERVICEMEN Henry J. Baumann, H. S. '27, who was stationed over in Tokyo, has been discharged. At the present time he is on a trip to South Dakota, Nebraska, and Georgia, visiting his sister and brothers. When he returns, he will take up his work in an insurance agency. 37


Donald Meier, H. S. '43, of Watertown, South Dakota, has received his discharge. Harold Fuhrman, H. S. '43, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, has also been discharged. Fred Nieno, H. S. '42, now discharged, lives with his English wife in Mankato, Minnesota. Elmer Uhlig, H. S. '43, is now serving in the United States Armed Forces. Pfc. Vernon Sprengler's address is the following: Pfc. Vernon Sprengler 37803066, Med. Det. 310th Inf., A. P. O. 78, Care of the Postmaster, New York, New York.

BIRTHS Some time during the first week in May, Professor and Mrs. Oswald of Watertown, Wisconsin, were blessed with a baby girl. Mrs. Oswald is the former Gertrude John, '27. CHANGES OF ADDRESS Mrs. Lois Burrow, '41, who has been teaching in Jefferson, Wisconsin, has accepted the call to St. Peter's Congregation in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Gilbert Fischer, '40, who has been at St. Peter's in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, has accepted the call to Grace Lutheran Church in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Meilahn Zahn, '32, has left Grace Lutheran Church in Oshkosh and has gone to Menasha, Wisconsin. Verna Birkholz, ex '44, of Two Rivers, Wisconsin, will teach in Waterloo, Wisconsin, next fall. Lois Trettien, '45, of Gresham, Nebraska, has agreed to teach in Bay City, Michigan, next year. Pastor Arthur Kell's new address is the following: Pastor Arthur Kell, 1100 West Territorial Road, Battle Creek, Michigan. Loretta Krenz, ex '45, who has been teaching in Wonewoc, Wisconsin, will teach in Two Rivers, Wisconsin, next fall. Professor Oscar Nawmann, H. S. '27, who has been with us at Dr. Martin Luther College for the past six years, has accepted a call to St. John's Lutheran Church in St. Paul. We, the student body, wish him the Lord's richest blessings in his new work. 38


CAMPUS VISITORS Julius Ingebritsen, '40, and his wife, the former Lorraine Gamm, of Tacoma, Washington, plan to attend our commencemen t exercises. Mrs. Theodore Binhammer of Watertown, Wisconsin, also plans to be present at our graduation exercises. She is the former Erna Sitz, ex '21.

Since the last issue of the "Messenger" we have added several more school papers to our Exchange. The Lone Star Lutheran comes to us from Texas Lutheran College at Sequin, Texas. It is a monthly publication, The Mooring Mast is the Pacific Lutheran College paper. Pacific Lutheran College is at Parkland, Washington, and their paper is published semi-monthly. The Red and White comes from Immanuel Lutheran College, Greensboro, North Carolina. The Indian, which comes from Newberry, South Carolina, is Newberry College's paper. F'rom Allentown, Pennsylvania, comes the paper of Muhlenberg College. It is entitled The Muhlenberg Weekly. The Lenoir Rhynean comes from Hickory, North Carolina. It is the weekly publication of Lenoir Rhyne College. The Gettysburgian comes to us biweekly from Gettysburg College at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Several other schools, to which we have written, have not been heard from as yet.


"Today's

College Woman" is an article sent us by Its author is Harold Taylor, president of Sarah Lawrence College. Harold Taylor Is one of the United States' youngest college presidents. About a year ago Life Magazine had several pictures of him. Taylor holds that out of the war has come a new American figure on the American campus-mature, earnest, informed, and with a mind of her own-today's college girl. He starts out by saying that the education of women in this country has been a by-product of the education of men. Women formed their own colleges patterned after the colleges of the men. When co-educational universities were introduced, the woman played her most important role, not in the classroom, but in the extracurricular activities of the school. Thus the trend was beginning to appear where extracurricular activities of the school are more important than the education itself. Mr. Taylor says this is contrary to our educational aims. He says that during the last war the character of the college woman was altered. With few men on the campuses, the woman became the dominant figure. Now the men are gradually returning and so is a higher respect for education. They are seeking a set of values to believe in and live by. On the other hand. the college woman has been living a life of diverse activities and wishes to continue to do so. So what do we find? The college woman of today is wife and mother completing her college work, and sometimes going on to graduate with her husband. I wonder what this will mean for the child of this era who, like all past children, desperately needs a home to guide them through early life? Today's college women are also taking a more active part in social problems and politics. They do not align themselves with some specific political group but form more general opinions on things. Mr. Taylor says that in the United States, as in no other country in the world, women have an opportunity to participate in national life, and to create a kind of life for themselves that they desire. He also says that the woman is the most active member of her community. Finally, he says that our college education must give the new woman student every means possible that will help her to promote general welfare.

Pageant Magazine.

40


I can't help remembering the age-old saying, "A woman's place is in the home." It seems to have been for-

gotten. What will become of that generation which, because of the mothers' desires to promote general welfare, must live and grow up under the care of some social agency? In the last Exchange column of our Messenger, I stated to you the conditions of colleges and universities in Greece, China, the Fhilippines, and Czechoslovakia. The W. S. S. F. (q. v. Easter issue of D. M. L. C. Messenger) has sent us another bulletin on conditions in Hungary, France, Finland, and India. In Hungary, the students live in holes in the ground. Butter, meat, and sugar are things dreams are made of. The writer of this article says that his salary amounts to $.50. Their clothes are of sacking; their shoes are full of holes. The W. S. S. F. plans to send student supplies as soon as United States authorities permit. In Paris, France, students also live in quarters underground. In the middle of one of these larger "dormitories" two bicycles have been installed. They are geared to the aeration system. When electricity fails, two students pedal vigorously to keep the others from suffocating to death. The Medical Staff of the Cite Universitaire recently published the results of physical examinations of 28,000. The average of their weights found them to be twenty pounds lighter than students before the war. Tuberculosis is taking a large toll of students. The other countries are in the same condition. These news releases appear on your Exchange shelf in the library. Read them!

41


/ I

[OLLEG E. NOTE S

I

Where there are people with the desire to get an education, there are high schools and colleges to fill their needs. And where there are schools of this type, things are always happening. Dr. Martin Luther College is no exception; in fact, the events that have occurred since the last issue of the Messenger appeared seem to be quite numerous. At two o'clock Sunday afternoon, March 24, streams of people from the surrounding area poured into the auditorium of D. M. L. C. They had come to hear an address by the Reverend Dr. J. W. Behnken, of Oak Park, Illinois, president of the Lutheran Synod of Missouri and other states. A capacity audience filled the extra chairs and benches. Professor Martin Albrecht played an organ prelude and then Professor Carl Schweppe led the group in prayer, followed by Scripture reading. Dr. Behnken spoke then, telling of the terrible physical suffering and also of the spiritual needs of nearly a score of countries ravaged by years of war. The audience was visibly moved by the address and gave freely to the collection then taken for the relief of suffering in Europe and Asia. April was ushered in by an evening of entertainment April first. The Polomene Potters ably demonstrated the use -of the potter's wheel in making vases of various sorts' from the commonest of clay. They also showed how to make casts of clay to turn out little placques and similar articles. A display of the many types of pottery from the 42

,


ÂŤ

ancients to the present age was interesting, especially one small vase in the shape of a bird which could be made to sound like a singing bird simply by partially filling it with water and then blowing. The two performers alternated in describing the steps in the process and their humor was "corny" enough even for the discriminating tastes of the students of our college. Everyone enjoyed the evening and probably several decided sooner or later to try their own hand at working with clay. This was the last lyceum number of the year. The last movie to be given this year was of Daniel Boone. The same evening, April 12, pictures were also shown of Glacier National Park. At 8 :00 p. m. April 16, Choir I gave a concert in which the following numbers were rendered: P_AiRT I Introit: Kyrie, God Father Praise to Thee Presentation of Christ in the Temple The Spirit Also Helpeth Us Organ: Theme and Variations on: Jesus Priceless Treasure E. D. Backer

", I

Ninth Century H. Schuetz J. Eccard J. S. Bach J. G. Walther

PART II Mitten wir im Leben sind C. Hirsch-Buszin Siehe, das ist Gottes Lamm (Motet for Lent) F. Reuter Der Herr ist auferstanden (Motet for Easter) F. Reuter Singt und klinget ueberall... E. Biedermann Wie schoen leucht' uns der Morgenstern G. Schumann Organ-Piano: March Triumphale A. Guilmant Organ: Marie Meyer Piano: Eunice Sauer PART III Praise God in His Holiness Sweetly Angel Choirs Are Singing Sing We All Noel. Away in a Manger Wake, Awake, for Night Is Flying The Lord Bless You and Keep You (Benediction) 43

D. Vandenberg arr. M. Luvaas C. York :G. Schroth E. D. Backer E. D. Backer


..

'


Easter vacation began after classes April 16, and work was resumed on April 23. Almost everyone took advantage of this opportunity to spend a few days at home, and everyone seemed determined to make the last six weeks of school go as fast as possible. It is not that we hate school-we just like home so much better! The Concert Choir sang at Arlington the evening of April 28, at Belle Plaine the afternoon of May 5, and at St. Paul the evening of May 5. Several of the classes had their traditional spring picnics lately. The sophomores opened the season May 8 and the next day the I Normalites had their picnic; theirs was followed by an outing by the II Normalites. The Fuchsies frolicked on May 15 and the Juniors May 16. The list was completed when, on May 21, the II Normalites gave a picnic for their graduating superiors, the III Normalites. The Brass Quartette, composed of Alfons Woldt, Homer Albrecht, Bruce Backer, and Wayne Schmidt, played for a Walther League banquet at Blue Earth May 19. On the same occasion the Vocal Quartette sang. Its members are Homer Albrecht, Bruce Backer, Roger Wessel, and Alfons Woldt. The following concert was presented by the Band, Aeolian Chorus, and Marlut Singers Sunday, May 26, at 8:00 p. m. BAND 1. 2. 3. 4.

March: Repasz Band Gold and Silver Waltz Country Gardens March: Queen of the Fleet

Lincoln Lehar Grainger Crosby

AEOLIAN CHORUS All the Things You Are Kern Accompanist: Joyce Hanke 2. Joy to My Heart Edw. H. Sauer 3. A Brown Bird Singing Wood Accompanist: Mary Lange Directress: Eunice Sauer EUPHONIUM SOLO Serenade Drigo Wayne Schmidt Accompanist: Chrysta Albrecht 1.

45


MARLUT

SINGERS

1. The Sailor 2. Sweet and Low 3. Funiculi-Funicula Accompaniment: Piano Duo Wayne Schmidt, Bruce Backer

Grieg Barnby Denza

BAND 1. March: The Klaxon Fillmore 2. Brass Quartette: Desert Song Romberg Alfons Woldt, Homer Albrecht, Bruce Backer, Wayne Schmidt 3. Intermezzo Scene: In a Persian Market.. Ketelbey 4. I'll See You Again Coward 5. March: Them Basses Huffine 6. The Star Spangled Banner On June flrst the band members went to Winona, Minnesota. The following morning they played in an open-air service, and in the afternoon they gave a concert. It was an experience that they will long remember. Besides these many events which have occupied the students' time the past two months, there are still others to look forward to seeing and taking part in presenting. Choir I and II combined will give the following Commencement Concert on Thursday, June 6, at 8 :00 p. m. 1. Choir Motet: The Spirit Also Helpeth Us J. S. Bach a) Andante con moto b) Allegro moderato c) Allegro d) Chorale Carol: Away in the Manger G. Schroth Motet: Der Herr ist auferstanden F. Reuter Motet: Wie schoen leucht' uns der Morgenstern G. Schumann 2. Organ-Piano: March Triumphale A. Guilmant Organ: Marie Meyer Piano: Eunice Sauer 3. Chorus: Duna J. McGill Accompanist: Chrysta Albrecht Roses of Picardy Haydn Wood Accompanist: Eldonna Timm 47


4.

Fiano: Polonaise in A Flat Wayne Schmidt

5.

Chorus: Schlafe, me in Prinzchen, es ruhn Accompanist: Elsie Zierzow Das Wandern ist des 'Muellers Lust

6. Piano: Rondo Capriccioso Joyce Hanke 7. Chorus: Where My Caravan Has Rested Carmena Accompanist: Mary Lange

F. Chopin

B. Flies K. Zoellner

F. Mendelssohn H. Loehr H. Wilson

The Commencement Exercises for the graduates of the High School and Normal Departments will be held June 7. The order of the services will be: 1. Processional: Organ: Professor G. Burk 2. Prelude and Hymn: Now Do We Pray God, the Holy Ghost Organ: Robert Moldenhauer 3. Prayer and Scripture Reading 4. Prelude and Hymn: All Depends on Our Possessing God's Abundant Grace and Blessing Organ: Walter Bonitz 5. Address: The Rev. Im. P. Frey, Denver, Colorado 6. Chorus: Soul, Be Still and Trust in God Franck 7. Presentation of Diplomas: C. L. Schweppe, President 8. Prelude and Hymn: Christ, Thou Art the Sure Foundation Organ: Carolyn Bathke 9. The Lord's Prayer 10. Benediction

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â&#x20AC;˘ [[]-ED "

N[]TES â&#x20AC;˘

Hi! How's life treating you? Not so good? Hmm! That's bad. Well, I'll tell you what, you sit down and read about someone else's troubles and perhaps you'll forget your own. Hope so. According to the latest reports, lone Strege is heading for a fall. Some certain medieval history professor (we won't mention his name) would rather see lone back in kindergarten. I wonder why! Speaking of troubles, Dot Winter has really been having trouble. She must have thought that Bode Hall was non-inflammable, and, being inquisitive, she intended to test it. Well, as the story goes, it all ended up in a mess, but Bode Hall is still standing. Now who would ever have thought we'd see Phyllis Beilke and Ardelle Zietlow walking around with their fingers in a sling? It came in handy, right around the time piano recitals rolled around, didn't it, Phyllis? What's Renata Pape's main trouble? She even goes so far as to practice calisthenics after "lights out." And who should know better than Norma Just? Troubles seem to be all over for Elsa Klein, but her friends have decided to buy her an anchor and chain, so she won't float away every time she gets a letter from Mobridge. Poor June Miller! In the wee hours of the morning she blindly stumbled down to the depot, only to be greeted by the depot agent, "Sorry, ma'am, no train! Don't you know there's a coal strike?" That's why she went home at 51


11 :00, and we hope that she lived happily ever after, despite her misfortune. Soon a plaintive wail will be heard that goes something like this, "0, mv little brain, where art thou?" The time to sharpen our wits and our pencils is again drawing near. That's right, semester exams are rolling around once more. Ivalo Pommeranz is really taking to the culinary arts. We were all thinking of buying her a recipe book so she could boil eggs all for the sake of a Third Normal. Speaking of Third Normals. They must be queer creatures, or else Elaine Bogenschneider is walking around in a fog. Otherwise why would she nonchalantly bump into an empty chair and then with the blankest of blank expressions say, "Excuse me!"? Hard luck has really struck West Hall. Just as the fad of broken fingers is sweeping the campus, even so are appendectomies. Carol Current is well on the way to recovery though, we hope. May 10 was a great day at D. M. L. C., for the Juniors, not only had a fashion parade, but also a piano recital! I don't see why Dorothy Prousa doesn't want to let us all in on what she has to announce. When's this all coming off, Dorothy 7 Anyone noticing the horticultural activity around Hillcrest Hall, please show Marcia Goehring that this work is appreciated. Your gardening will surely be missed next year, Marcia. The ~econd Normals can complain about all the work they have to do, but judging from Vera Huth, we're beginning to wonder. But then. there is a trick to hanging up clothes (so they stay) and she hasn't caught on yet. In due time Vera will not have to wash her clothes twice, as has been her past experience. Instead of receiving a package "Do Not Open Until Christmas," every senior girl was given a note labeled "Do Not Open Until 10 :55." Upon opening the notes, they were greeted with "Hi!" Takes brainwork, Cile! In a very short time fourteen fair maidens are leaving our halls to take on the title of Miss . The Third Normals are: Carolyn Bathke, Elaine Bogenschneider, Mar52


cia Goehring, Marie Meyer, Bernice Mundstock, and Eunice Sauer. The Second Normals are: Lois Fuhlbrigge, Lyla Johnson, Janice Kuester, Helen Kuske, Doris Mehlberg, Dorothy Prousa, Agnes Schlund, and Ardelle Zietlow. It's too bad we don't have a Nuremberg funnel for each of you. Incidentally, did you hear that Mickey Mouse, alias Carolyn Fink, is still perplexed over professors' names and nicknames? I suppose "Peggy" could be a family name. Hillcrest Hall has had some rare parties. They call them "Sad Sack" parties, because all they can do is cry and weep. Simple-onions are on the menu. It's surprising Lil Bode didn't burn her fingers the day she heated her thistle tube over the Bunsen burner. At present, any resemblance to a thistle tube is pure coincidental. It is past Valentine's Day, so Alice Reek and "Timmy" are playing cupid's role. I pity their victims. When Melda Brei is overcome with boredom, she spends her time drawing centipedes. Two of her friends decided to playa trick on her. Upon finding a real centipede, they presented it to her in Chemistry class. Naturally, she became frightened, but the remaining mystery is-what happened to the centipede? One would think that singing in concerts such as the choir sang in Arlington, Belle Plaine, and st. Paul would be enough. But no, our co-ed warblers warbled such familiar songs as "Found a Peanut" and "Show Me the Way to Go Home" all the way home. But the bus driver survived, and that's all that matters. Strike three! You're out! How often don't we hear that familiar cry coming from the athletic field. The girls have really taken to the sports and are keeping the balls rolling, and they're having fun, and lots of it. As the saying goes, "Tempus fugit," and since I had little to spare to begin with, I'll say, "S'long! Have a pleasant summer! Hope to see you again next fall!"

53


Time marches on, and here I am at a dead stand-still trying to think of an interesting way in which to present what I have to present. Oh, for the ingenuity of a woman at a time like this! Karl Bauer must have been reading about the Ku Klux Klan. What else could have motivated him to roam about the dorm with a blackened face, long ulster and slouch hat scaring the daylights out of men like Mensch, P. Albrecht, Lindloff', and others ? Yes, they really got scared. Has anyone heard who succeeded in contracting the worst case of poison ivy-R. Kramer or Eugene Spaude? Anyone who didn't know the circumstances might think that D. M. L. C. were serving as a resort for the Indians from overcrowded reservations. (Painted faces!) Don't wash your hands in the fingerbowl! Don't put your knife back on the table after using it! Don't pick up a goblet by its shank! Such pieces of information are eagerly snatched up by the Senior boys these days. Because of the formal banquet sponsored by the downtown ladies, May 17, every etiquette book is checked out from both libraries. Some have even sent home for books. Haven't they, Scharlemann? If you have any shaving soap that you don't want to 54


pack to take home, I'm sure either MacFarland or Moeller would be more than happy to relieve you of it. They rejoice in washing each other's mouth out with the stuff. Just how effective is it? If there ever was a panacea, I think

Harry's Listerine is it. Just ask him for all the purposes it has served. Before we get too far away from Moeller-Have you ever slept with an alligator? Well, Moeller went to bed one night after the lights went out, only to find that he wasn't alone. I don't know what he did. but would you like to sleep with an alligator? It is one of the remnants of the stuffed animals that were once in one of the fourthfloor rooms. It measures three and one-half to four feet long. Live bats have now taken over fourth floor. Why do those Biedenbender brothers argue so much? Women have nothing on them. The study of harmony has entered into the high-school department. Homer Albrecht, A. Woldt, Wessel, and B. Backer make up the vocal quartet that went to Blue Earth on Sunday, May 19. ~chmitty supplants Wessel to make an instrumental quartet. Quite a few new German hymnals are adorning the shelves and desks of the boys since the Northwestern Publishing House's closing-out sale. H. Albrecht was the first to get his. Ben Naumann, Bert's brother and Mrs. Naumann's son (strange as it may seem), h-is taken up residence with us in the dorm. He was formerly a pfc. in the 10th Mountain Infantry. H. Ratike found out just what it means to be all wet. The showers received his clothed body with open mouths. Moral: Don't drop water bags on the wrong people. What gave Q. Albrecht the hiccoughs for two days a-running? He staunchly maintains that he hasn't touched a drop for months. Room bucks, attention! If your charges don't get to bed on time, lock 'em out. Bauer does, doesn't he, Mack? Wanted, Lost and Found! Wanted: Choice pieces of Phillip 66 furniture. Not to be confused with Louis the 14th. See or call Prof. Sauer, College Heights, before school closes. 55


Lost and Wanted: "My bed sheets!"-D. blankets are prickly, aren't they?)

Mensch.

(Army

Wanted: A reliable compass and guide of more than five years' experience. See Wolf or Sievert. Found: "The Lost C(h)ord." Call at Wenzel's room (It's really there.) In closing, I earnestly conjure you to do things interesting so that I might be able to compile them in the fall issue.

ATHLETICS

Here we are again, sports fans, and we are ready to bring you all the news in the sports world of our school. However, before we take up the present activities, it will be necessary to pick up the thread where we dropped it in our last issue. That will take us back into the basketball tournament. Your editor (perhaps under the influence of general opinion) took a guess at the two teams which would appear in the !finals. This choice was correct. However, we can't let it go at that. There nearly was an upset in the semifinal game. The Normal I team, which was an underdog during regular play, surprised the spectators and the Senior team by putting up a tough fight. Normal I held the lead most of the way, but in the last quarter the college lads 56


bowed to the high school team. The final game between the Juniors and the Seniors brought a good deal of spirit on the campus. Posters were placed all over the grounds, and all attention was centered on the big event. The preliminary game on the deciding evening determined Normal II the winner over Normal I in the consolation bracket. In the colorfully decorated gymnasium, the second game was bitterly contested. The first half of the game was more exciting than the last part. After the close 'light, the second half put the Junior squad ahead and put them on the top side of a 49-37 score. And

now-"Take the park."

me out to the (base) ball game, take me out to

The baseball season opened with a good-sized group of fiery lads who were ready to go into a vigorous training and a number of tryouts. The boys all did their best at practices and took the instructive hints from the coach. The weather man was a fairly square shooter during the training season. At these first practices the coach was desperately looking for a pitcher. Ken Kolander and Dietz proved to be the best on the squad and haven't been doing badly. Another sticker was the problem of hitting. The D. M. L. C. boys didn't have the old "XX" touch with the warclub, but they improved as time went along. With a few of the rough spots shaved off, the coach arranged two scrimmages with the Trinity High School team. After a little more drill, the boys went into their first tilt with the nine from Mankato State Teachers College on April 24. The game was played on the Luther field, and it was a perfect day for baseball. The game itself was by no means one of the best, but everyone enjoyed it. The D. M. L. C. fans were especially pleased by the fmal outcome. Yes, our boys came out on top in this tilt by a 10-8score. Both teams displayed a need for more training, and the Mankato pitchers lacked control. The battery for the Luther squad was Dietz and Ken Kolander on the mound, and Moldenhauer behind the plate. Summary-Score MTC DMLC

by innings: R

:3 0 2 3 0 0 0 0- 8 0 6 0 0 2 2 0 0-10 57

H

E

7

3

10

2


In our next game, Mankato State Teachers College served as our host. This game proved to be much better than the first game had been. The Mankato mound staff took a marked turn toward the better. Ken Kolander went all the way for our boys and did a beautiful job, combined with a substantial backing. However, MTC ended one run ahead of our boys, with the scoreboard standing at 5-4. Summary-Score

by innings:

J)'MLC MTC

R

0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0-4 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 1-5

H

E

9 11

2 3

On May 8 the varsity was full of pep and in plenty of high spirits. In the first place, the team members were excused from classes in order to make the trip to St. Paul. Secondly, the narrow margin by which the team had lost its last game made it a determined group. The Bethel team proved to be the victors in this game. The number of errors and the comparison between hits and runs in this game doesn't look too good. Kolander and Dietz did the hurling for our side with Moldenhauer on the receiving end. Summary-Score

by innings:

R DMLC Bethel

.4 2 0 2 1 2 0 0-11 3 0 3 1 0 0 3 4-14

H

E

2 12

5 6

Our team is a member of the Southern Minnesota Junior College Conference. We will not be able to bring the remainder of our schedule because of this edition's printing deadline. In addition to the above mentioned games, the following schedule remained at the time this article was written. Date May May May May May

11 16 18 22 30

Opponent

Where Played

Concordia Bethany Bethel Bethany Northrop

St. Paul Mankato New Ulm New Ulm Northrop 58


Individual summary after first three games: Name AB H

Ave. E Peterman, If 11 5 .455 o R. Kolander, 3b l0 4 .400 1 Sievert, Ib 13 4 .308 1 K. Kolander, 2b-p l0 3 .300 1 Moldenhauer, c 12 3 .250 2 Dietz, 2b-p 10 2 .200 2 A. Voigt, ss.......... 5 1 .200 3 Schwartz, rf 7 1 .143 o Goede, cf 8 1 .125 o E. Schulz, rf 4 0 .000 o The boys who aren't playing baseball with the varsity are required to participate in intra-mural baseball, horseshoe, or tennis competition. Since the initial games are first getting under way, no results are as yet available. Now let us see what the D. M. L. C. co-eds are doing in the field of athletics. After the completion of the regular basketball schedule, which put the Koch team on top and the Mueller team in runner-up position, a basketball tournament was conducted. The tournament was run on an elimination basis with a championship and a consolation bracket. Many of the games before the finals were bitterly contested. However, in the finals, Normal II, A and 12, A ran away with the two hard-fighting Normal I teams. The girls' volleyball games increased in pitch as the season progressed. The games were tame at first, but near the end the girls raised the roof with this sport. The interest in this field was good this year, and I believe the sport will gain more adherents next year. The Standings Won Lost Klossner 10 5 Fennern 9 6 Huth 8 7 Bleck 4 11 During the spring season the girls have organized softball teams and tennis matches. Horseshoe was dropped because of a lack of interest. The ten softball teams play twice a week,and about the only thing that might hinder 59


the girls would be a flood or a blizzard. Cold weather is a minor item. It also seems as if the Normalite girls are losing their sway over the "Fuchs" in softball. At any rate, several Normalite girls are subordinate to diminutive "Fuchs" Charlotte Hackbarth, who is a team captain. The tennis "gals" are required to spend two 40 minute periods per week on the tennis courts. In both of these competitive games the results at the time of the writing of this article were too limited. With this I must sign off, but I will be on deck again next September.

* * * * * JOKES?

~ ~

<"'-_ .... ~,

(IN -n-te

CARS

MAY

BUT FOR.D~

CoME> (1,0

LAMP LIGIiT) AND CAR-OS M,','f f:"'ORE'\oI~R.

ee

01'1

Public health question: "What is the best method to prevent diseases carried by biting insects?" "Don't bite the insects!" Prof: "What was the biggest obstacle in building the Panama Canal?" Eager student: "Dirt!" 60


Daffynitions

Miser: Dough nut. Bargain Sale: Invitation to a counter-revolution. Lawsuit: Pretense, Suspense, Expense. Adolescents: Kids that are alike in many disrespects. A woman: A person who can hurry through a drugstore aisle 15 in. wide without brushing against a pile of tinware, and then drive home and knock one of the doors off a 12 ft. garage.

* * * * * Some husbands' words get sharp from trying to get them into the conversation edgewise!

* * * * * There was a young lady from Lynn Who was so exceedingly thin That when she essayed To drink lemonade She slipped through the straw and fell in!

* * * * * "What pretty hair you have, Mary," said the visitor. "You must have gotten it from your mother." "No," replied little Mary, "I must have gotten it from Daddy; his is all gone !"

* * * * * Teacher: "Johnny, can you teII me where the Red Sea is?" Johnny: "Yes, teacher, it's on the third line of my report card!"

* * * * * Prof. Stindt: "If monogamy is marrying one wife, what is bigamy?" II Normal: "A form of insanity in which a man insists on making same mistake twice!" 61


A flea and a fly in a flue Were imprisoned, so what could they do? Said the fly, "Let us flee!" "Let us fly!" said the flea. So they flew through a flaw in the flue.

* * * * * Dot Winter's version of "The Three Bears." Papa Bear: "Who's been drinking my coke?" Mamma Bear: "Who's been drinking my coke?" Baby Bear: "Burp! Excuse me."

* * * * * The height of illegibility-a doctor's prescription written with a post office pen in a rumble seat of a second-hand car.

* * * * * "Now, really, Sgt. MacFarland, in civilian life would you come to me with a trivial complaint like this?" "No, Captain; I'd send for you!"

* * * * *

Eunice hungry-Eunice eats pickle-Eunice Sauer. Philip on radiator-Philip sleeps-Philip Frey. Esther pale-Esther choked-Esther Poehler. Dennis wet-Dennis slips-Dennis Wetter.

62


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TAUSCHECK

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and Duplicated

DRS. SCHLEUDER Optometrists

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797

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52 - 341

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Phone 232 v. James Tillman, Sr., Proprietor

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STATE BANK New UIm, Minnesota Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

Friendly Helpful Service at Your Command Residence Phone 150

Office Phone 260

DR. F. H. DUBBE, F. A. C. S. NEW ULM,

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON MINNESOTA


E. G. LANG, D. D. S. Office Above State Bank of New Ulm Office Phone 472

Res. Phone 1172

PALACE

LUNCH

H. A. Bergmeier, Prop. New Ulm's Most Popular Lunch Room Sandwiches-- Ice Cream-Candy-Soft Drinks-Cigarettes

115 N. Minn. St.

Phone 668

New Ulm, Minn.

Reim & Church Jewelers

Brown & Meidl Music Store and School Piano Tuning, Repairing of All Instruments All Standard Makes of Band and Orchestra Instruments 308 North Minnesota St. Phone 1451 New Ulm, Minn.

Compliments of

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ATHLETIC

SHOES OUR SPECIALTY

Shoes Fitted Free by X-Ray

P. J. EICHTEN SHOE STORE New DIm, Minnesota

MEYER THE LEADING PHOTOGRAPHER Special Prices to Students We have a complete line of frames from miniatures 8xlO in metal or wood.

to

NEW ULM, MINN.

PHONE 165-L

T. R. FRITSCHE, M. D., F. A. C. S. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat GLASSES Fritsche

FITTED

Bldg.

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Shining

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123 No. Minnesota

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CO.

H. P. Zupfer, Prop. 103 N. Broadway


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for Dress

- - - and for school, too! If you want to be admired, praised

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j)~ Ice Cream Phone 104 Try

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PHONE

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Quicker Service


1945-1946 DMLC Messenger Vol. 36  
1945-1946 DMLC Messenger Vol. 36