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VOLUME XXXIII ,

OCTOBER 1942

NUMBER J


Lord, teach us to pray.

Luke 11:1

CONTENTS

POErr'S' CORNER LITERARY An Introduction to Dr. Martin Luther College South Dakota

6 ~_ 8

My Diary

10

Do You Need A RestL

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EiDIITORIAL

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ALUMNI NOTES

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EXCHiANGE

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COLLiEiGE;NOTES

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CO-ED NOTES_ - - --

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LOCALS - - - __--

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SPORTS - --

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HUMOR - - - -- -- -- - - - -

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POETS' VEISPER BELLS The day before the Sabbath At soft eventide, The bells of our chapel Ring out far and wide; And all of the townsmen And farmers around Will know that the morrow Will bring that same sound. The bells will be ringing, The choirs be singing Their praises to their Lord. The bells will be ringing, The pastor be bringing His people God's own Word. R. W. '45 QUIT? NEVER When things go wrong as they sometimes will, When the road you're trudging seems up hill, When the funds are low and the debts are high, And you want to smile, but you have to sighWhen care is pressing you down a bit, Rest, if you must, but don't you quit. Life is queer with its twists and turns, As everyone of us sometimes learns, And many a failure turns about When he might have won had he stuck it out. Don't give up though the pace seems slow, You may succeed with another blow. Success is failure turned inside outThe silver tint of the clouds of doubt, And you never can tell how close you are; It may be near when it seems so far. So stick to the fight when you're hardest hit, It's when things seem worst that you must not quit.

M. L. '43 2


CORNER LONELY The night is lonely, so am I; Forlorn the stars shine in the sky. Their merry twinkle too, is gone. All nature is waiting for the dawn. The night is lonely; why you ask? Could cheerfulness in moonlight bask? In moonlight bright, perhaps-but no, Not in moonlight pale as snow. The trees, as sentinels they stand, To keep off harm on either hand, From moonbeam that has gone astray, Or dust from star fallen by the way. The night is lonely, but why am I? My answer must be just a sigh. This loneliness, it can't be seen, Or heard, or touched, or felt, or e'en Be shared by one; none can atone; I must be lonely all alone. v. T.

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FRIENDS Friends are ones who shall not part Friends can calm each others heart Friends can make life worth living Friends can help you in your giving Friends shall quiet all your sorrow Friends shall be here on the 'morrow When from this world you shall part Friends shall mourn you from the heart. L. W.-H. S. '44 SHE A lily of shimmering verdure That blossoms in glorious hues, Attractive, alluring in contour, So stately, yet warm as a Muse. I R G R '43

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May I now formally introduce to you our former student and present instructress of music at Dr. Martin Luther College, Miss Gertrude Stoekli. She speaks for herself: "The piano is the musical charm of our social life."A. E. Lancaster. H,ow very truthfully and proudly D. M. L. C. students can make the foregoing statement! The pianos at their disposal are of the best type and condition. May they continue to be so through proper usage and care! All students have the privilege of using the pianos at no cost wrhatsoever. The aforementioned statement is too often one which is taken too lightly and without much deliberation. By this is meant the fact that at conservatories and universities fees are charged per hour for the use of the pianos. When one's practice period has passed, so also has passed the stated amount of money. Lost periods involve not only a loss of practice but a loss financially, however minute it may be. Then, too, the pianos are not in the best condition. Indeed, they are far from being new Baldwins! Many times this summer as I played the pianos in the Minnesota University Music Hall, I wished that I could rather be making use of the fine equipment at Dr. Martin Luther College. We should be proud of our equipment here and use it advantageously and with good discretion. The Minnesota University Music Hall is a rectangular brick building of comparatively recent construction. It

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houses the organ practice rooms in the basement, classrooms, the general office and auditorium on the first floor, piano studios on the second floor, and piano practice rooms on the third floor. As one practices one can see the tall peaks of some of the downtown Minneapolis buildings, among which is the Foshay Tower. On the first floor, as previously stated, are the classrooms. In one of these I attended History of Music lectures and in another Music Appreciation classes. The History of Music course proved to be extremely interesting and covered material ranging from the very beginnings of music up to the time of J. S. Bach (1685-1750). We studied the origin of the scales; how the Greeks made melodies; how seven different modes were devised corresponding to a segment an octave long; how the Ptolemaic modes origina ted; the development of musical rhythm; the Ambrosian modes; the beginnings of our so-called "Harmony"; the origin of the motet and its development; Faulx Bourdon and its importance; the beginnings of music-al notation and secular music; the influences of various men upon music-Palestrina, John Dunstable, Josquin des Pres, etc.; the new .forms of religious music, etc. The course was purely a lecture course of material found in the book, A History of Music, written by Donald Ferguson, our lecturer. How true then were his interpretations! Music Appreciation involved much more than the term may imply. This course of study was also a lecture course plus supervised "listening periods." Each day one-half of the period would invariably be devoted to the explanation of some composition and would be followed by the playing of the composition on a record. One particular day a Mozart Trio was played for us by three university musicians. It was our duty to analyze the various types of music to the best of our ability and to classify it as to the period in which it was written ~example: Baroque, Classic, Romantic, Modern). Then, too, we had to learn to identify compositions .and know the respective composers. The supervised "listening periods" could be taken on four of the specified days each week. Two "listening hours" per week were compulsory, but more could be taken at one's own discretion. These periods were under the supervision of an assistant to our class professor. In one of the piano studios on the second floor of the music hall, I took piano lessons and studied Piano Normal Methods. Piano Normal Methods dealt with the methods used in teaching piano students of various ages, 5


from the pre-school child to the adult. My interest was centered especially in the field of adults. E'ndless files of music materials, books, sheet music, etc., had to be surveyed and studied as to content and usefulness in piano study. Various books on piano pedagogy were prescribed as reading references, among which was the book written by Frank J. Potamkin, Moddern Piano Playing. Among the highlights of the summer at Minneapolis were the various vocal and instrumental recitals which were presented gratis to all summer students upon the presentation of their fee cards. Convocation hours were in progress each Thursday morning at eleven in Northrop Memorial Auditorium. Sigmund Spaeth, music critic, spoke on one particular Thursday on the topic, "Music For Fun." His definition of music was the following: "Music is the organization of sound toward beauty." Another interesting highlight was the old harpsichord which we Music Appreciation students had the opportunity of seeing during one of our class periods. All of the keys were black in contrast to the black and white keys of our modern pianos. The harpsichord is the immediate precursor of the piano and was in use from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. As students and former students of Dr. Martin Luther College let us all remember Dr. Martin Luther's definition of music: "Music is a discipline and a mistress of order and good manners." AN INTRODUCTION TO DR. MARTIN LUTHER COLLEGE When I was asked to write an article for this paper, the thought came to my mind that very few of us know the history of our school, so why not give some of the more outstanding facts? Professor Bliefernicht has written a very brief history of Dr. Martin Luther College which is in our library., The year 1883 represented the 400th anniversary of Luther's birth. The German Evangelical Lutheran Synod felt that they could not erect a better monument in honor of the. Great Reformer than by the establishment of a Lutheran institution for the education of the youth. It was then resolved to establish a school. However, actual construction was not begun until June 25, 1884 when the corner stone was laid. This is a memorable day 6


in the history of the Lutheran Church, for _it was on this day in the year 1530 that the Augsburg Confession was read before the Imperial Diet of Augsburg. Construction was begun and hurried along in order that school could be opened in the fall. On November 9, 1884, the newly completed building was dedicated. This original building is still a part of our complex of buildings today and is known ~,s "The Service Building" and more recently, "The Annex Hall." With a group of three men as a faculty, and with an enrollment of eight students, the institution began to function on November 10, 1884. Thus it grew and provided an education for those preparing to become pastors and also a general or business education beyond the scope of the elementary school. An agreement was reached in 1893 which meant a complete transformation for Dr. Martin Luther College. Henceforth the school was to serve as a Normal School of the General Synod. On September 3, 1893, the school Was opened under this new arrangement. Another change for the. school had begun in 1896 when the General Synod decided to permit girls to enroll for the normal course. In 1898 the first girl graduated from the normal course. With the entrance of this one girl the number of girls enrolled has increased until today that number nearly exceeds that of the boys. The next change for the school will come in 1945. when a fourth year in the Normal Department will be-. come effective. New Ulm, the home of our school, is situated in the: Minnesota River valley, one of the most beautiful spots in Minnesota. The school is bounded on the east side by Summit Avenue, on the north side by Center Street, and on the west side by Highland Avenue. The campus comprises twenty-four acres, a part of which, being naturally wooded, is reserved for park purposes. Another part is for baseball, tennis, and football. The east half of the campus is wooded by oaks and basswood. The west half is suitable for gardening, and offers a fine football and baseball field. We tower high above the city. Here we might make mention of the fact that the steps on the northeast section of the campus are caned "excelsior" meaning "elevated," or "lofty." We can easily see how they came by this name. 7


The buildings on the campus are all modern. The administration building, or recitation hall, the newest, was erected in 1928. It contains the classrooms, the library, the laboratories, gymnasium, an auditorium, the president's office, and the reception room. The Service Building, as previously stated, was the first building to be erected. It contains the two diningrooms, kitchen, hospital rooms, living quarters for the housekeeper and maids, and also dormitory rooms. The Boys' Dormitory is a four story modern building. The Girls' Dormitories now number two with additional rooms in the Service Building for those not wishing to reside in either Hillcrest Hall or Bode Hall .. The "dorms" are all modern and offer the best facilities. The Music Hall is used for practice purposes only, contrary to any other belief that may be heard. It contains one classroom and practice rooms for organs and pianos. The gymnasium, which is in the new administration building, contains basketball courts, and shower and locker rooms for both boys and girls. Literary programs and other forms of entertainment are offered so that school life here can compare to school life on any other campus. C. R. '43 SOUTH DAKOTA Has South Dakota entered the Union? Do you still have to keep your hat on so that Indians don't scalp you? These are some of the questions that you may have to answer if you proudly admit that you are from the Dakotas. Most of these questions are asked by so called intelligent people. ~outh Dakota is my stamping ground and I am proud of it. Many are the days that I have herded cattle on the prairie with the song of birds breaking the monotony of the grazing cattle. Eight or ten? No! There were more than one-one hundred. That was a small herd, a very small part of what is shipped as beef from the Dakotas. Is this what makes the so called intelligent person ask, "Does anyone live there?" Haven't you dried up and blown away yet? This is just a remark that is almost sure to come from a nonDakotan. Dry periods do 'enter this section of the country but do you hear anyone grumble? Surely! You hear the fellow that grumbles whether there's a crop or not. 8


~~~~~~~ Others thank God for what they have, and the rest don't seem to worry but try again. I've heard of crop failures in other states and with it came the fear of starvation and much grumbling. What can be more beautiful than a sunset ,on the great plains, golden grain waving to and fro like a great sea, miles and miles never ending, only to 'stop with a slope of the earth? Birds add a cheerful touch with their songs of happiness. Clouds look like a vast ocean as they pass on. Great banks of them catch the gleam of the last beams of the setting sun, looking as though they were there to dominate the world. As the sun goes down further, _they' become blue with a tint of gray-s-a picture that can only be painted by God. You may watch a lone cloud as it comes over the horizon, floating lazily along like a wild duck that has been lost from its flock and is just flying alone. As you watch it for hours you may think about the wonders of God. A cloud suspended in mid-air may break up and change its shape but still goes lazily on, only to be taken out of sight by the horizon. J Beauty is also added by the pheasant. There are a great many of these birds with golden-brown feathers: making their way across fields with their heads high, boastfully showing their beauty. There is also the white pheasant. Here, indeed, is the pheasant hunting center of the United States, but as for me; I'd rather see the flocks of these beautiful birds do as they please. The best equipment is used on most farms. This is necessary because of the large farms. The crops do not yield very much per ,acre but much more land is farmed. This land has to be worked well. This, of course is not hard to do with modern equipment. ' I speak mostly of the part of South Dakota in which I live and know about in which there is mostly farming. I have seen some of the large coal mines but I am unable, to say much about them. This section of the: country is just making a comeback after a few; years drought. This, however, does not show itself now, there being more beauty than man has time to appreciate. These are a few of the things that some people can't appreciate. I have watched there in South Dakota all my life, and I don't think this part of the United States can be surpassed in beauty. 9


You may have heard about the dust storms so bad in the Dakotas that a traveler saw a coyote dig a hole twenty feet in the air. Seriously though, there are beauties all over this world if man but takes time to appreciate them. If you care to have me verify any statement made

above, you are cordially invited to come and remove the doubts in your mind. The best hospitality that is possible will be shown you. E. R. W. '43 MY DIARY According to the school records, there are quite a few new students at D. M. L. C. One doesn't hear much of them, but I believewe'll soon playa prominent place here also. Let's be frank, open our diaries for a moment and see what impression we have of D. M. L. C. Customarily : it runs something like this: Dear Diary: This place is making one feel at home. You should have been here the first week though. We didn't know what was happening. We tried our best, and, with the help of a few considerate onlookers, we were soon walking in stride with the "old fellows" with a few exceptions. After inquisitive research, we have at least found out what it's all about. We came to D. M. L. C. the modern design way-a train. Getting on quite early at a distant station and knowing no one, we quietly and bashfully made our way to the seats and parked for a while__,awhile did I say? No, quite a few hours. Finally the train stopped, and we got out. No, we were only at Mankato and still had a way to go. It seemed, however, like quite a few were going the same way we were. We then approached some of the strangers to start a conversation, not beginning with the customary weather for that's a military secret. Guess what happened when we arrived at New VIm. Why, even some professors, among which we found the president of D. M. L. C, were there to greet us. Well, we got to college quite early in the morning (2 :00 A. M.) But now what to do. Why not go to bed? You can guess that. We really tried our best with our clothes on. Morning found us rather uncomfortable and tired, but we got up to start the day right. What should we do now? We didn't know;a soul, but that wasn't exactly the hardest. At college we found all the fellows in the college dormitory friendly, sociable, and inquisitive. An we could do was 10


answer such questions as: What's your name? What class are you in? Where do you hail from ?-and many others. Quite readily one established a lasting friendship, and before the day was over I even knew all the fellows in my class (two besides myself). As for the girls-no it wasn't bad. The girls were quite the same. One thing D. M. L. C. should be given praise for is the friendly way they invite newcorrers. Everyone likes to get acquainted, but this is the first place I've found it easy. A few of us have gone through experiences of this sort. Why, we even got acquainted with the professors and others already. Having gone through our first week, our outlook on life has already changed. It sâ‚Źems that the professors expect us to know our lesson, so-we're beginning to know what the world looks like from beneath a study lamp. And did you notice that the most popular person today seems to be the postman? Any mail today? Most of them expecting the negative reply go away trying to console themselves, but those who actually receive letters-oh, what joy hearing from home, friends, and probably even tha t certain special person! Now we've been at D. M. L. C. for quite some time, acquainted with its customs, traditions, and what have you. Yes, we like it and we'll always be a loyal booster to the college on top of the hill. Actually it feels just like home. And here, as strangely as it started, the diary abruptly ends. Perhaps the new life is too interesting, and one doesn't find time enough to continue writing it. in a book. M. L. '43 ,fI ~. DO YOU NEED A REST?

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"Now don't exert yourself this summer. Be sure to get plenty of rest, and we'll guarantee you'll be in excellent shape by fall. We'll promise to do that all right-won't we? "0, I will promise to obey your orders, Doctor." Then I thought of myself lying in bed until ten o'clock each morning and just basking in the sun all day. As I left the house the next forenoon, the playground instructor hurried up to me. "You are just the person I've been searching for. You are back from college aren't you? I'm going to put your name down on the list of helpers, and, of course you'll be on hand at ten o'clock each morning. You are a very dependable person, and 11


your assistance will mean a great deal to me." Stuttering and procrastination was of no avail. Before I could tell my story, I had been induced to take this position. The next morning a loud call was ushered up the stairway. Before I could collect myself, I heard some one say, "Get up in a hurry because you have to get breakfast." It was only seven o'clock. Father called me because Mother had unexpectedly received an invitation for a visit to certain relatives in Chicago. When I finally managed to get out of bed, I heard one of the younger members of the 'family calling for a dean shirt. How should I know where he had put his shirts? After all, I had hardly been home more than a day and had no time to hunt for other person's belongings. After a little effort on this fellow's part, he finally found his own shirt. After breakfast was finished, an electrician dropped in to repair a stove. The electrician left the house about nine o'clock. Amazingly, so it seemed, I reached the playground on time. What a dreadful morning! When things were finally straightened out, I decided to spend the afternoon by reading a book on the lawn. I picked this spot because I thought it would be peaceful and quiet there. Hardly had I begun to read when I heard some passers by say "I've heard that she can stay in bed as long as she desir~s and never has to work very hard." These words made me/ 'perk' .up my ears. How could people speak such untruths? In order to keep my anger back, I decided to give up the sunny weather out-of-doors and go into the house. Before the summer had started, as it seemed to me, I WI:1S now packing a trunk and several suitcases in order to return to school. . Before going back, however, I decided to have a checkup by the family physician. He informed me that the summer's rest was just the thing I needed. When he said this I could have .laughed hysterically in his face. What a relie'f! School has started. Now I can get a rest. L. Q. '44

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EDITORIAL

• A whiny voiced female droned on, "I can't see why the Messenger didn't put that affair in about that time I psspsspsspss." And her voice dropped to a wee treble for fear the thin walls of the room would not hold her vacuous tale of woe. -f "You know," replied the scratchy-voiced school gossip with loudvoiced bravado, "I can't either. But what about that 'cute' remark I made in history class that day. I've heard worse than that get into the Messenger, but then some people just seem to have a 'drag'. You have to be one of the upper 'crust' to get a little publicity in any column besides the cataloging of names in the first issue. Remember the time Kitty just psspsspsspss, and she got four whole lines in the co-ed notes. And remember the time Jane pulled that wise one in the library. I didn't think there was anything so 'hot' about that and she got it in the humor column. It didn't even make me crack a smile. And don't you feel sorry for Betty. She tried so hard to get her name in the co-ed notes. She even psspsspsspss. I reeled clumsily away feeling rather savage. I'd like to go back-no, I better not. I'd probably give them a piece of my mind, and I can't spare it. What do they think the Messenger is supposed to be, a scandal sheet ? Just what sort of juicy tid-bits do some of you gossipy

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girls (if the shoe fits, put it on) suggest be published in a record of life and literary ability of D. M. L. C? The Messenger was never meant to be a "hot" paper or a "Stop, Look, and Listen" magazine. Now let's be reasonable. We do want your cooperation. After all, whose paper is it? Perchance, as life wends its mysterious ways, you may discover a piece of news that would be of interest to others of our school. Anyone of the staff writers of the Messenger will happily relieve you of it. All articles, newsettes, editorials, or literary work, including poetry, will receive careful consideration. It is you, the student, who holds the power .in your hand to elevate the literary value of your Messenger. Please cooperate with your paper. Dear Fellow Students, The message contained herein is written primarily for D. M: L. C's new students. The keynote of it, however, will serve as a timely reminder to all of us. Firstly, to you who are attending an institution of this type for the first time, make the adjustment speedily 'and completely. Learn to know the school and the principles it stands for-work and play accordingly and you will be one of those fortunate persons who in later life remembers his college days as the "dessert in the meal of education." You as an individual have the privilege of setting your own pace to reach your goal. To do this most effectively you must make use of your talents and gifts. A possessor of rare talent in his chosen work can fail if he does not take the initiative to work and develop himself. Just so, a person with average ability, a "plugger," can make a success of his tasks because of his spirit of determination and courage. For you newcomers who have brothers and sisters who have established records at the schoolDO. NOT LIVE ON THEM ... MAKE YOUR OWN. Set your goal, do your best, and reap your own benefits. New classwork, new teachers, new friends, new experiences, and a new home give you distinct opportunities. When worked together they can all be turned to your advantage. Successful schooling can be likened to the operation of a factory machine. If all parts are assembled correctly, there is great efficiency produced. What activities are offered at D. M. L. C. to produce individuals of staunch character and pleasing person14


alities ? Foremost, of course, is to utilize the classroom knowledge. You will get out of it just what you put into it. . Secondly, we would speak of the outside activities. These are varied and numerous enough so that every person can find one or more in which he suitably fits. The new sports program can take care of many pounds of excess energy. Give it to the athletic field rather than to the furnishings in the schoolrooms and dormitories. Literary inclinations can find an outlet in the Literary Club. Probably the only all-student organization in the school setup is the band. We all enjoy the pep our band adds to the sport events. If you can help the cause by joining, do just that. For vocal music and development the Marlut Singers and the Aeolian chorus are at your disposal. If it's the privilege of our church to maintain this school, then it is our double privilege to be one of the enrolled. Through prayer for strength to do your best work you will show your appreciation and thankfulness in being one of the students at Dr. Martin Luther College! M. R. '44

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1!l. 1M. 1. ((. 1Mcsscngcr The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is. published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. 'The suhscrbptiou price is seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. S,nam,p,snot accepted. We request, payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscrtptton has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business comrmmications should be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request, Contri,butions to our Literary Department are requested from a ll alumni, undergraduates and fr iends. The aim of "The Messenger" is to offer such material as will be beneficial as well as interesting to our readers, to kaep the alumni in a closer contact with the college, to foster school spirit, and to give the .students an opportunitv in the practice of compost, tion land the expression of their thoughts. Entered as second class matter at Post Offlce of New Ulm, Minn.

No. I

Volume XXXIII October 1942

THE MESSENGER STAFF Editor Business ManagerAssistant Business Manager Assistant Business Manager; Typist; Alumni Notes

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Richard Poetter Marvin Becker Edward Kionka Wilbert Luehring -- _Lillian Quandt Margaret Lau

E~change------------------------------Ione Huebner College Notes Alice Konetchy Co-ed Notes Helen Sweeney Locals Arthur Guenther Athletics -__Richard Grunze Humor Myron Hilger 16


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Dear Alumni, It's October now and almost all the leaves are gone from the trees. It makes a person feel rather lonely and melancholy because winter is coming and because of the war. Even though the outlook is gloomy, there are bright spots too, just like the bright yellow leaves lying on the ground. I've been trying to rake up the leaves, but maybe I've missed some of them. In ca.se I missed some, please tell me; won't you? The brightest leaves, of course, are the weddings. June 10, Esther Gruendemann ('40) and Roland Bode ('40) were married in Grace Lutheran Church in Powers, Michigan. Mr. R. Bode is a teacher in Sebewaing, Michigan .. June 7, Agnes Strege ('36) and Lester Schierenbeck (H. S. '34) were married. June 22, Gertrude Lutz ('40) and the Rev, Theodore Mittelstaedt were married in Escanaba, Michigan. 18


June 28, Ruth Gehlar ('39) and Henry Krenz ('39) were married. They are living in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. July 9, Ruth Hinnenthal (H. S. '34) and Lester Heller (ex '42') were married in New VIm, Minnesota. Among the attendants were Harley Mathweg (,41), Erna Hinnenthal (ex. '41) and M!arie Hinnenthal ('38). July 20, Lucille Retzlaff (ex. '43) and Clifford Busse ('42) were married in Sleepy Eye, Minnesota. Ruth Hempel (ex. H. S. '41) was maid of honor and James Albrecht (ex. '43) was best man. August 20, Betty Trettien (ex. '42) and Morton Schroeder ('41) were married. Mr. M. Schroeder teaches in Madison, Wisconsin. September 6, Wilma Schultz ('40) and Leonard Brinkman were married. Among the attendants was Herbert Schultz (H. S~ '41) These young people are making their home in New London, Wisconsin. In September, Jean McKerer from Brooklyn, New York and Fritz Beck ('33) were married. M. F. Beck is now in the navy. The smallest leaves, I found, to be the babies. Due to the large number I perhaps missed some of them; but I'll try to get all of them. Edward James was born September 29, in Gaylord, Minnesota. He is the son of Anita nee' Wichmann (ex. '39) and Heine Schnitker ('38). Judith Nadine was born June 4, in Wood Lake, Minnesota. She is the daughter of Naomi nee' Birkholz ('39). and Henry Engelhardt ('38). Gene was born September 9. He is the son of Marcella; nee' EIMart (ex. '42) and Floyd Mattek ('41). Joyce Ann and James Allen were born July 19. They are the children of Hilda nee' Ulrich (H. S. '35) and Wal. lace Kurth (H. S. '34). Wallace Kurth is a Technical Sergeant in Camp Polk, Louisiana. John Hilton was born September 2,. in Watertown, Wisconsin. He is the son of Gertrude nee' John ('27) and Hilton Oswald (H. S. '24). 19


Martin Luther was born August 25, in Bowdle, South Dakota. His father, the Rev. Paul Albrecht, graduated from the high school department in 1916. A son was born September 2, to Mr. and Mrs. Eldor Kopitzke, Mr. E. Kopitzke graduated from the Normal Department in 1934 and is now teaching in Appleton, Wisconsin. Quite a number of II and III Normalites are teaching, but some of them are also in the army and navy. III Norrnalites : Harold Burow is in the U. S. Army. Clifford Busse is in the U. S. Army. Ruth Dommer is in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. Adelia Falk is in New London, Wisconsin. Vernon Gerlach is in West Salem, Wisconsin. Mary Ann Gieseke is in Caledonia, Wisconsin. Lester Heller is in the U. 8. Army. Orville Kempfert is in the U. S. Army. Gilbert Krause is in Gresham, Oregon. Paul Nolting is at Northwestern College in Watertown, Wisconsin. Charlotte Sauer is in Bangor, Wisconsin. Betty Schweppe is in St. Paul, Minnesota. Eunice Stern is in Monroe, Michigan Gertrude Stoekli is a music instructress at Dr. Martin Luther College. Ruth Struss is in Gibbon, Minnesota. Betty Trettien is married, as already mentioned. Loraine Ulrich is in Hustisford, Wisconsin. Walter Vater is in the U. S. Army. Charlotte Ziesemer is in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. II Normalites : James Albrecht has been inducted into the U. S. Army. Donald Becker is in South Branch, Minnesota. Elmer Bode is in the U. S. Navy. Helen Brei is in Gibbon, Minnesota. Ann Brukardt is in Gibbon, Minesota. Raymond Fluegge is in Fairfax, Minnesota, Charlotte Froehlke is in Winona, Minnesota. Margaret Gurgel is in Freedom, Wisconsin. Herbert Grams has been inducted into the U. S. Army. Loretta Lutz is in Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. Harry MacFarland is in the U. S. Army. Margaret Puttin is in Menomonie, Wisconsin.

20


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Ivan Raddatz is in the U. S. Army. Lucille Retzlaff, as already mentioned, is married. Margie Scharf is in Sanborn, Minnesota. Rhoda Schroeder is in Green Lake, Wisconsin. Robert Temple is in the U. S. Army. Emma Tiefel is in Bay City, Michigan. Isabelle Weber is in Hustisford, Wisconsin. There are many who have changed positions and are scattered all about. The following are among them: Theodore Lau ('26) was installed as parochial school teacher of the Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, Hortonville, Wisconsin, on August 23. Kenneth Born (ex. '44) is teaching in Corvuso, Minnesota. Floyd Mattek ('41) is at Fort Knox. Melville Schultz ('40) is at Fort Leonard Wood. Harley Mattweg ('41) and Walter Busse ('30) are also in the U. S. Army. Curtis Hotlen ('40) entered the seminary at Thiensville, Wisconsin. Roland Haefer ('38) and Edward Schmidt ('21) resigned from their teaching positions. Geraldine Boelter ('39) is teaching in Kenosha, Wisconsin, Bernice Hintz ('41) is in South Milwaukee, Wisconsin .. Ruth Koeninger ('39) is in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Arthur Bade ('41) is in Racine, Wisconsin. Edward Bradtke ('21) is in Princeton, Wisconsin. Norman Tradup ('40) is a dentist in the U. S. Army. Doris Walther ('40) is in Neenah, Wisconsin. Caroline Rider (,.i1) is in Tomah, Wisconsin. Florence Berg ('39) is in Baraboo, Wisconsin. Valborg Nesseth ('40) is in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. William Fuhrmann (ex. '44) is in the U. S. Army in Texas. Carl Nolting' (H. S. '39) was in an airplane crash in Florida. According to reports, he was flying solo in weather so cold that ice formed on the wings, and' he was forced to jump to the ground. He landed in a field and was hurt. He has now been recovering, and we certainly wish him a very speedy recovery. Now that you've raked leaves with me, goodbye till next time. Your Alumni Editor.

21


SUNN

TIME MARCHES ON! "While it is Day-" Take time out to feel your way though the contents of this article, appearing in "The Spectator" of September 24, 1942, reproduced her for your perusal. Contemplation may prove a gain in time. "With the school-year once more in full swing, all of us are settling down into our old routine. Our old routine"":""Iwonder how many of us realize just what this means in a world at war? "It means that God has been gracious to our church and to us. It means that all of us still have the opportunity to work for Him. Tomorrow the opportunity may be gone. Today it is ours. Let us work 'while it is day.' "You students of today bear a heavy responsibility for the future welfare of our country. While war's destruction rages, and afterwards when the destruction of today yields to the reconstruction programs of tomorrow, dozens of you will join the thousands of Christian pastors and teachers in the work of repairing and building anew the faith and life of our church and nation. Are we all conscious of this? Then let us plan our school-year accordingly. Every class period is important. Every chapel service is vital. Every extra-curricular activity is worthwhile looking into. Everything that will help to build our mental and spiritual life, every thing that will make our future teaching more effective, every broadening experience, every thing that will help to make us, like St. Paul, 'all things to all men,' is very much worthwhile, Everything else should be dropped. There is no place for it in total war, and we have two vital wars on 22


our hands, a long and grave one with the Axis, and an even more serious one with the devil and all his powers of darkness. LET US WORK WHILE IT IS DAY!" TIM,E ON YOUR HANDS? The Concordia student from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, doesn't find time on his hands. The motive for personified ambition is clarified by a glance at the July-August issue of the "Concordia Courier". A view of the interior of the newly erected library, pictures, ample room for occasional study, fairly invites one to settle comfortably amid peace and quietude for an afternoon of relaxation. TIME OUT! We quote quotable quotes quoted in the Reader's Digest: "Money isn't everything-just a reasonable facsimile of some." ("Here's Morgan" broadcast) "Occasionally he stumbles over the truth but he always picked himself up and hurried on as if nothing had happened." (Winston Churchill) "The sort of woman who doesn't enter a room but invades it." (Sydney A. Farbish) "I love to see her laugh. So much of her has a good time." (AI Pearce) '''A brief case full of responsibility." (Upton Sinclair) TIME AND TIME AGAIN! "The teacher flatters himself who thinks that he has had some modicum of success, when the brightest boy or girl in the class does well the average assignments of the class." The Lutheran

School Bulletin May, 1942

That's all for this time!

23


C;vLLEGE:

Greetings new and old !-Who said this would be a dead year on D. M. L. C. campus? That prophecy was all wrong. We're off to a wonderful start. No sooner had the portals of learning been opened, than the students were already introduced to the '42-'43 Lyceum Course. On September 24th our firts entertainer, Jack Rank, who calls himself "the one man theater", performed a streamlined version of The Merchant of Venice. Mr. Jack Rank played all the characters of the drama from gentle Portia to greedy Shylock. We're not so prejudiced after that presentation of Shakespeare; are we? The remaining five numbers on this year's course are as follows: Nov. 3rd-Sounds of the Air Nov. 24th-Hugh and Zelta Davis Jan. 20th-Novelty Trio Feb. 17th--.T. A. Zell Mar. 17th-Scheetz and Co. Let's all take in these worthwhile numbers which have been selected especially for our benefit. This beautiful Indian summer weather has proved itself irresistible. The III Normal class took advantage of it by having a hamburger fry at the beach Saturday evening, October 3rd. Decrease in number didn't affect their spirits in the least. In fact, James Albrecht, Herbert Grams, Raymond Fluegge and Helen Brei were also able to come, and all-in-all about half the former class was once more happily reunited. On the same evening the II Normal class sponsored a party for Kenneth Born who has now left their class to 24


~jj~~~~~ I

teach at Cedar MiUs, Minn. All reported a splendid time and were especially excited about their "birthday escapade" in which, it was quite evident, they had made someone very happy. We all wish Prof. Bliefernicht many more such happy birthdays. Our I Normal class this year has real spirit too. They're not letting the war get them down. A picnic that got them all acquainted. took place October 7. It must be Archie's dread of a possible meat rationing program that prompted him to suggest they buy a cow so they'd have enough hamburger. Well anyway, twelve pounds is almost half a cow. The treasure hunt was the most popular topic of conversation upon their return, with Gerry's pet expression, 'Are you a q-a-wail ?' running second. The twelfth grade took their entertainment in the form of a wiener roast on October 7th, also, with Prof. Leverson as chaperon. This is your College Notator you about the campus.

signing off. Be seeing

.... 25


D. M. L. C. October 27, 1942 Dear Aunt Clementine: Greetings from dear D. M. L. C. Well, the lazy (??) summer months are past and gone once again, and we have returned to another year of school.-That is, many of us have returned, and many have not. Quite a number of our would-be III Normal coeds did not return this year to finish their education, but instead have already entered our Lord's vineyard to help gather in His bountiful harvest. They are helping to fill the many vacancies left by our present situation. Among these are Isabelle Weber, Hustisford, Wis.; Rhoda Schroeder, Green Lake, Wis.; Loretta Lutz, Wisconsin Rapids; Charlotte Froehlke, Winona, Minn.; Margaret Puttin, Menomonie, Wis. ; Margie Scharf, Sanborn, Minn.; Ann Brukardt, Gibbon, Minn.; Emma Tiefel, Bay City, Mich.; Helen Brei, Gibbon, Minn.; and Margaret Gurgel, Freedom, Wis. However, although this is the case, there are more coeds this year than last. What with so many of our boys being called to serve our country, more and more coeds have undoubtedly decided their duty to be the maintainance of our Christian day schools. The Annex has enlarged its 'enrollment, the new girls being Louise Martens, Mavorette Lenz, Dorothy Bintzler, Marie Gurgel, Elvera Albrecht, Loretta Krenz, Grace Kothe, Shirley Schornhorst, Dolores Abenroth, Dorothy Winter. The new additions to Hillcrest Hall are Ruth Mae Mack, Litana Arndt, Eva Kozittsa, Mildred Petzke, Ruth Guenther, :Valeria Thalman, Lillian Krause, and Helen Gross. Ruth Welch, Lois Wegner, Lillian Bode, Emily Becker, Eunice Hagemann were welcomed to Bode Hall. Others to be included in this list are Elizabeth Redemske and Hilda Wollenweber, Melda Brei, Gerane Gutzke, June Lindemann, and Ruth Klossner. Here's hoping none have been skipped.

5

For the first time in the history of D. M. L. C. an organist succeeded in pulling along the singers instead of them dragging the organist. A. K.'s motto for Oct. 1 was "full speed ahead I" I move we establish a system of guides to direct the

26


. .

..,'"r

â&#x20AC;˘

I

victims of nightly "A" periods to the door. A second, LM? ".Red" Skelton has nothing on Emily Becker. Already she has the rep of keeping Bode Hall in stitches . One coed's theme song must be "I've got spurs that jingle, jangle, jingle," and she believes in letting us know about it. Oh, well, they say it pays to advertiseand they advertise!

When a "walz" was turned to a "wegner," he danced to a different tune. We've come to the conclusion that Myra B. must be a capitalist. She really likes her "nickels." Miss G. Stoekli certainly has a plentiful flock under her wing this year. Twenty-five in all. According to reports she proves an ideal matron. Sept. 30, the Annex group enjoyed their first outing of the year-a hamburger fry at Camel's Back. . One Wednesday afternoon the Annex-ranch girls went for a rip-roaring ride on their bucking broncos. Is it any wonder Gena had to retire to La Crosse the following day for a short rest? The "baker" doesn't seem to be as busy this year as last, or is it that we just haven't noticed? C. Bathke and a little grey mouse had a rendezvous one evening. One guess as to who frightened whom. As a result of the incident, C. B. maintains that the mice family carry away shoes. . M. Raddeman has abandoned dormitory life and has taken to climbing the hill this year. It

Some males prefer blondes, some brunettes, but Kempf seems to have his cap set for the "Graces." B. Tabbert knew the thrill of walking down the aisle. Although she was not the victim, she admitted that her knees felt pretty weak.

There's an old saying that "variety is the spice of life." So, let's eat dinner with one and walk up the hill with another. 27


Most of us don't go much for spoiled food, but it seems "Shunny" likes hers "moldy." T. Birkholz informed me that Manitowoc was sent to I. Huebner one day. I. H. also has a record for receiving the most mail in the girls' dining room. Oh, that I would more faithfully keep up my correspondence! The chitter-chatter, bing-bang of Va of the girls' dining hall is due to one particular table. Evidently they know the health maxim of being happy while one eats. It's a good aid to food digestion. "One dozen roses" might be sufficient for a lyric, but in this case it was. one and one-half dozen roses delivered to Bode Hall on the 24th of September to help celebrate the happy occasion. So, dear Aunt Clementine, this is all for this time. School has just begun, and here's hoping for a blessed, happy year. Your loving niece, Annabella


Because of the "Selective Service Act" and the urgent need for farm and defense labor, it was feared that D. M.. L. C. might become a girls' school for the duration. That fear disappeared, however, on September twentieth when cars and express trucks began gathering in front of the boys' dormitory. Soon the dorm became a beehive of activity. Old friends, shaking hands and slapping each other on the back, as well as new students curiously examining their newly acquired home, soon relieved the dorm of its hollow silence. The new students who are to be with us this year are as follows: ninth grade-Jonathan Schaller, Alma City, Minn.; Harvey Witte, Buffalo Lake, Minn.; Vernon Meyer, Nicollet, Minn.; Joel Gerlach, Arlington, Minn.; Jerome Spaude, Lake Benton, Minn.; Harold Just, Wood Lake, Minn.: Gerald Seevers, New Ulm, Minn.; Kenneth Weindorf, Goodhue, Minn.: Philip Frey, Denver, Colorado; Lyle Schmeling, Watertown, S. D.; Leroy Lothert, Olivia, Minn.; Harris Kiekher, St. Paul, Minn.; Harold Schultz, Freeman, Minn.; Delroy Aswege, Johnson, Minn.; tenth grade-Warren Steffenhagen, Hastings, Minn.; Frederick Mutterer, Rockford, Minn.; Donald Jordan, Redwood Falls, Minn.; eleventh grade-Vern Hinz, Farimont, Minn.; Harold Goede, Milwaukee, Wis.: I Normal-Donald Zimmerman, Flint, Michigan; Harvey Hulke, Courtland, Minn.; LeRoy Lieflander, Fond du Lac, Wis.; and III Normal-Martin Leitzke, Mayville, Wis. Kenneth Born has gallantly accepted a call to teach at Corvuso, Minnesota. May his discipline be as aweinspiring as George Heckman's. "Jim" Albrecht, "Termite" Heidorn, and "Ray" Fluegge were guests at chorus one day. Absence makes the heart grow fonder. This curious world: Valleskey and Sanville are never seen off the campus lately, even for class picnics. I wonder why? Spaude is again lowering ears this year to the disgust of those listening to the radio.

29


The leaves may have turned color, but the "fuchses" are as green as ever. Three of the brighter ones trailed into the inspector's office seeking highly intellectual information. Could I please use your spring stretcher? Some one took my springs out. Could I use your maroon and grey striped ink? Could I borrow your "Siebenbuecher?" (Seven keys to quick, easy wisdom). These are the interrogations presented to Professor Sauer. For some reason he seemed to be out. Police Report: Burglar seen forcing the window into the office of the music hall inspector. False alarm! Could it be money "Flunky" Kionka was after or could it have been the keys to the music hall that Poetter had locked in? Darkies aren't the only ones that like watermelon. Spaude, Albrecht, Bauer and "Jo" Goede after 'slobbering' a good deal over their chins did a poor job of decorating the outside of the new dorm. The party ended with a gay wall scrubbing exhibition under "Buck" supervision. Variety is the spice of life for "Mike" Lieflander. Although he has pitched two strikes, the next ball may be a hit with Kracht at bat. Is Mars in league with Grunze? The other morning the campus looked like the Solomon Islands after the Marines had landed. Is that the way Grunze creates work for his rustic ax and rusty muscles? Doesn't Kempf smell enough without bringing Wisconsin cheese to dinner? Why don't the "fuchses" at the Third Normal table have to shag? Could it be that Leitsky needs exercise or is it the view behind the counter? Flash! Walz turns musician-studies Wagner! Oh, pardon me, the name is Wegner and has nothing to do with music. Ladies and Gentlemen,-and students: I now present to you that master mind of jokes and innuendoes, student body "buck," Ervin Walz (bow); that pleasant minded, soft spoken, easy-going, happy-go-lucky "Pater" of the music hall, Richard P'oetter (boos); that long legged popularity man of the "must go through" route. Myron Hilger; that dynamic maestro of the Marlut Singers, Leslie Kehl; that baton twirling, foot stomping, ex-downbeater of the drums and present band leader, Milton Emkow (no cracks please) ; and last but not least that man most popular with disobedient highschcoters, that convict shagger of the Normal Court, yours truly.

30


SPORTS That season has again rolled around in which Wle hear cheers and shouts emitting forth from s tad i u m sand bleachers, namely, that season in which that poor, plump, 'porker' is the most ill-respected of all animals. 0, well, nowadays we must all sacrifice something. Why, he's 'such a conscientious sport fan that he'd give his very hide for the game-which you all by now have concluded is football. On our fair campus cheers will not be so prevalent as in previous years, for through various occurrences, we have put aside competitive football and put intramural touch-ball in as a suitable sub. The draft has placed such a vent into our enrollment of normal boys that many have left us and still more will probably be leaving us. As you all undoubtedly know, our school resumed its sessions much later this year than in previous years; and since football players can not be made as such overnight, we have had to discontinue outside football games. I hope that the draft problem and the last reason stated satisfies all curiosity as to why there are no outside games. If you will go out to the football field now, which one should do, you will not find OUr uniformed men from Mars digging up the gridiron, but civilian dressed boys treating that 'pig hide', absent-of-squeals, rather roughly. Uncle Sam wants this to be a strong and healthy nation, so football, baseball, and tennis have become compulsory for our boys. Be honest with yourselves, fellows, and get out there and give all you've got for your own sake. This time it's permissible. As I have aforestated, we're having fall baseball. This is the first time that I've known it to happen here. It's a splendid idea, for it will give Coach Voecks a fairly good picture of what he'll have to contend with next spring. Now, as far as baseball is concerned, he can

31


either worry or carry a light, happy heart all winter. We all hope that it's the latter. Teams can not have the proper cooperation without captains, so the following were chosen as football captains: A. Valleskey, R. Valleskey, K. Sanville, and F. Kiekhaefer. And since we have baseball, captains were also chosen for the various teams. They are .as follows: E. Walz, M. Becker, G. Gutzke, and R. Moldenhauer. Archie Guenther has again put the tennis courts into , good shape. He did a fine job considering the condition the courts were in when we got up here. Looking westward through our scanty sylvan scene I see that the horseshoe courts are. again in playing condition. Our thanks go to M. Hilger. What I have stated in the foregoing paragraphs seems to be referrmg to the boys only. WPll, I guess it does. Sincâ&#x201A;Ź, this school happens to have ce,education, I shall have to say something for the coeds also, because it wouldn't be fair to slight them. You girls, of course, realize that you are made of the same material that the boys are, that you breathe the same air, need as much fresh air; 'also require some exercise besides pushing the pencil around and pushing the piano and organ keys. In other words, I am convinced, though I may be prejudiced and somewhat wrong, that many of the coeds do not get enough fresh air and exercise. If I am wrong, so much the better. Right now kittenball, tennis, horseshoe, and especially long' hikes are in season. As far as hiking is concerned, it's in season the year round be it 100 degrees in the shade or 25 degrees below zero. You can easily regulate your time for outdoor activities. So girls, in all honesty to yourselves, get out into the fresh air and do something. You'll feel much better.

32


I,

HUMOR Pape: After being reprimanded, "I am a poor boy trying to get ahead." Prof: "That's fine; you certainly need one." Letter to Editor: "Dear Editor, I want to know how long girls should be courted." Editor to Reader: "Same as short ones." A co-ed's premiss to be on time carries a lot of wait! Batterman to Schaller: "Hand me the shelf paper. I want to decorate this box for a waste basket." Schaller: "Are you going to put it on the inside or outside T" Mosher: Nubbs: Mohser: Nubbs:

"How was your mark in that history test?" "Under water." "What?" "Below "c" level."

'Definition of school spirit at D. M. L. C.

something uncommon

Prof. Palmbach: "What is a vacuum?" Goede: "Oh, I have it in my head but can't get it out." Mike: "Why do you wear such loud socks?" Walz: "So my feet won't go to sleep." Some people are like taxi drivers; life just missing everything.

they

go through

Pvt.: "The enemy is as thick as peas." Captain: "Well, shell them!" Leitzke after being introduced to Kempf: "Gosh! That guy is a human dynamo." Berth: "Yeah, everything he has on is charged."

33


Admiral: "One of our destroyers is fast in the mud." Ejnsign: HIf it\'s fast in the mud, it should be a recordbreaker in water." Social tact is making your company feel at home even though you wish they were. There he was, battling against the waves. "Just a mile more," he thought, "and I'll be safe on shore." His strokes were getting weaker. He could scarcely lift an arm. The beach was only a few yards away. His last efforts were too much. He began to grow dizzy. Then his head began to swim and carried him to the shore. A new and different Scotch story: A Scotch traveling salesman, held up in one of the Channel islands by a bad storm, wired his firm in Aberdeen, "Marooned here by storm. Wire instructions," The answer said, "Start summer vacation as from yesterday." A detour: The roughest distance between two points. AIcertain professor insisted his students be more personal in their themes and received this ending to one student's paper: Well, professor, how is the little family? And, by the way, could you lend me five bucks?" Foreigner: "Just what is graft?" Staunch American: "Graft is a system which ultimately results in compelling a large portion of the populace to apologize constantly for not having money, and the remainder to explain how they got it." She is a decided blonde. She only decided recently. A West Indian planter sent his two young sons to visit their prim old bachelor uncle in New York in order to avoid the earthquake season. A week after their arrival, the planter received this telegram from his brother: "Take back your boys; send me the earthquake." A biology professor was unwrapping a parcel hefore his class which he explained to his pupils was a fine specimen of a frog. Upon disclosing two sandwiches, a hardboiled egg, and a banana, he undauntedly remarked, "Hut surely I ate my lunch!"

34


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For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, which is Christ the Lord. Luke 2:11

CONTENTS

POEfl'S' CORNER Unto You is Born

2

The Last CaIL

3

LITERAJRY Ignace Jan PaderewskL

4

Somewhere In Northern Africa Anecdotes Of The Great

7 10

EDITORIAL What Physical Fitness Means to a Christian Examine Your School Spirit; Missionary Sidelights ALUMNI NOTES EXCHANGE COLLEGE NOrrES CO-ED NOTES LOCALS SPORTS_- - HUMOR

14 20 22 26 28

,

31 33 -

35

~_______________________________ 38 41


POETS' UNTO YOU IS BORN If time should turn back many years And space should be no more, Then softly to our listening ears Would come this gladdening lore"Glory in the highest! Glory! On earth good will to men !" Holy angels sang this story To bring us peace again. To the shepherds first was told These tidings of great cheer. The angels sang to them, "Behold! Christ doth to you appear." The shepherds quickly left their sheep And hurried thru the night; They could not, dared not think of sleep 'Til they beheld that sight. So guided by that star above They reached that humble stall, Which sheltered Christ, our God of Love, Our Lord, that baby small. There was Mary, mother mild, Humming a lullaby; She kept sharp vigil o'er her child As angels sang on high. These men left To tell it to all This story that Which brought Later From They Who

and did make haste men, had come to pass great JOY to them.

also wise men came far and distant lands; were men of wealth and fame crossed the desert sands. 2


CORNER They were guided by that star That seemed to them so odd; They were led to. Bethle'em far To see the Son of God. Gentle Mary then arose When they came in the stall: There he lay in swaddling clothes And in a manger small. Myrrh, frankincense, and gold They laid at Jesus' feet; So they did in days of old 'Twas very right and meet. So in our hearts this Christmas When inns are filled again, We'll open wide the chambers And let the Christ-child in. R. W. '45 THE LAST CALL Oh, Lord, I hear Thy gentle voice Beyond that sharp divide; Thou knowest that I have one choice To Thee to be allied. Throughout my days of earthly grace I have not e'er been true; Yet now I soon shall see Thy face- . I'm coming home to You. I feel thy gentle presence near Though sinner that I am; Those sins no longer cause me fear, Washed white by bloodof Lamb. I'm going home fore'er to stay With Jesus my own Lord; The last call, I used to say, Would be a heavenly chord. IRG R '43 3


IGNAGE~JAN PADEREWSKI .h

When thinking of great composers and musicians, whether living or dead, we are tempted to turn up our noses and think of them as being human beings who in our language are a little odd. In some cases this may be true but in many cases' it is not. Naturally their lives do diff~r in many respects from the average man's because their occupation is .of a different nature, but human experiences, interesting happenings, sorrow, and joy are as much a part of their life as of ours. One of our greatest composers is Ignace Jan Paderewski. The beginning, of his life W3JS quite ordinary. Like all other great musicians he showed a mind for music at a very early age. His father was deeply interested and tried 'to rgive him an education which would develop these God-given talents. But besides being attracted to music, Paderewski was even more attracted to nature. He was very fond of climbing trees. One day after putting on a new suit which his father had just bought, the first thing he did was to climb a tree. That adventure proved to be tragic because he slipped and tore his clothes into shreds. At one of his very first concerts his musical ability was put to a test. After he had finished playing, some one from the audience came and held a towel over the keyboard. Paderewski played in spite of the handicap and thus proved his ability. : Other great composers also played a part 4

in

Pade-


rewski's life. It was while he studied in Berlin that he met Strauss. By watching Strauss he noticed that his facial expression was one of his drawbacks. He then became aware of the fact that he too was guilty and thus studied all his difficult passages with a mirror in front of him. He was able to play the most difficult passages without showing a disturbed or excited expression. Paderewski spent a great deal of time studying in Vienna. He lived in two very humble rooms. Within the walls of these rooms are crowded many happy memories. One of the most cherished of these is that of a spider. Among the finger exercises which Paderewski played was an exercise in thirds which he had to play every day. One day in the midst of his playing a spider came down from the ceiling. He hung motionless on the end of a silver thread and appeared to be listening to his playing. Here comes the interesting fact! After he finished his exercise in thirds and began playing something else, the spider turned around and hurried up to the ceiling. Paderewski, wanting to see if the spider was really listening or if it was an accident, began playing the exercise in thirds again. Instantly the spider came down. This spider appeared each day for many weeks whenever Pa, derewski began his work. When vacation time came, Paderewski wondered whether his spider would remain there. When he returned, however, there Was no sign of the spider, and he confessed that the room was empty without him. Almost everyone knows Paderewski's minuet, but few know the interesting story connected with if' It really grew out of a joke. Paderewski, while in Warsaw, was often asked to the home of a famous physician, Prof. Chalubinski. He was an old man and loved to hear Paderewski play. On one occasion there were two other distinguished men there who were very enthusiastic about Mozart and begged constantly to hear his music. Whenever Paderewski would finish his Mozart pieces, they would praise and expound on the genius of Mozart. One day Paderewski decided to improvise a minuet in Mozart style. When he returned the next evening, he was prepared. Upon their request to play Mozart, he immediate! ly sat down and played his minuet. Almost before he finished the men were on their feet crying, "Oh! Mozart I What a wonderful piece! Tell us, Paderewski, is there anyone now alive who can write such music?" When Paderewski replied that he had written the music, the

5


I'路

i

men became very angry and refused to believe him. It was a terrible blow to them and they were angered at first for being misled in this manner. A few nights later he was again asked to play Mozart; this he did. Upon hearing this, they asked very politely to hear the minuet. They became very fond of it, and it was at this time that Paderewski realized that this minuet would make his name famous. America. made a very profound impression upon Paderewski. Forty or fifty years ago, to a foreigner who visited only cities and towns, it looked very ugly. Since then it has undergone many changes, and he regarded it as his, second home and spoke very highly of it. It was during one of his American tours that a great disaster befell him. He was to give a recital at Rochester. As usual he opened with a few heavy chords. Suddenly something broke in his arm, but despite the terrible pain, he continued. After the recital he went to a physician and was told that he had torn some tendons and that a complete rest was needed. This of course was out of the question, for he was determined to finish his tour. He used his own remedies to nurse his dead finger. But even though his finger moved only slightly, he gave twenty-seven concerts in all. Paderewski also had many experiences with audiences. He would not tolerate people talking while he played. It was while in South America that he almost cancelled his entire tour because they had the custom of talking during the concerts. It was only through one of the distinguished ladies that he had consented to play. She had gone to all her friends and warned them that if they carried on in the manner of previous times, Paderewski would refuse to play, and they would be the laughing stock of the entire world. This audience turned out to be one of the most appreciative audiences for which Paderewski ever played. Toward the end of Paderewski's third tour in America, the train on which he was traveling was derailed. He had been bruised and his nerves shaken; hence he was advised to cease work. But when the time came for him to begin playing, he noticed he had developed a dislike for the piano. This feeling continued to grow until a great physician advised him to take up some other interest. It was at this time that Paderewski bought a farm. After a short rest he was again more friendly toward the piano.

6


Paderewski never neglected to tell people about his piano stool. It took him many years to find out why he did not feel comfortable while playing in public. It was a certain nervousness in his back. He then began to try out piano stools and soon found that the lowest one gave him the most comfort. Since then he has played from none other. When the stools became old and shabby, new ones were- made. He always speaks of the piano stool as being a part of his uniform and equipment .. Paderewski was also very active in political affairs. He joined the Polish national council and in 1940 accepted the presidency of the Polish Parliament in exile. III health caused him to return to Switzerland. In 1940 he left for the United States and resided in New York where he was active in allied causes. He died of pneumonia after a short illness in New York City} June 29, 1941. I hope that this example is sufficient to prove that the lives of musicians can be very interesting and they themselves are as human as you and I. E. J. '45 SOMEWHERE IN NORTHERN AFRICA "And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying, Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men." With these words Chaplain Brandt concluded his reading of the Christmas Story from Luke 2. His voice rang gently, yet reassuringly calm and cool among his "boys" of the 163rd division. It was Christmas Eve everywhere else in the world. People everywhere were singing praises to the Babe of Bethlehem, falling humbly before His manger-bed, and gazing lovingly at beautifully adorned pine trees which symbolized His presence. But here on the battlefront of Africa there was nothing to signify that this night was any different from any other horrible, bloody night. Only dead silence was everywhere, enveloping everything in its formidable anticipation of lurking evil-as the calm before a storm. Chaplain Brandt had known it would be like this. He also had known that on the midnight of this wonderful eve, when the dear little Christ Child was born so many years ago, his boys were to make a very dangerous attack on the enemy.

7


Some would return, but many would yet that night fall cold and lifeless before the foe's fierce fire. He had deterrnined that before this battle, his boys should at least have a taste of Christmas-should be brought upon this night closer to their Savior. This was to be done by his reading of the Christmas Story, which he had just now finished. "And so, my boys," he added in a voice of complete faith and calm trust, "through the gift of His only Son, God has established 'peace on earth, good will toward men.' Though the world is at war and striving is present everywhere-nation against nation, and man against man-yet, let not your hearts be troubled. God's peace is on earth in the hearts of men-in your hearts-going with each one of you as you march into battle." The men were visibly impressed by their chaplain's words-the Christmas Story had for a few moments put them back into another world-a world of peace and love and joy, lived now only in their dreams, or in such moments as these. An awed, almost sacred, calm hovered over them as they slowly drifted back to their quarters, each busy with his own thoughts-thoughts of home and God. Joe told his buddy not to wait-that he had something he wanted to see the "Chap" about. ("Chap" was the name the boys used among themselves when speaking of Chaplain Brandt. He was dearly loved by them all, and each regarded him as a friend.) Now Joe didn't know yet why he had come tonight. He hadn't planned on it, and then, at the last minute, he had found himself coming anyway. He had listened entranced to the tale of the Christmas Story-that was because it was so like a fairy tale, he told himself. It was "far-fetched" and impossible, but kept one interested. But then when the part came about "peace on earth," it was no longer interesting. Now it boiled Joe's blood to listen. His heart beat faster, and a cold, hard light flashed in his eyes. To think there were really some people who believed such rot! Some people who thought there was such a thing as "peace" on earth. Any sane, clear-thinking person could see everywhere hatred, wickedness, scheming, striving-yes, everything but peace. How could the "Chap" stand there and talk "peace" on this night before one of their most dangerous battles, meaning for many of them a rendezvous with death? His should be a pep8


talk of hatred for the enemy, of killing or being killed, of careless, dauntless courage. Where did peace come into all this? Joe couldn't understand it, and he meant to find out. Chaplain Bandt listened to Joe's rebellious talk and then kindly tried to calm and convince him. He explained again about peace in man's heart and about the birth of the tiny Babe in the city of David. All this made no impression on Joe. Oh, it was a good enough story for kids, he admitted. Once, a long time ago, he too had believed it all. But when one grows older he finds that the world isn't such a rosy place-he learns of wars and hatred. He learns that if he doesn't shoot, he'll be shot. He sees the true side of life-made up of hate-hateand more hate! He leaves behind him the fairy tale of the star of Bethlehem, the Babe, the angel chorus-the story of love in the world,-and of peace. So the night wore on. Midnight came and the 163rd division made their surprise attack upon the enemy. All night the battle raged, going in favor of first one side and then the other. The first rays of dawn brought to light the bodies of men lying mangled and bloody upon the field. Chaplain Brandt wandered among them stopping a moment beside one to refresh him with 'a few drops of water, beside another to catch his dying words, and beside a third to murmur for him one last prayer. In the distance the battle still raged-the roar of the guns and the glare of cannon sounding all too plain. Suddenly there was a rasping voice calling weakly, "Chap !-Hey, Chap!" The chaplain looked down. There was Joe. So they had got him too. Right below the heart-not much time left for him. Joe was trying hard to speak now, and the chaplain knelt beside him to catch his last words. "Hey, Chap," Joe was saying. "You were right after all, Chap, and I was all wrong. All about the Christmas Story, I mean." Gasping for breath, he continued, his, words corning in short, quick succession. "I've been lying here quite a while, Chap, and I've been doing a lot of thinking. There isn't any hate in my heart now-just pity for the other guy. Pity, and a sort of nice, quiet feeling-guess maybe you'd call it peace, Chap. Say it again for me, will you?" The chaplain knew what Joe wanted, and softly, with tears streaming down from his eyes, he spoke the words, 9


"And suddenly there was- with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God .and saymg, Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men." "Hey, Chap!" whispered the dying man hoarsely, "Listen, Chap! I can see 'em-the angels-hundreds and hundreds of them-the're coming closer and closer, Chap, and they're singing-"Glory to God in the highest-and on earth peace,-good will toward men." Ii

The chaplain slowly and reverently raised his streaming eyes to heaven. He had never before so felt the presence of God. With awe he spoke. "Oh God," he said, "I thank Thee that even in the time of war and striving, Thou dost mercifully find ways and means of bringing the lost sheep back again to the fold." The guns roaring loudly in the distance brought the chaplain back to reality. Slowly he rose again to his feet and reassumed his task with a renewed spirit and a faith strengthened by the angel's words of "peace on earth, good will toward men." A CO-ED ANECDOTES OF THE GREAT If you like to play classical music, you may know the full names of some of the foremost composers. Perhaps you even know how long they lived or whom they married. But what do you know about the intimate little things which make their personalities seem real to us? For example, not many of you know that Johann Sebastian Bach could span twelve keys on the organ with his thumb and little finger, while he played running passages with his three middle fingers. Bach was of a giant-like physique and not at all the dreamy type of man you would expect a' musician to be. All of you have probably noticed the flowing scale passages in his music. Bach was a Christian musician and the scales represented steps up to heaven and back again. He believed that anything dedicated to God should point upward. Hayden, who was born on April Fool's Day, fooled the world by raising the insignificant name of Hayden to lasting fame. During his childhood he was an ardent singer, and he belonged to a group of choirboys. When he became bored with the slowness of the other schoolboys, he used to amuse himself by cutting off the tails of the wigs of those who sat in front of him.

10


Hayden's wife was wished on him. He had been paying court to the young and attractive daughter of a wigmaker in Vienna, Johann Peter Keller. When he proposed to her, he found out that she had decided to enter a convent. To spite her, he married her older unattractive sister - to his. everlasting regret, because she fre-quently irritated him by cutting up his musical compositions to make curling papers and pastry forms. Many of the famous musicians had exceptional senses of humor too. When Hayden set the Ten Commandments to music, for the Seventh Commandment "Thou shalt not steal," he purposely stole a musical theme from Martine. As he composed his Surprise Symphony, his face lit up when he introduced a loud fortissimo on the kettledrum right in the middle of a soft passage: "This will make the women jump," he remarked to a friend who was in the room. A great man is seldom recognized until after his death. This is true also of the composers, Of course, Mozart led the most tragic life. When he died he left only thirtyeight dollars in worldly goods .to his wife. The day of his burial was so rainy and dreary that only the gravediggers were present when he was lowered into the ground. On the next day his wife, Konstanze, went to the pauper's burial ground, and she tried' to find his grave. Finally she went to the caretaker's. hut and asked" "Where have they buried my husband? His name was, Mozart." "Mozart," repeated -the caretaker, "I have never heard of him." Beethoven displayed a complete lack of the niceties of life. He said just what he wanted to say. One day, after Beethoven and a friend had visited court, his friend observed, "I am glad you knew the proper etiquette in the presence of nobility." Beethoven retorted, "You ought to be glad that the nobility knew the proper etiquette in front of a genius." Franz Schubert was rejected for military training three times because he was. anemic, undersized and "blind as a bat." He was. considered poor material for killing. Everyone called him Schwaemmerl (Fatty). Schubert contracted a disease from which he could be only partially cured. During the rest of his life, frequent attacks weakened him until he died. In this mood, knowing that he would soon die and that his brilliant _hopes would come to nothing, he wrote a symphony. The first two

11


movements were entirely complete, but the third one was never finished. Schubert was too interested in writing another unsuccessful opera. He never heard a performance of his Unfinished Symphony. After his death it was found in a friend's desk. Many people consider his "Serenade" as one of his most beautiful compositions, but few know the story behind it. A friend asked him to set music to the words of a little poem he had composed for his daughter's birthday. Schubert, in a hurry, scribbled down a few notes and apologetically handed them to his friend. This friend tried it on the piano and liked it. Then he made arrangements to have it played at the home of a mutual friend. Schubert was invited, but he forgot to come. Finally they went out and hunted for him. When the composition was played, tears came to his eyes and he said, "I had not realized it was so beautiful." When Franz Liszt was a little child his father made him, practice every day from sunrise until noon. One day in an exercise by Ries, he ran across a passage in which there was an interval of ten notes in the bass. It didn't take him long to figure out how to play them. He struck one note with his finger and one with his nose. Each day he prayed that his hands would become bigger, because he coudln't strike an octave. It worried him so much that he tried to make cuts between his fingers with his father's razor. Little Franz Liszt loved his music so much that at night he slept under the piano. Verdi's parents neither sang nor played, but their child was passionately fond of music. His happiest times were at church on Sunday morning. He"was an acolyte. One day he was so enraptured by the organ music that he forgot to hand the water to the priest. The priest lost his temper and kicked him down the altar steps. When his parents asked him what was wrong, he- only said, "Please, I want to learn music." Brahms was rather careless about his clothes. He grew a beard to conceal the fact that he didn't wear a collar. One evening at a party the talk turned to stockings. He remarked to the old Viennese ladies, "See how elegant my stockings are," and he raised his trouser cuff to show a bare ankle. Once when he attended a party everyone looked at him. so queerly that he asked, "What's wrong with my clothes?" His mother replied, "You have gone 12


and put on that coat from which I had cut off the buttons!" His speech was rough and uncouth. When the ladies of the Viennese choral society were taking a passage in one of Hayden's oratorios too slowly, he asked them if that was the way they had sung it under Hayden (who had died seventy years ago). He once ironically remarked after leaving a friend's home, "If there is anyone here whom I have forgotten to insult, I beg them to forgive my oversight." The great composers were very human. Each one had the peculiar quirks that go to make every man an individual. All of them were up against obstacles at every turn. In fact, the suffering in their lives is the thing which brought out their musical qualities to the utmost. In times of the severest strains they reached their highest peak in composing. Some were very poor and some went unrecognized throughout their lives. Some of them went through such strain that they lived only half a life time, but they packed a lifetime of music into it. They all had characteristics which would endear them to us if we only knew them. These little things, their humorous sides, their gruff natures, im,politeness, and mischievousness are the things which make them real to us. When we play a composition by Mozart and think of his short unhappy life, won't we feel a little closer to it - a little more understanding of it? If you find out more about the lives of the composers, you will appreciate them more. Try it and see!

C. B. F.

13


EDITORIAL

WHAT PHYSICAL FITNESS MEANS TO A CHRISTIAN Our country's draft of men during this war shows that our country was by far not the healthiest nation in the world. The government had to go so far as to even lower the physical requirements more and more so as to obtain the quota. Weare considered a Christian nation. Doesn't this tell you some thing? Yes, I realize that the Christianity in this nation is not what it used to be and that it is far from what it should be. Christ tells us that we are the light of the world and should spread His Word throughout the world. When such godless countries as Japan, Germany. and Russia turn out men in their countries that are physically fit and healthy, we should do the same, and even to a greater extent. I am not now; referring to our soldiers on the field of battle, for they are MEN and surely must be such so as to endure as much as they have in the past and will in the future. But before we were actually in this war, the draft of men, as I have stated above, showed that this country was made up of women instead of men. And what could have prevented these godless nations from drawing the same inference to which I have come? Upon coming to this conclusion they would undoubtedly think or their leaders would blare forth, "And that's from a Christian

14


nation. Christianity must be nothing more than a 'handle' with which they can identify themselves." The example I have used may be somewhat far-fetched, but I believe it will show one of the ways we unintentionally can prevent the spread of the Gospel. Paul writes to the Corinthians in his first epistle to them, "What? Know ye not that your body is the temple of the Holy Ghost which is in you, which ye have of God, and ye are not your own? For ye are bought with a price; therefore glorify God in your body and in your spirit which are God's." In this we see that God, as He had made us stewards of other earthly possessions, has also made us stewards of our bodies. We don't own ourselves; we are God's. He made and formed us. We are God's greatest and most precious creation and possession. Did He not give us an immortal soul which no other living being or creature upon this earth possesses ? Paul says that we are bought with a price and therefore we should glorify God _in our bodies. If all Christians or the majority of them who are drafted into the United States army were not rejected because of ill health and lack of physical fitness, the worldly people, that is those who are clear and common-sense thinkers, will begin to realize that we are an outstanding people. But if the case be just the opposite, the world will laugh and ridicule us because of our Christianity, and since Christ is our Saviour, they will mock and laugh a.t Him. All this will be the underlying cause for the Saviour's being crucified anew. Just think that over. Do you really want to be one of the causes for the world spitting upon our Lord on the cross? Being a heartfelt Christian, you will say, "No." . '. Paul writes in the same epistle, "Now the body is hot for fornication but for the' Lord." The word "fornication" 'everyone should know. Under this term we can also place the vice of overindulgence in edibles, drinks, and tobacco. Why does one overindulge in these various things? It is merely to satisfy his own lustful and sinful craving. Anyone with the least bit of common sense knows that too much of a certain thing will invariably prove harmful to the body. If symptoms of this ill health do not show up now, they will inevitably come forth later on in life when we are no longer in the acme of our bodily condition-in which time our resistance to sicknesses is not very good. If a person does do that thing which I have stated against, it grossly expells his vast storage

15


of ignorance and shows his lack of will power which is indicated by figurative speech as a spongy, ,soggy backbone. Paul himself says to the Philippians, "Let your moderation be known to all men." If you haven't any will power and must smoke, smoke moderately; if your backbone is so spongy and rotted that you tell yourself you must drink, drink moderately; and since you must eat, don't be a glutton, but eat moderately. There is an old saying: "Stop eating when you want more." Daniel, who was by the grace of God one of the wisest men in the Babylonian Empire, refused the king's stuffed tables of meat and wine, and for ten days he lived on pulse and water. 'This example doesn't mean that one should starve but rather suggests moderation. Don't worry, the Lord always provides. As Christians you will try to overcome these vices by prayer. With faith in one's heart there is great power in prayer. Praying and then doing the same thing as before will not do. For many it seems just praying, but they never try to do what they pray for in their living. Mind you, I said, "It seems," and I'm not trying to pass any judgment. James writes, "But wilt thou know, 0 vain man, that faith without works is dead." Surely we all know that we mortal men can't look into a person's heart and pass judgment as to his Christianity. It is hard to believe that the person who openly exclaims to , the rest of the world by his maliciously wasting away his life through ungodly practices is trying very hard to please his Saviour. Just think of all the suffering our Saviour went through for us. What did we do to deserve this sacrifice ? Nothing! Every time you deliberately fall or let Satan draw you into the same pitfalls of sin, you are slapping Christ in the face and also pounding the nails deeper into Christ's hands and feet. In all faithfulness and thanksgiving to your Saviour, stop your voluntary sin. Take note of 1 Corinthians 10 :31, "Whether therefore ye eat or drink or whatsoever ye do, do all to the glory of God." Coming back to the passage, "Now the body is not for fornication, but for the Lord." Those of us who are preparing for the holy ministry, be we pastors or teachers, will be entering into the greatest and noblest profession here on earth and will be giving ourselves entirely to the Lord. Now it is time, while we still have time, not only to prepare ourselves mentally but also physically. If you enter into the Lord's vineyard with a weak, debilitated, and sickly body, how long will you last?

16


Working wholeheartedly and diligently, under these conditions, I can assure you that you won't last very long. Of course my statement can't be proven one hundred per cent. The old Romans had a proverb which was: "Mens sana in corpere sano." Translated it means, "A sane mind in a sound body." There is a bit of truth to the adage. It stands to reason that if the body is fatigued, weak, and all "played out" the mind naturally will not react to different things as readily as if the body had been in the "peak of condition." This ought to be an incentive to make us desire a healthy body. By a "healthy" body I do not mean one with muscles protruding and bulging beneath our attire and large frame. It is not the muscles that give one health, but it is rather the manner of living which he follows. And what is this manner? By participating eagerly in the sports the school has patiently outlined for us is one way. One of the best mediums for good health is fresh air. And the best way to obtain this fresh air which so few really know what it is, is through long, steady, and brisk hikes. Now with winter nearly in the air, we should take a more active part in outdoor sports. The cold winter air is pure and free from germs which will awaken in us a fresh active mind. . Patriotism seems to be the new modern vogue or at least it is during any war time. All Christians are patriotic to their country and need no special deeds to show it. But there are times during this crisis when some super-patriots may look upon our honest patriotism with an interrogation. One of the best ways for Christian civilians to show the .world our patriotism is by donating blood to the Red Cross, Without a healthy body this highly valuable donation would be impossible; you can now draw, your own "sane intelligent conclusions. Many unbelievers realize the fact that dissipation and an unactive life is unhealthful for the anatomy, and therefore they live according to this principle. This should put many Christians to shame who realize the fact but allow the Old Adam to dictate to his heart and conscience to do just contrary to what the New Man. tries hard to implant into his heart. Therefore these Christians are a fertile soil upon whose field Satan's deadly seeds of sin mature rapidly. I hope that by now a will and hope to obtain a healthy body has placed a spark into your hearts which will be fanned into an everglowing bright flame by continual

17


prayer and practice. In all fairness and faithfulness to yourself and mainly to your God, who will some day need you in His vineyard, lay aside the craving brought about by the Old Adam and take upon that desire brought on by the New Man. R. G. '44 iThe classics-they include Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Hayden, Haendel, Schubert, and many other well-known and beloved composers. To know their works really kindles a fire in the true music lover's heart. Why is it that the young moderns find so much enjoyment in this "slap-stick," "jazzy" music of which we hear so much nowadays? True, this age seems to be one of just such caliber, but when you come right down to it, there is something lacking in this so-called music when compared to the classics. Many of you will agree that upon entering any college room or even while in the room, the radio is blaring forth something that represents music. These people don't realize the worth of classic music. They have no feeling for it. They can not evade the issue when it is said that the opportunity is there and chances are very great to create a love for it. It seems they prefer this "overmushy, applesauce-type of music," according to one of our professors. If we were to ask any of these fans of popular music what it means to them, they would really be 'stumped'. For what meaning is there in such foolish words as one finds in all this corroded music? One must however tolerate it; for how would it seem to come into a room, turn off the radio with a bang, and declare that you would under no conditions listen to such trash? Enemies are easily made under such circumstances. It has been noted that the simplest way to deal with such conditions is to wait one's turn at the radio dial and then put on the music for which one inwardly longs. . The classics fullfill a desire. They have a calming effect rather than to make one want to get up and jump around as this other music seems to do. Surely if only these fiends would try listening and would try to understand the classics, they might get a liking for it. The trend is opposite to this; they don't even want to hear it. For one reason it isn't being modern; it isn't the sty le. What do they know about style? As far as music is concerned, the classics have it all over the popular music. Style certainly is there. 18


The graceful flowing lines in Bach's music, the vivid portrayal of Saint Baens' "Danse Macabre or Dance of Death" clearly outlines a story in one's mind. The ghosts that walk, the churchyard, the crow of the cock at break of day, and when dawn finally breaks how calmly and exquisitely it appears. One must have a very picturesque imagination! Many themes from Tschaikovsky's symphonies bring to mind many fanciful pictures. Consider the "Andante" from his Fifth Symphony. It brings to mind a balmy spring evening. One can see the stars shine ISO clearly; how they glisten! The Sixth Symphony, or 'The Pathetique' as it is also called, is one of sweet sadness. There are so manyfeelings that come to the fore. Jan Sibelius' "Findlandia" is a stirring composition that makes one feel strong and mighty. Does it not portray the Finnish people? They are a sturdy nation. "Findlandia" is written in such a manner and such a feeling remains in one after hearing a rendition of it. Light classics too are great favorites with many, perhaps more so than the heavier music. Johann Strauss wrote many lively waltzes. This music is very airy and light. One is sometimes in such a mood, and then more than ever we find this music pleasing. With some the love of the classics is inborn; in others it is developed because they have been taught from small on to seek preference in the classics; still others develop a liking for it by being wise enough to take advantage of the many chances that present themselves by taking in concerts, orchestrations, or even symphonic band work, There are always those who will say, "But what would you do if we didn't have these advantages?" But we have an answer for that. There is the radio. Certainly we appreciate it if we have access to these musical entertainments, but often people much less fortunate must make use of the radio. There are many programs which are rich in classical music if only the pains would be taken to find them. The classics seem to be an unfamiliar subject with this generation. They are available; all that needs be done is to get acquainted with them and natural liking will develop. Why view the subject with indifference? Such an attitude seems to be prevalent, The reaction is then similar. Try the classics; surely they will appeal.

G. H. '44 19


EXAMINE YOUR SCHOOL SPIRIT two Following instructions word for word, nearly hundred student pilots lift their planes from the huge air base and begin to. gain altitude. What a thrilling spectacle! That is the scene that came to my mind when school opened last fall, and nearly two hundred students took off on a flight, for some of them their first, on September 22. Now take yourself back to the air base. The weather is fine for flying, and everyone is eager for the experience. The planes continue to gain altitude, and some have already levelled off with their objective in mind; other pilots with less experience are still struggling to bring their planes up into formation. Then comes a message that startles those new pilots so that they let their planes go into tearing, groaning nose dives-their leaders are to drop out of formation. On account of that mere message they are letting those powerful machines hurl toward earth and destruction. What thoughts flash through your mind as you watch aghast? None other than, "Why in all the world don't those pilots do something? Why are they letting their training and those vital materials go to waste tly allowing the planes to be dashed to hopeless wreckage?" All right, YOU ARE TRIOSE PILOTS! WHY DON'T YOU DO SOMETHING? That message was none other than the one given by Professor Voecks when he announced that there would be no varsity basketball team -our chosen leaders. That tearing and groaning of the diving planes was none other than the groan that shook the students assembled in chapel that morning. Yes, that is the picture which carne to my mind, and I thought of D. M. L. C. school spirit. Where is it? A few valiant ones are expected to carryon the work of keeping D. M. L. C. on the map, mainly the hardworking members of the varsity basketball team, while the majority of us expect to sit on the sidelines satisfying ourselves that we are doing our part for the reputation of our school by yelling ourselves hoarse on a few, ineffectual yells. Now is the time for us to realize that true school spirit is something of a quality much deeper than such mere outward display. Going back to the example of an armada of planes, each pilot does not fight merely for his own life; he is fighting to keep up for the sake of those who worked to provide the materials, of those who 20


worked to convert the materials into planes, and of those who put in hours of tedious work to train them. More than that, he is fighting for future lives. Truly, in such times as these I need not go into further detail to picture for you the responsibility of each of these pilots. Now open your mind, andrealize how much greater indeed is the responisbility of each and everyone of us. We have not been given the materials and training at this institution merely to promote earthly welfare and earthly life. What far more precious materials we have received! What far more glorious ends we should accomplish! Our material is none other than God's Gospel which is not to be used to increase earthly life and pleasure but to build eternal treasure in Heaven. With this thought in mind let us now strive to build a school spirit. Let us not be satisfied with the shallow display of so-called school spirit which is represented by the cheering and yelling at basketball games, That sort of spirit has its place, but that should not be our representative spirit. Let us develop a richer, deeper school spirit, a Christian school spirit, that we will carry with us from class to class, about the campus, and out into the world. Let the spirit of D. M. L. C. be such a spirit as will open the eyes of thinking men and women everywhere to the value of materials and training open to their use at our institution. Think of these things when you are tempted to give in to petty desires, to actions that not only cause people to look upon you in shame and disgust but cause them to cast the reflections of your acts upon your school and fellow-students. It would not please you, I'm sure, to tell some inquirer that you attend 'such-and-such' a school only to have him reply, "Oh, that is where so-andso. goes. Do you know what I heard about him? Is it true that such things happen there too?" Let each of us determine to keep our actions above the level of material for gossip and its undermining effects. Don't come back at me now and plead, "But we are all human beings, liable to err." That indeed is true, but what would you reply if one of those pilots said, "We're only human beings, you can't 路blame us for falling short of the responsibility you placed upon us." Of course you would reply, "We're giving you the materials, the training to fly with." Similarly, God has given us, through our instructors, ministers, parents, and Christian friends,

21


the materials and training. But how much greater, how much more powerful are His gifts! He does not give us mere man-made planes; the material He gives us is His powerful Gospel, created by His Almighty power. We are not trained by man-made directions; God has given us instructions through His laws. Let us not waste these materials and training. Let us now build our school spirit on faith in the materials and training provided for us, with thankfulness for it, and a willingness to do it. May the spirit of D. M. L. C. be a spirit of Christian steadfastness and courage, a spirit contributed to by each and everyone of the students. YOU ARE A PILOT-DO SOMETHING!

A. G. '44 MISSIONARY SIDELIGHTS You often hear the remark, "Are those missionaries that the Synod sends among the Indians doing any good? Are they getting anywhere with those wild savages or is it a waste of time and money?" These are just a few of the many questions that are asked by the serious-minded people who are concerned with the work their missionaries are doing. These questions, however, are also often asked by those who are always finding or trying to find fault in the work of our missionaries. Before one can truthfully draw any conclusions as to the amount of good the missionaries are doing, he m,ust know and realize under what conditions they are working. Many people picture the Indian reservations to be almost entirely inhabited by wild savages, waiting behind â&#x201A;Źvery tree and rock to scalp them. They think there are only a few isolated white settlers living in constant fear of their lives. To this they add the idea that if the reservations are situated in Ar-izona, they must be just large tracts of barren desert waste. There are also those who imagine the life of a missionary to be about the same as that of the average small town ministers. Both of these conclusions are wrong. Many of the Indians are quite wild, but they aye no savages. The fact that many of them receive three and four thousand dollars in cattle and lumber checks each year should clear up any idea that the reservations are desert

22


wastes. To compare the life of a missionary with a small town minister is giving the missionary credit for a lot of luxuries which he doesn't have. Most of the missionaries have the conveniences of running water and electric lights. Some are situated many miles from a store, and there are some who must wait days and even weeks to get their mail. Personal cars are used for every thing from lumber trucks to hearses. Very seldom do the missionaries miss a day or week when some Indian fails to drop in for dinner or supper. Some years ago at one station a large chicken coop was built. The chickens failed to lay so they were evacuated and the building was converted into a boys' dormitory. Soon the dormitory became too small because of the increase in the number of boys. The building was then turned into a permanent home for one of the teachers. Many years ago the army built a small frame building for the colored soldiers to use as a reading room. After the army left, it was turned into a plumbing shop and machine shed. A year ago it was condemend as useless. Now it has been removed five miles from its former position and holds distinction of being a church where the Indians assemble to hear God's Word. These are just a few of the many examples to give you an idea of the conditions under which the missionaries labor. The conditions are worse than many seem to imagine them. Missionary teachers' conditions are not those of comfort or luxury, neither are they overflowing with milk and honey. You do not have to worry about getting daily necessities, but a mjissionary teacher can not jump into his car and go to the corner grocery for a loaf of bread. One of our missionary teachers along with his wife has done a magnificent job of managing a fifty-six pupil school under conditions far different from, and far more nervewracking than those found in the average school of that size in our Synod. Not long ago this teacher had to hire a team of mules to connect with the truck freight line miles away from his station to get his next month's provisions for his school. He arrived home at 3 :30 A. M. The reason is plain; he used to use his personal car for such work, but now he must use a team because he can't get tires for his car. The only true comfort a missionary derives from his tireless work is the unquestioning faith of an Indian in the Savior. Let me take you into a hospital ward of the

23


Indians where tuberculosis runs rampant. To the right and left are rows of living Indians. Tomorrow they are dead. But today the missionary is offering life everlasting to them. How eagerly the dying Indian grasps for life! Walter William, an Indian lover of the great out-ofdoors, has. been confined to a narrow bed for over three years with tuberculosis. Although he awaits an inevitable death, God, through the missionary, has given him hope of another life. Cheerfully he awaits that life. Likewise these numerous, otherwise pitiful deaths turn into unexcelled examples of childlike faith. We don't. have to go back to the early Christian church for examples of faith. Outstanding examples. of faith are seldom noticed among our white Christians. Look to the Indian and he will show you what faith really is. Cyril Duryea, an Indian carpenter who helped build one of the mission churches back in 19.21, was baptized on the day of dedication, and he has never missed going to church since that time unless he was, ill. Each Sunday after the rest of the congregation has left, he kneels before the altar and prays for himself, his family and for his missionary. John Williams, bent with age and failing eyesight, seldom fails to attend services. He also helps spread the Word of God by interpreting to the older Indians who don't understand English. Every Sunday there are Indians in church who have come miles on foot to hear the Word of God. How can we account for the ever increasing voluntary enrollment into our schools and churches on the part of the Indians? There can be but one answer. There must be an ever increasing number of Apache fathers and mothers, who are sincerely concerned' with the spiritual training of themselves and their children. And this in turn can only be accomplished through the untiring efforts of our missionaries and teachers along with the help of God.

A. A. G. 24


1!l. ,m. JL. ((. ,messenger The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is, published quarterly during the school year bY'tl~e students of Dr. Martin Luther C'ollege. 'The subscriotion price ts seventy-five cents' per annum. Single copies twenty cents. 'S'tJaiTI1lP'S' not 3J0_gepted.We .requesa payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after tim,e 'Of eubscrtptton has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. AH business comnnimcations should he addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on r_equest. Oontributlions to our Literary Department are requested from a.ll alumni, undergraduates and tr iends. The aim Qf "The Messenger" is to offer such material as win be beneticdal as well 'as interestrng to our readers, to keep the alumni in a closer contact with the c,oJ.le,ge,to foster school spirit, and to give the students an opportunitv in the practice of eomposi; taon land the ,eXIP,res,si'On of their thoughts. Entered as second class matter at Post Offil:?-e 'Of New Ulm, Minn.

No. II

Volume XXXIII December 1942

THE

MESSENGER

Editor Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Assistant Business Manager 'I'ypist., Alumni Notes Exchange College Notes Co-ed Notes Locals Athletics Humor 25

STAFF

.,

Richard Poetter Marvin Becker Edward Kionka Wilbert Luehring Lillian Quandt Margaret Lau 1one Huebner Alice Konetchy Helen Sweeney Gerhard Mueller Richard Grunze Myron Hilger


ALUMNI

NOTES

• •

• •

A

1

• • ••••

HIEL

Your Alumni Editor is back again to give you the pieces of news for this time. Two little boys read what I wrote about twins last time, and they were jealous, so now I must tell you about their births. Their names are Boyd Herbert and Bruce Harold. They were born June 24th to Mr. and Mrs. Lester Krueger. Mrs. Krueger was formerly Ruth Seehusen, who graduated from the Normal Department in 1936. The family's home is in Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. Hildegard Bode ex-H. S. 1940 was married to Norbert Reiner October 2. Their home address is 5834 Puget Sound Avenue, Tacoma, Washington, Sunday, November 15, Leorda Gieseke, H. S. '39, and John Marxhausen were married in Courtland, Minnesota. Among the attendants were Myrtle Gieseke, ex-H. S. '42 and William Gieseke, ex-H. S. '43. The John Marxhausens' now live in New Ulm. Helene Webert H S. '40 and Herman.Jaster were also married this fall. They are making their home in Valparaiso, Indiana. A little boy, whose name is Leroy was born July 17th to Mr. and Mrs. Mrs. Schapekahm was nee Martha uated in 1928. This family we have Minnesota. 2'6

Adolph Schapekahm, Adolph Schapekahm. Seehusen who gradwith us in New Ulm,


Marie Elizabeth is the little daughter born to Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Kiecker. She was born on March 26th. Her mother was Gertrude Seehusen, who graduated from our High School Department. Mr. Kiecker also attended high school here. This family lives in Fairfax, Minnesota. Mr. Adolph Gerlach, formerly a teacher in Arlington, Minnesota, is now a teacher in St. James, Minnesota. Mr. Gerlach graduated from Dr. Martin Luther College in 1916. Gwendolyn Birkholz '4,4 and Richard Poetter '43 are teaching in Arlington, Minnesota, until Christmas. They are filling the vacancy left by Mr. Gerlach. Edward Bradtke '21 was installed as teacher of St. John's School in Princeton, Wisconsin, September 13th. Many of our Alumni are now serving in the armed forces. We have an Honor Roll in the hall of our Administration Building, and there are forty-three names on it. There are too many to mention them all personally. I will mention only those that were with us last year: Corporal Orville Kempfert, Fort Des Moines, Iowa. Private Harold Burow, Camp Robinson, Arkansas Private Eckhart Gauger, Fort Bliss, Texas. Private Elmer Bode, Jacksonville, Florida: Sergeant Harry McFarland, Los Angeles, California. Private William Fuhrmann, Camp Barkeley, Texas. Private James Albrecht, Camp White, Oregon. Private Herbert Grams, Fort Benning, Georgia. Corporal Ivan Raddatz, Camp Beale, California. Pvt. Robert Temple, Chanute Field, Illinois. Lieutenant Edgar Duin and wife visited in New Ulm recently. Lieutenant Duin is a graduate of our High School Department and Mrs. Dillin, formerly Dorothy Froehlke, graduated from our Normal Department in 1939. Lieutenant Duin has just been promoted and is now in Washington, D. C. If there is any other military news, please let me know. I don't intend to forget anybody, though sometimes it may happen. . That's all the news for this time. I'll be back with you after Christmas. Your Alumni Editor will sign off wishing you all A Merry Christmas. 27


EXCHANGE Page two of the October Eighth issue of the "Spectator" distributes food for thought along with humor. Let its humor penetrate; then stop for a minute's reflection before treading upon advice sown in "Work and Beauty." "The Modern Hiawatha" He killed the noble Modjokivis Of the skin he made him mittens Made them with the fur side inside Made them with the skin side outside He to get the warm side inside Put the inside skin iside outside He to get the cold side outside Put the warm side fur side inside That's why he put the fur side inside Why he put the skin side outside Why he turned them inside outside. "Work and Beauty" The most beautiful flower in your garden draws its substance from the good brown earth. 'I'he most beautiful joy in your-life has its roots deep in work. To be idle is to be unhappy. Amid the routine of monotonous tasks conscientiously done, lovely, unexpected blossoms of happiness lift their perfumed petals. Work was not laid on us as a curse but as a blessing, compelling us to joy, saving us from suffering, even against our wills. Wise indeed is the one who, early in life, grasps this truth and avails himself of the sure working of the principle. Circumstances no longer force such a one, to take the right path. He takes it gladly, rejoicing in every opportunity to serve others, no matter how obscure now-how humble, the service rendered. Watch the man who works quietly', uncomplainingly, unceasingly. Our door mats are holding a hearty welcome for the coming Christmas season and, not too infrequently, are supporting a group of lusty carolers. Supplementing the two preceding, quotations, the same issue of the "Spectator" presents Wm. Byrd's. persuasive comments on sing. ing.

28


"First, it is a knowledge easely taught, and quickly learned where there is a good Master, and an apt Scolaro Sscond, the exercise of singing is delightful to Nature, & good to preserve the helth of Man. Third, it doth strengthen all parts of the brest, & doth

open the pipes. Fourth, it is a singular good remedie for a stutting & stamaring in the speech. Fifth, it is the best meanes to procure a perfect pronunciation, & to make a good Orator. . Sixth, it is the onely way to. know where Nature hath bestowed the benefit of' a good voyce: which guift is so are, as ther is not one among a thousand, that hath it; and in many, that excellent guift is lost, because they want Art to expresse Nature. Seventh, there is not any Musicke of Instruments whatsoever, comparable to that which is made of the voyces of Men, where the voyces are good, and the same well sorted and ordered. Eighth, the better the voyce is, the meeter it is to honour and serve God there-with: and voyce of Man is chiefly to be imploid to that ende. Since singing is so good a thing I wish all men would learne to sing." By the way, did you know that Concordia Junior College, Fort Wayne, Indiana, has soup and pie on Monday? From the "Maroon and White," October 9, we gleaned a "list of seven pecautions to be followed when listening to war reports by radio." 1. "Listen to every word ... Whereas it is possible to reread printed matter, the radio news program; is: ---heardbut once ... When reading, persons skip over words, this is even more likely when listening to war news in a room where there are other distractions . . . . The words 'not' or 'possibly' may alter the meaning of an entire sentence or of a whole newscsst. 2. Don't become hysterical. What may seem bad news at the moment, when viewed from a distance may not be quite so bad as it sounded on first hearing. 3. Check the radio news with newspaper accounts of the same news items ... Intonations, pauses, changes in tempo and other speech technique used by newscasters sometimes affect the meaning of news stor29


ies to such an extent that a reading of the newspaper accounts gives a different interpretation to the news item. ,4. Note the source of the news ... A report of an official United States army communique, read verbatim, is quite different from a report from 'ususally reliable sources.' 5. Don't report radio news as facts ... Because an account of some event is heard on a newscast does not necessarily make it a fact. Even though the original listener heard the account perfectly, when it is reported to succeeding individuals, it becomes colored by the interpretations of the various recounters. 6. .Regard opinion and conjecture as such ... This caution is especially applicable to news commentators who frequently express their opinions relative to the future progress of the war." \

Concordia College, St. Paul; Minnesota, and St. John's ' College, Winfield, Kansas, are observing golden anniversaries during the fiscal school year. The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" wishes both colleges a jubilee year of God's richest blessings. "Adaptation" Hope is a beaten cowering child Who struggles to rise. Innocence is a little girl With stars in her eyes. Optimism is J! slender youth Who smiles as he lies. Sadness is a broken man Whose lips breathe sighs. Trouble is tall gaunt woman In mean disguise. Peace is an erect and calm old man Who happily dies. . Life is a young and carefree thing About my size! "Reporter" November, 1942

30


C;vLLEGE

1 /'

Seems a long time since our last chat, and once more comes the time when you're begining to wonder what we've been doing up here on the hill. Now let's see-(hum)-!! ! Oh yes, the evening of October 31st marked the annual Hallowe'en party. The affair was held in the gym and was started off with a hearty "Happy Birthday" wish to Prof. Voecks. The usual precautions concerning the gym floor were taken. Result: a stocking-footed minority. After a rigorous round of games, refreshments were served, and the band furnished entertainment for the rest of the evening. We were entertained November 3rd by Alice and Harold Allen. Miss Demmons has produced on the radio for several years, and Mr. Allen the screen, specializing in whistling, imitating

Demmons programs fills in on birds, etc.

Their program, which is known as "Sounds of the Air" revealed to us what goes on behind the mike. First, they produced an imaginary program exactly as it would be done on the air with music and comedy. After signing off, they demonstrated how sounds are produced by manual and mechanical means. -Their thunderstorm was almost too realistic. The first literary program of the year was given by the Phi Delta Sigma society on Nov. 20th. Thanksgiving was the general theme. A skit depicting the conditions of the first Thanksgiving introduced the program. Eunice 31


Sauer then offered the Landing of the Pilgrim Fathers. This was followed by a Thanksgiving song. In contrast to the first, a modern skit entitled A Wartime Thanksgiving was next on the program. The familiar Thanksgiving Day was rendered by Helen Gross. The program was concluded with a third skit, November Days, commemorating famous Americans born in November. Our Christmas program will be given Friday, December 18, at 8 :00 p. m. The program is as follows: 1. Pre-service Christmas

Organ Music Miss Violet Stechmann

2. Procession 3. Choir: The Christmas Story F. Reuter Narration: MI. Ervin Walz Organ: Miss Ruth Engelhardt 4. A.ssembly: No.1, Veni, ,Emanuel Organ: Miss Corintha Reier 5. Choir: a) Star and Crown of My Salvation F. Reuter b) Behold a Simple BabeW. Buszin 6. Address: Prof. V. Voecks 7. Choir: a) Silent Night M. Hokanson b) Song of Mary Fischer-Kranz c) In Dulci Jubilo W. Olds 8. Assembly: No. 12, Adeste Fidelis Organ: Miss Helen Sweeney 9. Choir: a) Da alles stille war M. Gulbins b) Schumschei Wiegenlied E. Backer 10. Organ: Canonical Variation on, "From Heaven Above" J. S. Bach Miss Gertrude Stoekli 11. Choir: Now Thank We All Our God J. S. Bach 12. Assembly: No. 15, Froehlich solI mein springen Organ: Miss Gladys Lindloff 13. Recession To one and all a Merry Christmas l l l !!

32

Herze

"r


Dear Aunt Clementine:

1

I

-(

By the time you receive this the most won d e r f u 1 Christmas Season will be very near again. What is happening among our D.M.L.C. Coeds in preparation for this joyous time? Well, lots of things. Some are busy making gifts; can't afford expensive things, this year, you know. In all the dormitories inexpensive Christmas parties are being celebrated with brightly adorned Christmas trees and the exchanging of gifts. Everywhere there is a spirit of expectation-our Christmas Concert, going home, and then Christmas itself. It's a wonderful time, Aunt Clementine. Everyone is so happy. It seems that every year there is someone who must go hobbling around on crutches about this time. This year the unfortunate victim is Grace K, as a result of a game of basketball. "Toody" is trying her hand at teaching in Arlington from December 1st until Christmas along with Dick Poetter. "Spree" also will fill in at Liberty, Wis., sometime in the near future. Teachers are almost as plentiful as money these days. Lillian Q. finds redecorating to her liking. She started out with painting bed posts, and proceeded to do wonders. As yet, Gladys doesn't seem to be feeling quite her normal self. Could her recent trip through Wisconsinespecially Watertown-have any connecting significance? Her latest faux pas, was her revelation to the science class that the earth is the center of the universities. One of Our coeds was making pancakes at the Voecks' home one morning.. Little "Mikie" asked, "What's that in the bowl?" "Batter", answered the coed. Mikie's innocent response was, "Batter than what?" Hartwig special: "To be or not to be, that is conception. Consumption be done about it?" The newest fad is to can your Nylons-e-what Nylons? -in vinegar to preserve them for the Easter parade. Ruth Smith must have had a particularly realistic dream one night. She awoke in the morning to find herself in bed with her bedroom slippers on. 33


Lois Wegner was awakened in the middle of the night by the soft, sweet voice of her bed partner asking, "Would you please move your arm? It's across my face." We hear that Eunice H. and R. P. played house together when they were small. Humpty Dumpty had nothing on Artcy. A slip of the foot, and the doctor had to start putting her back together again. It's "Buddy" in the army, "Joe' in the navy, and "Fellow-dumbell" in the III Normal Class. Annex Hall had a party on November 19th. The high points of the evening were the scavenger hunt and "found a peanut." One group of the scavenger hunt ran into more than they were looking for, it seems. Corry and Prof. Backer have been finding occasion to exchange boxes of chocolates. Tsk, tsk. What is particularly pleasing is the fact that the entire III Normal Class is always included. Not a bad idea, eh? Maybe all this sweetness explains Corry's recent visit to the dentist. "Big" Petzke came pretty close to believing in ghosts one night when organ 22 started functioning by itself. Ask G. L. and L. K. what they know about ghosts. There have been two new additions to the III Normal Class-.A!gnes and Betty. Has anyone noticed how much brighter and more shiny the Annex girls look these days? All credit is due to their newest "fixtures". The rumor goes that Elvira has a pet mouse. Evidently he got a little wild the other morning. His performance drew forth mighty blasts from Corry's lungs. All Hillcrest Hallers were thoroughly aw:ake at breakfast that morning. We wonder if the aggravator is the same one who burrowed his way directly through Latana Arndt's 5th Avenue? Anita had a taste of swinging the rod the weekend that Miss Gertrude Stoekli went to the "Cities." The symphony, Rachmaninoff', and shopping fined Miss Stoeckli's time. A Merry Christmas to everyone. May God's peace dwell in your hearts on Christmas Day and through all the New Year, and erase the care and the ugliness of a war filled world. Your loving niece, Annabella

34


A man in white slashes at one of the students. with a knife !-Keep your toupee down. It's only the M. D. looking for "Joe" Goede's appendix. "Joe" doesnt need an appendix in his book. of life. Uhlig is making the "fuchses" air-minded, not because he lacks oratorical terminal facilities, but because he has started some interest in model airplane building. Did anyone see that Schmitter-mess that Vernon Meyer built flying around? Maybe he keeps it under cover for fear of the F. B. I. Our Thanksgiving vacation was reduced this year, but that didn't eliminate our Thanksgiving dinner, which was as stomach-ache-producing as ever. More than one boy was slowly walking back to the "dorm," with hands over a full stomach and a satisfied grin from ear to ,earor was that mouth stretched trying to eat a drumstick all at one time? "Don" Zimmerman broke the traditional wishbone with "Archie," who didn't get the lucky end. Prof: "You missed my class yesterday, didn't you?" "Chuck" Langnickel: "Not in the least!" Surely no one objects to Poetter's smoking. In fact, who could imagine a pipeless Poetter ? But the "toby" he smokes surely has some kick to it. It seems he has a mixture of Kentucky Club (race-track sweepings), Sir

35


~~j

~lJ

Wally Raleigh, Prince Albert, shredded Ralston, and what not, all in one can. Some one should remember him on Christmas with some good tobacco. We don't realize what inventive genius we have in the boys' "dorm." Uhlig and Horst, Inc., have designed a new modern miracle,-a flying submarine. But sh! It's a military secret. Several boys may be leaving to join Uncle Sam's forces this school year. All the II Normal boys have received their questionnaires. Last year it was "Gone With the Wind." This year it's "Caught in the Draft," Besides the din from the music hall-organs, pianos, and band-the boys' dorm offers other chances to become musically inclined. Lyle Schmeling and Vernon Meyer pluck at guitar strings; Gerhard Hintz occasionally fills his end of the hall with accordion notes; and this, year one of King Cole's fiddlers, Donald Jordan, is with us. Will wonders never cease? Schierenbeck actually came to chorus one Saturday. Maybe he decided he likes singing better than learning all about composers while writing compositions. Our radio repairers and photographers are gone. This year, however, a printer, Aiswege, has established a job printing office on the third floor. Two familiar faces are missing from among us until Christmas. "Dick" Poetter and "Toody" Birkholz left on the last days of November to get real experience at teaching at Arlington, Minnesota. Grunze is the master of the music hall in Poetter's place meanwhile. "Don" Meier and his roommates are bewailing the loss of the dormitory's only bathtub, especially as they were the sole users this year. They are consoled by the fact that it went for a good cause. Mr. Seehusen gave them a clothes rack in its place. G. Hintz uses a scissors (not in the best condition) for trimming' the end of each wl1{sker in his mustache. One look and he decides once moreto shave it off.

36


)

November 18th came, and already the boys were eagerly and anxiously awaiting the following Saturday, the day of the big Minnesota-Wisconsinfootball game. Saturday finally arrived. Slowly the day dragged on until the start of the game. Last minute arguments were in progress. The boys crowded around each radio. Wisconsin had a touchdown. Minnesota fans were calm, but their calmness disappeared as Wisconsin again scored. There was still hope. Both teams couldn't win, and this year Wisconsin grinned and Minnesota took the consequences. Clarence Peil left us to return again next year. Just before he left, the college truck took his baggage down. On the way back they stopped at the lumber yard, and Clarence came up under a board and broke his nose. He had to leave on the train shortly and didn't see a doctor until he got to Brookings. What a farewell! Your local editor wishes each and every one a very Merry Christmas!

37


SPORTS Basketball has again bounced into the picture of sports, although the rebound is not so great this year. In the past years as far back as I can' remember, we've' supported a college varsity. But as in football, which was discontinued because of the war, we've had to discontinue the college varsity for the duration. We now have in our midst a highschool varsity. Some may get the idea that basketball will not be as exciting and full of action this year because of this. Those who have that foolish idea can expel it from their minds. For by now you have seen what action and excitement those preps can really give us. So give them your full support and come to all the home games. That much time you can spare to let loose some of ,that secluded school spirit. They need our support, so give it to them. By the time you receive the "Messenger" some games will have been played. Those games will go into the next issue. The only things that I can report on now are the boys' class basketball, girls' basketball, tumbling, and volleyball. In the boys' basketball the following teams comprised the major league during the first round: III Normals, II Normals, I Normals, 12A, 11th grade, and lOA. The 12B, lOB, 9A, and 9B made up the minor league. In the major league the 12th grade easily walked away with the title, for the records show that out of five games played they won five. The second position is held by the following three teams: III Normals, the 11th grade, and the 10th grade. These teams won three out of five games. And next, holding onto the third ranking position, is the I Normals team. Out of the prescribed five games, they won only one. And lastly, grasping feebly to the last position, are the downtrodden II Normals. Their percentage is nil. In the minor league the 12B team, as did their classmates in the major league, won all their games, being five, sitting in the top notch. In the notch below this fits the 9A. Three out of five was their final standing. This wasn't bad for a group of freshmen playing against those 12B and lOB veterans. The 9A had the privilege of look38


~t

================================================================

___l

ing down on the lOB. These boys won two games. In the same position with the II Normals are the 9B players. Out of five games they came along with a goose egg. . Continuing in the line of basketball, there's also the girls' basketball. From what I can see, these are not class teams, but they are different teams comprised of players from various classes. The girls chose names for the different teams and here they are: the Blackbirds, the Bluebirds, the Bobolinks, the Cardinals, the Hawks, the Larks, the Swans, and the Wrens. It seems as if the girls are pretty flighty. Get it? The only way these teams can be ranked is by percentage, for not all have played the same number of games. I am figuring those games played up to and on November 27th. At the top of the tree are perched the Bluebirds with Alice Konetchy, their elated captain. They proudly let the rest know that they won five games out of six. Just a twig below them is Lois Wegner with her Hawks, having snatched four games from five of their opponents. I believe I see a number of tiny birds sitting on the third limb. It's Carold Gieseke and her Wrens perched about her. For little birds like that they really had to go some to win three games out of five. Sitting a little to the right and beneath the Wrens are the Blackbirds, with Betty Tabbert looking her flock over that won four games out of seven played. With the fifth position card in her bill, lone Huebner directs the Bobolinks in a rollicking song. Or is it rollicking? The lyrics to their song concern their three wins out of seven games. On the branch with the number "six" tag attached to it are two flocks of birds. Helen Sweeney's Larks' playing isn't as good as their singing. They lost four games out of six. But those other birds on the same branch-how they ever got up there is beyond my comprehension. These birds happen to be Swans. For the answer to this puzzle you'll have to see Dorothy Bintzler. She'll also tell you that they won two games out of six. How those last birds ever got on the ground is beyond me. I wonder what their cousins in St. Louis, who won the World Series, would say. Maybe Helen Gross can answer for her Cardinals. How the girls play and how good they are, I can't answer. You'll have to see Hilger and Kehl, who are the referees for their games. From the haggard look on them every Monday and Friday night, I have a fairly good idea. In our physical fitness program there is also tumbling for the boys and volleyball for the girls. I haven't much information about the tumbling team, and I guess there

39


isn't much to give. I do know that the tumbling team has practice in the old gymnasium. Leonard "King" Berth heads the group, putting' them through their muscle building exercises. I hear that Bob Moldenhauer is second in charge. I hope they put on some exhibitions this year. Lastly, and the old saying continues, but not least, is volleyball. There isn't much information that I can give on this game. I do know that there are four teams. They are the Lovenuts, the Butternuts, the Peanuts, and the Walnuts. Pardon me while I take time out to laugh. Lillian Krause is the captain of the Lovenuts, Valeria Thalman is captain of the Butternuts, Dorothy Mueller heads the Peanuts, and Corintha Reier was chosen captain of the Walnuts. I understand that the Peanuts are leading all the nuts. .. Whether you get nuts in your Christmas stocking, or whether birds sing for you on Christmas, I wish you all a Merry Christmas and an especially Happy and Peaceful New Year.

ATHLETICS

* SONN

40


HUMOR Zimmerman: "It's amazing what the auto engineers have done to make driving easier." Guenther: "You're absolutely right ___ in 1940 no running boa-rds; in 1941 no' gear shift; 1942 no car." Doctor: "Now- I'll examine your throat. Open your mouth and say Ah." Waltz: "Aw" Doctor: "No, Ah." Waltz: "Noah." Doctor: "No!" Waltz: '\No." Doctor: "Never mind-next!" Grunze: "That soprano who sang last night in the music hall reminded me of a pirate." Leitzke: "Why?" Grunze: "Because she did murder on the C's." Work is such a fascinating thing that some students can sit and look at it for hours. Prof. Backer, just before class was dismissed: "All boys fond of music please stay ,loiter class." With visions of a tryout for special choir, a half dozen boys remained after class. Prof. Backer: "Now then, you fellows get busy and carry that piano up to the top floor of the service building." Waiter: "Our kitchen is very modern. We cook everything by electricity." Patron: "Would you please give this meat another shock ?" Dear Editor: "What should a student take when he's run down?" Dear Reader: "The license number." G. Hintz: "What did the little dog say when he ran through the fire?" 41


G. Mueller: "I don't know." G. Hintz: ''''Whee~I've just been defurred!" Boys' dorm motto: A friend in need is a guy to stay away from. Prof. Bliefernicht to II Normal Psychology class: "If a little knowledge is, a dangerous thing what a crime wave will hit this class." .. First Co-ed: "What do you think would go well with my green hat?" Second Co-ed: "A blackout." The young fellow burning with love usually makes a fuel of himself. Prof. Leverson: "Is trousers singular or plural ?" Attentive Student: Singular at the top and plural at the bottom." Prof. Sauer: "Why were you late for breakfast this morning?" . Uno Who: "I think I must have overwashed myself." A shining example of old-fashioned simplicity is an unpowdered nose. Hi~3r: "Boy, what a drilling I'll get." Grunze: "By the army?" Hilger : "No-dentist." Birkholz and Hartwig disputed concerning the window, and at last called Prot. Schweppe to settle the dispute. Birkholz: "If that window is open, I'll catch cold and probably die." Hartwig: "If you close that window I'll suffocate." They glared at each other. He was at a loss, but he welcomed the advice of Berth who sat near. Berth: "First open the window, that will kill one. Next shut it. That will kill the other. Then we can have peace."

42


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lIyOU

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Auto Glass Replaced to Order


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i>-

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Phone

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370

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INC.

HARDWARE NEW ULM, MINN. COMPLIMENTS OF

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ULRICH E~LECTRIC COMPANY Electric Service at Its Best-Buy

with Service

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HENRY GOEnE / STUDIO We Make PHOTOS of Merit Most reliable Studio in Southern Minnesota. A trial will convince.

Floris

Shoe Store

X-RAY SHOE FITTING Hanel Bags Tel. 449

Students'

Hosier:J1 124 No. Minnesota

Clothing and Sport Wear

HUMMEL BROS. 14 No. Minnesota St.

New DIm, Minn.


INHOFER - RAUSCH BAKERY

• D-LISHUS

PRODUCTS

• Phone 232 The Home of

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FRED

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CO.

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FARMERS

& MERCHANTS

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BANK

New Ulm, Minnesota

Friendly Helpful Service at Your Command

Residence Phone 150

Office Phone 260

Dr. F. H. Dubbe, F. A. C. S. NEW ULM,

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON MINNESOTA


SOMSE:N, DEMPSEY and SOMSEN Henry N. Somsen W. H. Dempsey Henry N. Somsen, Jr.

ATTORNEYS AT LAW

New Ulm,

Minnesota

COMPLIMENTS of the

RETZLAFF

MOTOR CO.

New Ulm's Dodge-Plymouth Distributor for 29 years

MUESING Drug Store EXPERT PRESCRIPTION SERVICE

ARTCRAFT PHOTO SERVICE We Have It!

Will Get It!

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Where Old Friends Meet SATISFACTORY CHEERFUL

IDEAL BEAUTY SHOP Alyce Gieseke Otto - Laura Gieseke, Owners and Operatore Albove Brey's Grocery Telephone 530


E. G. LANG, D. D. S. Office Above State Bank of New DIm Office Phone 472

Res. Phone 1172

CHAS. F. JANNI HARNESS DEALER Kwik-Pak Parcel Post Laundry Cases, Trunks, Traveling Bags, Suit Cases, Purses and Other Leather Specialties

PALACE LUNCH H. A. Bergmeter, Prop. New. DIm's Most Poputar Lunch Room Sandwiches-Ice Crearnr---Jeandy-Soft Drlnks-c-Otge.rettes

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New DIm, Minn.

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CO.

Stores: New Ulm and Sleepy Eye, Minn.

Distinctive Funeral

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1942

OUR GOLDEN JUBILEE The progressive record of any concern proves its dependability. The Henry Simons Lumber Company has increased its circle of friends and customers continually for the past fifty years. Its progressive record of accomplishment, dependable information, right price, and a promise never broken, if within their control-proves their dependability.

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Phone 201

PINKS STORE Air-Step

Caral King, Jr. Dresses Munsing and Barbason

Shoes

Loungerie

Swansdown Coats and Suits Friendly Sales People to Help You

WILLIAM J. VON BANK, D. D. S. F. I. C. D. DENTIST Office Phone 237

New VIm, Minn.

Residence Phone 797

DRS. HAM.MERMEISTER & SAFFERT Physicians

and Surgeons

Office Over State Bank of New Ulm


WHEN IN NEED OF FOOTWEAR Be Sure and Call on Us We 'carry a complete Hue of men's, ladies' and children's shoes We appreotate your business, Our prices are always the lowest, QuaHty considered.

ATHLETIC SHOES OUR SPECIALTY Shoes Fitted Free by X.Ray

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PHONE 165-L

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NEW ULM GREENHOUSES FLOWERS FOR EVERY OCCASION We are prepared to fill orders for flower's at all points through the FIMiists 'I'elegraph!c Delivery Association.

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See

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~

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Phone 756

20% Discount Cash and Carry Eyes Tested

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DRS. SCHLEUDER Optometrists and Opt,jcians NEWULM.

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D. M. L. C. MESSENGER VOLUME XXXIII NUMBER III APRIL 1943


FOREWORD With the Easter issue of the "Messenger", another new staff makes its entry. Ours is a unanimous hope of pleasing success. That kind of success can be achieved only by pleasing you, our readers. In order to please, we must know what your hopes are concerning material found between these covers. We would be highly pleased if all, including the alumni, would offer suggestions and even corrections. This is not the staff's quarterly paper, but yours. Our literary column and editorials will be complete if we have your material. This is your paper, so give it your full cooperation, and we shall have complete success.


~ ,

, . ..


Death is swallowed up in victory.

I Cor. 15 :54.

CONTENTS

POE,TS' CORNEH Christ, My Vicar

2

A Sonnet

3

Preach The Word

3

LITERARY Christ Is Risen

4

Your American Classics

6

That Sun-An

8

EDITORIAL Lasting Peace? Despondent?

Allegorical Fantasy

11

~----------------------13

ALUMNI NOTES

19

EXC:a;A.NGE

22

COLLEGE NOTES

27

CO-ED NOTES

31

LOCALS

34

SPORTS

36

HUMOR

42


Poets' CHRIST, MY V:ICAR I see Him in the garden. His head is bowed in pray'r. I see the bitter anguish He suffered for me there. There are Peter, James, and John.. Asleep, near-by, they lay. I hear Him kindly tell them "Awake, and watch and pray." To Pilate then the soldiers And guards lead Him fast bound. For my many, many sins M,y Lord with thorns is crowned. To Calvary I follow. I see Him bear the cross; See Him give His very life, That life be not my loss; Hear Him in the hour of death Breathing a pray'r for me: I hear, "Forgive them, Father," Reecho from that tree. I see the gentle women Who mourned for Him that day. I see the good kind Joseph As they laid Him away. Three days have passed and now I see The tomb where once He lay; The Roman seal is broken. I hear the angel say, "He is risen!" yes, my Lord Has vanquished all my foes; God can see my sins no more; Christ suffered, died, arose.

R. W. '45 2


Corner A SONNET The bursting buds on trees are seen Shining in the warm sunlight; The grass blades paint their coats so green, And robins chirp with all their might; The flowersrise lip from their beds, The air a haunting fragrance takes, Sunlight shines on children's heads, The cold no more an effort makes. Who giveth us this wondrous thing? Who bringeth forth these beauties bright? Who maketh thus the birds to sing? Who showetj, us this beauteous sight? God in all His strength and love Giveth these blessings from above. B. M. T. '45 PREACH THE WORD The skies are dark this dismal day, From heaven comes no sunshine ray. The earth is filled with mournful cries, And smoke from guns to heav'n does rise. The people in a turmoil are, Minds bent for things they see afar, Things greed has made them wanting for, Things which keep knocking at their door. Will God e'er see our wrong aright, Drive out temptations with His might? Yes, pray for it, He can and will, If we the ground of faith do till. So, Christians, one and all, arise; Go through the world and wipe out lies; Show forth the true Word of our God, And lift the people from the sod. Some day our God will hear our prayers, And take us from this mesh of snares; And till that day do what is right, And preach the Word of Truth and Light. A. V. - H. S. '43 3


CHRIST IS RISEN On Easter morning you will hear many pass the greeting, "Happy Easter." The greeting will be returned. What has actually been said? 'The word "Easter" goes back to> the Greek word "Ostern." It means the name of a Teutonic goddess of

spring. A definition in the dictionary will further state that Easter is an annual Christian festival in commemoration of j:;heresurrection of Jesus Christ, observed the first Sunday after the full moon that occurs on or next after March 21st. You will agree that in the original this word is meaningless to us, and in no way testifies of the Easter miracle. Let us look at the Easter greetings of previous times. The early church had a greeting that rang out a sermon everytime it passed someone'slips. It was "Christos anestee I"~ "Christ is risen!' and the response was "Aleethoos anestee!" "He is truly risen!" In the early Latin Church of the first centuries they greeted "Vivit!" "He lives!" and the reply, "Vere vevet!" "He lives indeed!" In Spanish lands Christians say, "Cristo vive!" A German Easter salutation; "Der Herr ist auferstanden!" and reply, "Er ist wahrhaftig auferstanden." We can easily realize that all these greetings have but one purpose in mind-to glorify the risen Savior. In our country we say, "Happy Easter." Does that convey the message, "Christ is risen?" Does the reply convey the message, "He is risen indeed?" Would it be judging too critically to surmise that while speaking the 4


~11~~~~~ Easter greeting with the lips, one can be thinking about spring hats, new clothes, festive food, etc.? "Christ is risen." This is the very core of our assurance of eternal salvation. It is, therefore, quite natural that it should be the spot most often and severely attacked by unchurched people as an impossibility. For us, as we study it from Scriptural. light, it leaves no doubt. We know that a non-Christian tries to find loopholes. He questions the possibility of Christ's actually being dead when put into the grave. How could one read the description of agony on the cross, the fulfillment of prophecies to the next degree of His death, and conclude otherwise? Does the unbeliever not know that everything in, over, and under the world will collapse before the Word of God can ever be broken down? The unbeliever tries to make the story plausible that the Roman soldiers, standing guard at the sealed, rockhewn tomb fell asleep, and the disciples stole His body. How absurd. It meant certain death for a Roman soldier to fall asleep while on duty. No matter how many statements brought to our attention, concerning Christ gaining for us eternal life by overcoming death, we can always answer every last one of them without flinching an eye. We have so much information given by Christ Himself as to His mission. For example, "In my Father's house there are many. mansions. I go to prepare a place for you." Indeed, anyone who rejects the Easter Gospel is too stubborn to concede to the most wonderful truth, making possible for man eternal life after earthly death. Thomas Arnold, headmaster at Rugby, stated that no, fact in history is so well attested as the resurrection of Christ! We have the assurance that Mary Magdalene saw the risen Savior. We know that He blessed His disciples with His scar-marked hands. Doubting Thomas had to examine the hands to support his conviction. In fact, every baptism, every church service, every mission work attests to the unconquerable truth that "Christ is risen !" To seek scientific comprehension of this miracle is sheer foo-lishness. Challenge such a person to explain the .miracle that goes on in every inch of ground under his feet, in every breath he breathes, in every inch of flesh in his body!

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Our present day world has been blackened as a result of punishment for our sins. We have a beautiful white message to .give, "Christ is risen!" May you ever be suc-

cessful in projecting the radiance of this powerful mission gospel. M. Rademann YOUR AME;RICANCLASSICS More Americans read newspapers today than ever before. More Americans read weekly and monthly periodicals today than ever before. More Americans . are reading propaganda today than ever before. What American will reconcile himself to the task of reading a long-winded novel or poem whim he can settle satisfactorily with a newspaper or 'a magazine? It seems that the conditions of the country necessitate the shortcut type of literature which conveys to the public the latest turn of current events. America is made warconscious by its trend of .war material popularized by news flashes over the radio and by material which is read by citizens all over the country in newspapers and magazines. Time has been divided into eight-hour shifts, and people of today are being advised to economize in every way possible. How can one enjoy the relaxation of an evening at home with a novel when he should be "all out for victory?" Evidently America has no time for its classics during a time when they should be read. Yes, we have a job to do. We have a war to win, and we need sharp, keen minds to meet the situations confronting us today. But we aren't going to win this war or help to promote morale by substituting propaganda for literature. Literature helps to mold the heart of youth. The American classics furnish an excellent mold with Mark Twain, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Franklin, Poe, Cooper, Howells, Melville, Lewis, Harte, Louisa Alcott, Longfellow, Irving, Whittier, Whitman, and Dickinson on the distinguished list. All we have to do is to read them. In selecting your American classic, don't grab any work of art simply because it bears the name of a prominent American writer. Cross-examine yourself. Distinguish carefully the varied works of our great authors. Pick out the type of 'literature you like most. You always 6


~!J~~~~~ have an opportunity to taste the style of other writers once you have satisfied yourself with a favorite. Before you discipline yourself into reading something morbid, when you would secure more pleasure from a gay, light-hearted novel, shop around for the prose that pleases you most. Perhaps you prefer reading poetry; or maybe you are the. type who could pass several hours engaged in reading dramas, essays, or mystery stories. Select your type of book, relax, and read to your heart's content. "Tom," "Huck," "Captain Ahab," "Hester Prynne," "Uncle Tom," and "Pollyanna" all suggest the plots of interesting prose stories read the world over. You say you're not interested in prose? Try Franklin or Henry Adams for autobiography. Emerson and Thoreau present essays to aid you in forming opinions. Bryant, Whitman, Whittier, Longfellow, and Dickinson supply several different types of American poetry. Poe will oblige if you are looking for something depressing. His short stories may be read in a comparatively short period of time, giving you the satisfaction of completing a plot in one sitting. Hawthorne portrays his genius by permitting his readers to gather the underlying motives involved in his works of art. Speaking of the short story, one can't forget Irving with his immortal "Rip Van Winkle" and his "Sleepy Hollow" legends. If it's local color you're looking for, try Hamlin Garland with his middle border novels. Sinclair Lewis supposedly depicts typical Americanisms of today and yesterday. The well-known Brete Harte has local color smattered with realism. Try Howells along the realistic line or Dreiser as a naturalist. Cooper paints Indians for your reading pleasure, but triumphs historically as well. Hawthorne peacefully narrates stories of symbolism and sin. Melville intrinsically relates the details of the South Seas while Twain brings out a chuckle when perusing his humor at its best. American classics certainly 'are not limited by the few comments made in the above paragraphs. You may experience delight .and pleasure from different viewpoints. No matter which classic you prefer, remember that it acts, more or less, as a guardian of civilian morale in these days. The classics furnish busy minds with relaxation. The classics are yours. They were written and are being written for you'. .Read them! I. Huebner

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THAT SUN -AN

ALLEGORICAL FANTASY

In the east another dreary day of gloom and hopelessness is listlessly plodding along behind the dark, satanic heels of a disappearing cloudy night. This morning, as all other mornings for the past two score centur-ial years, brought nothing but heavens bedecked with dark, infernal clouds. Clouds stretching themselves from their hellish west to the departing east, which, being pushed ever onward by an unseen devilish force, seemed to be keeping the sun of happiness from arising. Until now the belialistic forces had accomplished their evil purpose, but the faithful knew that when the appointed time came, that orb of gladness would repel those satanic clouds, and show forth its glittering radiance in all splendor and solitude. Many upon this earth had thought nothing of these foreboding black, billowy blankets of the heavens. They lived their lives day in and day out beneath these hovering signs of destruction with neither hopelessness nor a hope of a blissfully bright future. Theirs was a life of mummery. Also upon this earth dwelt those with a prayerful hope in their hearts. They knew that these leadened clouds would soon be completely abated for them, while the others would continually trod this earth shrouded by those dreaded, dreary clouds. The hope of the former was built upon a foundation laid many years ago when these ethereal tarns first appeared, swiftly approaching over the horizon-the horizon of that peace which passeth all understanding. Daily they had come forth from their dwellings, as the deadly revolving night made its exodus into the west, lifting their appealing eyes to the east seeking the coming of the long sought promised sunshine. That peaceful sun whose warm inviting rays would draw from their heavy sinful laden souls that satanic burden of death. The faithful knew that that sun would not make its entry into this beclouded world with noise and exuberant joyful shouts. But on the contrary, that radia.nt disk would appear quietly and tranquilly as a singularly tiny white alto-cumulus makes its way noiselessly across a shining, serene azure sky. Continually their eyes had to behold a perpetual lowering cloud. This particular morning again brought the emerging believers from their abodes to seek a sign of the celestial sunshine coming into brightness from, the promising east. Still that blanket of depression and despondence covered the ea.rth. Again their hearts and their eyes drooped. 8


Before entering their homes, they habitually cast their depressed glance out and over the bleak western horizon. Suddenly their hearts quaked; a quaking which their hearts had afore never felt. For out of Satan's boiling caldron in the west a soupy vapor and mist came rising, then settling o'er the .earth, preceding hellish black clouds: which also came pouring out of the caldron of hate. Never before had they seen such dark foreboding signs. As the vapory mist began settling around them, fear seemed to rivet them to the earth. The. watery mist began washing from their souls all hope of that sun for which they had these many decades been waiting. How could anything repel these huge lowering forces arising from the west? Just as the earth was becoming blacker and blacker, so were their hopes dwindling more and more as the clouds came closer and closer. Mounting higher and higher over. the western horizon came those heaving, Ieviathanic. sinister clouds. As the day grew older, so the' clouds g~ew blacker. Out of the clouds charged flashing steeds of lightning, drawing Satan's massive sooted 'chariot ever onward. Bright, gigantic, hellish fiery steeds zigzagging and crashing across the bemoaning heavens. Here and there a charger would gleefully dash earthward, causing in its wake death and destruction. From their despondent tran â&#x20AC;˘.'e the fearful were suddenly awakened by a distant pealing of thunder. Quickly they made their ways into their dwellings there to remain'.' The day had completed almost three fourths. of its course, when the day could no longer be called such, for it was as night. The only light to be seen was made by those fiery, flashing steeds of hell. Theirs was not a. soft, restful light, but a blinding, sharp illumination. Their massive sharp hoofs sounded and resounded across the skies as these chargers came flashing and crashing; lashing with their sharp tongues at the desolate earth with hateful glee. They seemed to possess incontestable supremacy of the heavens. Suddenly a leviathanic steed dashed towards the earth followed by just as great a crash of thunder. So loud a. crash was never . before heard, nor has been since. Slowly but eventually these chariots of black death were making their way eastward. At last the greatest and worst storm in history was assuaged. Truly the storm was past, but the heavens were still shrouded by a seemingly perpetual misty, grayish black veil. Thus they remained for another day and night.

9


It was the morning of the second day after the storm when the fearing "faithful" again came forth, this time not to seek that ra.y of hope, but only to be out of their dwellings. This morning an entirely different scene greeted them-a scene never before beheld since that ac. cursed day centuries back. There before them the landscape was basking in a golden warmth. For in the east in all shining brilliance and radiating beauty and glory majestically rising was that Sun.

Ivr E.

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..

II

EDITORIAL

• LASTING PEACE? The gospel that the Allied war lords of today and their gullible puppets are blaring over the air waves is "Lasting Peace". A. number of Sundays ago' the leader of one of our great Allies made the statement over a worldwide hookup that Europe was the source of this greatest and last of wars. Truly Europe is the source, and with a surety we can say that this is the greatest of wars. During the last and first of world wars not as many nations. participated in actual combat as are in this present war. And has there been so global a war before? The sun is always shining, except when it's a cloudy day, upon fields. and waters besmirched with blood. The only war that is. far more universal is the Church's continual strife against the evil forces of HELL. That speaker's first description of this economical strife is true, as afore stated. But the latter description is. absolutely false. All Christians know and fully realize that such a beautiful turning point in the history of this world has no ground on which to place a foundation. In fact, that foundation, if any, is ethereal. I suppose at this point the worldings would accuse us Christians of trying to undermine our country's and soldiers' morale and hope of a shining future. But there they are again wrong. I do not for one moment doubt that anyone of us would enjoy just as much as they, the worldlings, a post-war lastingly peaceful world.

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:In order to have this lasting peace here upon earth, the world must be made void of an sin. For where there would be no sin, there would be no jealousy and hatred. And where there would be no jealousy and hatred, there would be no murders and killings. And where there would be no murders and bloodsheds, there would be no strifes. And with no strifes there would be no wars. Since this world will never be void of sin, we shall always have wars. Just take a look at the police records of our present juvenile criminal cases. They show exasperating evidences! . What, with these cases of youthful crimes, will this country be like after this war? These youths' will be so calloused to crime, and will learn to know the ins and outs of crime, that OUrpost-war country will not be that of peace, but of greater internal strife. How do- these "geniuses" of "lasting" peace plan to make this world have a continual peace? By having an fnternational police force. There they show that they know their Utopian plan will not have any success unless administered by force. This police force will be there to enforce the 路law. And where there is a law there is sin, for law is the eventuality of sin. Are the German-occupied countries content with the policing done in their countries to keep them in subjugation arid so keep such a. peace in them which will not hinder the Nazis in their work? No, they are not. One can see this from all the underground work being done in these countries; all the riots and guerrilla attacks made upon the Third Reich soldiers. But then someone may retort with the statement that these insurrections are occurring because of the waves of protests and opposition to the Nazi ideals practiced within these countries which,' to these people, are unjust and cruel. So, these worldlings would logically conclude, naturally these uprisings would take place. Wouldn't it be the same if Allied soldiers were placed in Germany, Italy, and Japan to police them and keep them from causing unrest and trouble? . TheY wouldn't agree with our ideals. They would also, consider them" unjust, and, maybe even cruel. Naturally they too would set off the T. N. T. keg of insurrection thus making it a lasting impossibility to keep a peace after this war. Say what they will and "blow" ever so mucj, as our war analysts do- of lasting peace, there never will-b芦 any as+long as this earth stands. Christ says, "And ye shall hear of'.. wars and rumors of wars-for all these things must come' to pass,-and then shall the end come." In this quotation 12


Christ says, "And many false prophets shall arise, and shall deceive many." You can see for yourself who some of these false prophets are, for aren't they prophecying a future lasting peace? The psalmists states, "He that sitteth in the heavens shall laugh: The Lord shall have them in derision." What will those that oppose the will and decrees of God accomplish? Nothing. Truly, the Lord will laugh at them, or is probably even laughing at them now. Those insignificant pieces of clay and dust trying desperately, without success, to bring about that which God says will never come to pass. The only lasting peace that will ever come to pass is that which we shall inherit through Christ alone. ' "The Lord shall have them in derision !'; Probably ten, fifteen, or twenty years after temporary peace has fin-. ally been declared after this war, another such or even greater bloody conflict shall turn that "peaceful" world into turmoil and unrest. At that time the thoughts of all sane thinking people shall go back to that promise of lasting pea.ce made by our mountebanks of lasting peace. If Fate shall have done them the injustice of allowing them to see the next war, then shall they be put into derision to their faces by the people of this world. Their remaining short lives shall be made uncomfortable and oppressive by scorning sneers and mocking-laughter. Their philosophy and ideals shall be laughed at more than was WiL son and his program of a lasting peaceful world. The pages of history. are staring them in the face. The Lord shall have them in derision! R:Grunze

Have you ever felt like giving up because all, according to you, had gone wrong; because your attempts had come to naught; and because of failure you thought that you were a failure? Or since your dreams and wishes had been washed onto the rocks you felt that you were getting the wrong end of the deal? If these despondent and disheartening thoughts have entered your mind-then beware! Satan has many cunning, secretive, and cruel methods of trying to dethrone Christ, our Savior and King of everlasting hopes, from our hearts, thus attempting th.e destruction of God's kingdom here upon earth. Those of us who have taken it upon ourselves to make the spread of the Gospel our sole profession are some of the main targets for Satan's work. It is at our hearts that

13


he aims his missiles of despondence. Satan is the fifth columnist within the kingdom of God here upon the decrepit earth. ' When a pastor or teacher, in attempting, with the Word of God, to check the sin and corruption that bas entered his congregation or school. becomes lax in his attempts to check these evils, because all of his earnest and heartfelt endeavors seem to be of no avail, then is he leaving a gap wide open for Satan and his cohorts to wreak destruction. The disheartening was part of Satan's preliminary pla.ns before he would enter in and take possession. Thus we see what a great responsibility lies in our hands. It may be that in the hour of despondency we forget God's uplifting promise, "It (His Word) shall not return

unto me void, but it shall accomplish that which I please, and it shall prosper in the thing whereto I sent it." If we become disheartened, which leads to despondency, it is no one else's fault but our own. Do not forget that we are working for God,and our Lord will then work with us. In fact, it is not we ourselves that bring about the change of a person's heart to the better, but the Word of God; and since it is the Word of God,it is God Himself who brings about these changes and nothing more. All of the world's social philosophies can be tossed onto the rubbish heap. God can surely do it if it is His will, "for with God nothing is impossible." He says, "It shall accomplish that which I please"-that which He pleases do not forget that. ~e also says, "My thoughts. are not your thoughts, neither are my ways your ways." There, fore let us not, when trying to accomplish that which we please, and fail, try to comprehend or reason out why God will seemingly not aid us; but let us all continue working diligently, trusting and relying in God, who shall accomplish that which He pleases. We must continue to strive and labor whileit is day, never giving up hope, for "the night cometh, when no man can work." Do not give up and become despondent and thus become lax and sleepy in our attempts and then suddenly awaken when the night is swiftly o'ertaking you. Now is the time to work. Now is the time to fight Satan and his hellish cohorts with the Word of God,for there may never be a tomorrow for you. While we are young and have stamina and energy enough, our whole heart should be placed in this work. The Arabians, in spite of their infidelity, had some sound advice once in a while. One of these is, "The MovingFinger writes; and having writ, moves on: nor all

14


~Jj~~~~~ thy Piety nor Wit shall lure it back-." In other words, "Time and Tide wait for no man." If we slumber and sleep now, which is caused by despondency, letting the evils in the world pass before our very eyes, carrying not an iota of correcting them because things had not formerly gone the way we had planned and wished then our conscience should prick and hammer us into' submission to that will of God. Granting the assumption that we would awaken later on in life to our immense folly, then we would begin to realize that we had not done our God-given duty. Then also we would begin to feel sorry and wish that we could live those days once again, which we had so ignorantly neglected, and that which we had failed to do. But that would be too late, for the moving finger of life having writ moves on and all our wishes cannot make that finger return to rewrite what we should have done in the pages of history. So now is the time to work and accomplish that will of God, to show to this sinful world the grace and love of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Then also there are those of us whose wishes and dreams have not "panned out" as we had hoped they would. Deep in our hearts we feel slighted by God. We say to ourselves that we prayed to God in faith to bring those things to pass, still nothing has happened-God has refused to answer our prayers and therefore refuses to listen to us. Such is the logic used by the despondent mind. But, does He refuse to listen to us? Does He overlook our pleas? Oh no, He does not. His thoughts are not our thoughts. God's thoughts are holy, undefiled, and just. He continually does for His children that which He knows will be beneficial for our soul's salvation. Just consider the great love of God, Approximately six thousand years ago man "double-crossed" God. Man refused to be thankful for the love God had shown him. So, what happened to man? He was cast from the presence of God and doomed to Hell-his just punishment. Up to this point all is humanly comprehendable, To man it is just when a person, who has been shown great love and has received abundance from another, and turns about and slaps his benefactor in the face, is shunned and considered an outcast in the eyes of him whom he rejected. Man will justify the act of the latter. The only possible means of gaining recognition with him again and probably forgiveness is by doing something that will appease his wrath. But not so with God. He realized the plight of

15


~1j~~~~~ those He so lovingly created. His great love for us led Him to plan a way for us to obtain salvation. But in the plan we were notito play any part, for He realized we would make a dreadful mess of the entire plan. For hadn't we blundered even when sin was not in this world? So how could we possibly appease His wrath against sin by our own method, when we now live in a world wallowing in the mire of sin and filthy corruption? Therefore He made it simple for us to earn that which .we do not in the least deserve. He took his Son, His own beloved Son, and placed-Him, into this beclouded world as, a sacrifice so as to appease His wrath. And this Christ did, suffering the greatest pain and torment upon the cross on Calvary. All we have to do now is have faith in the atoning death of Christ Jesus, our Savior, as the only means of our being able to merit salvation. How simple! Since it was God's love that prompted Him to bring about this greatest of all sacrifices, we receive forgiveness through the grace of God. In other words, "By grace are ye saved through faith, and that not of yourselves, it is the gift of God, not of works, lest any man should boast." Now let us summarize all this: God put our forefather, Adam, into Paradise. He was kind, loving and just to Adam. Yet Adam made a turnabout and slapped His master and loving creator in the face. God's righteous judgment condemned him to damnation, for "The soul that sinneth, it shall' die." But God loved Adam so that He set a plan for him to follow in 'order to obtain salvation. This plan arranged for a sacrifice-the first and last of its type in history. Here, I must make mention, .that we were- just as guilty as Adam when he slapped God in the face for, "In .Adam all die." Can anyone anywhere show to me so great a love as this? No, for this love was never paralleled in past history nor ever shall be. Christ Himself says, "Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his for his friends."

life

What. reasons, therefore, have we to be despondent when our earthly wishes are not granted? You know the answer just 8$ well as 1 do. Our paramount and greatest - wish should be to inherit th.e blessed salvation God has so mercifully given us through Christ. This wish of ours will be granted without doubt; Wie should not let the troubles of this sin-sick world trouble us; for as the author of Hebrews writes, "For here have we no continuing city, but we seek one to come." And that one to come is

16


the blissful city of heaven. Just think .of the blessed, peaceful and happy life we shall live in our future city. Words and human reason cannot even begin to imagine and comprehend the ecstacy we shall partake of with a11 the others, who having died in the Lord, are in everlasting peace. What's the use of fretting over miseries here on earth? We must bear our crosses. Moses wrote, "The days of our years are three score years and ten; and if by reason of strength they be fourscore years, yet is their strength, labor and sorrow; for it is soon cut off, and we flyaway." What are seventy to eighty or even more years of sorrow and trouble here upon earth compared with the eternity of happiness and joy we shall live in heaven? Paul writes Roman 8, 18, "For I reckon that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us." Out of our hearts and from our lips should not come words of despondence and remorse, but words of thankfulness and praise to God for all that He has so mercifully done for us;

D.-M. E.

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lR~I~~~~~ JE _::_J

1!l. .m. 1L. etC. .me~~enger The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published quarterly dur-ing the school year bY'tl:!e students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is seventy-five cents, per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stannps not aocepted. We requesd payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time 'Of subscrtption lias expired, unless we are notified to discontlnue and all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressed to Business Manager : all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furrrlshed on request, Cont.ributnons to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends. The aim of "The Messenger" is to offer such matertaj as will be beneficial as well as interestang to our readers, to keep the alumni in a closer contact with the eoHege, to foster school spirit, and to give the 'students an opportunity in the practice of compost, taon land the expr-ession of their thoughts. Entered as second class matter at Post Office of New UIm, Minn.

Volume XXXIII

No. III April 1943

THE MESSENGER STAFF Editor --------------Business ManagerAssistant Business Manager Typist.L; Alumni Notes-------Exchange College Notes Co-ed NotesLocala.L.L; Sports; - - -Humor--- --

Richard Grunze Edward Kionka Wilbert Luehring Lillian Quandt Margaret Lau .:. Ione Huebner Gunhild Hartwig Betty Tabbert Gerhard Mueller Myron Hilger

-----------------------

18

__Leslie Kehl


A

ALUMNI NOTES Dear Alumni, Just as spring brings to us fresh and budding flowers and trees, so also I bring you fresh and "budding" news concerning the alumni. We've never had anything about the WAACS before, so maybe now would be a good time to begin. Auxiliary Erna Kuehl ('37) has been promoted to Auxiliary first class in the WAACS. She is on duty with the 107th WAAJCPost Headquarters Company at Fort Mason, California. These last few weeks have been real ones for visiting. There is always somebody here, and we're getting used to the old names again. February 26th Ann Brukardt (ex '43) and Ruth Struss ('42) were -here for a basketball game. March 6th was the real day for visitors. Those who visited school or were in New VIm that day were Ralph Muenkel (,41), now teaching in Sparta, Wisconsin; Vernon Gerlach (,42) in West Salem, Wisconsin; Corporal James Albrecht (ex '43) from Camp White, Oregon; Kenneth Born (ex '44), teaching in Corvuso, Minnesota; Pri-

19


vate William Fuhrmann, (ex '44) from Camp Barkeley, Texas; Betty Schweppe ('42) teaching in St. Paul, Minnesota; Myrtle Pagenkopf ('38), teaching in Mankato, Minnesota t Helen Brei (ex '43), teaching near Gibbon, Minnesota; Margie Scharf (ex '43), teaching in Sanborn, Minnesota, and First Lieutenant Horner Schweppe. March 13th was another day for visitors. Second Lieu, tenant Harold Burow (,42), Ensign Carl Nolting (H. S. '39) from Pensacola, Florida, and Paul Nolting ('42) of Northwestern College were here on that day. As far as I know now, there are two of last year's students serving abroad. They are Private First Class Eckhardt Gauger and Corporal Ivan Raddatz. Their addresses are: Pfc. Eckhardt Gauger c/o Postmaster A. P. O. 3660 New York, N. Y. Cpl. Ivan Raddatz Asn. 37284500 842 Signal Service Co. A. P. O. 502 c/o Postmaster San Francisco, California Arnold Wehausen (H. H. '40) is now in the army too. His address is as follows: Arnold P. Wehausen 37551537 60 A. 100th Recon. Bn. 20th Arm'd Dv. Camp Robinson, Kentucky March 13th Leonard Berth (ex '44) left for the navy. That means another gone from the II Normalite class. Others that have left us recently are Alfred Kempf, now at home in Marathon, Wisconsin, and Lorraine Kracht, now attending the Door-Kewaunee County Normal in Algoma, Wisconsin. There were two couples' married last summer already, who have not been mentioned here before. In May of last year Margaret Carlovsky and Adair Moldenhauer '39 were married. Mr. Moldenhauer is teaching in North Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, which where the couple is now making their horne., v,

is

On June 20th Adele Nommensen '36 was married to the Rev. Lorman Peterson at Columbus, Wisconsin. They now live in Illinois. 20


December 27, 1942',Norman Sauer (H. S. '35) and Nora Blake were married in New VIm by Professor Edwin Sauer, father of the groom. Charlotte Sauer ('42) and Doris Sauer ('35) were the organists; and Naomi Sauer ('39) was one of the bridesmaids. The two are now living in Naper, Nebraska, where the Rev. Norman Sauer was installed as pastor. We have also received word of three babies born last summer and fall. A baby boy named Philip was born to Mr. and Mrs. Carl Graupner on November 28, 1942. The baby's mother was Gertrude Boock, who graduated in 19,33from the Normal Department. AI~ three are living in Burlington, Wiscon. sin. A baby boy named David was born to Mr. and Mrs. Norbert Boock on July 22nd. Mr. Boock is a graduate of our High School Department. Their home is in Minneapolis. Another boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Schulz on JUly 2nd. His name is Bertram Walther and his mother was Gertrude Walther ('38). They are living in Saginaw, Michigan. Another group of alumni will flow from this funnel of learning here on the hill; I hope it will offer more material for this column. Meanwhile, may the joy that comes. with Easter make your hearts as glad as spring. Your Alumni Editor

21


EXCHANGE OUR PAROCHIAL SCHOOL TEACHERS

There is existent in the minds of many today a condescending and fault-finding attitude towards our parochial school teachers. Obviouslythis attitude is detrimen, tal to the work of saving souls, and is, in the final analysis, downright sinful. Furthermore this attitude reveals an ignorance or, at best, an uncharitable appreciation of conditions prevalent in the education and work of a parochial school teacher. Perhaps a few remarks concerning conditions prevailing at our Dr. Martin Luther College will shed light on this matter. A large percentage of students entering the college department are public high school graduates. These students usually have had no instruction in Christian knowledge besides confirmation instruction, which in many cases is pitifully little. They usually have had little or no musical instruction. In many cases the "elective method" has deprived them of adequate instruction in history, English, and the sciences. On this weak foundation Dr. Martin Luther College must begin to work. In three years it must inculcate in the minds of these students a Christian "Weltanschaung" and a liberal supply of Christian knowledge, must supply them with a reservoir of general secular knowledge on which to base their teaching, must teach them pedagogy so that they can transmit their knowledge, land must make them church organists and choir masters. Indeed a formidable task, is it not? It will be conceded that the accomplishment of this task is, in many cases, impeded by the fact that every student has not.the various innate abilities necessary for the successful completion of these mental and technical aims. Especially in studying music must the soul be bountifully blessed by God. A person devoid of any innate musical ability will find it exceedingly difficult to achieve suceess as an organist or choir master. Is it not tactless or even malicious to insist that every New Ulm graduate be a Bach concert artist and a master choir director? Is it not uncharitable to expect a New Ulm graduate to be a human oracle capable of answering all ques22


tions pertaining. to God or man-after a mere three years of college training? "But why don't our teachers continue to study and practice organ after thy're out of college?" A word about the parochial school teaching profession will reveal a logical reason. A parochial school teacher is a comparatively busy man. He is usually janitor, the or. ganist for double Sunday services, festive and funeral services, the director of various musical organizations, the assistant to. the pastor, a Sunday school teacher, organizer and supervisor of youth entertainment, a member of odd committees, bus driver and general delivery man, athletic supervisor, and, incidentally, he may be the teacher of anywhere from one to nine grades. For his p:ains he receives a monthly pittance, the magnitude of which embarrasses him and should his congregation. Throughout the year he feels that he is not wanted but merely tolerated. In June he is congratulated on the prospect of his leaving his school work and earning "big money" during the summer vacation. All this, you will agree, is conducive to producing "whole men"-good, solid, learned school teachers. In spite. of all this, however, there are successful parochial school teachers. A teacher may be successful if he plays as an offertory soma soothing selection in soft stops with the tremolo. He may be successful if he produce a good choir or if the congregation thinks it is a good choir, which is the same thing. A good "mixer" may be a successful teacher. But seldom is a teacher successful because he is a good teacher. Remarkable, isn't it? But easily explained. How can our congregation recognize a good teacher? They seldom visit the school. They're ignorant of the equipment the school possesses and should possess. Some don't even know their teachers and may be in doubt whether they have any. The pastor and congregation are both usually ignorant of fundamental pedagogy and of those qualities that make for a good teacher. How in all the world can they determine whether the teachers are gOod or poor? All this ignorance culminates in the sad fact that we have no fair criterion by which to judge our school teachers. Our teachers are being judged and condemned on the basis of variable external qualifications and fickle public opinion. -I offer no panacea for these ills but would like to, suggest a few possible remedies. An ideal solution for many ills would be a single course of study for both pas23


tors and teachers. However, this ideal is impossible for the present. Nevertheless, it is the duty of the pastor, who receives a more extensive education and is the head of the congregation, to acquaint himself with the philosophy of Christian education, the problems confronting the teacher, the equipment necessary in the schoolroom, and general method. A pastor conversant with these matters would be a beneficial assistant to the will of God that the teacher labor without the constant intelligent assistance of the pastor. I am told a congregation can also be suitably educated through a Parent-Teacher agency. Imagine -a good teacher, an intelligent and sympathetic pastor, and an educated congregation-would not Satan be tempted to despair? It is my opinion that the congregation should attempt to furnish at least part time 'organists and possibly choir directors, especially in congregations having only one or two teachers. A congregation should make every effort to remove the extra teaching activities of its teachers. A teacher must have time to devote himself to thework for which he is called. It is a poor and destructive policy to overburden our young teachers. They need time for private study, meditation, and prayer. If, however, musical and other talent is unavailable in the congregation, our congregation must feel duty-bound to give our teachers a salary that will enable them to continue study during the summer months, and by so improving themselves, become more valuable to the congregation and also banish unjust criticism; Any congregation that calls a teacher for nine months and considers that it is saving money is sowing the seeds of destruction for its own school. In order that our normal school may produce good teachers our congregation must furnish it with intelligent young boys and girls. If our congregation would make the parochial school teaching profession a bit more attractive, perhaps we could get more and better students. Whereas it is true that 'man cannot live on bread alone' it is also true that man cannot live without it. How oftan is the matter of encouraging prospective students discussed at our delegate conferences? Is not the future of our church just as important as the retirement of our present debt? Before the new hymnal how many pastors included our parochial school and teachers in the general prayers? How many pastors preach a school sermon? Is one Sunday a year sufficient for. this all important matter? Gentlemen, these ,things merit prayerful considera-

24


~~~~~~======== tion, and God grant that we become aware of them before it is too late! Reproduction of this editorial taken from the January issue of the "Black and Red" will enable all students as well as alumni and friends to ponder upon the subject discussed above. It is of special interest to know that its author, Paul Nolting, graduated from our normal department and therefore the references to our institution are based upon personal observation, experjence, and conclusion. Five essential characteristics of a truly higher Christian education have been gleaned from the "Alma Mater" of March 10th. 1. "Intellectual and spiritual integrity Both spiritual and intellectual obscurantism have no place in a truly Christian system. Unfortunately there are evidences of both in many Christian schools, both professional and lay. We must be aware of the theologian who is contemptuous and ignorant of the sciences and the humanities. We must eliminate the humanist and the scientist whose religion is a thin veneer acquired for the purpose of getting and holding a job. 2. Thorough indoctrination This has always been emphasized, but unfortunately usually in complete isolation from the remainder of the Christian life. 3. Worship This is the great channel through which life and warmth can enter the process of Christian education. It needs far greater emphasis at all Christian schools. When all is said and done the life of the redeemed soul is alternating in its character. There is the downward movement from God to the believer through Christ and the Means of Grace ; and there is the upward movement of the redeemed soul through the art and practice of worship. The character of true worship is always grateful oblation. Its final question is not, "What have I gained?" but "What have I given?" The' application of this principle to our educational system is clear. 4. A deep respect for the dignity and value of the individual human soul. In terms of practical campus life this means intimate personal contact between instructor and student, between those' who are nearer the Church Triumphant,

25


illuminated by its far light, and those who are still in the rear ranks of the Church Militant. No truly Ohristian school can live very long without this personal touch of hands that have been worn beautiful in the service of the King. 5.

Functional religion It is superficial thinking to believe that an empha, sis on the practice of religion invariably leads to a corresponding de-emphasis of doctrine. The former is the inevitable result of the latter, provided that the latter is done well. Too often our trouble has been that we have not dared to insist on results. This is, of course, a very difficult and baffling task. How else can we explain, for example, the prevalence of cheating on many Christian campuses?" To quote something of a lighter vein I present: "Attention First Aiders" First Alders, if you see me lying On the ground and may be dying Let IDlYblood run bright and free, Don't attempt to baadag., me. While there's life, there's hope, so Don't attempt a tourniquet, Do not give for my salvation Artificial respiration! Do not stretch my bones and joints Do not press my pressure points. If queer symptoms you should see, Don't experiment on me. If I'm suffering from shock, Take a walk around the block. If you must he busy, prayHelp to keep the crowds away. So whatever my condition Phone at once for a physician. Let me lie-I'll take a chance Waiting for an ambulance. From First-Aid I beg release! So please, let me die in peace. "The Springfielder"

2'6


C;vLLEGE:

Things have been happening up here on. the hil!';iSince November 24th, four lyceum program's and twO:piano recitals have been given in our auditorium. " ,Ii The evening 01 N~vember of 24th brought to ..Us two especially interesting entertainers, Hugh and Zelta Davis. This man and his wife described and showed to us by, movies their experiences in South America. The Davises brought a large collection of live snakes. Everyone received a most cordial invitation for an introduction to the snakes, and, believe it or not, most of those who accepted were girls. The pet orangutang also brought many a laugh from the audience. The novelty trio was to. be our entertainment for J anuary 20th, but it was unable to be present. A high school teacher and his wife were substituted: now that sounds very dry and uninteresting, Just wait-they really held our attention. The gentleman was an expert rope thrower, and his wife was often the subject of some of his more dangerous acts. Not qnly was he a rope thrower, but he and his wife were acrobats and roller skate artists. Many a mouth fell open during some, of the very spectacular performances, The accompanist was an accomplished pianist. Some of his solo works included "Bells" by Liszt and the even more popular "Maleguania." ~very one enjoyed these acts, something truly novel. February 18th brought J. A. Zell and his furs. This man certainly knew his business. With many little stories concerning his trade, he presented a very educational program. He showed us .many types of furs, and told us of all the various animals from which they were taken. The 27


furs must have seemed particularly inviting to Professor Sauer, for he asked whether the audience might come up and touch the various pelts. Prof. Emil D. Backer 'presented Miss Ruth Engelha.rdt of Elgin, North Dakota, in a piano recital on Sunday, February 2,8th at 8 :00 P. M. PROGRAM I

Piano:

Two-part Invention in B flat Major J. S. Bach Three-part Invention in B Minor J. S. Bach Sonata in A Major W. Mozart a) Theme and Variations b) Menuetto c) Allegro (Turkish March) Chorus: 0 Blessed Word M. Hauptmann He Stooped to Bless E. Morgetson II Fantasy Pieces R. Schumann 1) At Evening 2) Whims 3) Why 4) Dream Visions 5) End of Song Waltz in C sharp Minor F. Chopin Waltz in G flat Major -' F. Chopin Chorus: Bow Down Thine Ear Fatyeff-Tkach III Piano: An American Dance C. Burg Liebestraum No. 2 F. Liszt Hungarian Rhapsody NO.4 F. Liszt Miss Engelhardt is a II Normalite. We certainly are proud of our Ruth. She pleased us all, and her excellent ma.stery of technicalities proved her ability. Every one enjoyed her manner of rendition; a great deal of feeling was shown in the work. ' The college choir assisted Miss Engelhardt. On March 18th, Scheetz and Companypresented a marvelous and lavish entertainment of magic, illusions, and, mystery. It all sounds very interesting and it certainly was, for Mr. Scheetz with his constant talking really did' 'pull some tricks' on the spectators. He fooled all of us and even more so some of the students who were called' up on the s~age. His last trick has put many of us into a.

Piano:

29


haze, even the professors cannot figure that one out. Mr. Scheetz was completely blindfolded and blinded, but yet - he could tell us very distinctly what we in the audience held out to him. It certainly makes us wonder!

Miss Gertrude Stoekli was presented by the faculty in a piano recital on Sunday, March 21, at 8:00 P. M. PROGRAM I

Etudes Symphoniques R. Schumann Theme Andante Var. L Un poco piu vivo Var. 2 Marcato il canto vivace Var. 3 Marcato sforzando Var. 4 Scherzando Var. 5 Agitate Var. 6 Allegro molto Var. 7 Sempre marcato Presto possible Var. 8 Con energia Var. 9 Con espressione Finale Allegro brillante Choir: Derr Herr ist rneinHirte, Psalm 23 __ G. Schreck II

Ballads in G Minor, Op. 24 G. Schreck Nocturne in D flat Major, Op. 27, No, 2 F. Chopin Etude, Octave Study, Op. 25, No. 10 F. Chopin Choir: The Heavens in Splendor, Majestic and Fair B. Edwards III

The Blue Danube, Concert Arabesque __ Strauss-SchulzEvler Concert Etude in D flat Major ~;_:-F. Liszt Hungarian Rhapsody No. 10 F. Liszt Miss Stoekli, '42, a member of the piano faculty has successfully rendered her third recital here at Dr. Martin Luther College. .The first group of pieces was especially interesting. The many variations were expertly played. The other numbers were rendered very well. The Strauss and the last Liszt number were especially well liked. Eiver,yone enjoyed her work, as was indicated by the applause. " ." '. Miss Stoekliwas assisted by the CollegeConcert Choir. This appearance was the first of the season for the choir. The spring concert by the Concert Choir and the College Chorus is the coming event of interest. It will be given on Sunday, April 11th. 30


Mice can really be very help, ful. For instance, one little mouse has been making the round of the various girls' dormitories and has gathered a $_reat deal of information regarding those little secrets that can flourish only in a girls' dormitory. This partie ular mouse ran about the campus, especially the girls' residences. You'd be surprised at the things he heard! Some of the girls screamed at poor little Mickey, and other cruel girls tried to take his life by gathering courage to set a trap-or corner him with a broom handle. But Mickey escaped and told me a lot of things-those things you want to know when you express a desire to be a mouse. Here are some of those deep mysteries-revealed at last to thos-e who enjoy obscure b~t interesting tidbits.

5

~::;;:;r=t=:L!::"

Apparently some girls belong to the New VIm Junior Chamber of Commerce. They're trying to advertise the possibilities of Denkmal Park as another Sun Valley Resort. Rather cool, wasn't it, girls? Are there really ghosts at Hillcrest? The girls have their own opinion. When a report one night stated that ghosts did prowl about, the girls got a few ideas of their own. Who were they to permit such an opportunity to pass by? They saw to it. that ghosts had great opportuni, ty to work after 10:30 P. M. The sound of footsteps on the stairs interrupted the prank. By the way, "Little" Petzke, what were you doing in the closet? So Helen didn't have the measles after all! Whatever the rash was, we're happy it didn't appear two weeks earlier. Isn't that right, Helen? The girls basketball tournament has ended, proving that the III Normals had "the" team. Of course they admit that there aren't a great number of girls in their _ class to compose a team, but let's give them three big cheers for having the initiative to get a team together. That alone deserves a victory. At a certain hall the girls have a great interest in domestic affairs. Some have taken up the art of knitting, while others are more adept with a needle. What use can

31


they possibly have for the buffet sets and tablecloths they're making? Every man has his own opinion! While some g irls practice domestic science along sewing lines, others practice the culinary art. They have avowed success with every thing from jello to glazed carrots. Perhaps woe'can begin a course in that subject. "Eek !"-Don't jump. It's just the sound another girl is making at finding that green snake (imitation) in her bed. It seems to be making the rounds at Bode Hall, but it still has the same effect every time it's found. W,e wonder if Gena really enjoyed the cracker jack the magician .gave her the other evening? At least we can agree on one thing: she certainly earned the treat. Here's a vote of thanks to Aunt Clementine's niece, Annabella. We'll all agree that she did an excellent job in her former authorship of this column. The annual post-Christmas change of tables brought a noticeable decrease in tne volume of noise in the girls' dining-hall. If the girls become as acquainted with their

new table-mates as they were before the change took place, the volume should be increased shortly. It's really amazing to watch the girls select their gowns for Special. From all appearances we can judge that the girls are definitely shorter than in previous years. There was one exception: "Benny" actually got a gown that was too short! Many of our students have been teaching these past few weeks, and with the return. of each of them comesanother story to be added to the annals of interesting incidents that occur to the PE.D:AGOGUES of D. M. L, C. G. H. also brought one back from Arlington. She tells of the first morning of school when one little boy peeked around the schoolroom door and gave his report to his fellow classmates, who were outside. In a disgusted tone of voicehe said, "They're girls again !" . Bode Hall went into mourning over the departure of Wiggleinda and Joe. It may have been the severe Minnesota weather that took its toll 'Oftheir lives. By way 'Of explanation, these are goldfish owned by two Bode Hall residents. They have been replaced by two more finny creatures. We must keep our Minnesota, "lakes" well stocked!

32


I~l

============================================================================

-=-'

Those walls at the Annex must he very frisky. Why, one of them hit G. K~in the face! It could he that she held a grudge against the' wall and hit it instead. At any rate, she got the worst of the accident. The famous D. M. L. C. "Diktat" is something unheard of to a oertain newcomer. When some girls were discussing the coming dictation this girl asked, "What is Diktat? Is it a free day?" E. Z. greeted the last year of her "teens" with a gala celebration, to which were invited many of the I Normalites. All report the party was truly a success-even to the "dormitory-cooked" meal. G. A. G. believes in "justice." She practices this policy on Saturday, nights and Sunday afternoons. "Are you a Maloney or a Murphy?" was the frequently asked question at Eunice Bode's "Wearin' 0' the Green" party. It was given March 14th for the I Normal class. By the way H. G. and J. G., what did you do with the soap? Laughter reigned supreme at the party. Silence prevailed, however, while the lunch was served. A happy and blessed Easter to everyone. May your prayers for peace ease your troubled hearts of the heavy burdens of a war-torn world. May the peace of God dwell in all of us, and may His bountiful blessings make bright the sky that is darkened by the world's sinful clouds.

33


What a fright some of us had when two "Iroquois Indians" made their debut on our campus. What a hair-do! Chuck's ears still look like they're frozen without that fuzz to cover them. How do lights stay on in the dormitory after the current is shut off? Prof, Sauer found the solution and confiscated a few extension cords. "AI" Nolting tested the hardness of ice at the skating rink with his head. Those skates were quickly packed away as soon as the aching cranium allowed thought. Some of the boys seem to be obliging and helpful to our janitor. Halls are swept; the gym floor is scrubbed, and windows are washed. Or was that enforced "penance?" Women seem to be taking over many of the positions men formerly held. Now that .'Al" Kempf has left, Emily Becker is flourishing that bass drum stick. Every school year manages to report at least one opera ... tion in the student body. This time D. Oswege is the hero of appendectomy. With gas rationing and tire saving, I can't see why so many people still get that run-down feeling.

34


Meta did a wonderful job taking care of the hothead epidemic with temperatures reaching 1040. From reports isolation in the sick rooms is more pleasure than misfortune. The sunervised study room had a catastrophe. A chemistry testwas being written by the Senior class. A. Horst was anxiously scanning the sheet for a question to answer when .suddenly, due to a collapse of his seat, he found himself sitting on the floor with hilarity at his expense. "Ba's" favorite expression: "Now, that was done SO well; I'll have to hear it again." With the departure of Leonard Berth and "AI" Kempf the II and III Normal boys are just a triumvirate. . Biology must be interesting: a new student, a hairy animal of the "man's best friend" type, voluntarily comes to the class. Prof. Palmbach after class: "I thought there was something there." Elmer says that sulphuric acid is "purty pow-a-ful stuff!" After it has gone to work on his towel a few seconds, he didnt have enough left to wipe his hands on. Did someone notice that glistening red hair tint again lately? It seems Alma Mater can't be resisted. D. M. L. C. saw its share of the Armed Forces and former students with the visits of "Jim" Albrecht, "Kenny" Born, "Harry" Burow, "Ray" Fluegge, W. Fuhrmann, V. Gerlach, "Bill" Kuether, Ralph Muenkel, "Fritz" Nieno, (whew!-let me catch my breath) and the Nolting brothers, The Juniors seemed to have enjoyed the supper to which they were invited by W. Ring. Ask "Joe" Goede what he did there that evening and watch his embarrassmerit. Prof. Sauer was given at least six different and interesting tales of the ghastly suffering and treatment that Ernst Winkler received in a German prison camp. Each boy added his bit after checking in at the office.

35


SPORTS "Out for the duration" is a term that needs no explanation by the reader. A list of the things that are out for the duration is long and varied, but paging through the list you would find college basketball at D. M. L. C. for the 42-43 season. You may wonder why college basketball at D. M. L. C. succumbed for the duration when the government is attempting to establish a nationwide physical-fitness program. First, Uncle' Sam said that there would be no more gas for pleasure which meant no long trips for the basketball team, for the Cadillac doesn't run on air. Secondly, the college department has been depleted 'of boys who are capable of playing the type of ball required of the college squad. Three members of last year's team have either joined the army or graduated. It was for these reasons that Coach Voecks eliminated the college varsity and substituted a high school team. With. a high school team, Coach Vcecks was able to arrange a. schedule with high schools in the vicinity of New Ulm. An induction center was opened on the Hilltop in early Novembeir with thirty enlistees answering the call to-the colors. The enlistees went through their basic training under the supervision of "Staff Sergeant" Voecks and "First Sergeant" "Erv" Walz. Upon completion of the basic training, "Sergt." Voecks divided his recruits into two companies. The boys were soon supposed to. show their colors. On December Ist, Hanska attempted to storm the "Hilltop Citadel" but was repulsel. Luther scor, ed 46 direct 路hits against 12 for Hanska. "Sergt." Voecks was not content to remain on the defensive and according, ly led his "Commandos" to Gibbon on December 4th. The Luther men gained the objective 38 to 26. The Hilltop forces were besieged on December 8th by the Trinity forces. The Hilltop line held and the Trinity men were forced to withdraw on the short end of the score 30 to 27. Facing a lull in .hostilities because of the Christmas furlough, "Sergt." Voecks arranged for a sham battle 36


with veterans of the Hilltop Fortress who had wandered into strange lands since their departure from the D. M. L. C. ranks. It seems the veterans were a bit unprepared for the 'Onslaught of the Luther Division and bowed in defeat 41 to 28. With the Christmas furlough out of the way, "Sergt." Voecks led his "Leathernecks" to Hanska where they proceeded to sack the town 57 to 25. January ~9th found the strong New VIm force attempting to dent the Luther line. The New Ulm force did succeed in forcing the defenders to retreat 31 to 23. The Bethany force of Mankato thought the opportune moment had arrived for them and tried an invasion, but found the Luther force very much in a fighting mood and fled for home scoring 22 direct hits to our forces' 2'9. Rumors were afloat that a fifth column group was active in the Nicollet area. A .cornpany was .immedi:~.tely dispatched to the area but found no "fifth columnists." They did succeed in attacking and scattering an en~iny force. "They reported that they scored 31 direct hits to 24 for Nicollet. January 28th the following communique was filed by the Luther men. St. Marys of Sleepy Eye attempted an invasion but was repulsed after a brief skirmish 2'4 to 17. "Sergt." Voecks led his "minutemen" on the 'Offensive on February 6th to Mankato where they again gained the .'Objective and defeated the-foe 38 to 24. This was 'followed on February Ll th-by an expedition to sf. .Marys of Sleepy Eye from which our forces emerged the victor 28 to 18, " The Luther forces swooped into the valley to besiege the New VIm H. S. fortress. Our forces charged at the command to attack and apparently held the edge in the fight, when at last, a last-minute hit by a member of the New VIm force prevented the Luther men from gaining their objective. The Luther men were forced to bow 29 to 28. Although they were suffering from the sting -of defeat, the, warriors went to Fairmont, where a strong force awaited them. The Hilltoppers were forced to flee for home bringing back the sad news of a 53 to 36 defeat, They had no sooner returned home when the vanquished Gibbon force returned to avenge an earlier defeat. The Luther force was in no mood for trifling after suffering two defeats and sent the Gibbonites scurrying for their barracks on the short end of a 42 to 36 score. 38


March 3rd was the time "Sergt." Voecks chose to attack the opposing Trinity force in the valley. With accurate shooting, our division returned with the report of a 40 to 28 victory. They were soon called to duty when the Nicollet "Raiders" attempted a surprise attack on March 9th. The "Raiders" received the surprise and ned pell mell for the nearest haven. Voecks "Commandos" reported 50 direct hits to 27 for the "Raiders." The home guard's wall was dented on only three occasions out of sixteen attempts by the opponent. For the success of the Luther Division we honor the following: "Fritz" Kiekhaefer, "Andy" Devine, D. Engel, "Arry" Vallesky, "Romie' Valle sky, N. Koch, G. Bauer, and "Milt" Spaude. Dec. 1-Luther Dec. 4-Luther Dec. 18-Luther Dec. 12-Luther Jan. ll-Luther Jan. 19~Luther Jan. 23-Luther Jan. 26-Luther Jan. 28-Luther Feb. 6-Luther Feb. ll-Luther Feb. 16-Luther Feb. 19-Luther Feb. 26-Luther Mlar. 3-Luther Mar. 9-Luther

Season's Record Hanska 46; Gibbon 38; Trinity 30; Alumni 41; Hanska 57; 23; New Ulm Bethany 29; 31; Nicollet 24; St. Mary's 38; Bethany 28; St. Mary's 28; New VIm 36; Fairmont 42; Gibbon 40;. Trinity 50; Nicollet 581

Bauer Vallesky, R. Kiiekhaefer Vallesky, A. Devine Engel Koch Spaude

12 26 27 28 25 31 22 24 17 24 18 29 53 36 28 27

here there here here there here here there here there there there' there here there here

427

Individual .,

Total

Scoring

113 103 ~__ 102 78 63 34' 14 5 512'

39


Not to be forgotten is the "B" company under "First Sergt." Walz. The "B" company compiled the record of seven victories against six defeats. -. They don't receive a great deal of attention and are given the preliminary game; but everyone who saw them play will admit that they provided plenty of thrills and excitement. The following comprise the "B" team: Rengstorf, Birkholz, Serwe, Weichmann, Sitz, Hellmann, Holt, Langnickel, Frey, Spaude, and Dietz. While Luther's "First Army" was battling against the adversary, the home camps force had to be content with intersectional skirmishes. When the fun and noise were over, the twelfth grade was perched on the top of the heap a slight margin ahead of the I Normals. The class basketball tournament was completed on March 27th with a bang. The morning of March 27th found the campus decorated with posters, paper streamers and what have you. The evening of the battle found the gym attired in bright colors and decorations including the cheering sections. The decorations were not the only things that gave added zest to the 路tournament. We were privileged to have the services of Elmer "Rollie Johnson" Unlig as commentator. A loud speaker system was installed for the occasion, Elmer did not only provide us with side lights on the game, but provided a few Fred Allen jokes to keep the. crowd in a jovial mood. The double bill feature presented the I Normal "All Starts" against the tenth grade "Globe Trotters" in the opening event. The game began with fury and pro, mised to be the game of the year until the "All Starts" showed signs of weakening from their strenuous training program. They fell behind and never did succeed in picking themselves up. The tenth grade was triumphantly proclaimed the win, ner by a score of 48 to 28. The championship game found the eleventh grade pitted against the twelfth grade. It was really a case of the first team against the first team. The twelfth grade had four members from the first team and the eleventh grade had three members from the first team. The game had a hurricane beginning but it soon became apparent that the twelfth grade had the edge. The end of the game found the twelfth grade, the class champions of '43. by a score of 48 to 24. The shrieks, yells and general racket that were heard throughout the year on Monday and Friday afternoons

40


may have aroused fear in the heart of the timid individual, but quiet your fears. D. M. L. C. has not started a concentration camp nor have they started a WAAC camp, it was merely the co-eds of D. M. L. C. doing their part in Uncle Sam's physical-fitness program. After a winter of basketball and volley ball, a class tournament was held. The oddity of the event is that an aggregation under the title of "Miscellaneous" ran off with the title and left the class teams in the lurch. Your motorman has been approached on various occasions regarding the ability of the weds to play basketball. I had promised to answer the question in this answer but after blowing a whistle for them all winter, I will refrain from making any remarks pro or con. With the completion of the class tournament, the basketball jerseys have been mothballed for another season. Spring is here and with spring a young man's fancy, among other things, turns to baseball. We are sorry to say that conference baseball is out at D. M. L. C. for the duration. There is no cause for gloom, however, because there will be baseball at D. M. L. C. Details are not available at this writing but everyone will have an opportunity to vent his wrath on the "ump" and the opposition. How about giving Coach Voecks a' solid backing? Conference or no conference, baseball is still the same grand 'old game.

..

41


HUMOR Hi! My collegefellows: I hear that everyone up here enjoys jokes, and I believe it-after what the weatherman just did. But to get back to jokes, look into your mirror; if that doesn't suffice, you can try these, Prof. Klatt: Who was Ann Boleyn? Student: Ann Boleyn was a flatiron. Prof. Klatt: Here, here, what do you mean by that? Student: Well, it says here in the history book, "Henry, having disposed of Catherine, pressed his suit with Ann Boleyn." A young man walked boldly up to an elderly women whom he had mistaken for the matron of a girls' dorm. "May I see Miss Larson, please?" he asked, "Could I ask who you are?" was the reply. "Certainly, I'm her brother." "Well! Well! I'm glad to meet you; I'm her mother." Prof. How old.would a person be who was born in 18901 A man, or a woman. W. P. A. Executive: "If we don't find a way to spend that 120 million dollars, we lose our joQ~. Secretary: How about a bridge over the Mississippi River-e-leng thwise ?

The professor who comes in late is rare: in fact, he is in a class by himself. Even his best friends wouldn't tell him, so he flunked. Elmer: How do you get down off an elephant? Joe: I don't know. How? Eilmer: You don't. You get it off a duck. Customer: "Is the manager in?' Druggist: "No, he stepped out for lunch ?" Customer: "Will he be in after lunch?" Druggist: "No, that's what he went out after." Musical Daffynitions: Notes-to you. 42


Treble-What bad boys get into. Minor-yours. _. Duet-"or maybe we'd better not." Cello-six delicious flavors. Alto-gether. Bass-very handy in baseball. Trill-of a lifetime. Bow-,a date. Clef-what people fall off. Staff-and nonsense. If this column leaves you feeling worse than usual, I must remind you of rationing-save those old shoes! P. S. If you can spare a shoe, don't throw it at your regular joke editor.

After you have finished with your laughter, I'd like' to let you know that we wish to thank Miss Goehring for her hilarious substitution. Also here are a few more jokes sent to us by our joke editor: "Don" Meier sat perfectly relaxed in German class, his feet stretched into the aisle, and his jaws were vainly trying to masticate a certain forbidden material. The professor rebuked him with a sharp command, "Take that gum out of your mouth and put your feet in." D. Jordon: I dread the day when my appendix will have to be removed. H. Fuhrmann : Yes? Why? D. Jordon : Well, I've never had them removed. Those who go to college and never get out are called professors.

43


NEW ULM STEAM LAUNDRY Otto F. Oswald & Sons

Phone No.5 For Your Dry Cleaning, Laundry or Hat Work We assure you 'P'rompt and efficient service and invite you to visi,t our modern up-to-date plant at 107-109 ISO.Minn. St.

High Quality

FIl.M DEVELOPING AND PRINTING 25c per roll FOUNTAIN PENS and SCHOOL SUPPLIES Have Your Prescriptions Filled Here Lowest Prices to Students Phones 1003 - 1004

~~

HENLE DRUGS REXALL DRUG STORE New DIm, Minnesota

DOUBLE

SECURITY!

This bank offers you Banking Safeguards,

Convenience

and Helpful Service

CITIZENS STATE BANK Member Federal Deposit! Insurance Ocrperatlon

New DIm, Minnesota


-High Quality

Low Pmee

J. C. PENNEY

CO.

Corner Minn. and 2nd North St. Budget your income and Stretoh it far Play cash at Penney's where Bargains are

Phone

For Printing and Supplies

370

KEMSKE PAPER CO. Portable

Safes

'I'ypewrttens

Mimeo'graph Stencils and Ink Filing Equipment and Office Supplies

Towels

and Toilet

Paper Desks

NE;W ULM DAIRY THE HOME OF Pure Dairy Products

j)~. 4~ Phone 104

Try LEADWAY or DEL HAVEN FOODS Distrtbuted

by

NE;W ULM GROCERY CO. Wholesale Grocers Complete,Line of Footwear for

COLLEGE STUDENTS at popular prices Ball.Band Rubbers and Overshoes Betty Barrett Shoes for Women

WICHERSKI , i

SHOE STORE

NEW ULM Phone 246


A. C. OCHS BRICK & TILE COMPANY Executive Office and Plant Springfield, Minn.

General Sales Office

906 Foshay Tower Minneapolis

MANUFACTURE

Artistic Face Brick' Various Colors

-

Also -

and complete line of

STRUCTURAL

BUILDING TILE AND. COMMON BRICK ,

WHY IT WILL

PAY YOU TO BUILD . WITH FACE BRICK Face brick offers the widest choice of color tones, both in IIll1.isticblends and even shades. Colors and textures burned in becoming lovelier with age. A Face Brick Home offers you less upkeep over a }Hlriod of years. Lessened heating cost and greater comfort in whtiter and summer. Greater resale value. Easily financed because loan oormpanies prefer the known merfts of Face Brick houses.

Our Products Are Sold in the New DIm Territory by

NEW ULM BRICK & TILE YARDS


SCHUCK'S TAILORS TAILORED TO MEASURE SUITS AND OVERCOATS Cleaning and Pressing All Kinds of Repairing No Deposits-No C. O. D.!s 215 N. Minn. St. Phone 498

ROBERT FESENMAIER,

INC.

HARDWARE NEW ULM, MINN. COMPLIMENTS OF

T. O. STREISSGUTH When in Need of Electrical Supplies and Radios or Service call on

ULRICH ELECTRIC COMPANY Electric Service at Its Best-Buy with Service Phone 148

HE,NRY GOEDE STUDIO We Make PHOTOS of Merit Most reliable Studio in Southern Minnesota. A trial will convince.

Floris Shoe Store X-RAY SHOE FITTING Hand Bags Tel. 449

Hosiery 124 No. Minnesota

Students' Clothing and Sport Wear

RUMMEL BROS. 14 N o. ~linnesota St.

New Ulm, Minn.


INHOF.ER - RAUSCH BAKERY

• D-LISHUS

PRODUCTS

• Phone 232 The Home of

HART SCHAFFNER & MARX SmTS AND OVERCOATS O'DONNELL SHOES-STETSON HATS Complete line of Men's and Boys' Clothes and Furnishings

FRED

MEINE

CLOTHING

CO.

BANK WITH

FARMERS

& MERCHANTS

STATE

BANK

New Ulm, Minnesota

Friendly Helpful Service at Your Command

Residence Phone 150

Office Phone 260

Dr. F. H. Dubbe, F. A. C. S. NEW ULM,

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON _ ; . MINNESOTA


SOMSEN, DEMPSE,Y and SOMSEN Henry N. Somsen W. H. Dempsey Henry N. Somsen, Jr.

ATTORNEYS AT LAW

New mm,

Minnesota

COMPLIMENTS of the

REl'ZLAFiF MOTOR COMPANY New Ulm's Dodge-Plymouth Distributor for 29 years

MUESING Drug Store EXPERT PRESCRIPTION SERVICE

ARTCRAFT PHOTO SERVICE We Have It!

Will Get It!

Or It Isn't Made!

Phones 52 - 341 The Studentzs Shop ECONOl\n,C'AL

Where Old Friends, Mee't SATISFACTORY CHEERFUL

IDE,AL BEAUTY SHOP Alyce Gieseke Otto - Laura Gieseke, Owners, and Operators Above Brey's Grocery Telephone 530


E. G. LANG, ,D. D. S. Office Above State Bank of New DIm Res. Phone 1172

Office Phone 472

CHAS. F. JANNI HARNESS DEALER Kwik-Pak Parcel Post Laundry Cases, Trunks, Traveling Bags, Suit Cases, Purses and Other Leather Specialties

PALACE LUNCH H. A. Bergfneler, Pl'OP. New DIm's Most Popular Lunch Room Sandwiches~Ice-CreaIlli--Candy-Soft Drtnks=-Cigarettes

115 N. Minn. St.

Phone 668

New VIm, Minn.

Service and Satisfaction at the

MODEL BARBER SHOP ALFRED H. KUESTER, Prop.

We Turn a House Into a Home

BUENGER FURNITURE

CO.

Stores: New VIm and Sleepy Eye, Minn.

Distinctive

Funeral

Service


1942

OUR GOLDEN JUBILEE The progressive record of any concern proves its dependability. The Henry Simons Lumber Company has in, creased its circle of friends and customers continually for the past fifty years. Its progressive record of accomplishment, dependable information, right price, and a promise never broken if within their control-proves their dependability.'

HENRY

SIMONS LUMBER CO. DEPENDABLE

Phone 201

New VIm, Minn.

PINKS STORE Caral King, Jr. Dresses

Air-Step Shoes

Munsing and Barbason Loungerie Swansdown Coats and Suits Friendly Sales People to Help You

WILLIAM J. VON BANK, D. D. S. F. I. C. D. DENTIST Office Phone 237

Residence Phone New VIm, Minn.

797

DRS. HAMMERMEISTER & SAFFERT Physicians and Surgeons OfficeOver State Bank of New VIm


WHEN IN NEED OF FOOTWEAR Be Sure and Call on Us We carry a complete Iine of men's, ladies' and children's shoes We appreciate your busdness, Our prices are always, the lowest, QuaHty considered.

ATHLETIC

SHOES

OUR SPECIALTY

Shoes Fitted Free by X.Ray

P. J. EICHTE.N SHOE STORE New Ulm, Minnes()ta

MEYER TIllE LEADING

PHOTOGRAPHER

Special Prices to Students We have a complete line of frames 8xlO in metal or wood.

from

PHONE 165-L

miniatures

to

NEW UL~I. MINN.

T. R. Fritsche, M. D., F. A. C. S. Fritsche

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat GLASSES FITTED Bldg. New VIm, Minn.

NEW ULM GREENHOUSES FLOWERS FOR EVERY OCCASION We are prepared to fill orders for flowers at all points through the Flodsts

'I'elegraphic Delivery Assoclation.

Phone 45

NEoW VLM, MINNESOTA


AID ASSOCIATION FOR LUTHERANS Legal Reserve Life Insurance Exclusively For Synodical Conference Lutherans APPLETON, WISCONSIN THE LEADER IN ITS FIELID!

For Smart, Practical and Inexpensive

COLLEGE STYLES J. A.

OCHS

The Bee Hive -

& SON

New Ulm

"Where Quality is Not Expensive"

DEER BRAND BEER

AUGUST SCHELL BREWING COMPANY NEW ULM, MINNESOTA


---------------------------

-

See

CRONE BROS. CO. For Young Men's Clothing and Furnishings Geo. D. Erickson

John W. Graff

ERICKSON & GRAFF Attorneys at Law New Illm, Minnesota

Our Best Attention

Everything

of a banking nature entrusted to our care receives our best attention. We shall be glad to have a share of your 'business.

STATE BANK OF NEW DIM }Iember Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

DANIEL

WEBSTER FLOUR

• SOLD ANn GUARANTEED BY LEADING DEALERS EVERYWHERE

EAGLE ROLLER MILL CO. NEW ULM, MINNESOTA


UNION

HOSPITAL

NEW VLM, MINN. A modern, well-equipped, and fireproof hospital supervised by and staffed with registered nurses,

PHONE

No. 404

Brewers and Bottlers Since 1864 T,elep'hone No.1

New VIm, Minnesota

Reconstruction, Installation Additions, Blowers Chimes, Ha;:r<ps

Modernizing, Maintaining, Tuning, Repairs, Service, Sales

Wicks Pipe Organs

ERNEST 4Oi)路409North Broadway

C. VOGELPOHL Nelf Ulm, Minn.


EIIBNER QUALITY

PRODUCTS

BAKERY GOODS-ICE CREAM~CANDIES Whenever you think of an Eibner Product you associate it immediately with Quality. After all Quality Goods Taste Better and are Better. We assume the responsibility of giving you the best SERVICE-QUALITY-VALUE,

EIBNER BAKERY

& SON

and ICE CREAM

Phone 128

~stablished 1883 THE FASTIDIOUS STUDENT will find satisfactory

service at

Grundmeyer's Barber-Beauty Shop Air Conditioned Below Tauscheck

& Green',s Cothing 'Store

Phone 710

SALET'S DEPARTMENT STORE-NEW

ULM, MINN.

EVERYTHING TO WEAR FOR HIM OR HER WEAR SALET'S FAMOUS FOOTWEAR

Highest Quality and of Course "YOU ALWAYS SAVE AT SALET'S"

QUALITY

CLOTHING

Correct Fitting and Standard Lines

TAUSCHECK & GREEN


(

If you want to be admired, praised, and

'_'VHHH~;HU':;U

excellent judgment in style and comfort, select your "Easter Shoes" at

LINDEMANN'S

SHOE STORE

"The Students' Shop"

E,UGENE KOEHLER OLD RELIABLE

BARBER

SHOP

Good Satisfactory Work Guaranteed at all Times Your Patronagn is Appreciated

Subscribers

-- Attention!

When You Change Your Address Be Sure to Notify the Business Manager The Messenger Is Never Forwarded By Your Local Postmaster


SHAKE CLEANERS and DYERS Phone 756

510 1st No. St.

20% Discount Cash and Carry Eyes 'rested

Lens-as Ground

Glasaes Fitted

and Duplicated

DRS. SCHLEUDER Optometrists and Opticians \\~~ MINNESOTA

NEW ULM.

H. J. BAUMANN INSURANCE AGENCY Insurance

Bonds

Hospitalization

Phone 666

• STUD-ENTS! ,

PATRONIZE YOUR MESSENGER ADVERTISERS


UNITED STATES

WAR SA\1INGS ,

BONDS *


Buy Where You See This Sign

A 500 Store Buying Power

"YOU BUY BETTER -BECAUSEWE BUY BETTERII F. H. R,ErTZLAFF HARDW ARE CO. Over 50 Years of Service

Champion Shoe Shop For the Best Repairing in Town

Courteous Servi~

517 Genter St.

Royal Maid Ice Cream Store "Make Our Store Your Headquarters"

OLSON BROS. DRUGS Phone 88

WE:ILANDT &... STEGEMAN Contractors and Builders Correspondence Solicited Work Done in Any Section of the Community Plans and Speeifiloo:tions Furnished Estimates Cheerfully Given Office 1100 Center St. Phone 571

Auto Glass Replaced to Order


Delicious Home Made Sausages

City Meat Marl{_et Hugo M. Schnobrich-Oscar A. Schnobrich Proprietors New UIm, Minnesota

Quicker Service


_,


D. M. L. C. MESSENGER VOLUME XXXIII NUMBER IV JUNE,1943


,,

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---_- ---

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Except the Lord build the house, they labour in vain that build it: except the Lord keep the city, the watclumm waketh but in vain. . Psalm 127:1

CONTENTS

CLASS OF 1943 CLASS HISTORY Class Will

...

---.----7 . 10

._..

Class Prophecy

._..

In the World of Sports 0, Spirit, Soar

..

.

13

----

15 17

High School Graduating Class Senior Class History .... POETS' CORNER LITERARY A Famine In the Land

18 20 22 ....

EDITORIAL Man or Mouse

24

._.

31

Are We Here for, the Looks of Things

32

Some May Prefer the City, But-._. ALUMNI NOTES ._.. EXCHANGE

33 37 38

COLLEGE NOTES CO-ED NOTES

40 44

LO路CALS

46

0

SPOR~S HUMOR _.

._.. .

._. ...._._._

. .

48 50


CLASS OF 1943

CLASS MOTrO Go ye therefore,

and teach all nations. Matt.28:19

.CLASS COLORS Red and White CLASS FLOWER American Beauty Rose CLASS OFFICERS President

Richard Poetter

Vice President

Ervin Walz

Secretary~Treasurer

Helen Sweeney

"

it


AICE KONE,TCHY La Crosse, Wisc.

-.

Our Alice's only weakness is mice. Phi Delta Sigma, 4; Concert Choir, 4; Messenger Staff, 1; Aeolian Chorus, 3; Girls' Athletic Board; Matron, Bode Hall.

She's sugar and spice and everything nice.

ANITA KUTZ Qak-field, wise,

Simple and sweet, kind and true, 'Nita is goodness thru and thru.

MARTIN LEITZKE Mayville Wisc. Marlut Singers, 1.

Leitzke is our newest scout, Who, it seems, can get about.


GLADYS LINDLOFF ElktO'n, S. D. Phi Delta Sigma, 4; Concert Choir, 1; Band, 4; Aeolian Chorus, 4; directress.

Our "Sleepy-Town Gal" is Gladys, she Takes life in stride SO'dreamily.

RICHARD

POETTER

F'ond du Lac, Wisc. Phi Gamma Rho, 3; Basketball, 2; Music Hall Inspector; Concert Choir, 3; Marlut S'ingers, 1; Messenger Staff, 3, editor: Class president.

outwaro-esober, quiet too: Inward-ripping!

Just like you.

CORINTHA REIER Waupaca, Wisc. Phi Gamma RhO',3; Concert Choir, 1; Band, 1; Aeolian Chorus, 1.

Corintha with her "I don't know," Will once regret her bitter woe.


VIOLET STEGHMANN New

Ulm, Minn.

Phi Gamma Rho, 4; Concert Choir, 3.

Sauerkraut arid weiners spell The reason for our Violet's "gel?"

Phi Delta Sigma, 4; Concert Choir, 4; Messenger Staff, 3; Aeolian Chorus, 3; Girls' Athletic Board, President; Matron, Bod(r HaU; Class secretary-treasurer.

Thoughful of others, a lovable creature, I'd like her for my grade school teacher. ;

mRVIN w:ALz Java, S. Dak. Basketball, 1; Assistant Basketball Coach, 1; Concert Choir, .3; Marlut Singers, 1; Class Vice President; President of S:tudent Body. Our Walz is on the witty side And comes from open spaces wide. Phi Delta Sigma, 3; Baseball, 3;


WE ARE NINE Thru the halls of D.M.L.C., Thru the campus round about, There went many, ever many To make up our merry number, To complete our happy class. These are now but past traditions Which have reached their terminations; Days must have their expirations, And today-we 'are but nine. When a year ago we gathered Rippling laughter filled the air, Never thinking, never -dreaming That our worlds should be disrupted, That our lives should be disjointed, Tha t each one should go his own way Forth enroute to. distant shores~ Some into the Master's Vineyard, .Some to fight in bloody wars, Each to carry forth-a memory, Each to leave behind-just nine. Should you ask me, whence this dreaming, Whence this sadly reminiscing Of those days now gone forever, Of those days of joy sublime'Tis because our graduation, Our commencement now is nigh, With its joys and sweet, sad heartaches, With its pleasures and its griefs. As we proudly take our token-sLifted head and shiny eyedLo! Again they all are with us

Sharing now this glorious day, All onestrong, great unity. See! In spirit we are many, Tho in body-only nine. Helen Sweeney

6


CLASS HISTORY On Sept. 2, 1936, an ambitious and intelligent-looking group of twenty-fivestudents met in Prosessor Levorson's room, where we received our first schedules. Those twenty-five members were Pearl Anderson, Arthur Aufderheide, Hildegard Bade, Ralph Baur, Elmer Bode, Helen Brei, Gerald Carpenter, Raymond Fluegge, Eckhart Gauger, Herbert Grams, Robert Kolb, Maynard Koosmann, Wendall Kurth, Marlin Mentz, Roland Meyer, Carl Mischke,William Muesing,Jr., Frederic Nitz, Reinholdt Nolte, Leo Preuss, Edgar Priezz, Lucille Retzlaff, Ruth Schroeder, Violet Stechmann, and Arnold Wehausen. At our class election we chose Mischkeas our president, A. Aufderheide, vice president and Lucille Retzlaff as secretary. Professor Leverson promised us a free period any day on which M. Mentz would come to English class on time, but this never happened, so we lost that free period. This first year was devoted to studying and getting acquainted with all the new people and things; so no picnic or party was held. As the school doors opened on Sept. 8, 1937,we found that Pearl Anderson, Hildegard Bade, Gerald Carpenter, Maynard Koosmann, Frederic Nitz and Ruth Schroeder left our ranks. In their places we welcomed Rudolph Haak, Herbert Kuske, Margie Scharf and Edwin Kuesel. All class'officersof the foregoingyear were reelected and no picnic or party was given this year either. We left in June haying passed a rather quiet and uneventful year. Each new school year brought new faces, and Sept. 7, 1938brought these two new members to our class: Gladys Lindloff and Edward Weiss. Rudolph Haak decided to remain at home this year. Our new class president was Raymond Fluegge, the other officers remaining the same. It's quite evident that during these years we weren't very socially minded as this year brought no form of class activity either. Our classes were made quite interesting through the efforts of the town boys. Looking at a bruised finger, we often wondered who placed that mouse trap in our desk. Then too, the suspense of wondering when they'd lift the cover off that box with the live snake in it kept you awake.' Each day brought something different which continued until June. On,Sept. 6,1939, we met as the senior class at D.M.L.C. 7


The only one to leave our ranks was Edwin Kuesel, The new members were four girls: Alice Konetchy, Renata Priesz, Helen Sweeney, and Helene Webert. We held our first class party in the band room on Oct. 10, with Professor Voecks acting as our chaperon. . Oil March 9! our senior boys carried off the championship in the class basketball tournament. On June 7, we marched down the aisle and received our diplomas. Those experienced members who returned in Sept. 1940, as I Normals were Elmer Bode, Helen Brei, Raymond Fluegge, Eckart Gauger, Herbert Grams! Alice . Konetchy, Gladys Lindloff, Renata Priesz, Lucille Retzlaff, Margie Scharf, Violet Stechman, Helen SWeeney! Helene Webert, and Arnold Wehausen. The new members were James Albrecht, Donald Becker, Alton Duebner, Charlotte Froehlke, Margaret Gurgel, Doris Luehmann, Loretta Lutz, Harry McFarland, Richard Poetter, Margaret Puttin, Ivan Raddatz, Corintha Reier, William Ristow, Rhoda Schroeder, Emma Tiefel, Ervin Walz, and Isabelle Weber. Wm. Ristow left our ranks in early October. He's now a corporal in the army in California. It didn't take us long to get acquainted and to begin our social season, for on Oct. 18, Ivan invited our entire class and路Professor Janke to his home at Clements for the day. We all had so much fun-s-especially on that scavenger hunt. One memorable event of this year was that Armistice snowstorm. It was during this year that the name "Annex Hall" became the official name for the dormitory quarters .in the Service building. The Annex Hall girls invited our class to a party in the band room on Feb. 20. Professor Naumann was our chaperon on this occasion. That swishing noise heard on May 14, was only the sound of OUrlong gowns as we girls whisked to the formal dinner party given by Lucille Retzlaff. Our class again won. the class championship in basketball on March 14. on Sept. 3, 1941, we assembled without Doris Luehmann" Alton Duebner, Renata Priesz, and Helen Webert. Arnold Wehausen decided to teach this year instead of being taught. New members were Ann and Grace Brukardt, Anita Kutz, and Robert Temple. This year bur social activities began with a weiner roast which was sponsored by the four town girls. On Nov. 7, our class surprised Raymond Fluegge, called to teach at West Salem, Wis., with a farewell party. This party was given by the Bode Hall and "Dorm" girls. 8


Jan. 30, marked the day of our Valentine party and another farewell party, this time for Harry McFarland, the first of our class to leave for the armed service. Professor Backer was the winner of "Crossing the Delaware." Later on in spring the boys entertained the girls at a 6:00 a.m. class breakfast at the lake. The boys prepared all the food, and those scrambled eggs tasted mighty good to those of us who closed our eyes while they were being scrambled. At this time plans were made for a class reunion to be held in 1950. Then we all have our own pleasant memories of the choir tour in which many of our class had the opportunity to participate. Soon after Easter it was noted that the I.Q. of the

pupils in practise school had jumped up 100%. This was the result of placing II Normals there for practise teaching. Feb. 5, marked the day on which Harry McFarland left our group. We all "saw him off" at the bus station. All in all, we all enjoyed this year very much. On Sept. 22, 1942,only ten members of this once large class returned. Those who left us to teach were Donald Becker, Helen Brei, Ann Brukardt, Raymond Fluegge, Charlotte Froehlke, Loretta Lutz, Margaret Gurgel, Margaret Puttin, Margie Scharf, Rhoda Schroeder, Isabelle Weber, and Emma Tiefel. Those in the army are James Albrecht, Oregon; Eckart Gauger, North Africa; Herbert Grams, Georgia; Ivan Raddatz, South Pacific; Robert Temple, Alaska. One member, Elmer Bode, joined the navy, and another member, Lucille Retzlaff, decided to "center aisle it" during the summer! Our new members were Louise Martins and Martin Leitzke. Shortly after school started we had a hamburger fry with Miss G. Stoekli as our chaperon. Louis Martins left our ranks after the Christmas holidays thus reducing us to exactly nine members. All of us had the experience of doing some teaching some place or other. For those who taught at Arlington, the name "Elmer" brings back many memories. For this class, Arbor Day was quite a snap compared with that of other years. On May 8, we were the guests at a picnic given by the II Normals. All of us had a good time, especially when the good food was passed around for the second time. We'll all agree that they were perfect hosts and hostesses. Professor Naumann was our chaperon. 9


Our class was considered lucky in many things; for instance, everyone of us got at recitation in every class. During the year some of us also found out that we "missed our calling"-we should have been lawyers (Prof. Bl.). We also had the same experiences, for just as we were running to look up a' word in the dictionary,. we slipped, fell, and sprained our ankles (Prof, Bl.) Result: that

word wasn't looked up. When we leave on June 11, we'll all be thinking of that future day in 1950, when we'll all meet again, Until then, may our work in the church be successful! CLASS WILL We, the class of '43, with all due regard to the incessant progression of Father Time, have assembled once more within the portals of Dr. Martin Luther College with the momentous decision to bestow upon our brothers and sisters the fecundity of gifts, talents, and character traits with which we have been so plentifully en-' dowed. Out of our joyfully ebullient natures we hereby bequeath our most prized possessions. With never a thought of prestidigitation or procrastination, but with a spirit of liaison for the future evolutionary improvement of D.M.L.C.,we legally impress the following upon our erudite successors and heirs. But, stop, let us not sacrifice thought to verbosity. We, as a class, bequeath our continual arguments and pugilistic encounters over practice periods on organ "A" to some future faculty meetings. (Perhaps an organ "A" for each future III Normalite would be satisfactory.) I, Alice Konetchy, do hereby bequeath mv patience, acquired waiting for H. Sweeney. to Lois Wegner. She can make use of it to keep up with that hustling R. Wilch. I also leave to "Putz" Engelhardt mv "good" fortune of playing for chapel the first day after every vacation. Caution: Memorize hymn. You won't be able to read the notes, 'specially if the Northwestern pulls in at 3:00 a.m.: I, Anita Kutz, will and beaueath my "musical ability," especially on the organ, to 1. Huebner and the "experienced" teacher knowledge,to which Professor Bl. always referred. to R. Smith. I, Martin Leitzke. out of necessity in a sane frame of mind, will my inferiority complex to 'Moe" Emkow, my mellifluous virtuosity at the piano to "Dick" Grunze,.my 10


unusual ideas and customs to. M. Hilger, and my interior decorating talent to. L. Kehl. I, Gladys Lindloff, do. bequeath the following humble yet sentimental possessions: my tulip bed to. L. Mack; my drag (?) with the matron to. "Cal" Bathke; my tape . and measure to. 8. Vogel; my non-matronly attitude (that's for sure) to. Valeria Thalman; my sunny disposition (?) to Belen Gross; my kitchen utensils and alarm clock to E. Zimdars; my towel rack to 1. Huebner, and my ability to. fall asleep quickly to. Professor Bl. ~ I, Richard Poetter, as meek and humble as usual and as close to. sanity as possible, do. hereby bequeath my in, dividuality to. Gerhard Mueller, my touch of insanity from Eugene O'Neill to. R. Engelhardt, my music haH inspectorship to the man with the strongest nerves, the deafest ear and the hardest heart, my spirit of cooperation to G. Hintz, and my "pipe to brain" method of study. ing tel R. Grunze. I. Corinth a Reier, at present cool, calm, and collected, will to Dorothy Mueller and Elizabeth Johannes my sin. gle bed, which formerly held two mattresses. May the best person win and rest in undisturbed slumber. I will my ability to. say "I don't know!" with a malicious look to Loretta Krenz, my duties as student matron to V. Thalmann, and my madamoselle magazines to Litana Arndt, May she profit by this type of literature. I, Violet Stechrnann, hereby solemnly will and bequeath my speed in walking up the hill and steps in three minutes every morning so as to get to. chapel on time to Mildred Rademan, the remains elf the box of "Hemo" which we shared at Arlington to Carol Gieseke, and my Reuter book of funeral music, for their ambitions as future concert organists, to Carleton Sitz and Richard Hellmann.' . I, Helen Sweeney, out of the goodness of my heart, do legally bequeath to R. Wileh my ability to 8;HOOzevociferously, to "Lil" Rome my "hustling" qualities, to Emily Becker and Eunice Hagemann the sa wed off bed and the mouse that goes with the room, and "CH" Rengstorf my ability to wring out stockings. I, Ervin Walz, temporarily of a sober attitude, will my ability to. play in chapel to R. Engelhardt, my grace in. conducting to. H. Hilger, and my basketball coaching talent to Coach Voecks. . III Normal Class College Heights Ward 9 11


CLASS PROPHECY Looking into the future is something we all like to do. And the III Normal Class of 1943 is no exception. So let's look into the future ten years, to the year 1953, and see what has become of the honorable III Normal Class of 1943. Who would believeit, but Anita has already formulated a .philosophy. She always impressed me as a person who would strike some great truth some day, After much serious, down-to-the-root thinking, extensive reading of the latest psychology texts, and consultations with the nation's educators, Miss Kutz has come to the conclusion that the trouble with all "EImers" is their primary education. The result is a book entitled, Pedagogy in the Kindergarten or An Expert's Advice. Just off the press, 'Nita's work proves interesting and profitable reading. She has successfully solved all difficulties ever met in the primary grades and all ever to be met with in the next century. It's a small wor1d after all, for I've even managed to contact a classmate from the distant Dakotas. Walz furnished the surprise of my life one weekend last year in Milwaukee.He informed me that he was on the market for a few new farm implements directly from the AllisChalmer Co. It seems he stayed in the teaching profession only one year and then decided to help defend the food. front by taking over "back home." If I've seen success personified, it was Ervin Walz. Funny!!! Of all people, he remains a bachelor. I read in the Star Journal the other evening that Miss Corintha Reier is giving an organ recital at the Twin Cities in the near future. "Corrie" just couldn't leave New Ulm in '43 and lingered for a year or two, taking a post-graduate course from Professor Backer. Her specialty on the organ: the most intricate Bach fugues obtainable. From here she returned to her home state and studied at the Conservatory of Music in Milwaukee. Today we have reasons to be proud of our Corintha. As Marion Hutchinson's successor, she takes top-ranking honors with organists of the middle west. As I reminisce, I remember the good old days when Helen and Alice were practically inseparable. Were they ever apart for even a period of twenty-four hours? I doubt it.' But college graduation changes many things. I heard recently from Alice that the two rarely see each 13


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other. In fact, the last time was three years ago when Alice made it a point to enjoy an extended visit with Helen in her new home. It was difficult for her at first to imagine Helen in military surroundings, but, when she saw how happily Helen had resigned herself to her new life, she actually envied her. You see, Helen's husband is now an instructor at West Point. Do you still remember way back in '43 when we learned that Professor Burk was to resign after fifty-nine .years of faithful service at D.M.L.C.? Oh, the anticipation that followed concerning his successor! I believe it has been no secret since that Martin Leitzke readily volunteered to fill the vacancy. After one year of study, in which Mr. Leitzke did a bit of brushing up on technicalities, he was ready to take over the long list of students who had gathered from far and wide to study under the new master. Mr. Leitzke is more in demand than any other virtuoso of whom we have knowledge. The day is coming when many eager young-musical minds will necessarily be refused. Professor Leitzke simply cannot bear the strain. Richard Poetter has just come out of hibernation with his latest book, The Sole Purpose of Woman., When we

asked him to comment on his new book, his only reply was, quote, The subject material originated from college classmates, unquote. He estimates that in the past ten years he has worn out twenty pair of trousers sliding on and off the organ bench. His motto: If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. Violet Stechmann is next on our list;路 It's quite a trip we must make to find her. You see; she is now living in the cold regions of Alaska, The prize for having done the most traveling of our class would go to her, since she has visited almost every state. in the Union. She now devotes her time to sending recipes to her friends-re. cines on home canned salmon, whale blubber as a substitute for butter, and many others too numerous to mention. When she is not thinking of new recipes, she is giving singing lessons to the Eskimos. Our vacation is over in Alaska, and since our route goes through South Dakota, we will take this opportunity to visit Gladys Lindloff. She is lecturing in the university on the subject, "How to Stay Awake in Boring Classes." This course she informs us is a four-credit course. Having earned her doctor' degree she is also

14


entitled to deliver lectures every day on the topic, "The Newest Way to Prepare Foods." We offer the comment that her classes are very well attended and asked her the secret of her. popularity. She replied, "It's due to the mental telepathy which I learned in a certain class at D.M.L.C. ten years ago." . Having had an invitation to spend some time with Alice Konetchy, we arrange our schedule as as to arrive there to finish our trip. She is actively engaged in running a pre-Kindergarten school. Great strides in this field of education have been made since Miss Konetchy has been teaching. Incidentally her pupils are the sons and daughters of some of her former classmates. Teaching doesn't keep her very busy since we note that her articles appear in various magazines. D.M.L.C. Messenger still receives quarterly articles from her. . IN THE WORLD OF SPORTS In athletics we find it necessary to speak not only of those in our class at the present but also of those who have left us for various reasons. We are proud of our accomplishments but not boastful. Let us go back and review our lives in sports. Not much has been recorded of the participation of the members of our class iIi:athletics, but there is a certain spirit which was present which could only have been created by a cooperative class. In the fall of 1938, "Billy" Muesing was a member of the football team. This was the beginning of our collegiate activities in athletics. When the basketball team appeared on the floor, whom should we see but C. Mischke, E. Priesz, Muesing, and Grams. In this eleventh grade year the class basketball team took second place in' the tournament. In the twelfth grade year, 1939, Muesing, Grams, and L. Preuss, were lettermen in football. Grams, Muesing, Mischke, and Priesz also made the basketball team varsity team this year, nobly upholding the honor of our class. This year members of the class made their appearance on the baseball team.' Those present were Gauger, Grams, Mischke, Muesing, and Priesz. Grams began to develop pitching ability. New faces were seen on the campus when the school year of 1940 and 1941 began. Football began and found some of these faces in the mud with the veterans of the class. But Muesing, Mischke, Priesz, and Preuss had left

15


us after the completion of their high school years. D. Becker was the new man of the class to take their place. Basketball this same ye',l"t brought Grams, Poetter, AIb'pe-eht~ami- Watz' out there trying to-convince the'-coach

that i~ was their ability that was needed for a: winning team, The baseball season found' Grams ana Walz sharing the mound to worry the opposing teams. The II Norm&lyea:r fouridthe 'boys'back again on the gridiron. For football fodder we had Grams, D'.Becker, and another asset in R. Temple. In basketball no)class has ever compared to this one. We had 1:11. varsttf team of Temple, Grams, Poetter, Albrecht, Walz, and-Gauger. The basketball season was successful. Templer played first base with Walz and Grams sharing the :rimuna and taking care or the shortstop' position. This was the year in which we tied Concordia for the championship. This class was a <fighting class' in- athletics: Uncle Sarrrrecogrrlzed them: as such and has-taken most of the boys for his work, causing ,tn~ school tqdrop all' college football and basketball. In baseball Walz is-the'sole representative of our class. We have been wrapped in schodlathletics and have forgotten the class arnH~flcs: Our twelfth' grade' year=started a tl1'ree-year winning streak, which was ended' in the III Normal' year by' the' selective service. Tlie gi'rls also did theft' part tli.is year: by winning' the~girl's'"l5'asketball tourrtameat;

'

May our athletic school spirit confinue' to the walls of D.M.L.C.!

16

live

within


0, SPIRIT, SOAR Crouched above the tepid consciousness of earth I ponder. My soul and spirit plead and cry, "Away from thence, But yonderUp into the realms of boundless, endless space Leap up, Soar on, Cry out" Roll, Tumble Float, Gasp huge breaths of spicy, cutting air Until the lungs are taut,

Filled with life, energy, power, freedom. Swoop upward, parting space with reckless abandon. Float on and on and on, Thoughtless, Unconscious, Obliviousto the dull, opaque farce of worldly censure. On wings of celestial thought seek out , The, hidden doubts of mankind's quaking souls, The basic concepts of beauty, art, thought, , .And there express with perfect voice and pen From spirit, free, unprejudiced, the truths 011 eternity. And bring to 9-11 mankind a pansophia of lifeLife, ' ' ' Love, Faith, Hope, Compassion, And sever with a mighty blow Hypocrisy from all the face of earth, From within the heart and soul of man, As the executioner's blade Cleaves the head from body Then man, when coming face to face with man, May cast aside his mask and be a man." Now once more, Crouched above the tepid consciousness of earth I ponder. IRGR ;17


HIGH-SCHOOL GRADUATING CLASS Class Motto: Thy way, not mine, 0 Lord! Class Colors: Blue and Gold Class Flower: Pink Carnation Carolyn Bathke, Manitowoc, Wis., Ph. Gamma Rho (1). Ruth Bentrup,- Winona, Minn., Concert Choir (1), Phi .Camma Rho (1), Girls' Athletic Assoc. (lL). Elaine Brinkman, Truman, Minn., Girls' Athletic Board (1) .

Orlan Devine, Wood Lake, Minn., Basketball (lL). Orlan Dorn, Hendricks, Minn., Band (3), Baseball (lL). Donald Engel, Amboy, Minn., Baseball (lL), Basketball (I-L), Marlut Singers (1), Concert Choir (1). Harold Fuhrmann, Milwaukee, Wis., Band (3), Marlut Singers 1, Concert Choir (1). Norma Fuhrmann, Graceville, Minn. Naomi Gerlach; St. James, Minn.,Phi Delta Sigma (1);. ;

Gerhard Hintz, Neenah, Wis., Concert Choir (1).

,

;,

Arlo Horst, Misson, S. Dakota. Philip Janke, New VIm, Minn, Concert Choir (2). Fred Kiekhaefer, Manitowoc,Wis.,Football (lL) Basketball (lL), Class, Secretary-Treasurer. ~; Karl Langnickel, Minneapolis,Minn. Howard Larson, New VIm, Minn., Football (lL), Baseball (lL), Band (3). Mavorette Lenz, Renville, Minn. Paul Lindemann, New DIm,Minn. Lois Mack, Sanborn, Minn., Band (1), Girls' Glee Club (1), Concert Choir (1), Phi Gamma Rho (1). I Donald Meier,Watertown, S. Dakota, Concert Choir i (1), Marlut "Singers (1). . !'

18


Rpb.eIft Moldenhauer, Mil.w.aJike.e,WJs., ,Marlut Singers (2), Concert Choir t2), 'Phi Delta 'S-igma (1), Band A) , Cheerleader (1). Gerhard Mueller, Neenah, Wis., 'Concert Choir 2), Maelut Singers (29, J'JY1~搂~ngt?l'''s~q.~fPl路) "C;:a,ssPresident. Bernice My.nq_~tQ<ik,.LflCr.o~e, W~S,., !Cla,ssVice President. Theodore Pape, M!!Ditowoc)W!S" Concert Choir (1), l'4iarJlut 'Singers (1). Pa,u;lPriesz, New 'PJ-m, Wl}l1' I\epp#h Sanville, Two Rivers, Wis., Band (4), M8jJ.!lut Singers (1), Phi Gamma Rho (1). EWl}C~ ;S5t'Y~r,New ",1m, ~Il~,

peUa ,$jgIJla

tJ~rls' {~'WeP!W ,(1), Phi

(1).

J'ilmer Uh!!g, Manitowoc, Wis. .. flhi Gamma Rho (1), RlIJthUl:n~Q,New JUIp!, ~., C~oopt Choir (1), Qirls' ~tQ.let~cAss.Q~.(11;,,). Aron Valleskey, M!!-pii:gw,Qc, Wi-s.,~ask,0tQa~1(IL), M;arlut Singers CO" Concert Choir (1), Phi Gamma ~ho 1).

19


SENIOR CLASS HISTORY On the sixth of September, 1939, one more crew assembled itself to begin the journey on the sea of learning. The thirty members were Conrad Althen, Ruth Bentrup, Elaine Brinkman, Orlan (Andy) Devine, Donald Engel, Harold Fuhrmann, Norma Fuhrmann, Naomi (Omi) Gerlach, 'Bernice Gieseke, William Gieseke, Gerhard Hintz, Philip Janke, Ethel Krech, John Kuehne, Howard Larson, Paul Lindemann, Lois Mack, Victor Marxhausen, Donald Meier, Duane Miller, Robert Moldenhauer, Gerhard Mueller. Patrick Murphy, Theodore Pape, Clarence Peil, Merlin Salzwedel, Kenneth Sanville, Eunice Sauer, Aron Valleskey, and Ruth Ulrich. We hoisted our "Jolly Roger" of red and white and set out. "Pat" Murphy drew the leadership lot and was made our captain; Sanville became first mate. Our motley crew manned the 'fuchs" ship and gradually became acquainted with all the ropes. That year we landed at foreign ports twice, and, as sailors do, had one grand, picnic. In June we arrived at homeport. . In September, 1940, we again set sail after signing up some new crewmembers and releasing others. The new ones were Carolyn (Cal) Bathke, Eugene Bode, Orlan (Ossie) Dorn, Fred Froehlke, Louise Kasper, Fred (Fritz) Kiekhaefer, and Lorraine Weber. Those that left us were Althen, B. Gieseke, Krech, Markhausen, Duane Miller, and Salzwedel. This year's captain was Engel. This year we were no longer amateur sailors. However, most of this year was spent drifting with the tide till we entered port. By 1941 we had a different crew again. Additions were Arlo Horst, Bernice Mundstock, Paul Priesz, Lowell Tews, Elmer Uhlig, and Thelma Kunde. Those who left were Bode, Froehhlke, H. Fuhrmann, W. Gieseke, Kasper, Kuehne, Murphy, (who left to join Uncle Sam on a ship of war) and Weber. Aron Valleskey took over the captaincy. We decided to change our flag colors and raised instead a flag with a blue field and gold stars. This trip proved to be a mutinous one and many sailors declared intentions of abandonment. The sea had its attractions for almost everyone returned to it. Only Kunde, Tews, and Peil, who went along on half of our last trip, left us. H. Fuhrmann returned and Karl (Chuck) Langnickel and Mavorette Lenz joined us.

20


Our captain this year was Gerhard Mueller. The first mate was Bernice Mundstock, our first feminine officer. Our crew had a few athletes who bagged the class basketball championship for us. We weathered a stormy and again a mutinous year. At home port once more we are full-fledged sailors. Some of us intend to be more than mere captains, and continue to the admiralty of the sea of learning. Because of the war, however, many will now discontinue sea life for the duration' or forever.

21


路;

POETS路' CORNER PSALM 127:1 1. In vain we take our pen to write Unless His voice would guide us. The word and thoughts and phrases, too, Returning would deride us.. 2. Except the Lord be by our side And guiding each endeavor, Unless He gives us strength to work And stays with us forever. 3.

"Except the Lord build us the house In vain we laborers build it." In vain, attempt each enterprise Unless our God has willed it.

4. Uselessly on coastal shores The soldier guards the city, If our Father loves us not And for us has no pity. 5. In vain His servants bring the Word To comfort souls of sinners, Unless the Holy Spirit wills To make of them the winners. 6. In vain we pray to save those souls 'Neath divers flags unfurled, If Christ had not been merciful And willed to save the world. 7. So "With Thy Help" and "If Thou Wilt" So will we ever pray, And praise Him for the wondrous things He does for us each day! Ruth Wilch

22


OF BEAUTY Is beauty but an empty word That satisfies the mind? .Nay, beauty cometh of the Lord

To seeing and to blind. Do not search it for to find, 'Tis present everywhere: The friendship that true friends doth bind'Tis sweet beyond compareEach season with its beauties rare, 'Gay moods, star-studded skies, All these are beautiful and fair To those whose souls have eyes. The man who beauty true hath found His heart with beauty doth abound. V. Thalman

OUR COUNTRY Our country is a land of liberty What other countries lack aboundeth here. Justice for all and true equality Should be preserved by all from year to year. Excelled by none though they be far or near, Our country will forever be the best. The peopleshould be filledwith joy and cheer, For our dear Lord has surely always blessed Americans far more than all the rest. G. Gutzke

23


A FAMINE IN THE LAND In the west a winged black cloud is swiftly enshrouding the land-grasshoppers. They alight, destroy and can. tinue on their flights, demolishing all the crops in relays. When this horde is well on its way into the east, nothing remains but naked trees, barren fields, and gnawed fence posts. Naught remains about us save dust, and sand . and a blistering, copper sun beating down. Thus that sun, that dust and that sand remain for an unmentionable time. What is the fatal result of this? A famine of bread and water in the land. From Satan's dark infernal abode, swiftly descending upon the earth, comes sin; leaving in its fatal wake greed, hatred, lust, and lawlessness. Naught whatever can be done to offset: and counteract these evils, for the saving gospel-of Christ Jesus is nowhere to be heard. Of what is this the result? A famine of the "hearing the words of the Lord." Just as a famine of food would be'

disastrous to the huma'n body, so also a famine of the Word of God would be disastrous to the human soul. Thus the Lord, through Amos, had prophesied, approximately three quarters of a century before this famine occurred in the land of the Israelites, in the eighth chapter of Amos verses eleven and following, "Behold, the days come, saith the Lord God, that I will send a famine in the land, not a famine of bread, nor a thirst for water, but of hearing the words of the Lord: and they shall wander from sea to sea, and from the north even to the east, they shall run to and fro to seek the word of the Lord and shall not find it. In that day shall the fair 24


virgins and young men faint fo.Qthirst-and shall never rise again." And thus, as with all other prophecies of the Lord, it came true. In 722 B.C. the northern ten tribes were taken into the Assyrian Captivity, never to return, only to intermingle with other peoples, and wander to and fro across the face of the earth, never to rise again. A curse descended upon them by the just and righteous God. What brought about this calamity? Not a whim of God which delights in the sufferings of others, but the faithlessness and corruption of the Israelites. In the foregoing verses we read that there were some which swallowed up the needy. The people said, "When will the new moon be gone, that we may sell corn? and the sabbath, that we may set forth wheat, making the ephah small and the shekel great, and falsifying the balances by deceit?" The feast of the new moon, which was a compulsory day of' rest, was another of the sacrificial days. The Jews longed for this day to pass swiftly that they might tend to their commercial businesses. Their God was not the Lord, but mammon. The foregoing also refers to the sabbath. .They would rather tend to profitable worldly interests than go to the temple. By making the ephah small and shekel great they wished to cheat in the measuring of grains and thus gain more money. Their immense interest in money was bad enough, but now they even went so far as to rob and cheat for profits. Summarizing all these evil desires of the Israelites, we see that they took an immense interest only in material gain, dropping God by the way-side, caring not an iota of their spiritual gain. As stated before, they received their due reward. Doesn't this Kingdom of Israel re~ind you of at worldrecognized powerful nation of today? Just take a look out of your back door and view the country in which we live.. Yes, the United States of America is just such a nation. If we Christians will remain silent and do noth-

ing in the spreading of the Gospelof Christ crucifiedand Him risen, we too shall be in such straits as the Israelites were placed into by God. We too shall have a "famine ill'the land, not a famine of bread, nor a thirst for water, but of hearing the words of the Lord." The entire responsibilityof the spiritual welfare of our nation, which we cannot live without, lies in our hands. If the Lord should send a famine of His Word into our land, the fault lies solely with us. Christ says Matt. 5, 13, "Ye are the salt of the earth: but if the salt have lost its sav25


- i

our, wherewith shall it be salted? it is thenceforth good for nothing, but to be cast out, and to be trodden under the foot of man." If it were not because of the -duty we Christians still have to perform, this earth would not remain 'any longer. The same refers to our country. If there were no Christians here to carryon the work of the spread of the Gospel,there would be a famine of the hearing of the Word; and this country, once blessed for our sake, would be doomed to destruction. If we, the salt, have lost our savour; that is, if we have lost our in. fluence and our country is!no longer a Christian nation, wherewith shall our country be salted? Why should He bless' our land any longer if He hasn't any more of His children here? Our country is thenceforth good for nothing, God will no longer have any use of it. Just as the discipleswere commanded by Christ to shake the dust off their feet of that city or house which refused to hear His saving Word, so God our Lord will shake the dust of our land off His feet and depart from America. Therefore America shall be cast out and trodden under the foot of men. One of the uses that God!will have of the forsaken-by-God America, will be as an historical example of what happens to those nations which absolutely desert God. History has already -shown us what happened to the Kingdom of Israel and other nations. History is staring us in the face. God has placed a great responsibility into our hands, the welfare of our nation. If we care not an iota about the evil conditions ravaging our country, you know the consequencesas wellas I do. There will be that dreadedby-all-Christians famine in the land. Pre-war America' was well on its way to Godlessness. It takes a war to bring our country out of its lethargic forgetfulness of God into the realization that there is a Supreme Being who governs the destinies of men-God. But just the realization that there is a God will never save a person. "Thou believest that there is one God: thou doest well; the devils also believe,and tremble." James 2, 19. Therefore we must preach to them the saving Gospel of Jesus Christ to bring them to faith. Paul writes Rom. 10, 17, "So then faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of God." Before this war, well over three-fifths of the people in this country admitted, and probably brazenly so, that they did not attend any church at any time whatsover. And how many were there of those that did attend a church whichprobably went merely because 2'6


it might have been fashionable to them? Sunday was no longer a day for spiritual strengthening and praise to God for most people, but a day on which. they could relax, probably to consider profitable business transactions, and hope that Sunday would soon pass by so as to get back to their places of business and gain more materially. They were saying, "When will the sabbath be gone that we may sell corn and set forth Wheat, making the ephah small and the shekel great." This brought on more crime, and crime at present is soaring to appalling heights. Why did conditions occur? Because we Christians were not tending to our business, that of spreading the Gospel.

Since we had not done our duty, and since God had to send a war, in which we are participating, to check these evil conditions and bring America to the realization of Him, it is because of us that this war is raging. Yes, we are the cause of this war-not Hitler, Mussolini,Stalin, or any other dictator. Doesn't the news of this fact make you wince? It should. I believe that this will make us realize so much more the great responsibilityresting upon our shoulders. Right now conditions make it possible for us to reach the hearts of more people with the Gospel. The government urges us Americans to forget about personal pleasures, and the straits in which we now live make the people desire comfort for their weary and sick souls. Since the Gospelis the only thing which can bring about this comfort, it is for us, through Christ, to lift this burden from their souls. Remember, the conditions of today make this possible. But do not forget that this war will not last forever, and that there will be a post-war America as well as there was a pre-war America, And how will this post-war America be concerning the spiritual life of our country if we Christians do not step in with fervor and confidence in God? The same as before this war, if not worse. Lawlessness will increase still more, for the government will no longer require us to disregard personal pleasures, and conditions will make the people again forget about God. Probably in post-war America, if we do not properly 路attend to our business, three-fourths or seven-eightsof the populacewill brazenly admit that they do not attend any church. Then conditions will become definitely worse. Do you for one moment think that God will allow these conditions to continue? 27


:~

He has given us our many chances, and probably our last chance to return to Him is in this war. The great and mighty America being scattered into the dust of nothingness! Recall what happened to the Romans. It was truly a splendid and powerful nation while there was no 路hindrance to the spread of the Gospel. Soon after the 路persecution of the Christians, and after the Christians .became -more and more lax, allowing themselves to be dragged into the vices and lusts of Rome, its power gradually deteriorated. Beginning in the early part of the 路 fifth century, God allowed the Romans to be trodden under the feet of Goths, under the leadership of Alaric. And in 476 God's final earthly, judgment descended upon the Romans when the Vandals, from Africa, sacked Rome. God only knows who our "Vandals" will probably be. Again take the German nation as an example. While the Gospel flourished there they were a splendid, powerful, and an internally peaceful German nation. But look at the chaos and disruption they wandered through up to our present time. The cause of this was the ever increasing acceptance of the devilish philosophiesof Marx, Voltaire, and others. Luther warned them against this. Therefore, we must strive with unceasing efforts, with the aid of the Almighty God, to bring our Americans to the realization of their sins, and thus have them seek after righteousness. "messed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled." Yes, and when they of America, who have desired righteousness, are filled with righteousness, then will God also fill us with his blessings. With what must we fill them to obtain righteousness? With Christ, who is the bread and the living water of life, thus evading that dreaded dire famine. Who is to fill these impoverished and needy souls? Every single Christian-the pastors and teachers as well as all other believers. But the greatest load rests upon our pastors and teachers, for they have made this spread of the Gospel their sole profession. Whenever we attempt something, we start at a beginning. And so with the preaching and teaching of God's saving Word, we must start with our youth. By that, however, I do not mean that we should ignore the adult laymen, but that an entirely greater stress than in the past must be placed oil the Christian training of our youth. For as you.bend a sapling, or a young tree, so will it grow. So also it is with our youth. If we, through the aid of God, inculcate

28

)


into their flexible minds the need and the desire for a Savior and show them this Savior, so will they grow, always realizing the need of Him and recognizing Christ Jesus as that Savior. One of the best agencies to carry out this is the Christian Day School. More of them must and should be fostered. Now, as before stated, is an opportune time to begin. I realize, however, that the need of teachers in schools already begun is very great. But cannot the pastors urge young men and women in their congregations, who have the suited intellectual ability, to adopt this glorious profession? More and more people

are beginningto realize that the philosophiesof the public schools,that is their social-bettermentphilosophiesare "all wet." They can see this through this war, and by the ever increasing crime wave amongst our youth at the present time. Reform schools and prisons can never check the evils amongst our youth, only faith in Christ will. God has many reasons for sending this war, and probably one of these is to give us an opportunity to build and strengthen our Lutheran schools. Sunday schools will never do the proper job of remedying these conditions. You all undoubtedly know the argument stating that receiving Christian training only through the Sunday school leaves us the ratio of one to five-one day (only three hours at that) of hearing God's Word to five days of absorbing Satan's beguiling philosophies. That argument probably is' old, but it need not be placed into moth balls. In fact, it is firm and concrete. This wilful deprivingour children of the opportunity of hearing God's _Word is sinful, Christ, in referring to the parable of the unjust steward, said, "For the children of this world are in their generation wiser than the children of light." Yes, in this generation the worldly educators and public school officialsare wiser than we Christians. Do the publicschoolshold sessionsonly once a week, as do some of our pastors,who are satisfied with only Sunday schools or one hour of religious training a day? They realize that in order to inculcate into the youths of our nation their trends and philosophies,they must have them with them five times a week. What children learn in Sunday schoolsis quickly overshadowedby the trends of thoughts in public schools. If we refuse to institute into our midst the Christian Day School,we then openly admit that we are a more foolishand inferior generation than the world. But, someonemay say, it is not we ourselves that can bring about a change in a person's heart, 29

I


but God alone. True enough. But in John 9, 4, Christ said, "I must work the work of him that sent me, while it is day: the night cometh when no man can work." The same holds good for us. We must work now, and bring

our youth up "in the nurture and admonitionof the Lord." This quotation is taken from Ephesians 6, 4, and when we read the entire verse, we read that this is the God-given duty of the parents. But this training of the youth is also the duty of the church. By taking hold of youth at the right time, while the sap is still running freely, when their hearts and minds are pliable, we can have them grow, through God, into upright citizens of America. However our paramount aim is to show them the only way to salvation, for good character and honest citizenship are the fruits of faith. Thus, by inculcating into our youth the knowledgeof Christ crucified and Him risen, we can do our part in preventing that famine of "hearing the words of the Lord" from infesting our country. Pastors and teachers, a load lies heavily upon your shoulders. Receive that load gladly with prayer and supplication unto God, with whom nothing is impossible, for strength, faith, and assurance to be able to carry that load. It is up to us to keep that famine of the Word of God out of our land. D.M.E.

30


EDITORIAL MANOR MOUSE? The men have gone soft! Fifty years ago a man was something to be looked up to, and respected. He was a character of convictions, of dauntless courage, and of super-man strength, always.ready to assist the damsel in distress. To him belonged responsibility, wisdom, and clear-thinking far excellingthat of any woman. Woman recognized these valuable, praiseworthy traits in man. She worshipped at his throne and never questioned his superiority. Subsequently, man was boss of his home, his job, and of the world. Then what happened? Well man became soft! He lost his convictions,his dauntless courage, his strength in right, and became the wishy-washy, spineless male ("man" is no longer a fit title for the present-day speci. men) of todav.His mind no longer craved for the higher plains of wisdom. and his once clear-thinking brain be_came bemuddled by faulty conceptions of value. As a result, woman was forced to step in. Someone had to take over the responsibility, and woman learned the art quickly. She now no longer remained the dependent, quiet, mousy creature of former days; however, this was impossiblewhen on her back she bore the burden of the world. Hers now were the convictions,the wisdom,the clear-thinking, and courage. Even strength was hers in her own womanly way; her strength was made perfect in her weakness. The Beau Brummel of fifty years ago would swim'the oceanto see his loved one.TheBeau Brummel of today assures "her" that he would do the same, then adds that he "will be over to-night if it doesn't rain." Woman does not want to take the lead, but she can't stand by and see the man make such a miserablefailure of a job. If a man is a man, he will be respected and treated as such. If he is but a backbonelessparasite, he wi11likewisebe so regarded. It seems only a pity to me that things have cometo such a pass where men can no longer hold their own. It marks

31


a clear degeneration of the male and an admirable advance in the adaptability and responsibility of the female. Men are continually bewailing the place of women in the world. Yet, if they were the men they should be, they would cease

their talking and commenceto act. Woman, once having seen the man's superiority return, would be only too glad to take 'again a back seat, and to be the sweet, demure 'maid of "ye olden times." Does it seem that I condemn all men of today? Well, I don't. To him of you who considers himself to be still a little old-fashioned;still a little musty and tarnishednot all bright; new, and shiny, I say that you might still be the old type of "he-man," You probably rule your own little world and step to your own little tune. Your type, alone, is man, not mouse.

B.S. ARE WE HERE FOR THE LOOKSOF TIDNGS? "Follow the crowd!" That isa phrase we've all heard many a time. There are a few of the human race who have been born leaders. The others follow mutely as sheep follow their shepherd. Take, for example, this fad of the girls to go out into sub-zeroweather with only ankle socks and no other protection on their legs. Or notice the boys who are often seen with no head covering and their overshoes flapping. 'Why do they do it? Just because they saw someoneelse do it and it appealed to them. They do it for the looks of things. Few people have enough initiative to take a stand of' their own on anything whatsoever.There are those who try to adjust themselves to the situation. We may say they have duo-personalities. Or could they be called hypocrites? They do not like to follow their own convictions because it may not "look" right. It just simply isn't done. Why is it that so many of our Christian young people lust after worldly things as dancing and movies? They certainly know the right and wrong. They have had their instructions and Christian influence from home life; but still we find them doing things contrary to what they have learned. Why, I repeat, do we find those conditions? First of all, forbidden fruit always tastes better. :Theother adage of grass being greener 011 the other side

32


of the fence may apply here also. Secondly, everyone does it. Why shouldn't they? If they don't, they will

be laughed at, ridiculed, and scorned. People are cowards in this respect. It hurts their pride to be looked down upon, although their stand is a correct one. They haven't enough backbone to stand on their own convictions. Still these same people, when in contact with. those who object to the worldly principles, will agree with their present company. Here, too, they can't defend themselves. They are here for the looks of things: The American people must "keep up with the Joneses." They can't bear to see anyone get ahead of them. If the neighbors have shutters put on the house, then we must have them put on both house and garage. Before long the entire block has shutters on the house. Why? It's the conventional thing to do! These so-called "yes men" are irksome. No matter what subject is being discussed, or what side you may take, they are bound to agree. You just can't disagree with them. Or is it that they can't disagree with you? The latter is probably the case. They can't disagree because they can't defend themselves. "To be or not to be. that is the question." These words Hamlet uttered-when he contemplated suicide. Now. we are not contemplating suicide; but we often find ourselves asking the same question. That is. should we be ourselves, or should we not be ourselves? Too often, I think, we are here for the looks of things. A. Kutz. SOME MAY PREFER THE CITY, BUTCrowded streetcars clang along, while cars swerve in and out. each blowing a horn at the fellow UD ahead. People dash across the intersections here and there, and tbe police officer frantically tries to maintain order. Tall. cramped buildings cast dreary shadows over soot-covered streets and sidewalks. A distant factory whistle shrieks its call to a tired, hustling group of working men and women. Car horns, shrill whistles, people's shouts. alarms, crashes. screeching auto brakes-c-all these, and much more. comprise what is termed that "wonderful" life in the city. Many disillusioned people who have never lived in a

â&#x20AC;˘

33


large city believe that such a life is ideal, and they envy those who brag about the good times to be had there.

That is not the actual case, however, because the city offers little or no enjoyment in comparisonto its prevailing disadvantages. A person who enjoys "running around town" late into the night visiting various "hangouts" and leading a shallow, boisterous life, may not agree with this; but if anyone longs-for mental peace and a quiet, normal life, he will heartily affirm the statement that conditions within a city are detrimental to such enjoyment. An outstanding disadvantage is the unfriendliness of the people. One may walk down the street. and meet fifty to one hundred persons without getting as much as it friendly glance from one of them. Instead, he is pushed around by the crowd, and in order to accomplishanything he soon acquires that same "look-out-for-yourself" attitude. In the more quiet neighborhoodsolder boys linger on street corners, bully the smaller children, and jeer at passers-by. Here and there shabby men lean against buildings and street posts, while an occasional drunkard staggers along a dark alley. Another detriment is the nerve-racking noise in the city. It is almost impossibleto have peace of mind if one lives in a business section or near a streetcar line. Besides the continual traffic din there are factory whistles, pedlar's shouts, bells, children's voices from playgrounds and innumerable disagreeable sounds that are sure to leave one with a headache and "jittery" nerves at the end of the day. The crowdedquarters in the city lend a dreary appearance, and one cannot enjoy the beauties of nature unless he goes to a distant park, which will probably be crowded with boisterouspeople. Many narrow streets are dusty and frequently lined with various kinds of dirt and rubbish. Probably one of the most derogatory characteristics of the city is its evil influence. The sinful entertainment, excessivedrinking, gambling and dancing, in night clubs and taverns, which wreck family life, and lead the younger generation astray. Of course, there are many advantages in the city, which include good employment, modern home conveniences, large libraries and museums, fine shopping dis- 34-


tricts, immediate access to fine musical and theatrical entertainment, and close help in any emergency. If one is willing to endure the previously mentioned

disadvantages, he can easily enjoy the city; but he who longs for a peaceful atmosphere and neighbors with high moral standards will readily despisethe "big city" life if he must take part in it. How quiet and appealing it is in a small town or the country, where one can enjoy the beauties of nature and have respectable neighbors who pursue their labors in an unoffending manner! The advantages of a large city are easily overshadowedby those of the rural or semi-rural life, where everyone and everything Seemsto be in a closer communionwith God. The city may be great, but the country is greater by far: L.W.

35

" â&#x20AC;˘.J

J


119. Jfl. JL. etC. Jflessenger The "D. M. L. C.' Messenger" is published quarterly during the school year by tl!e students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription pr-ice is seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. 'SJfJaJmpsnot accepted. We Irequesrt1payment in adVallce. "The Messenger" is Continued after time 'o'~ subscrtption has expired, unless we are notified, to dtseontinue and all arrears are paid. AU business communications should be addressed to Business Manager; 'all literary contrtbutions to the' Editor-i.n-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contri.but'ions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friendls., The aim Qf "The Messenger" is to offer such material as will be beneficial as well as int.erestdng to our readers" to keep the alumni in a closer contact with the college, to foster school spirit, and to give the students an opportumty in the practice of compost, tion and the expression of their thoughts. Entered

Volume

as second class matter

at Post Office or New Ulm, Minn.

xxxm

No. IV June 1943

THE MESSENGER

Editor .... . .. . . . Business Manager .__ c .. Assistant Business Manager Assistant Business Manager

.

•__•

I'ypist

Alumni Notes Exchange .__ . CollegeNotes Co-edNotes Locals , Sports Humor

STAFF

~

36

Richard Grunze Edward Kionka . Donald Zimmerman . . ._.Wilbur·Lueheing .. . Lillian Quandt Margaret Lau lone Huebner . Gunhild Hartwig Betty Tabbert Gerhard Mueller Myron Hilger Leslie Kehl


Dear Alumni: Since only a few weeks have passed since Easter, there is very little news this' time. There have been many rumors, but most of thse are not very definite yet. I am sure that next September will bring you much more. April 24 a son, Robert John, was born to Mr. and Mrs.

Erwin Ulrich. Mr. Ulrich is a High School graduate of 1933. Charlotte Ziesemer '42, now teaching in Fond du Lac, Wis., visited us the week-end of April 18. Besides visiting classes, she also visited Hillcrest Hall and brought back memories of other years. Julius Ingebritsen '40, now teaching near Milwaukee, was another visitor here the week-endof April 18. Lieutenant Herman Gurgel and Bettie Munro were married April 12 in Spokane, Washington. He is a .graduate of our High School Department. This is the final issue in which I am writing these notes. I am sure it has been a pleasure for me, and I hope it has been for you, too. May I ask that you cooperate with your next editor as you have' with me? As my farewell wish, may the work of all of you be blessed,and even through these troublous times may our Lutheran schools come out victorious! Your Alumni Editor 37


EXCHANGE With this issue comesthe final blot of news from outside sourcefor another year. Pens are beginningto lament the strains of overwork and are eagerly awaiting the last dips until a rest has been duly granted them. The April issue of the Black & Red brings with it an interesting sidelight of "Lament" in regard to which we say, "If the shoe fits, put it on." I quote: "There are cetrtain unfortunate individualsthat are invested with the dubious honor of typing out the manuscripts for the Black and Red. I flatter these students by calling these documents manuscripts. Let me take you through the typing of several of these." Your editor takes the privilege of using Mr. Xi and Mr. Y as the .names of the author's subjects. "First of all we find an article by Mr. X. He insists on writing in pencil and apparently puts one sheet on the other when he writes. This does smear it up some, but it also helps. If you can't read one page, try to decipher it by the inverted writing superimposedon the next page. (This is comparable to deciphering meters in an Aeschylean strophe by conferringthe antistrophe). We would advise a typewriter except for the fact that our friend X broke down and wrote us a typewritten letter once. Somehow or other he has the ability of transferring his ability at poor writing to the machine also. Perhaps he could hire a secretary; but not for long. You see, it is a hard enough pill for us to swallowwhen we must type one of his articles (after all the hieroglyphicshave been cleared up) to give up our political,national. athletic, musical,racial, and classicalideas to set forth his document on paper. A secretary might feel the same way and revolt. There is no hope for him .... Have you ever seen one of Mr. Y's articles? The handwriting, although far from beautiful. can be read,-at least enough of it to make decipheringof other words possible. But to find through the paper without a road map is another matter. Inserted paragraph here, omission there, crossed out words and phrases, with the substitution on the bottom (if we're lucky) of another set, four pages hence. He might try the system of arrows, but they wouldbe lost in crossing, no doubt. Perhaps if he could keep from changing any38


thing the last time he rewrites, the final draft would be fairly easy to follow.. One more thing: "We hope that the novelty of Greek wears off soon, and that he will begin to use the Latin alphabet again." We say yea and amen to the concluding paragraph which states: "We are awaiting the day of manuscripts written from bottom of page to top, and especially from left to right .... We can offer only this remedy: give every incoming Sextaner and Freshman" (in our language a fuchs) "one of the following: a course in penmanship, typewriter, or a secretary." Since we're on the subject of school periodicals perhaps you have been annoyed not a little by the presence of a bold set of initials at the bottom of an article or two in your college quarterly. Read what the March issue otthe Black and Red has to say in the article "hep, rep, mek."

Try the prescribed line of attack to appease your curiosity regarding the owner of the "puzzling pseudonyms." If at first you don't succeed, try, try again, or to quote from the article referred to "keep fighting, chins up, the truth will come out." We say aufwiedersehen to the grads of '43 by quoting from the '42 Commencementissue of The Springfielder: The Bell Song "Softly the bells were ringlng-sRinging a melody of farewell-sA sweet farewell at the close of day. While silently the sun was nestlingNestling to rest among the colored clouds. The tiny wren was warbling and trillingTrilling a song of joy at the close of day. The campus bells still ring farewellA soft farewell on this last day. Its tender tunes will linger long. Within our hearts we'll linger long. Farewell, 0 Youth-Farewell This is the parting bell. Go forth with prayers to fight. Behold Christ is your Light. And when the battle's won, When all your days are done, Within His house you'll ever dwell Farewell-O Youth-Farewell."

39


The advent of spring again brings much excitement. The interest may be spread into many channels. Concerts, a banquet, a picnic, and commencement are the main topics of discussion at the time. On the of April, the combined choirs presented

uu:

the Spring Festival Concert in our auditorium. Program I

Concert Choir: . Praise Be To Thee .._. ....H. Schuetz Come, Jesu, Come (Motet for two choirs) J. Bach Der Herr is mein Hirte . G. Schreck Cherubim Song A. Arkhanagelsky The Heavens In Splendor, Majestic and Fair ______________________________________________________ B. Edwards Organ: Meditation .. .... J. Pache J_ â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘

_

Gladys Lindloff II

Chorus: Christi Leiden ._: Wer mich liebt Altgeistliches Wiegenlied Organ: Duet .__ .

.

C. Hirsch M. Gulbins ~E.Backer J. Rheinberger

Corintha Reier III Chorus: In Thee 0 Lord .._. J. Rheinberger Y:eaSurely, He Hath Borne Our Griefs F. Reuter Organ: Violet Stechmann 40


Bown Down Thine Ear Fatyeff-Tkach Piano: Hungarian Rhapsody No. 4 .... ._~ __ . F. Liszt Ruth Engelhardt Chorus: He Stooped To Bless __ ",...._. .._.... . E. Morgetson

o Blessed Word . M. Hauptmann A Mighty Fortress . Luther Olds The annual II Normals and III Normals picnic took place on the 8th of May. If everyone could have seen the invitation, I'm sure the general idea concerning it would have been "Oh, it will be a 'bum picnic' anyway!" The III Normals, all nine of them, were there with "bells on." From all reports everyone had an enjoyable time at the beach. Prof. Naumann added life to the party, and the fashion picnic ended by marching home in military fashion to the songs of the various,branches of the service. On Saturday the 29th of May, the faculty invited the III Normals to a banquet at the National Cafe. The II Normals decorated the private room and the hall in the service building after a Maytime theme. The striking festive colors brightened both places and put all in a cheerful mood. The three organizations under student direction, namely, The Aeolian, The Marlut Singers, and the Band have presented a concert on the 4th of June at 8:00 o'clock. Program Aeolian: . .... G. Lindloff, Directress Incline Thine Ear F. H. Himmel-Piery The Lost Chord A. Sullivan-Moore One Sweetly Solemn Thought ....R. Ambrose-Spicher o Morn of Beauty â&#x20AC;˘...J. Sibelius-Matthews Can't Yo Heah Me Callin Caroline _ _____ .________________________________________ Caro Roma=-Wodsworth Sympathy ._..__ .... R. Frime-Goetze Alice Blue Gown . R. Fierney-Frey Ay Ay Ay-Creole Song G. Pitcher Angels of Mercy... Berlin James Marlut .... ._L. Kehl, Director Jesu Priceless Treasure .... J. Cruger Dearest Jesus, Draw Thou Near Me J. Schap Vater Unser . Fr. Reuter The Bells of Shandon ... G. B. Nevin Moving Along .... Brandon-Zamecnik Goin' Home (New World Symphony) A. Dvorak 41


E. Gruber The Caissons Go Rolling Along (Artillery) From the Halls of Montezuma (Marines) _ ________________________________ -~-------------------- ,_W _ m. Stickles The Army Air Corps . R. Crawford n.M.L.C. Band M. Emkow, Director (1) Kinderhook (March) ...J. J. Richards (2) American Patrol (Selection) F. W. Meacham (3) Pomp & Chivalry (Processional March) .._. _ _____________________ ".... C. J. 'Roberts (4) Marines' Hymn (Selection) ._. F. L. Buchtel (5) E Pluribus, Unum (March) ._._FerdJewell Clarinet Solo: Harold Fuhrmann Legerete Rudolph Toll (6) The Hoe Cown (Rural Medley) Paul Yoder (7) Sunrise on the Mountains (Waltz) G. E. Holmes (8) 32nd Division (March) Theo. Steinmetz (9) Olympia (Overture) G. E. Holmes (10) Chaser (Medley) : ... Paul Yoder (11) Star Spangled Banner Commencement Concert Emil D. Backer, Director College Auditorium, Thursday, June 10. 8:15 P. M. Program Concert Choir: Praise Be To Thee .... H. Schuetz Der Herr ist mein Hirte _... G. Schreck Cherubim Song A. Arkhangelsky The Heavens In Splendor, Majestic and Fair _ ...... -~-------------....-----------.._. B. Edwards Organ: Chorale Prelude: Sleepers Awake J. S. Bach Violet Stechmann Chorus: A Mighty Fortress .... ,_L _uther-Olds Altgeistliches Wiegenlied .._. E. Backer Parade of the Wooden Soldiers Characteristic Novelty) L. Jesse Piano-Organ: Rhapsody .... D. Demanest Piano: lone Huebner Organ: Carol, Gieseke Chorus: The Arkansas Traveler arr. Ch. Reppen Home On the Range ... arr. Ch. Reppen Carminna Walz Wilson Piano: Ruth Engelhardt 42


Piano: Arabesque .... Cl. Debussy Golliwog's Cakewalk .... Cl. Debussy Ruth Engelhardt Chorus: Anchors Aweigh (Navy) Ch. Zimmermann From the Halls of Montezuma (Marines) ....__ W. Stickles The Caissons Go Rolling Along (Artillery) E. Gruber Off We Go Into The Wild Blue Yonder (Army Air Corps) .... R. Crawford Piano: Gertrude Stoekli National Anthem Piano: Ruth Engelhardt Organ: Alice Konetchy Commencement Exercises 10 o'clock A.M.

Friday, June 11, 1943. Program

1. Processional 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Prof. G. Burk Come Holy Ghost... F. Reuter Corintha G. Burk Prayer and Scripture Reading Prelude: What is the World To Me... A. Theile Helen Sweeney Address: Prof. R. A. Fenske, Director, Northwestern Lutheran Academy, Mobridge, S. D. Choir: A Mighty Fortress Is Our God-Luther-Olds Presentation of Diplomas .._.__ .... _ ________________________________________ C. L. Schweppe, President Prelude: Jesus Christ, My Sure Defense, D. Lorentz Gladys Lindloff The Lord's Prayer (unison) Benediction Prelude:

43


Our friend Mickeyhas been as busy as ever. When some one told him that only a few days remained until graduation, he hurriedly scampered about to gather material so that he might give his III Normal friends a last glimpse of inside information at D.M. L.C. Except for the screams of two 'In Normal girls. he encountered no interference. Should you like to know what he discovered? Well, here it isWould you take eggs along if you went on an egg fry? Most people would, but two coeds are exceptions to' the rule. R. G. and E. S. insist theirs was a complete success.without eggs! 'Liz" says she does more oratorical work on TUesday than on any other day. "Dot" is the object of that morning's vocabulary effort. But words soon turn to warbling, and 'Liz" knows her attempt has not been in vain. Did you know L. A. uses a pillow extensively? If you see a pained expression cloud her countenance when you sav "Horse," you'll know the reason why she believes in .pillow transportations. Could it be that the twelfth grade girls are overjoyed at their coming graduation? Reports have it that they have been celebrating this coming graduation by "gently" tossing' some metallic implements down the third floor stairs. The melting of snow at Sun Valley resort brought the most prominent sign of spring. Although the snow has changed, the uniforms haven't. Imagine the matron's surprise at finding six empty beds one morning! Don't become alarmed! The girls had only gone on an early morning breakfast party. Their unusually silent departure had confused the matron A tired voice called through the darkness, "Omi, when vou wake up tomorrow morning, wake me to see whether I'm too tired to wake up!" Some dictionary will probably explain the foregoing statement. The originator of "Step sprightly with one foot and drag the other" got a few of her pupils into difficulty the other day. It seems that one of the pupils, E. H., was making quite a bit of noise when these pupils were prac-

5 ....., .:_,_.,...,.... ~:;;;t::;:l;a.-==-

44


tieing this procedure in the hall. She has decided to wear shoes with rubber soles and heels in the future. Here's a bouquet to those coeds who really did a wonderful job on Arbor Day. They had to work a great deal harder than usual, because their work this year had to indude that work usually done by many of the boys in the army. Their efforts showed they were proud enough of their campus to do the best they could to make it beautiful. The request of finding a name for the pet rabbit at the Annex has been completed. A value of life prevents a revelation of the name here, but if you're inquisitive, D. B. might tell you about the story behind this name. "Heave ho, me hearties!" and over went another bed. The matron.was given no priority rating, and hers went over in a similar manner. Were you "wreckers" letting loose the energy you had gained during Easter vacation? Winter has long since gone, but even that hasn't dulled M. R.'s interest in Jack Frost. Why, one day she prepared a sketch of his life for English class! The gas situation has even affected Sunday 'hikers." Some girls say that 14 miles is quite a distance to walk in one afternoon! Just ask those girls who were soaking their feet on a certain Sunday evening for further information. The graduates of our college department are not the only ones whose friendly faces will not beam on the campus next semester. Many of our II Normal girls are also going forth to sow the seeds of the Gospel. They are Gwendolyn Birkholz, Verna Birkholz, Chole Fenske, Artcy Goehring, Margaret Lau, Ruth Petzke, Mildred Rademan, Esther Riess, and Ruth Sprengler. We wish you the greatest amount of success and hope that after this crisis is over we may see you again in the halls of D.M.L.C. Farewell III Normal coeds. With you you'll take many memories: the first day when you wandered lonely through the halls; the growth of friendships; swiftly pass.ing years-each filled with more fond memories; the strains of the organ as you march down the aisle garbed in royal blue. When your thoughts wander back to D.M.L.C., think of us, won't you? We'll never forget your guiding aid and helping hand. Forth to the vineyard you now go To teach the Gospel far and wide; 'Tis time for you the seeds to sowGo forth! in Him teach them t' abide.

45


Once more I view this erudite student-body for possible victims of discussion. My first thoughts turn to Elmer. When queried in class about whether he was chewing that rubber product, gum, he claimed that it was just wood. Sanville helped the cause along and brought to class a piece of knotted firewood for him to chew on.....Does anyone know whether Elmer developed the "beaver" habit up in the North woods where he used to live? Arbor Day special: Meier stranded hanging from a limb! When a truck crew passed beneath a tree, a branch reached out and grabbed him by his rake wielders. (Lack of hair prevented grabbing that). Backing up the truck effected his rescue. What ambition some "fuches" have! To Sparky's wonder and admiration Schaller requested a Latin test which resulted in the gratification of his wish the following day. As the welder's visits to the boys' dorm were so regular, it was decided to get a new boiler. Easter vacation saw the removal of the old one and the installation of a new slender "black Beauty." The cold water during this time really did wonders to raise those heavy mornshutters. "Archie" sported a sore jaw as the result of modern dentistry, not the blows of an amateur pugilist.

46


Sanville's Navy physical exam and interview in" the Twin Cities proved to be quite an experience. When asked, he gave stamp collecting as his favorite hobby. Don't laugh. Every week on his letter from home he gets a new stamp for his collection. The main bleacher (kibitzer) section of the baseball field is now taken over by the new coal supply bin. To give us the right "atmosphere" for reading in English Class the essay "On a Piece of Chalk," Elmer 'gave us the first strain of the air "The White Cliffs of Dover." I wonder whether a firebug thought it was too cool in Meier's room. You're too late; that room has already patented that method of disposing of wastepaper to eliminate the "laborious" task of carrying it to the incinerator. Some people have strange ideas about decorating and beautifying our "Ad" building. According to confessions that trailer against the front door wasn't self-propelled. Grunze can wiggle his ears. Ask Michael Voecks about it; he saw a demonstration on the way from Milwaukee. - Fishing is again "in the vogue" for "The Compleat Angler." If you need any flies or hooks ask "Vern"

Meyer. What is more appetizing than a plate of buttered fried CottonwoodRiver specials on fourth floor. Say, I have ta' hurry! The train is pulling out, and I need a vacation. . Congratulations to the Graduates!

47


SPORTS "Ball Four." "Bum!", Throw him a fish!" "Show him the plate, Erv!" The "ump" proclaiming his guesswork, the crack of the bat, and the thud of a high hard one in the catcher's mitt are sure signs that another baseball season has arrived. The Luther nine went "gold coast" this spring. They trained north with the Yanks, Cards, "Bums" and' a few other teams. Our heroes enjoyed the chilling winds and cool weather that plagued Joe Medwick,Bill Dickey, Jimmy Dykes and the rest of the professionals. At the beginningof April the outlookwasn't too bright. The conferencedecidedto abandon baseball for the duration. The fact also had to be consideredthat there wasn't an abundance of material from which Coach Voecks could.choose a team. Despite this rather gloomy picture, Coach Voecks with the assistance of Naumann and Walz succeededin getting a team into condition to meet teams scheduledfrom the near vicinity. Coach Voecks showed his "Yanks" on May 5 at the college diamond. The Luther nine, with two or three exceptions, looked like grade school boys in comparison to the heights of their opponents,Mankato Teachers. We can say without offendinganyone that Luther outplayed the teachers. . Coach Voecks,much to his joy, discoveredthat he had a second starting pitcher in the person of Roman Valleskey. Roman, a sophomore,won his first start with the fine support of "Andy" Devine at short, Larson on second, Dorn catching, Jerry Gutzke on first, Sitz on third, Serwe in left, Moldenhouerin right, and "Kennie" Sanville,who covered the center pasture from short center to Schnitker's petunia patch. The Teachers rushed two runs over in their half of the second. Luther came back with three in their half of the second to take the 48


lead. The Teachers made it an even three in their half of the fifth and forged ahead by scoring one run in their half of the sixth. Luther shoved two runs across in their half of the sixth to take the lead five to four, and increased their score to seven in their half of the eighth. The totals for the game gave Luther seven runs, ten hits and they committed four errors, Mankato Teachers collected a total of four runs, six hits and they also had four errors. On May 10, at 6:30 P.M., Coach Voecks led his nine down to Johnson Field in New Ulm against New Ulm High. Although the Luther nine was strengthened by the return of "Erv" Walz, they had a bad case of jitters that evening and allowed several unearned runs. The result was that New Ulm scored one in the first, two in the sixth. Luther saved their scoring to provide a marathon seventh inning which netted them three runs. Luther had difficulty in solving the slants of Mr. Forstner all evening. Roman Valleskey, making his second start, received poor support at crucial moments; al'though he struck out eight men and allowed only seven hits, he had to bow in defeat to New Ulm. The totals 'gave New Ulm High seven runs" seven hits and three errors. Luther collected three runs, five hits, and three errors. By the time this issue reaches the reader, the Luther nine will have completed their schedule of seven games. They will have encountered Bethany of Mankato twice. will have had two return games with New Ulm High and a return game with Mankato Teachers. Your reporter climbs out on aIimb and predicts that Luther, with its "gas-house-gang" spirit, will have dented the victory column on several occasions. . Not to be forgotten are the boys who have regularly played tennis and horseshoe. There was no organization, but the individual competition was keen. Also to be re,membered are the two individuals responsible for the fine playing condition of the tennis court and the baseball diamond, namely Guenther and Welke. Your reporter wishes you :;t, pleasant vacation, and with

Uncle Sam's permission hopes to see a 'few of the old familiar faces in the fall.

49


HUMOR I do not represent a woolen company, but here are a few coarse yarns that I have to offer. The First Aid instructor had been 'lecturing to the class on the treatment of the various degrees of burns. In conclusion, he added, "Above all things, if your clothing catches fire, remain cool." Poetter: Did your watch stop when it dropped on the floor? Walz: Sure! Did you think it would go through? Prof. Klatt: What's all that noise in the back of the room? Voice; History repeating itself. If silence is golden, think how extravagant some girls a:re. The worried student came to the doctor in utter desperation. "My hair are falling out," he said. "Will you .give me something to keep them in?" "Take this," he replied, giving him a pill box. One of the coeds remarked to me recently, "Oh no! I wouldn't think of joining the WAACS, I don't care for their hats." Irritated Buck: Look here, young fellow! Are you the buck of this room? . Fresh Fuchs: No sir, I'm not. Buck: Wellthen, stop talking like an idiot! A fond father visited the collegeto see what progress his son was making.'In response to his inquiry the president said: . .', "Your son will probably go down in history." "That's good news,", glowed the parent. ,~ 50


The president lifted his eyebrows and continued: "But then of course he might do better in psychology and the other subjects." Student: I say, dad, I hardly know what to do with my week-end out here. Dad: Why not put a hat on it? No wonder there is a lot of knowledge in this collegethe freshmen always bring a little in and the graduates seldom take any away. (Not making any reflections, of. course.) Some girls go to college to pursue learning; others, to learn pursuing. Prof.: What is the greatest water power known to man? Student: Woman's tears. A. Valleskey: Who done it? G. Mueller: Who did it? A. Valleskey: I don't know.

Spaude lookedat Fuhrmann's sleek hair and asked him, "Do you want it, cut or just the oil changed?" Schaller: All you say goes in one ear and out the other. Guenther: What's there to prevent it? The English Professor directed the class to write a brief account of a baseball game. All the pupils were busy during the time, except for one boy who never wrote a word. When the professor called for the papers, he suddenly awoke to life, and scrawled a sentence. It ran thus: "Rain--no game." People as well as pins are useless when they lose'their heads. As we are all going home for the summer recess, this may help prepare you for' the trip. The anxious wayfarer was indignant at the slow speed of the train. He appealed to the conductor. "Can't you go any faster than this?" "Yes," was the serene reply, "but I have to stay aboard." ,

51


Etc.: The symbol' used to make, people think we know more than we do. Coward: One who, in a perilous emergency, thinks with

his legs. 'MitifCÂť:rtURe: The kind of fortune that never misses. Recreation: Any work you don't have to do for a living. E~.epie~oe:Whatyou have left after you've Iosteverytmqg ..else. Hospitality: The virtue which induces us to feed and lodge 'certa-in'persons who are not in need of food and lodging. Intoxication: To feel sophisticated and not be able to pronounce it.

52


NEW ULM STEAM LAUNDRY Otto F. Oswald &

SO"Q$

Phone No.5 For Your Dry Cleaning, Laundry or Hat Work We assure you prompt and efficient service and invite you to visit our modern up-to-data plant at 107-109 '80. Minn. St.

High Qt,la.Iity

FILM DEVELOPING AND PRINTING 25c per roll FOUNTAIN PENS and"SCHOOL SUPPLIES Have Your Prescriptions Filled Here Lowest Prices to Students Phones 1003 - 1004

~~

HENLE DRUGS REXALL DRUG STORE New DIm, Minnesota

DOUBLE

SECURITY!

This bank offers you Banking

Safeguards,

Convenience

and Helpful Service

CITIZENS STATE BANK Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

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J. C. PENNEY

CO.

Corner Minn. and 2nd North St. Budget your income and ,StJretClhi,t far Bay cash at Penney's where Bargains are

Phone

For Printing and Supplies

370

KEMSKE PAPER CO. Portable

Safes

'I'ypewrtteris.

lUimeograph Stencils and Ink Filing Equipment and Office Supplies

Towels and Toilet Paper Desks

NEW ULlvI DAIRY THE HOME OF Pure Dairy Products

Phone 104 Try LEADW AY or DEL HAVEN FOODS Dlstrbbuted by

NE,W ULM GROCERY CO. Wholesale Grocers Completa Line of Footwear for

COLLEGE STUDENTS at popular prices Ball-Band Rubbers and Overshoes

WICHERSKI

Betty Barrett Shoes for Women

SHOE STORE

NEW ULM Phone 246


A. C.

ocas BRlCK' & TILE ('OM'PANY' General Sales Office 906 Foshay Towel" Minneapolis

Executive Office and Plant Spningfield, Minn.

Artistic Flac,e~Brick Va.rtoua Colors

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PAY YOU TOrBUILD . WITH FACE BRICK Face brick offers Ute' widest cJrO'icc'01' color tones, both in artistic blends and even shades. Colers and textures burned in becoming lovelier with age. A Face Brick Home offers )'ou less upkeep' over a pe:rlod of years. Lessened heating co'st an-Ifgreater colirfort ill wmter' and summer. Greater resale valueÂť Easily financed- because loan companies prefer the known merits of Face Brick houses.

Our' Products

Are Sold in the

New UIm Territory

by

NEW ULM BRICK '& TILE YARDS


E. G. LANG.,D. D. S. Office Above State Bank of New DIm Office Phone 472

Res. Phone-1172

CHAS. F. JANNI HARNESS DEALER Kwik-Pak Parcel Post Laundry Cases, Trunks, Traveling Bags, Suit Cases, Purses and Other Leather Specialties

PALACE LUNCH H. A. Bergmeier, Prop. New Ulm's Most Popular Lunch Room Sandwiches-Ice .Cream---Candy-Soft Drinks-Cigarettes

115 N. Minn. St.

Phone 668

New Dim, Minn.

Service and Satisfaction .

at the

MODEL BARBER SHOP ALFRED H. KUESTER, Prop.

We Turn a House Into a Home

BUENGER FURNITURE

CO.

Stores: New Ulm and Sleepy Eye, Minn.

Distinctive

Funeral

Service


INHOFER - RAUSCH BAKERY

• D-LISHUS

PRODUCTS

• Phone 232 The Home of

HART SCHAFFNER & ~IAJtX SUITS AND OYERCOATS O'DONNELL SHOES-STETSON HATS Complete line of Men's, and Boys' Clothes and Furnishings

FRED MEINE CLOJ'HING CO. BANK WITH

FARMERS

& MERCHANTS

STATE

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New Ulm, lUinllesota

Friendly Helpful Service at Your Command

Residence Phone 150

Office Phone 260

Dr. F. H. Dubbe, F. A. C. S. NEW ULM,

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON MINNESOTA

_" ,'J


SOMSEN, DEMPSEY and SOMSEN Henry N. Somsen W. H. Dempsey Henry N. Somsen, Jr.

ATTORNEYS AT LAW

New VIm,

Minnesota

COMPLIMENTS of the

RETZLAFF MOTOR COMPANY . ".

New VIm's Dodge-Plymouth Distributor for 29 years

MUESING D,ryg Store .~p:1.' :jW.,-'路;;

EXPERT路

SCRIPTION SERVICE

ARTCRAFT PHOTO SERVICE We Have It!

Will Get It!

Or It Isn't Made!

Phones 52 - 341 The Student's Shop ECONOMICAL

Where Old Friends Meet SATISF.NCTORY CHEERFUL

IDEAL BEAUTY SHOP Alyce Gieseke Otto - Laura Gieseke, Owners and Operators Above Brey's Grocery Telephone 530


SCHUCK'S TAILORS rAILORED TO MEASURE SUITS AND bVERCOATS Cleaning and Pressing All Kinds of Repairing No Deposits-No C. O. D}s 215 N. Minn. St. Phone 498

ROBERT FESENMAIER,

INC.

HARDWARE NEW ULM, MINN. COMPLIMENTS

OF

T. O. STREISSGUTH When in Need of Electrical Supplies and Radios or Service call on

ULRICH ELECTRIC COMPANY Electric Service at Its Best-Buy

with Service

Phone 148

HENRY GOEDE STUDIO We Make PHOTOS of Merit Most reliable Studio in Southern Minnesota. A trial will convince.

Floris Shoe Store X-RAY SHOE FITTING Hand Bags

Hosiery 124 No. Minnesota

Tel. 449

Students' Clothing and Sport Wear

RUMMEL BROS. 14 No. ~linnesota

st.

New fIlm, Minn.


Henry Simons Lumber Company Established in 1892 For 51 years we-have served the community of New VIm with building needs.

- YEAR AFTER YEARDependable Service-

Right PriceWe save the home builder dollars in real values! Phone 201

Marvin. Earl, Mgr.

PINKS STORE Caral King, Jr. Dresses

Air-Step Shoes

Munsing and Barbason Loungerie Swansdown Coats and Suits Friendly Sales Pepple to Help You

WILLIAM J. VON BANK, D. D. S. F. I. C. D. DENTIST Office PhQuâ&#x201A;Ź 237

New VIm, Minn.

Residence Phone '797 i

DRS. HAMMERMEISTER & SAFFERT Physicians and Surgeons

Office Over State Baak of New VIm


WHEN IN NEED OF FOOTWEAR Be Sure and Call on Us We carry a complete line of men's, ladies' and children's shoes We appr'eciate your business. Our prices are always the lowest, Quality considered.

ATHLETIC SHOES OUR SPECIALTY Shoes Fitted Free by X.Ray

P. J. EICHTEN SHOE STORE New Ulm, ~linnesota

MEYER THE LEADING PHOTOGRAPHER Special Prices to Students We have a complete line of frames from miniatures 8xlO in metal or wood.

to

NEW UL~I. lIINN.

PHONE 165.L

T. R. Fritsche, M. D., F. A. C. S. Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat GLASSES FITTED New Ulm, Minn. Fritsche Bldg.

NEW ULM GREENHOUSES FLOWERS I\,PR EVERY OCCASION We are prepared 00 fill orders for flowers at all points through the Flo'r'iisrtsTelegraphic

Delivery Assoclatlon,

Phone 45

NEW ULM, MINNESOTA


AID ASSOCIATION FOR LUTHERANS Legal Reserve Life Insurance Exclusively For Synodical Conference Lutherans APPLE-TON, WISCONSIN THE LEADER IN ITS FIELD!

For Smart, Practical and Inexpensive

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New DIm

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DEER BRAND BEER

AUGUST SCHELL BREWING COMPANY NEW ULM, MINNESOTA


See

CRONE BROS. CO. . For Young Men's Clothing and Furnishings John W. Graff

Geo. D. Erickson

ERICKSON & GRAFF Attorneys at Law New Illm, lUinnesota

Our Best Attention

Everything

of a banking nature entrusted to our care receives our best attention. We shall be glad to have a share of your. business.

STATE BANK OF NEW ULM ,

Member Federal ltellosit Insurance Corporation

DANIEL

WEBSTER FLOUR

• SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY LEADING DEALERS • EVERYWHERE

EAGLE ROLLER MILL CO. NEW ULM, MINNESOTA


UNION

HOSPITAL

NEW ULM, MINN. A modern, well-equipped, and fireproof hospital supervised by and staffed with reg istered nurses.

PHONE No. 404

Brewers and Bottlers Since 1864 Telephone No. 1

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Reconstruction, Installation Additions, Blowers Chimes, Harps

Modernizing, Maintaining, Tuning, Repairs, Service, Sales

Wicks

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ERNEST 105路409 North Broadway

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BAKERY GOODS-ICE CREAM-CANDIES Whenever you think of an Eibner Product you associate it immediately with Quality. After all Quality GoodsTaste Better and are Better. We assume the responsibility of giving you the best SERVICE-QUALITY-VALUE

EIBNER BAKERY

& SON

and ICE CREAM ::::':stablished 1883

Phone 128

THE FASTIDIOUS STtIDENT will find satisfactory

service at

Grundmeyer's Barber-Beauty Shop Air Conditioned Below 'I'auscheck

& Green's Cothing

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Phone 710

SALET'S DIDPARTMENTSTORE-NEW ULM, MINN.

EVERYTHING TO WEAR FOR HIM OR HER WEAR SALET'S FAlVI'OUSFOOTWEAR

Highest

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"YOU ALWAYS SAVE AT SALET'S"

QUALITY

CLOTHING

Correct Fitting and Standard Llnes

TAUSCHECK & GREE,N


r If you want to be admired, praised, and

excellent judgment in style and comfort, select your next pair of shoes at at

LINDEMANN'S

SHOE STORE

"The Students' Shop"

EUGENE KOEHLER OLD RELIABLE

BARBER

SHOP

Good Satisfactory Work Guaranteed at all Times Your Patronage is Ap.preciated

Subscribers -- Attention! When You Change Your Address Be Sure to Notify the Business Manager The Messenger Is Never Forwarded By Your Local Postmaster


SHAKE CLEANERS and DYERS Phone 756

20 % Discount Cash and Carry Eyes Tested

Lenses Ground

Glass'es Fitted

and Duplicated

DRS. SCHLEUDER Optometrists and Opticians MINNESOTA

NEW ULM.

H. J. BAUMANN INSURANCE AGENCY Insup nee

Bonds

Hospitalization

Phone 666

• STUDENTS! PATRONIZE YOUR MESSENGER ADVERTISERS


UNITED STATES

..... WAR SA\1INGS ,

. BONDS *.


OWN HARDWARE ~

~:OUR

Buy Where You See This Sign

A 500 Store Buying Power

"YOU BUY BETTER -BECAUSEWE BUY BETTER" F. H. RETZLAFF HARDWARE

CO.

Over 50 Years of Service

Champion Shoe Shop For the Best Repairing in Tow路n路

Courteous Servifle

517 Center St.

Royal Maid Ice Cream Store "Make Our Store Your Headquarters"

OLSON BROS. DRUGS Phone 88

WEILANDT & STEGEMAN Contractors and Builders Correspondence Solicited Work Done in Any Section of the Community Plans and specifiloations Furnished Estimates Cheerfully Given Office 1100 Center St. Phone 571

Auto Glass Replaced to Order


Delicious Home Made Sausages

City Meat Market New DIm, Minnesota

Quicker Service


.:....


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1942-1943 DMLC Messenger Vol. 33  
1942-1943 DMLC Messenger Vol. 33