Page 1


~: CONTENTS : ~

LITERARY a)

Valedictory

2

b). "The Hero

4

c)

6

Swift's Satire

LIBRARY COMMENTS

9

EDITORIALS a)

To the New Students

b)

Our Exchange Column

c)

Excomm'unicated Children

d)

The Aim of Our Publication

····12 13 · ··· 13 ·······.15

ALUMNI

·..·16

EXCHANGE COLLEGE NOTES CO,-E'DNOTES ; LOCALS ATHLETICS

·.····18 :

···20

············

·..·..··22 :

24 ····..···27

I

JOKES

·..29


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The

n, 1\1.L.

C. Messenger

VALEDICTORY Honorable members of the faculty, schoolmates, and friends: The class of 1936 welcomes you to its commencement exercises. We are happy to see so many of you here to help us observe this occasion. 'This day marks for us the goal for which we have been striving. By the grace of God we have been trained, so that now we are servants fit to work in the Lord's vineyard. We are now ready to go into our Christian Day Schools as l-eaders. We are ready to help parents in "bringing their children up' in the nurture and admonition of the Lord." Let us pause here a moment and review the real purpose of our Christian Day School. The training of children is not the duty of the parents only, but also of the Church. The Church has been commanded "to teach all nations and to teach them to observe all things commanded by the Lord." The Christian Day School is an institution of the Church; it has been instituted to assist in the blessed work of properly rearing children. It is a precious gift of God, created by the work of the Holy Ghost, and called into existence by the free course of the Gospel. The aim of the Christian Day School can be summed up under four points: First, to teach the way to salvation. Secondly, to train children in godly living, so that everything in life is controlled and directed by the Gospel.


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Thirdly, to keep Christian children in Christian environment in order to strengthen their interest in the Lutheran Church and the Kingdom of God. And finally,. to equip our children for service' as intelligent, useful, desirable, and God-fearing citizens of the country in which they are living. "Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old, he will not depart from it." Proverbs 22 :6. This is the kind of training we offer in our Christian Day Schools. Here our children receive a Christian training not only in the religious instruction, but also throughout the rest of the instruction of the day. Every branch of study is permeated by the Christian spirit and is taught from viewpoint of Scripture. Now let us consider the position of the teacher in the Christian Day School. The true teacher is a master craftsman who knows that he is charged with molding not only • the intellect and mind, but above all the heart and will of the children entrusted to him. It certainly is a privilege to be a teacher of those of whom Christ says, "That in heaven their angels do always behold the face of my Father who is in heaven." Matthew 18 :10. But this fact, at the same time, stresses the responsibility which rests upon the Christian teacher. He is dealing with immortal souls, with children bought with the precious blood of Christ. It behooves the teacher, therefore, to remain fully aware of this fact at all times. In bringing children to Jesus, the. teacher must himself know how to use the Law and Gospel most effectively; he must be able to use the Law in such a way as to work in the hearts of the children a realization of their own sinfulness, thus preparing the way for the sweet message of the salvation earned by Jesus Christ. He must make the .love of Christ, as produced by faith, the foundation whereon the children may base lives of true sanctification, as believers devoted to the service of their Savior, as loyal citizens seeking the welfare of the country in which they are living. Unless the teacher always keeps these important facts in mind, unless they are impelling motives in his life, he cannot do justice to his office. Dear Classmates, we have much for which to be thankful. We cannot repay the sacrifices that our parents made in order that we might study at this institution. We are very thankful to our teachers who have, through their unfailing guidance, brought us to this goal. For seven years they have worked hand in hand with us. They patiently bore all our shortcomings and kept us on the path of truth. When we erred, they admonished us and advised us .according to true Christian principles.


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The D. !II. L. C. MesSenger"

'To you, schoolmates, we extend our ~est wishes and hope that you will all reach the goal for WhIChyou are now striving. We thank the membe:-s of the ~I Norm.al class for having beautified our auditorium for this occasion. And now, dear classmates, we soon must part. We will be sent to various parts of our country to take up our work in the Lord's vineyard. N,Qdoubt all of us will meet with difficulties that will seem hard for us to solve. Then, as well as at all times, should we not forget that we have our Father in Heaven, Who can and will help us in all troubles. Let us, therefore, go into the field with willing hearts and hands to do our Cod-appointed tasks. Our motto, "Be thou faithful unto death," continues with one of the most precious promises and rewards that Jesus gives to faithful servants, "and I will give thee a crown of life." With firm and unfailing trust in this promise, I, in behalf of the class of 1936, bid you teachers, • schoolmates, and friends, farewell.-Julius Wantoch, '36.

THE HERO The day was dreary with a threat of rain in the air. A gray mist hid all objects along the street of the large city. The sidewalks along the thoroughfare were almost deserted and only a few cars crawled along, their tires making a hissing sound on the pavement. Walking along the street were two men, one short, the other tall. Both were quite shabbily dressed, their clothes being patched at several places. The head of the taller was adorned by a cap which appeared to be several sizes too large for him; the shorter man wore a hat. These were pulled low over the eyes of the two men. Both walked slowly up the street. The shabby apparel of the two and their seemingly aimless wandering gave a clear indication that the men were hoboes, or as such of their type are more generally known, "bums."

"I ain't never seen such lousy weather in my life" muttered the smaller of the two "bums." "Wish I had 'a cigarette. Might warm me up some." "So do I, Joe," replied the other. "I ain't seen one in three weeks an' I guess there ain't much chance of gettin' one now either."


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5

"You know, Bill," said Joe, "I wouldn't mind eatin' right n?w .. I co~ld go for a big steak an' everything that goes with It. It d be pretty nice if we had a lotta money like most people has. I wish one of these here buildings would start burnin'. I'd go in an' save somebody an', when I come out 0' the buildin', they'd make me a hero an' ask me what I wanted for a reward. Boy, I'd take plenty." "Yeah," drawled Bill, "that'd be swell all right, but them things don't happen every day." "Just look at those kids over there," continued Joe, pointing to a group of children playing with a ball on the sidewalk across the street. "They ain't got nothin' to worry about. They always know where the next meal is comin' from an' they got clothes an' everything." At this moment ,the door of one of the houses across the street opened and a woman stepped upon the porch. "Come in, Tommy," she cried. "It's time for supper." "Yes, mother," answered a childish voice, "right away. Wait till I get the ball." The ball had rolled out into the street, and before his mother could stop him, Tommy had run after it. Suddenly around the corner at- the other end of the block roared a huge car. It rushed straight at thâ‚Ź unsuspecting child, who had as yet not seen or heard it. The mist seemed to blind the driver, or perhaps it was the dusk which had now fallen upon the city. Everyone seemed frozen to the ground with horror-that is, all but one. With a cry of warning the short hobo, Joe, ran toward the child. Without checking his speed he caught up the boy, leaped to one side, and sprawled on the street. The automobile passed over the spot where seconds before the child had stood. Slowly Joe got up, set Tommy on his feet, and asked, "Arâ‚Ź yuh hurt, sonny?" . The boy who was crying did not answer but rushed to his mother, who without a word crushed him in her arms. By this time quite a number of people had assembled which the neighborhood policeman had trouble in keeping orderly. A man detached himself from the crowd, swiftly took Joe by the hand, and shook it. Tears stood in his eyes. "I saw what you did just now," he said. "That boy is my son, and I don't know how to thank you. I'd like to be alone with my family now." Here he hesitated. "Y ou understand, don't you T"


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The D. ]U. L. C. Messe!!ger

"Sure, sure, I understand," replied Joe. "Well, here's my card," continued the man. "If you come to my office tomorrow, I'll try to thank you in an appropriate manner." He pressed Joe's hand once more and, turning, walked into the house. Slowly Joe crossed the street with his long friend. "What does it say on the card, Joe?" asked Bill. "I don't know. It's pretty dark here. Let's go under this lamp post." The two walked to the post, and Joe held the card into the light. On it were printed the words: Randolph E. Davis Banker The card also bore the name of a large banking firm of the city. "Well, there yuh got the break yuh was alway's talkin' about," exclaimed Bill. "Yeah," answered Joe, "yeah, I guess you're right." Slowly he glanced at the card again; then Joe stared into space. He seemed wrapped in deep thought; then very deliberately he took the card and tore it into tiny bits. Putting his hands into his pockets, he walked up the street. Bill stared after him; then he ran to his friend and stopped him. . "Say, are yuh crazy!" he exclaimed. "No, Bill, I'm not crazy. Just doin' the right thing, that's all." answered Joe. "Yeah, but yuh-" "I know I said I'd get sumpin out 0' doin' a thing Eke that, but I can't sponge off'n nice people like that." "I still think you're kinda screwy," answered Bill, scratching his head, "but I guess you're right." Slowly the two walked up the street and finally disappeared into the gray mist and darkness.-E. D.

SWIFT'S SATIRE Practically all of Swift's writings are such burning satire that the pages upon which they are written fairly sizzle. A satirist, we understand, is one who picks out certain


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faults of society and holds them up for ridicule. Of these men Swift has the honor or dishonor. if you will, of being the .most powerful among them. His prose style-clear, straightforward, and convincing-together with his ability to make every scene, no matter how grotesque, as natural as life itself, constitutes his power. Emerson says that he describes his characters as if for the police. The two faults of Swift are his inability to see his fellows in a true light because of the misery in his own heart and soul', furthermore, he is possessed with a strong liking for coarse

references, His purposes for writing he expresses quite aptly in the following little rhyme that appeared in one of his earliest works. "My hate, whose lash just Heaven has long decreed Shall on a day make Sin and Folly bleed." Because he was very poor and very proud and because he had received unpleasant treatment from relatives during . his youth, and because he didn't get such attention as he thought he deserved, he became a hater of humanity-a misanthrope. Swift scorned all judgment but his own. He could see only the vices of men and the lash that scourges them. When writing, he was not an impartial observer, nor a judge, but a criminal lawyer prosecuting humanity on the charge of being a sham. Gulliver's Travels, although it appears to be a nice little adventure story, is really such an attack on the sham of humanity. The book contains four parts. The first part treats of the voyage to Lilliput, which is inhabited by human beings six inches high. The capers of these midgets are a satire on human society-on the unimportant things with which society concerns itself. For instance. one group of Lilliputians insists that an egg be opened on the narrow end while another says it is to be opened on the wide end. In the voyage to Brobdingnag, land of the giants, he reminds us of the petty "human insects" whom Gulliver represents. The voyage to Laputa is a satire on scientists. He tells of a man who is trying to extract sunbeams from a cucumber, so that he can bottle them up and make sunshine during inclement weather. The scientist has hopes of successfully completing his experiment in eight years. Just like a scientist! The last part of the book is hardly readable because of its terrible tales of adventure. The kingdom is ruled by intelligent horses and the people and creatures over which they rule have the forms of men and the habits and customs of monkeys. It . is upon Gulliver's Travels that Swift's fame rests today.


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The D. ]\i. L. C. ]\iessenger

"He is the inventor of irony, as Shakespeare is of poetry," says Taine of Swift. It is in his Mod~st P~oposal that he shows his irony, which was for a while mistaken for sheer brutality. The occasion for the writing of the Modest Proposal was the sad plight of the Irish who because of lack of monev had to let their children grow up ignorant and destitute. or even let them die of starvation. Swift therefore ironically suggested killing all children a year old and serving them as new dishes on the tables of the great. His irony was also misunderstood in The Abo~ishing of Christianity. Swift is one of the greatest English prose humorists, and is also known for wit of the satirical kind that leaves ilts victims feeling rather squelched, and also for the kind that leaves its imprint on the thought of the time. A good example of his humor can be found in the Bickerstaff Papers. During this time many almanacs were being published by pretending astrologers. Partridge. was the most infamous of these and so Swift decided to take him off his high horse. Under the name of Isaac Bickerstaff he predicted the death of Partridge for March 29, 1708, at eleven o'clock in the evening. On March 12 Swift gave out pamphlets containing a circumstantial account of Partridge's death. When Partridge protested that he was still alive, Swift said that the man who claimed to be Partridge was only an imposter. "The stars said he would die; he must have died," said Swift. The immediate result of this prank was a joining of the wits of the town in proclaiming Partridge's death. More lasting results. however, were the increase in contempt for the scientists and the establishment of the Tattler, in which Steele used the pen name Isaac Bickerstaff. Noone and nothing could escape the lashing sarcasm of Swift-not even the church. The Tale of a Tub was written to uphold the Episcopalians and satirize opposing religious demonstrations. It was the story of three boys each of whom had received as an inheritance from their father a coat. The father asked them aIways to wear the coats and keep good care of them. As the style changed they put ornaments on their coats. Peter kept the ornaments on his coat, Jack tore them off thereby ripping the coat, and Martin took the ornaments off carefully, so as not to tear his coat. The coats are God's Word. Peter put on ornaments and kept them on; Jack tore them off again without regard for the coat; and Martin took off the ornaments carefully, in order to keep his coat free from tears. Swift was one of the greatest pessimists of his time and all times, but he is at Ieast earnest in all he says. V. K. '37.


The D. lIf. L. C. Messenger

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LIBRARY

COMMENTS To all students, old and new, the library has again opened its doors at the threshold of a new school year and bids them a hearty welcome. It is a most pleasant sight to see you in groups at the tables, getting what aid you can for your new courses from the treasury of books which have been gathered for our library in the course of more than a quarter century. Not every school library by far offers to its students the privilege you here enjoy, of stepping back into the stacks and browsing about to your heart's content among the rows of books covering nearly every important subject. We do want you all to make use of this privilege. Take the time occasionally to look oyer the books. It might be a good thing to do this methodically. Choose some subject in which you take more than ordinary interest and spend a free period looking at the titles of the books our library has on this subject. Some may desire to see what we have on sports. There are books on tennis, basketball, indoor and outdoor games, on things boys can make or those at which girls might like to try their skill. We have books on mushrooms, others on electricity, still others on etiquette, on travel, on pioneer days in the west, etc. It will be quite easy to find the books on any subject in the stacks after you have had a bit of library training. It might be advisable for students who have not as yet had our library course to refrain from pulling books out of the shelves, unless they are very sure that they can find the exact spot from which the book was taken and put it back there again. A book which has been placed even a few spaces away from its. proper place is practically "lost" until the librarian or his assistant has had time to collate the books in the stacks. To collate means to start at the lowest number in the stacks and to look at every class and book number of each book in order to make sure that the books are all in their right place. At such times we usually find some volumes which have been misplaced. But collating books is quite a task and should become nearly unnecessary when the students have completed their course in library economy.


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The D. 1\1.L. C. Messenger

We stated before that one can _readily ~nd books ~n any subject which is represented III the lIbrary.. Th~s brings us to the matter we promised to take up III this issue of the Messenger, namely the Subject Card. So far we have discussed in these columns the author card and the title card in the card catalog. These two cards are most commonly looked for by students and patrons of a library, because one usually has either a certain author or a certain title in mind when he comes into the library for a book. Yet it frequently happens that readers come to the library with no special book in mind, but wanting books on a certain subject, such as Birds, or Radio, or English history. To make it possible to find the books on a subject, the librarian makes a card for each important subject in a book, with the subject printed on the top line. As stated before in connection with title cards, the rest of the matter printed below the subject is identical with that on the author card: the author's name, the title, and such details as place 'Of publication, publishers, copyright date,' etc. But the subject is found on the top line, above all these other data, and the name of the subject IS ALWAYS PRINTED IN RED. Most cards in the catalog with red printing at the top are subject cards, although we may state here that the names of persons about whom a biography is written also are printed in red. Thus it is very easy to find whether a library contains books on a certain subject. Remember that the card catalog is arranged like a dictionary. If, then, you are looking for books on hunting, let us say, you need merely to pull out the drawer which carries the cards under the letter h, find the word HUNTING in red letters, and you will soon see whether our library has any books on this subject. We suggest that you go to the card catalog when you come into the library the next time and try to see what red letter subject cards you can find. Next time we shall spend a bit of time with so-called analytical cards. After decorating the chapel for the commencement exercises last June, the students who had charge of the work and had collected the money for it from the student body came to us and gave us the money that was left over. This amounted to $3.85 and we were told that this money was to go into the library's treasury for books on fiction. We take this opportunity to express our heartiest thanks to the student body in the name of the library for this gift. We dedicate to you five new western novels and a new Book-Of-The-Month novel by Andre Malraux entitled Days of Wrath.-Adalbert Schaller, Librarian.

,..,


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The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther. College. The subscription price is seventy-fivecents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not accepted. We request payment. in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communicationsshould be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends.

Entered as second class matter at Post Officeof New DIm, Minnesota

September

Volume XXVII

No.1

1936

-: The Messenger Staff :Editor-in-Chief

Milton Bradtke

Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Typist Alumni. Exchange College Notes Co-ed Notes Locals ;

Arnold Coppens Robert Nolte :.Henry Krenz Henry Engelhardt Veleda KeIrn Gertrude Limpert 路路路

Athletics Jokes..,

Myrtle Pagenkopf Margaret Koehler Winfr:ied Stoekli Gerhard Rolloff

:

~

Ruth Gehlhar


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II

II

EDITORIAL

• TO THE NEW STUDENTS Although we are well into the beginning of a new . school year, the Messenger takes this opportunity to welcome back all the old students as well as the new ones. You have decided to continue your studies and are already acquainted with your duties at our institution. I say our institution, because it belongs to all of US; therefore our . sense of pride should urge us on to do our utmost to fulfill those curricular duties which experienced hands have found necessary to fit us out for our work. It is also up to us to abide by the tradition of our school, so to speak. We are of course referring to the extra-curricular activities. The Literary Societies will soon begin their work. Then there are the Band, the Girls' Glee Club, the Marlut Singers, and all kinds of athletics. Although you may not take an active part in all or any of these, your moral support is indispensable. Finally there is the Messenger to consider. Only a few take an active part in the making of our schooI paper. But more than your moral support is necessary here. The finances must also be taken care of. To that end you have subscribed for the Messenger, but that is not enough. The greatest expense is offset by the advertisers. It is for this reason and not because, as many may think, to fill up space, that in the advertising section of the Messenger we often read, "Patronize Messenger Advertisers!"

J


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The D . .1\'1.L. C. Messenger

OUR EXCHANGE

COLUMN

Which section of the Messenger is given the least attention by its readers? The section devoted to athletics?' No. There are always enough sport-minded alumni who are interested in knowing how the team is coming in this or that activity. But I wager to say that more is read from any other section than from our Exchange Column. Yet why? The Messenger has one person reading and preparing material for this column as well as any other. Thus it can be, and really is, one of the most interesting parts of our paper. Just what does the Exchange Column contain? In general, bits of news from other schools with whom we exchange papers. Only choice lines and thoughts are selected, with a little humor and sage advice added, to make this column very enterta:ining and well worth reading. Then why don't we read it? Some of us look upon this column as something, that was in one of the earlier issues and is continued as an old custom. We perhaps glance at the names of the papers printed with heavy ink, but there our interest stops. We do not give this column a chance to speak for itself. Therefore, let us read this section, and I am sure we shall find it entertaining and enjoyable.

•

G. R. '37. "EXCOMMUNICATED

•

CHILDREN"

This heading stared at me from the pages of the Walther League Messenger, and the accompanying article written by Dr. Maier impressed itself very strongly upon my mind. Excommunicated children! Yes, it has come to that. In England a young man was read out of the church because he had failed to "love. honor, and obey" his parents. His father, who was a bishop in the Anglican Church, and his mother committed suicide because their son had become a scenario writer, had used a large sum of their money, and had failed to reimburse them in any way. He is now charged with indirectly causing the death of his parents. . Having cited this concrete example, Dr. Maier proceeded to discuss conditions, deplorable. to be sure, among modern youth, but he did not blame youth itself for these conditions; he blamed the parents, who, he said, are so concerned with seeking their own pleasures that they leave the children to their own devices. Furthermore, they induce them to do wrong by themselves leading a disreputable life. Dr. Maier urges fathers and mothers to make


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TrIe D. ]'II. L. C. Messenger

home' attractive to their children, to be, their companions instead of superiors. He commands them to bring their children up in the nurture and admonition of the Lord, as the Bible says. Certainly Dr. Maier knows whereof he speaks, but I should like to say a word as to the education of modern youth. .

In the world of today one must have an education. That is an established fact. Since there are few families who can afford private tutors for their children, most youths are sent away to colleges or universities where they do as they please and where they often get into company that is' harmful, to say the least. Not only that, but the teachers who teach them are non-Christians and consequently do not teach from the Christian, the correct, viewpoint. Rather do they instill atheism, pantheism, and all the 'Other "isms." , The point I am trying to get at is this: Why do. not Christian parents send their children to a Christian institution? If they are truly concerned about the welfare of their children, they should. At our schools a child is taken care of spiritually, mentally, and bodily. He is instructed in the Word of God, as such; furthermore, he is taught the secular subjects from the Christian viewpoint. The Christian spirit so permeates his entire curriculum that he cannot help feeling its influence upon himself. I said the child was taken care of mentally. The same subjects are taught in our schools as in the public schools and just as efficiently. Pupils may take the state examinations and enter any state school if they do not wish to become pastors or teachers. The Jesuits used to say, "Give me a child until he is seven years old; then you can have him." In other words, what a child learns when he is young, he will not forget so easily. Send your boy or girl through the high school department, at least. Although none of our schools have football teams with a Big Ten rating, they do foster sports of all kinds for the benefit and pleasure of their students. Our colleges cannot make angels of criminals; they do not try, and they should not. That power lies in the Word of God alone. Our colleges try to educate modern youth in a Christian atmosphere. Will you not give your child, his: chance?-V. K. '37.


'rhe D. ~I. L. C. l\{essenger

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THE AIM OF OUR PUBLICATION "Johnnie, be sure you're on the right road, then stick to it." What boy has not heard this advice at one time or another? A few years ago a group of students at our institution must have experienced the same advice. For some time there had been talk concerning a school paper; but certain difficulties had to be overcome. At times it looked nigh unto impossible to realize such a goal. Thenas I am firmly convinced-a groun of students knew that they' were on the right road and determined to stick to that conviction. The result was the D. M. L. C. Messenger. At the moment their eyes fell on the first publication, a copy of which lies before me, they must have been filled with an honest and justified satisfaction of a task well begun. Beg undid you say? Yes. for the succeeding issues which came out always brought this thought to the staff's attention: How can we improve our publication? If each of you could have the opportunity of looking at all the publications of our paper, from the first issue of December, 1910, to the last issue of June, 1936, you would realize that the various staffs throughout the years have not been unconscious of this question. With this in mind the present staff gives the following: What is the aim of our paper? Well, that's easy. The aim is to-ah-em-ah-Yes that is the way we felt about it. From time to time certain aims and benefits of our publication appeared in editorials, but never-according to my knowledge-have these been collected and published. The staff has endeavored to state a definite aim for our school paper. In attempting to do this we have gathered from former publications those statements which we felt constituted the aim of the D. M. L. C. Messenger, namely: To offer such material as will be beneficial as well as interesting to our readers, to keep the alumni in a closer contact with the college, to foster school spirit, and to give the students an opportunity in the practice of composition and the expression of their thoughts.-A. W. C. '37.


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The D. M. L. C. Messenger

ALUMNI

ALUMNI NOTES

Knock, knock! Who's there? Bess. Bess who "Bess wir uns wiedersehen." Yes, "bisz wir uns wiedersehen," the followingnews shall have to suffice. Of course, I know you are all eager to know how last year's class has been placed. Here you are. Elizabeth Berg, La Crosse, Wisconsin. Albert Brokelmann, Truman, Minnesota. Frances Meyer,Bowdle,South Dakota. Beata Moldenhaur, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. Adele Nommensen, St. Paul, Minnesota. Waldemar Nolte, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Erwin Pretzer, Des Plaines,Ill. Ruth Seehusen, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. Agnes Strege, Sanborn. Minnesota. Oliva Stindt, Saginaw, Michigan. Ruth Uhlig, Racine, Wisconsin. , Julius Wantoch, Sanborn, Minnesota. Margaret Wegner, South Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Rudolf Weyland, Hortonville, Wisconsin. Florence Witte, Neenah, Wisconsin. Ora Wollenburg, Kewannee, Wisconsin. Among those who graduated from the High School Department and who are now attending other schools, are the following: Albrecht Habben, Northwestern College, Marcus Horn, Northwestern College. Ruth Priesz, MontevideoHigh School. Donald Schaller, Northwestern College. Hans Wagner, Valparaiso University. Raymond Wiechmann, Northwestern College. Homer Schweppe '35, Northwestern College. Gangway, Gangway! Here comes Cupid! And if anyone was,ever successful in archery, Cupid surely was this past summer. He ought to receive a trophy, for here are ten couples who fell victim to his good marksmanship.


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William Bartels '33 and Kathrvn Kent ex-'33 took the fatal step on June 21. Norbert Be~ndt '33 was among the attendants. . Margaret Stegeman ex-'33 and Rev.¡ Harold Backer '26 H. S. were married on June 26. Among the attendants at this wedding ware the Misses Hildegard Hellmann and Verna Buenger '30 H. S. and Rev. A. Hellmann '26 H. S.

•

Closely upon the heels of the Backers followed Martha Steinberg '29 and Ralph Jankowsky, Their wedding date was June 27. Gilbert Timm '32 and Lydia Rudolf ex-'33 chose July 3 as their wedding day. Adele Rudolf ex-'32 and Meilahn Zahn '32 served as maid of honor and best man. On Aug. 8, Rev. John Dahlke '26 H. S. was married to Caroline Kansier. Rev. Dahlke formerly taught at Dr. Martin Lu ther. College. Aug. 12 proved to be an eventful day in the lives of Henry Hasse '35 and Lena Klolz. Aug. 29 was chosen as a wedding day by two couples. Norbed Berndt '34 and Virginia Hackly are the one couple. Molly Engel '30 is one member of the other couple. Miss Engel is such an elusive little lady that I have been unable to learn the name of her husband, but she is married .. Gerhard Aug. 25.

Koepsell was married

to Lydia Moeller on

Dorothy Schwartz '29 chose Sept. 5 for her marriage to Rev. O. Naumann. Congratulations

to all!

Among the wounded in Cupid's battle is Albert Brokelmann '36 who is engaged to Esther Pasche of Kennewick, Washington. We are happy to report the birth of Rowland John Cummings on May 31, but equally sad to report his deaj;D on Aug. 28. To Mr. and Mrs. Cummings (nee Edna Stein. berg '33) we extend our sympathy. Arthur Meier '33 and Wm. Arras '34 attended summer sessions at River 'Forest, Ill.


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The D. l'iI.

L.

C. Messenger

!

i.

EXCHANGE NOTES Concordia College at Milwaukee. Wisconsin, has just introduced the cap and gown into its graduation exercises, and in the Concordia Courier the history of this tradition is given. When this tradition began in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, priestly robes were worn, since the great majority who attended the universities was the clergy. In the days of Columbus caps and gowns were a sign of wealth and distinction. Early students wore robes continually. "They found that while they sat inactive in cold buildings for hours at a time, a long flowing gown was as warm as any dress which could be got. But many of the clerics, and certain laymen. unfortunately had a particular spot which became chilled in the draughty, damp buildings. This weak spot was their shaven or perchance naturally bald head, for which they then devised the cap to keep it warm."

o

Gradually peculiar cuts in caps and gowns were developed, so that today many styles and customs exist at the different universities. We see that this tradition is an old, but distinguished one, and every college should introduce it. We ourselves can be proud of the fact that it has been introduced here, and we can be quite confident that the use of cap and gown will be continued by the succeeding classes.


The D. lU. L.

c.

~Ies8enger

19

Although Christmas vacation is a long way off, no doubt, everyone has given the trip home a fleeting thought, if not a lingering one. The Maroon and White suggests a game for traveling, which it claims will break the monotony of any journey. This game is called "Zitz."

•

" 'Zitz' is a game of looking for beards. Whenever one spots a beard, he should immediately exclaim 'Zitz,' because the first one to call out gets the counter. But all beards do not count the same. A plain everyday beard (it has to be at least the month's growth, not a 'bad shave') counts one; a Rabbinical beard, three. . .... We expand the Rabbinical to mean any beard untouched by scissors (or any other cutting implements)." "Although 'Zitz' seems to be a nonsensical game, it really has its value. It will show the observer the diminishing number of beards and provide entertainment for a monotonous ride." Why not try it!


20

The D. M. L. C. l\lessenger

n \.__jL)LLEGE:

COLLEGE NOTES We wish to extend a hearty welcome to all the new students in our institution. This year the enrollment is about 147 pupils, which is approximately the same as last year. On September 14 St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran 'Schoolbegan its faIl term, and with it came the ordeal of practice-teaching for the III Normal class. Gertrude Limpert and Winfried Stoekli are the teachers who opened the school year. The band, under the leadership of Winfried Stoekli, and the Marlut Singers, directed by Milton Bradtke, have already begun rehearsals. We wish them success in their organizations. • The new inspector of the music hall is Arnold Coppens. Winfried Stoekli must endure all kinds of weather so that the students may receive their afternoon mail. The literary societies will soon resume their work. The following officershave been chosen: Phi Delta Sigma -President, Henry Engelhardt; vice president, Karl Mittelstaedt; secretary, Naomi Sauer; treasurer, Paul Fuerstenau. Phi Gamma Rho-President, Winfried Stoekli; vice president, Ralph Swantz; secretary, Ruby Holzheuter; treasurer, Reuben Bode. We hope that this year we may have a few more programs and activities than in the past years.


I

The D. M. L. C. Afessenger

The professors spent the vacation in various ways. Some remained at home, while others spent a few weeks in the neighboring states of Wisconsin, Iowa, and South Dakota. i

On Sunday, September 13, the college had a social afternoon for the purpose of getting acquainted and to help keep the new students from getting homesick. The first part of the afternoon was devoted to playing group games, and later the boys played quite a spirited kitterrball game. A considerable majority of our professors was present and also stayed for the supper, which was served in the boys' dining room. If the boys and girls would always eat together, perhaps there might be some improvement in table manners. As it is, both are rather slack along this line. The student body extends its appreciation to the professors for this afternoon of entertainment, and hope that we may have more of them.


22

The D. IIi. L. C. Messenger

CO-ED NOTES "Ah!! Doesn't it feel good to get back to school again? Just look at all the new students this year! Why. the Girls' Dormitory is literally swarming with new faces!" This probably may have been the first saying of the "old residents" at the dorm upon entrance at Hillcrest Hall on September 1, 1936. Among the new girls here at the dOTmitory there are the following: Dorothy Froehlke, Winona, Minnesota. Ruth Koeninger, Manitowoc, Wisconsin. Eunice Stern, Detroit, Michigan. Hildegarde Bade, Balaton, Minnesota. Pearl Anderson, Hanska, Minnesota. Marguerite Bleck, Buffalo, Minnesota. Geraldine Boelter, North Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Among those girls who decided that the dorm was the better place at which to board are Gertrude Walther and Evelyn Hunt. As we all know, spring, summer, and autumn are the days of picnics, so on September 7th, several 3rd Floor girls took advantage of the wonderful weather and had a watermelon "feast" out at Camels Back. And believe you me, did the melon ever taste good! (take it from Ruby Holzheuter and Veleda KeIrn who seemed r ? to have enjoyed the. "feast" more than the rest of us!). On September 8th, the 3rd Floor "Gang" was escorted, via chauffeur (a chair) to Salon 10 to a formal "dinner" party, sponsored by The Bug. The menu consisted of buttered toast, pickled peaches, birthday cake, cookies, and candy. It seems that a very good time was enjoyed by all. Most of the girls sighed and moaned when informed that school would be in session on September 7th in spite of the fact that everybody else was observing the national holiday, Labor Day. But then, we had enough noise


The D. 1\1.L. C. l\{essenger

23

around the place with the farmers' picnic at the park and the lively atmosphere inside the dorm. Several girls had some pennies which burned holes in their "pockets, so they just had to spend them over at the stands at the picnic. Some girls also took part in the contests, and Erna Kuehl happened to be lucky enough to win the first prize of $1 in the split-pea-guessing contest. I bet that $1 bill certainly came in handy. Everybody had a good time at the "get-together" given by the faculty on September 13th. It seemed that the good spirits of the girls could not be downed very easily, so Miss Ingebritson consented to take us all out for a walk in the beautiful evening air. The walk finally ended up at the Schnitker home, where we all seranaded them with some of our songs. Since three members of the Girls' Athletic Board graduated, a meeting was held to fill the vacancies left by their graduations. The following new members were elected: Marie Hinnenthal, Melba Gieseke, and Marie Sweeney. Recently some of the girls became rather ambitious, so they set to work weeding the tennis court and getting it ready for next spring. And was it ever hard work! The two new tennis managers are really "go-getters." Their names? Marie Sweeney and Naomi Birkholz. Cecelia Priesz is the new kittenball manager, Melba Gieseke is the new basketball manager, and Erna Kuehl is the horseshoe manager. Myrtle Pagenkopf is the volleyball manager. Captains for the four kittenball teams are Veleda Kelm, Adelaide Nolte, Marie Sweeney, and Margaret K oehler, and games are already in progress. The "Redeker Gang" has been in the "party" mood of late too. Margie Larson happened to be the honored one this time, for on September 6th and 8th parties were given in her honor. Naturally, birthday cake was the treat of the evening, besides the popcorn. Among the newcomers at Redeker Hall, there are the following: Elizabeth Beutler, La Crosse, Wisconsin; Mildred Baumann, Neillsville, Wisconsin; Estella Albrecht, who moved up from downtown. The new matron at Redeker Hall happens to 'be Gertrude Limpert. Marie Sweeney and Betty Beutler certainly did some worrying during the first two weeks of school. Reason: their trunks were delayed on the train between La Crosse and New Ulm. Finally, after days and days of patient waiting, the trunks arrived at the correct destination.


:24

The D. lU. L. C. Messenger

LOCALS On September 2, D. M. L.. C. opened its doors for the' new school year of 1936-37. A hearty welcomeis extended to all newcomers in our midst. We hope that each one soon may consider himself one of us. The newcomers here at the dormitory are: Clemens Weindorf, Goodhue, Minn.; Raymond Fluegge, New VIm. Minn.; Donald Schultz, Litchfield, Minn.; Marlin Mentz, Faribault, Minn.; Elmer Bode, Nicollet, Minn.; Edward Schmidt, Milwaukee, Wis.; Roland Meyer, Balaton, Minn.; Sylvester Schreitmueller, Kiester, Minn.; Wendell Kurth" Buffalo Lake, Minn.; Edward Peterson, Rockford, Minn.; Carl Mischke, Hazel, S. Dak.; Frederick Nitz, Rockford, Minn.; Norman 'I'radup, Rochester, Minn.: Ekhart Gauger, Corvuso, Minn.: David Geil, Milwaukee,Wis.; Edward Larson, Hanska, Minn.; Leo Preuss, Benson, Minn.; Robert Kolb, New VIm, Minn. and Elroy Schroeder, Collins, Wis. "Bob" Meyer just couldn't resist returning to our midst-arriving a few days late. In one of his first classes: he was asked, "What is the opposite of education?" He solemnly replied, "Co-education." Now we are all in doubt whether he is here to seek education or co-education!


25

The D. l\'I. L. C. Messenger

Dallman is reported to have bought his car from a fire-chief; at least its color would seem to denote that. There seems to be a number of new guitar and mouth

organ players about, judging by the numerous evening

,

I

It.

"serenades" Of course. it is only natural that the "fuchses" should be going from room to room seeking striped-ink and skyhooks! As Dallman could find no one to fill his position, he has resumed his tasks as "official creaser." Mentz attributes swamp.

his "reedy"

voice to living near a

If only someone would donate a few fly-swatters, we would be more comfortable here at the dormitory. Howard Birkholz maintains that he. has all records broken-26 flies at a single stroke! Here's a real life-saver, Bade says he has bought a new fly-swatter. Julius Ingebritson had his tonsils removed Sept. 10, but is now with us again. Boxing has become popular among the high school boys again. I

"Billy" Muesing-s-is he our coming college humorist? The II Normals Konig."

are "studiously"

reading

"Markus

Among those having bicycles at the dormitory R. Nolte, E. Peterson, and Frederick Nitz.

are

Football practice is already well under way. By the way, Krenz calls football "manslaughter;" evidently we shall not see him out for practice! . The source of all the melons for the recent "feeds" is still unknown to most of us. It might be of interest to know that floors have all been waxed. .

our dormitory

Until football began, "Peewee" got his daily dozen swatting flies! Rolloff is very happy to say that the door to his study room has been repaired-now it closes!

, .


26

The D. M. L. C. Messenger

The 11th grade does not like its "no free period" schedule very well. Lueker and Fritz are of course enjoying German as much as ever before. The Band has begun its rehearsals-several new members have appeared.

promising

"Bob" Meyer maintains that Washington's birthday is Feb. 12, for he says, "Washington lived long before Lincoln !" We even have night classes already this year-the library course. M. Schultz, the renowned lawnmower again worrying over his extra burdens. Did you know that this summer!

Engelhardt's

The new reading-room manager?

engineer,

is

"blonde" fish died Mr. Robert Meyer!

Quite a number of our former fellows here at the dormitory have been visiting these first few days: Julius Wantoch. Albert Brockelman, Frederick Tiefel, Arnold Tiefel, Wallace Kurth, Herbert Birner, Ray Wiechmann, Norman Sauer, Brainard Otto, and Marcus Horn. "Charlie" Brockelman feels bad there is now no longer anyone here to defend the West! Another newcomer-Arnold Wehausen.

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The D. M. L. C. Messenger

28

ATHLETICS D. M. L. C. WINS S. M. J. C. C. BASEBALL CHAMPIONSHIP D. M. L. C. by defeating Concordia 11-7 in the final game of the season retained its title of champions of the Southern Minnesota Junior College Conference for the second consecutive year. In the game played May 29 both teams committed errors which aided materially in the scoring. A large crowd attended the game which was not decided until the seventh inning when D. M. L. C. scored five runs to take a commanding lead. Foss led the Hilltopper attack with a triple and a single. The box score:

D. M.L.

AB Dallmann .......... 2 Ingebritson ...... 5 Raabe ................ 4 Schweppe .......... 4 Lindemann ...... 5 Hoefer .............. 4 Foss .................. 4 Rolloff ................ 4 Horn .................. 3 C.

35

H I 0 2 I I I 2 0 I

R I I 3 2 I 2 I 0 0

9

11

Concordia AB Nachtsheim 4 Lieske ................ 5 Hansen .............. 3 Krueger ............ 3 Petersen ............ 4 Hasskamp ........ 5 Schweigert ........ 5 Mack .................. 4 Schierenbeck .... I Becker .............. 3 37

H 0 2 2 0 I 2 2 I I 0

R 0 2 I 0 0 I 0 I I I

11

7

FOOTBALL After such an exciting baseball season this spring, we are wondering what the boys will do in football, this fall. But that question can only be answered by what the 35 husky lads who reported for practice intend to do. Seven letter men, Swantz, Duin, Rolloff, Coppens, Fuerstenau, Bradtke, and Horn, are returning but much new material will be needed. At present the squad is divided into two groups. These groups will play several games between themselves before the season opens. And with such teams as Waldorf, Shattuck, Rochester, and St. Peter scheduled, the boys will need just plenty of practice. So come on gang; let's go!

••


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

29

Father Understands "Hadn't you better go and tell your father?" said the motorist to the farmer's boy who stood looking at the load of hay upset in the lane by a collision. "He knows," replied the boy. "Knows? How can he?" "He's under the hay."-Ex.

He: They laughed when I sat down to play the piano. She: Why? He: Because there was no piano stool.-Ex.

Fischer: Say, Bruce, if yoI u had five bucks in your pocket, what would you think? . Bruce: I'd think I had on somebody else's pants.

Kuesel: Did you hear about the fellow who invented a device for looking through brick walls? Preuss: No, what does he call it? Kuesel: A window, you mutt!

One of the biggest auto accidents of the year happened the other day when a motorist stopped his car to see if he had really killed the skunk that he ran over. He hadn't! -Ex.


30

Th" D. 111.L. C. l'IIessenger

"Did you ever see the Catskill mountains?" "No, sir, but I've seen 'em kill mice."-Ex. On His Way "I hear you stayed in a. haunted house last night, What happened ?" "About twelve o'clock a ghost came through the wall just as if there were no wall there." "And what did you do?" "I went through the opposite wall in the same way." -Ex. Perfect Alibi There was a timid knock at the door. "If you please, kind lady," said the beggar, "I've lost my right leg-路" "Well, it ain't here!" retorted the woman of the house as she slammed the door.-Ex. What Dumbbells Think A dog is a lucky animal because he never has to press his pants. A jersey sweater is a perspiring cow. You always find feather ticks on an old rooster. The Eskimos have a difficult life in the cold North because they have to go around in their bear skins.

"I saw the sea yesterday." "Did it recognize you?" "Well, it waved towards me."-Ex. Diner: This salmon isn't nearly so nice as that I had a week ago. Waiter: It should be, sir; it's from the same fish. -Ex. What some people don't know, they are always talking about.-Ex. Diner: Porter, I want some more ice in my ice water. Porter: Sorry, sah, but if ah takes any moh ice off'n that corpse in the baggage cah, it's gonna spoil.


The D. l\'[. L. C. l\'[essenger

She:

31

I'm giving you a bol' of cigars for your birth-

day. He: She: He: She: know you

But I don't smoke. Then I'll give you a bottle 'of wine. Oh, no! I don't drink either. Well, then I'll give you some flowers because I ' smell:

Use a Bathtub Never .break your bread or roll in your soup.-Etiquette hint in English paper.

Or Flat Feet "I'm glad I'm not a snake," said Sammy. "Why?" asked his dad.

"Because when a snake has a stomach ache, how does he know whether it's a stiff neck or what it is ?"-Ex. Wehausen wants to know whether they put mortar between bricks to hold them apart or keep them together.

;: I


STUDENTS! BEFORE BUYING CONSULT ADVERTISING

THE

SECTION

Patronize Our Advertisers Without' Them

THE MESSENGER Cannot Exist

List of Advertisers. Saffert's Provision Market F. J. Backer & Co. Eugene Koehler Barber Shop Dr. G. J. Hiebert Mr. Albert Flor The Bee Hive J. C. Penney Co. Drs. Schleuder Somsen, Dempsey, Johnson & Somsen Fink's Store New VIm Grocery Simons Lumber Co. Farmers and Merchants State Bank ModelBarber Shop Wicherski Shoe Store Salet's Department Store Crone Bros. Company Erickson and Graff National Tea Store Drs. Hammermeister and Saffert


State Bank of New Ulm Muesing Drug Store Eichten Shoe Store Herzog Publishing Company Kemske Paper Go. Weilandt and Stegemann New DIm Greenhouse Rexall Drug Store Eagle Roller Mill Co. Eibner and Son Schlumpberger's Grocery Hummel Bros. Dr. A. L. Kusske

Ulrich Electric Company Tauscheck and Green Buenger Furniture Company Citizens State Bank Dr. E. G. Lang Robert Fesenmaier, Inc. Silver Latch Inn Mr. T. O. Srtreissguth Retzlaff Motor Company Retzlaff Hardware Company New "DImDairy Henry Goede Studio Lang's Master Barber Shop Fred Meine ClothingCompany New DIm Steam Laundry Schroeder Bakery , Dr. F. H. Dubbe .1 Schuck's Tailor Shop Dr. Von Bank Gastler Studio Union Hospital E. C. Vogelpohl Aid Association for Lutherans A. C. Ochs Brick & Tile Yards August Schell Brewing Company The Hauenstein Company

. 1,

•

,

.


DANIEL WEBSTER FLOUR PERFECTED

Makes More and Better Bread

EAGLE ROLLER MILL CO. NEW ULM, MINNESOTA

PINK'S STORE Where the Newest Styles Are Shown First The Smartest Wear for Young and Old At Prices You Expect to Pay

The Store Where You Feel At Home DEER BRAND .1_' I_tl_"_I_"_"_' I_f'BEER ~I_C_'.

AUGUST SCHELL BREWING COMPANY NEW ULM,

MINNESOTA


COMPLIMENTS

路OF

T. O. STREISSGUTH Modernizing, Maintaining, Tuning, Repairs, Service, Sales

Reconstruction, Installation, Additions, Blowers, Chimes, Harps

Wicks Pipe Organs ERNEST C. VOGELPOHL ORGAN ARCHITECTS AND BUILDERS New Ulm, Minn. 405-409 North Broadway When in Need of Electrical Supplies and Radios or Service call on

Ulrich. Electric Company Electric Service at Its Best-Buy With Service

Phone 148

I.

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-:..

HENRY GOEDE STUDIO We Make Photos That Satisfy

I

STUDIO

; I

Phone 315

170 North Broadway

; : . I ~

I

Res. Phone 311 Always a Good Barber Waiting to Serve You At

LANG'S MASTER BARBER SHOP Individual Neck Duster with Each Hair Cut No Mug-We Use Bar-Soap Lather Machine-No Brush All the Latest Sanitary Equipment Shoe Shines Shower Baths


A. C. OCHS BRICK & TILE COMPANY Executive Office and Plant Springfield, Minn.

General Sales Office

906 Foshay Tower Minneapolis Manufacture

Artistic Face Brick Various Colors -

Also-

Load Bearing. Tile and complete line of

Building Tile and Common Brick WHY IT WILL

PA Y YOU TO BUILD

with FACE BRICK Face Brick offers the widest choice of color tones, both in artistic blends and even shades. Colors and textures burned in becoming lovelier with age. A Face Brick Home offers you less upkeep over a period of years. Lessened heating cost and greater comfort in winter and 'summer. Greater resale value. Easily financed because loan companies prefer the known merits of Face Brick houses. .

Our Products Are Sold

i"n the

New Vim Territory by

NEW ULM BRlel( & TILE YARDS


SPAULDING ATHLETIC GOODS -at-

Robert Fesenmaier, Inc. Special discount given to students

EUGENE KOEHLER BARBER SHOP Hair Cuts 30c Efficient Service and Courteous Treatment New DIm

20 N. Minn. St.

AMERICA'S FINEST SUIT VALDES See the Beautiful Patterns on Display in our Window. Come in and Feel the Luxurious "Meaty" fabrics $15.00 - $17.50 - $21.50 - $25.00 The Biggest Money's Worth You Ever Saw

HUMMEL BROTHERS New DIm, Minn.

14 No. Minn. St.

BANK WITH

FARMERS ~ MERCHANTS STATE BANK New Ulm, Minnesota

FRIENDLY HELPFUL SERVICE AT YOUR COMMAND TAILORED TO MEASURE SUITS

$23.50~$25.00 and up No Deposits-No

C. O. D.'s

All kinds of Repairing

CLEANING AND PRESSING

SCHUCK

TAILOR S

215 N. Minn St.

Phone 498

Residence Phone 150

Office Phone 260

DR. F. H. DUBBE PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON NEW ULM,

MINNESOTA


NEW ULM GROCERY CO. Wholesale Grocers Distributors STOKLEY'S CANNED VEGETABLES LIBBY'S CANNED FRUITS

Service and Satisfaction at the

MODEL BARBER SHOP ALFRED H. KUESTER, Prop.

Footwear Athletic Footwear and Sox Ladies' Smart Styles Attractively Priced

EMIL 路WICHERSKI

HENRY

SIMONS LUMBER CO. DEPENDABILITY


We Have "Steinies" HA DEN STEIN BEER and PALE DRY CARBONATED BEVERAGE SERVED AT ALL PLACES Telephone No. 1 New DIm, Minnesota

Buy Rexall Merchandise ,

i'

SUPERIOR QUALITY AT LOWER PRICES

REXALL DRUG STORE Walter Muesing-Walter

W. Hellmann

"SAVE WITH SAFETY"

NEW ULM STEAM LAUNDRY OTTO F. OSWALD

& SONS

Phone No.5 For Your Dry Cleaning, Laundry or Hat Work We assure you prompt and efficient service and invite you to visit our modern, up-to-date plant at 107-109 So. Minn. St.


THE SCHROEDER BAKERY THE FLOWER OF NEW ULM JUST LIKE THE BREAD MOTHER MAKES

PHONE 232 AID ASSOCIATION FOR LUTHERANS APPLETON, WISCONSIN

,

In its various plans of life insurance, the Aid Association for Lutherans, the largest legal reserve fraternal life insurance society for Lutherans in the United States and Canada, and operating strictly within the various Synods of the Synodical Conference, offers that absolute SAFETY which all who purchase life insurance to create an earning-ability estate are seeking. INSURANCE

IN FORCE

ASSETS, July 1, 1936

$164,736,045.00 .

. $20,414,273.82

Total Benefits paid to Certificateholders Beneficiaries since organization

and

Alex. O. Benz, President

Wm. H. Zuehl~;e, Treasurer

Wrn. F. KeIrn, Vice President

_ __. $15,852,054.32

Albert Voecks, Secretary Otto C. Rentner, General Counsel


Save to the Limit Buy to the Limit If Savings Mean Anything at All to You, You'll Stock Up at Penney's

J.. C. PENNEY CO. Corner Minn. and 2nd North St.

Give Your Eyes a Chance We fit your eyes right, grind lenses in our own shop and replace broken lenses on short notice. After October 1st we will open up in our new building at 102 No. Minnesota St.

DRS. SCHLEUDER Optometrists 102 N. Minn. St.

Telephone 87

New Ulm

Phone

For Printing and Supplies

Towels

3 7 0

KEMSKE PAPER CO.

Toilet

and Paper

Mimeograph Stencils and Ink Filing Equipment and Office Supplies

Safes

NEW

ULM

Desks

DAIRY THE HOME OF

Enjoy

Pure Dairy

Products

ICE CREAM

Phone 104

SOMSEN, DEMPSEY, JOHNSON and SOMSEN Henry N. Somsen Russell L. Johnson Attorneys

New Ulm,

W. H. Dempsey Henry N. Somsen, Jr. At Law

Minnesota


SCHLUMPBERGER'S GROCERY Groceries-Fruits-

Vegetables-Smoked

Phone 182

Meats

New Ulm, Minn.

WILLIAM J. VON BANK, D.D.S. Dentist Office Phone 237

New Ulm, Minn.

Residence Phone 797

We Welcome You to the

NEW BEE HIVE J. A. OCHS & SON, Inc.

New VIm, Minn.

Every Article Brand New Store OPen After October 5th

F. J. BACKER & ,CO. ,HARNESS DEALER Kwik-Pak Parcel Post Laundry Cases Trunks, TravelingBags, Suit Cases. Purses and Othe~ Leather Specialties

E. G. LANG, D. D. S. Office above State Bank of New Ulm Oflice Phone 472

Res. Phone 1172

THE GASTLER STUDIO For Quality Photographs Also Kodak Finishing


Buy Where

r ou See

This Sign

YOU BUY BETTER BECAUSE WE BUY BETTER Our 500 Store Buying Power Makes Possible the Low Prices on Our Quality Merchandise

F. H. RETZLAFF HARDWARE COMPANY

D,rs. Hammermeister

~ Saffert

Physicians and Surgeons Office Over State Bank of New UIm

QUALITY CLOTHING Correct Fitting

and Standard

Lines

TAUSCHECK ~ GREEN

Drive With Dodge

SAFETY

RETZLAFF

Plymouth

MOTOR COMPANY


We Turn a House Into a Home BUENGER FURNITURE

Stores:

CO.

New Ulm and Sleepy Eye, Minn.

Distinctive Funeral Service

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CITIZENS STATE BANK New DIm, Minnesota Under provisions of the Banking Act of 1933 Our Deposits Are Insured


WHEN IN NEED OF FOOTWEAR Be Sure and Call on Us We carry a complete line of men's, ladies' and children's shoes We appreciate your business. Our prices are always the lowest, Qualitconsidered

ATHLETIC SHOES OUR SPECIALTY TRY OUR REPAIR DEPARTMENT

FOR GOOD WORK

P. J. EICHTEN SHOE STORE New Ulm, Minnesota

â&#x20AC;˘

QUALITY GROCERS OF THE MIDDLE WEST

Weilandt & Stegeman Contractors and Builders Correspondence Solicited .Vvork Done in Any Section of the . Community Plans and Specifications Furnished Estimates Cheerfully Given Office 1100 Center St. Phone 571 Auto Glass Replaced to Order

HART SCHAFFNER SUITS

& MARX

AND OVERCOATS

O'DONNELL

SHOES

.WHN B. STETSON

HATS

Complete Line of Men's and Boys' Clothes

Fred Meine Cl. Co.

NEW ULM GREENHOUSES

Flowers For All Occasions

NEW DLM, MINNESOTA


BREAD! Helps You Off to School With Needed Food Energy Your Baker Makes The Finest, Most Delicious, Wholesome Bread EIBNER'S BREAD IS GOOD Eat More Of It And Keep In Tip-Top Condition

~.

EIBNER 8' SON BAKERY and ICE CREAM PHONE 128

Established 1883

ALBERT D. FLOR Attorney at Law New DIm, Minnesota

SALET'S DEPARTMENT STORE-NEW

VLM, MINN.

EVERYTHING TO WEAR FOR HIM OR HER WE,AR SALET'S FAMOUS $1.98 FOOTWEAR

Highest Quality and of Course "YOU ALWAYS SAVE AT SALET'S"

SILVER LATCH INN "The Pride of New DIm" Fountain Service-Lunches-Meals Dining Room Service


UNIDN HOSPITAL NEW ULM, MINN. A modern. well-equipped, and fireproof hospital supervised staffed with registered nurses .

by and

.PHONE No. 404

A. L. KUSSKE, M.D. Practice Limited to Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat and Fitting of Glasses In Weiser Block Over Silver La ~ch Cafe N â&#x201A;Źw Ulm Minnesota

Goodyear Tires Batteries Radios-Accessories HAROLD RIESS

ALBERT HELD

Center and Minnesota Sts,

Phone 1040

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]l.lml.1t-. <it. lI(J$$en er

1

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Number II

Volume XXVII DECEMBER

1936


Better Meats

Cleaner Meats Quicker Service

I

I

CITY MEAT MARKET Hugo M. Schnobrich-Oscar A. Schnobrich Proprietors New Ulm, Minnesota

'.

Delicious Home Made Sausages

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L '


-: CONTENTS

:-

:of

I

LITERARY a)

A Real Christmas

b)

Courage..............

c)

Money Mad................................................................ 6

LIBR.ARY COMMENTS

'2 5

:.................................... 8

EDITORIALS a)

The New Staff

b)

Literary Activities

:

13

ALUMNI

15

EXCHANGE

17

COLLEGE NOTES

19路

CO-ED NOTES

22

J...IOCALS ATHLETICS JOKES

,\

12

;

26

:

29

34


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The 1,). M. L. C. Messenger

A REAL CHRISTMAS It was on Christmas Eve that a hoy of fourteen years was seen trudging listlessly along a lonely road near the village of Norris ville. The snow had been falling thick and fast all day, and by evening the snow was so deep that traveling, and even walking, along a lonely road was not an easy task. This boy, bedraggled and cold. came from a poor, outcast family. He was the oldest of seven children, having six little brothers and sisters ranging between the ages of twelve and two. His father had died when he, Jimmie Mitchell, was twelve years old, leaving his mother alone in this world almost penniless and with the burden of rearing seven little children. In order to provide food and clothing for him and his brothers and sisters, Jimmie's mother worked hard from early in the morning until late at night, doing housework, washing, and ironing for rich people. Jimmie's parents at one time had been quite well-fixed financially, but because of the big business slumps and the closing of banks, Mr. Mitchell had lost practically all of his money and had been left almost penniless. He had at one time been earning enough money so that he could easily support a family of seven and provide them with enough food and clothing. During the depression Jimmie's father had lost his job and he was compelled to look around for another one. This was no easy matter since jobs at this time were few and far between, so Mrs. Mitchell had to go out to earn the money with which to buy bread. Things went from bad to worse, and the family grew poorer day by day.


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One day, a knock was heard at the door of the school which Jimmie was attending. and Jimmie Mitchell was called to the door.

â&#x20AC;˘

"Are you James Mitchell?" standing before him .

said a big fat policeman,

"Yes, sir, that's my name," answered Jimmie in amazement, "but tell me, Mister. is there anything wrong at home?" "You are wanted at home immediately; dead," answered the policeman.

your father is

"Oh, no, Mister, that can't be true," and Jimmie began to cry. That very afternoon a neighbor had found the body of All of his worries and cares had driven Mr. Mitchell to take his life, and now Jimmie's mother was lef c alone in this world with her little children. Much responsibility also fell upon Jimmie's shoulders now since he was the oldest of the 'children.

My. Mitchell tied to a tree.

After the funeral Jimmie promised his mother faithfully that he would help her wherever he could, but he knew it would be difficult for him to do half as well as his mother usually did. Since his mother also did not have a strong constitution, Jimmie often had taken his mother's place in .her work. Mrs. Mitchell was a hardworking woman, but finally her health broke down and she was forced to go to bed with pneumonia. On this Christmas Eve the sight at Jimmie's home was not a pleasant one to see. His mother was very sick, his brothers and sisters had no shoes to wear and were forced to go barefooted, and they had had very little to eat for several days in this ice-cold house.

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,

Christmas Eve meant nothing to them; it was just like any other day. Perhaps the children had wished for toys, but they knew that their mother was not in a position to buy any for them. They did not know what Christmas was being celebra.ed for. Their father and mother had never attended any church whatsoever, and the children had never been told about Jesus. When Jimmie's father was buried, he was given a simple funeral, and he received a pauper's grave. Jimmie heard a man praise his father at the funeral, also offer up a prayer, but Jimmie had no idea what the significance of it was. As Jimmie Mitchell thus trudged along the roadside, he passed by many homes which were ablaze with lights.


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Thp D. 1\1.L. C. 1\1"ssenger

Beautifully lighted Christmas trees could also be seen through the windows of some of these homes. _ All of a sudden Jimmie heard some church bells ringing in the distance. They were the bells of the church at the next corner, calling the people together for the Christmas Eve service. A strange feeling crept over Jimmie as he heard these bells, and he stopped at the, roadside, wondering what it all really meant. He had never 'been inside a church before, and he had always wanted to see what it was like inside. A strange little something within him told him to go to this church and find out the reason for the ringing of the bells. As Jimmie neared the church, he noticed that many people were slowly filing into the church. Just as he reached the doorway, the sound of a choir of children's voices singing, "Silent Night, Holy Night!" reached his ears. What was that he heard? "Silent Night, Holy Night i: Why were they singing that? His curiosity drove him inside the doorway, and Jimmie crowded behind the people into a little inconspicuous corner, apart from the people. There he heard the minister recite the Christmas story: "How in a lowly manger in a stable the baby Jesus was born for all mankind. Jesus has been born to take our sins away, and that is why we celebrate Christmas." Jimmie stood there, gazing with astonishment at the big Christmas tree which stood in the front of the church, and listening intently to the words which the minister spoke, "Unto you is born this day in the city of David a Savior which is Christ the Lord." Immediately the thought came to Jimmie that he must run home and tell his mother about Jesus too. He crawled out of his corner and out of the church, running along the road toward his home as fast as his legs could carry him. When he finally reached home, he wasted no time in telling his mother where he had been and what he had heard. As he told these things to his mother, he noticed that she was crying. She remembered how she as a little child had learned about Jesus, but as she grew older, she gradually fell away from Jesus and the church, finally forgetting entirely about Jesus. "Don't cry, mother," he said, "for we're going to have a nice Christmas this year. Now we'll celebrate Christmas, and we'll know why we celebrate it-Jesus Christ, the Savior of all the world is born to us this day; yes, to you and to me and to all my brothers and sisters, mother." That very same evening some kind folks came to Jimmie's home and brought food and clothing and even toys to


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Jimmie and his mother and brothers and sisters. Thus, with the true meaning of Christmas in their hearts, the Mitchells were privileged to celebrate a real and happy Christmas.-M. K. '37.

COURAGE Courage is defined as that quality which enables one to encounter danger and difficulties with firmness, without fear. It includes 'bravery, dauntlessness. gallantry, boldness, valor, and fortitude. These characteristics are necessary, not only where there is immediate danger of death, but also in meeting the problems and trials in everyday life. It takes courage bravely to face business depressions, financial failures, loss of dear ones, sickness, and disease. Several years ago, a newspaper narrated an incident which so impressed me that I still remember it very clearly. Two little girls (whom I shall for convenience name Jane and Mary), aged eight years and five years respectively, were playing along the railroad tracks when the younger girl's foot got caught in the rails. The train was coming, and Jane worked frantically to release Mary's foot; but it seemed to be securely fastened, and Jane's efforts were futile. What did she do ?-run to. the nearest house to summon aid? No, she simply used her common sense. She was determined that her little sister should not lose her life, even if she would lose her leg. Quickly she pulled Mary from the tracks; only the limb was in the way of the rapidly approaching train. As the locomotive neared them, the rails spread apart, and Mary's foot was released. Only the toes were cut off. I wonder how many children, eight years of age, would have bad the courage and presence of mind to act as Jane did. Undoubtedly most of them would have run, with terrified cries, from the scene. When a gallant young soldier goes to war with the knowledge that he will probably never see his home again, and that, if he does return, it may be without one, or both, of his arms or legs, or without 'his eyesight, it must take all the courage he can summon up to bid his family "Goodbye." Even to witness the horrors of war is enough to make a man lose his dauntlessness. . I think love is, in a large measure, responsible for most courageous deeds. A soldier goes to war because of love


The D. l\'[. L. C. Messenger

6

for his country ; a father rushes into a burning house to rescue his child; many Christians die for love for their Savior. When one person risks his life for another, the motive must be love. Courage is usually thought to be limited to the stronger sex. A man manifests his courage when physical strength and endurance are necessary, but in confronting the problems of everyday life, woman shows greater intrepidity. When there are sorrows or failures in the family, the woman is generally the one to pick up what is left and carryon the ship, while the man broods and complains over the matter. Men are capa:ble .of bearing up under physical strain, but women can carry a greater load of mental strain.-E. A. '38.

MONEY MAD Mammon is the American's God! He rules the business, social, educational and recreational phases of the fortyeight states. He speaks with a smooth and powerful voice, and his word is law. But he is a man-made God and will therefore lead his worshippers to destruction. It is in the world of business that Mammon's influence is felt to the greatest extent. The average business man's motto is: I want to make money. I shall make money, and I don't care how. Of course, there are exceptions to the rule, but then these only aid in proving the assertion. From the Mellons and the Morgans on Wall Street to the Babbitts on Main Street, money is the goal arid purpose in life. The big money men of our country have been given various titles, such as "Robber Barons," the "Favored Few" and the "economic royalty." It is a well known fact that these men have amassed their huge fortunes through the exploitation of natural resources or human dreams and lives. The Babbitts, of course, do not belong to the "robber barons," but they manage to get in their share of petty thieveries. I suppose the game of making money follows the idea of most games-namely, the more you get, the more you want. As I have said, there are honest, Christian business men, just as there are white orchids. .

In

the social world money also rules. It is said that we have no class system in America. I do not agree, for I believe that just as England has its titles, we have our bankbook. The sizes of your balance being your card of admittance to the inner circles. True, we still give first place to


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members of the families who founded and built up our nation, whether or not there is much of a fortune left, but the man who reaches the heights of social prominence in these days B. C.-before Communism-is the man who can afford to buy and sell any number of "first families." Oh yes, you can buy anvthinz in America, from your freedom from arrest to an English Tudor castle. The svstcm of show-me-your-bank-book is pathetically silly because usually the finest people and most worthy of social prominence are those who don't have a bankbook, least of all a balance. Money has also seeped into the educational world. The professor does not care whether he is going to no more good at some hill-billy college than at Harvard. He cares that Harvard is going to nay him an undreamed salary-ann that fact settles all Questions in his mind to where he shall dispense of his wisdom. The average student looks at the beautiful buildings and conveniences the larger college can off-er him rather than at the spiritual advantages that he will attain by going to the smaller school. Money screams loudly and emphatically. Last but not least monev madness has entered the realm of sport. Our so-called amateurs are professionals and our college stadiums are betting stalls. This lengthy discourse would make me a doddering, old busy body, with a violent dislike for anything that looks like or suggests money. I hope not, because "all I know I seen by the papers" and I certainly have no desire to tell Mr. Morgan-or Mr. Babbitt-s-that he is a dirty crook and I wish that he would alter his way of doing business. I also appreciate honestly earned money and the things that it can buy, -such as travel, books, beautiful homes, horses, dogs, hamburgers and popcorn, but I believe that Mr. G. H. Lorimer's following bit of advice is well worth remembering: "It's good to have money and the things money can buy, but it's good, too, to check up once in a while and make sure you haven't lost the things that money can't buy"-George Horace Lorimer.-H. J. M. '37.


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TIH' D. 1\1. L. C. 1\f.~ssenger

Library Comments Recently we came across' a newspaper statement in which the Iibrarian of the St. Paul nuolic library contends that "among the many thousands of novels published in the last 50 years, there have been few that can be described as 'pleasant,' " and she has submitted a list of those termed "pleasant" for the purpose of determining the public's reac, tion to this classification. The list is a long one and cannot be reprinted in these columns. But in order that our readers may get an inkling of the type of books which this librarian considers "pleasant," we shall name the titles which may be found in our library. No doubt our students have read some of these books and your librarian would be pleased to hear whether they impressed you as being pleasant. Here are the titles: CARROLL, AS THE EARTH TURNS; CATHER, DEATH COMES FOR THE ARCHBISHOP; DAVIS, SOLDIERS OF FORTUNE; DE LA ROCHE, JALNA; HILTON, GOOD-BYE, MR GHIPS; HOUGH, ,COVERED WAGON; JORDAN, DOCTOR SEROCOLD; LINCOLN. CAP'N ERI; MORLEY, THE HAUNTED BOOKSHOP; WRIGHT, BI8HOP MURDER CASE. But this statement about "pleasant" books is interesting also from a purely theoretical point of view. Why should the list of books described as pleasant books be so limited in comparison with the huge number of books of fiction published over this long period of time? .Why should authors insist upon inflicting on the great reading public stories which leave a sour taste, and color the landscape of life with sombre hues? Perhaps we come very near the truth if we say that the general run of authors write as they do because they do not accept the fundamental principles of true Christian faith. They aim to produce realistic representations of life. Their conception of true everyday life is that it is ugly and unpleasant. The happiness and serenity of soul and the pleasant associations of men and women as presented in so-called "pleasant" books .are taboo with them because they consider them unreal. This is true as far as the unregenerated people of the world are concerned. There is nothing beautiful or attractive or ideal about the corrupt human nature anywhere and at any time. It is saturated with sin and if we describe its day by day development in the course of a human being's existence, the result will be a bleak picture of sordidness and selfishness, of hate and of lust.

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The D. M. L. C. Messenger

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But why should only this pitiful wretchedness be stressed over and over again in our modern fiction? It is a view of life which has never perceived the radiance shed upon the world by the wondrous appearance of God in the flesh. It is a: view of life which simply eliminates the influence of our holy Savior and the regenerating power of the Holy Ghost. To this extent at least such literature is definitely anti-Christian in character. It virtually denies the miraculous power of God to change the wicked human heart. We deny emphatically that there cannot be anything idealistic and beautiful in human life. We insist with equal emphasis that one can write pleasant stories which are thoroughly true to life. It should not be difficult for any Christian of mature age to find among his Christian acquaintances one whose life has brought true happiness to such of his fellowmen with whom he has come in contact. The precious Christmas gift of God, His own dear son and our Savior, has made this world a better place and many people in it better people. We would like to urge you to bear this in mind when you read modern "unpleasant" fiction. Do not let such books sour your mind or create a wrong impression of people in your hearts. The ugly and wretched kind of life portrayed there is present round about us. Of this the Bible assures us also. But on the other hand we must hold fast to the fact that the gospel of Christ has also in the course of the centuries since His blessed birth created or re-created countless human beings and has made of them "lights of the world in the midst of a crooked and perverse nation."-Adalbert Schaller.


The D. ~'1. L.

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c.

~lessenger

The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is seventy-fivecents per annum. Single copies twentycents. Stamps not accepted.- We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communicationsshould be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends. The aim of "The Messenger" is to offer such material as will be beneficialas well as interesting to our readers, to keep the alumni in a closer contact with the college, to foster school spirit, and to give the students an opportunity in the practice of compositionand the expression of their thoughts. Entered as second class matter at Post Officeof New DIm, Minnesota

Volume XXVII

No.2

December 1936

-: The Messenger Staff :Editor-in-Chief ; Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Typist : Alumni Exchange College Notes Co-ed Notes Locals Athletics Jokes

Milton Bradtke Arnold Coppens Robert Nolte Henry -Krenz Henry Engelhardt Veleda Kelm

.

Gertrude Limpert Myrtle Pagenkopf Margaret Koehler Winfried Stoekli Gerhard Rolloff Ruth Gehlhar


12

Thf' D. M. L. C. l\-Iessenger

EDITORIAL

â&#x20AC;˘ = THE NEW STAFF In a few days our calendars will have to be changed. The end of the year is the time for balancing budgets, closing books, and summing up results. The old year brings to a close for seven of us active work on the Messenger Staff. Rather than sum up results, we shall let the readers be the sole judges. Ours 'has been the beneficial end. The approach of a new year brings with it the forming of resolutions. Whether they are carried out or not is a matter of individual initiative. We of the retiring staff, however, can do no less than wish success to our successors,. who are the following: Editor-in-Chief : Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Alumni Notes Exchange College Notes Locals Co-ed Notes Athletics Jokes Typist

Robert Nolte Henry Krenz Edgar Wehausen Bruce Mueller Naomi Birkholz ~ Estella Albrecht Myrtle Pagenkopf Adair Moldenhauer Gertrude Walther Heine Schnitker Ruth Gehlar Henry Engelhardt


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

. LITERARY

13

ACTIVITIES

Have the literary societies been carrying on their original objective? This fall our faculty has again found it necessary to remind our societies of the fact that they must not "lie down on the job," and I believe that the admonition will not go unheeded. In the last few years the societies have been falling back in their work, especially in the number of programs presented per school year. At best each organization has been giving only two programs annually, and in one case only one was given. Upon consulting the respective constitutions we find a 路clause which states that each society is to present one program a month. We know this quota was carried out at first, but why is it not now? Probably several reasons may be given. We know that our student body has been decreasing" somewhat in number compared to a decade ago. This naturally limits the size of the societies. Thus the necessary material must be chosen from a limited amount of talent. Or on the other hand, it has been stated that especially during the last two years too many outside programs have been sponsored by our college. I am sure everyone will agree that these programs are interesting and educational; but, at the same time, the fact must not be overlooked that they tend to diminish the interest for student activities. It surely is unfortunate that such has been the result. A third cause of vital importance is of a subjective nature: namely, the age-old problem of lack of cooperation and leadership. We do not "get together on the matter" and really push things along. The familiar slogan heard is, "The other society is supposed to give the next program." This "Old Adam" has been saying in many different ways for thousands of years. Therefore, what we as literary societies must do is to "jerk ourselves together" a little. I believe it would be a good idea for us to adopt the faculty's suggestion of one program a month presented alternately by the two societies. A promising step to greater success has already been taken in combining the efforts of both organizations to stage a . drama of a higher and more elaborate nature than the customary light comedies, and we feel confident that the efforts will not be in vain. W~ often forget that some day we intend to teach in a Christian Day School, and that one of the foremost requisites for successful teaching is the ability to present a subject to the pupil by word of mouth in an interesting and in-


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The D. M. L. C. lUes"enger

telligible manner. It was for the cultivation and training of this ability to speak that the societies were formed, and . they surely do give us a good opportunity to路 practice that art. Therefore we must strive to produce more and better programs. Let our slogan be, "More power to the Literary Societies !"-R. D. N. '38.


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Married-At Jefferson, Wisconsin, on June 21, Hilda Zahn, ex '32, to Prof. Heinrich J. Vogel of the Winnebago Lutheran Academy at Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Attendants were the Misses Leonarda Vogel '21, Gertrude Vogel '35, and Elizabeth Robisch '35, and the Messrs. Martin Albrecht '29 and Waldemar Nolte '36. Congratulations. Married-During the latter part of August or the first part of September, Miss Esther Behrens H. S. '29 to Rev. Waldemar Lemke. Congratulations! Married-At Appleton, Wisconsin, on November 14, Miss Lydia Thielke to Elmer Behrens '34 of Weyauwega, Wisconsin. Congratulations, "Jingles," and to you too, Mrs. Behrens. Married-At Nicollet, Minnesota, on October 10, Miss Edith Bode '31 to Mr. Edward Pettengell of Baraboo, Wis. consin. Congratulations! Married-At La Crosse, Wisconsin, on November 21, Miss Marie Sweeney H. S. '36 to Mr. Joe Hanifl of La Crosse. Congratulations! I Engaged-Miss Martha Robisch H. S. '35 to Mr. Walter GoegleinJr. H. S. '34, of Fort Atkinson, Wis.

/


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1'1... D. ]\1. L. C. ]\ie.senger

Engaged-Miss Clara Mehlberg '31, to Rev. Otto Heier of Circle, Montana . . Engaged-Mr. Ervin Humann to Miss Edna Gruetzmacher of New London, Wis. Born-To Mr. and Mrs. Meilahn Zahn of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, a baby boy on June 7. Richard Miller is the name. Mr. Zahn is of the class of '31. Arrived-On October 31, Hans Wagner, H. S. '36 of Valparaiso University, to spend the week-end with his mother. Visited-At D. M. L. C. on October 17, Miss Adelia Schumacher '33 and Eric Sievert '31 of Nielsville, Wisconsin. Spent Week-End-On Nov. 6 or 7 the Wilbrechts, Arnold '20, Irma (Mrs. Norman Slavensky) '22, Bertha '25, and Adolf '33 together with Harold Klatt '30 visited friends and relatives in New Ulm. Also Clarence Radl '35 spent some time here. Resigned- Veleda Kelm from the position of Alumni Notes Editor. Please send all news to her roommate Naomi Birkholz, who is the newly elected editor. Miss Kelm wishes to thank all those who contributed to the column during the time she edited it. Congratulations, Miss Birkholz. Here's to your success!


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r

EXCHANGE NOTES I've always pitied those poor students from the state of South Dakota, the sunshine state, not because they need the sympathy of us who hail from Minnesota and Wisconsin, but because they must bear the slams and sarcasms of fellow students as well as of professors. I've always wondered just how that much-talked-of state could be pictured and found a neat description of it in The Black and Red: "There is no other place where one may realize the immensity of the earth as in the midst of the Prairie-unless it be that near kin of the Prairie: the ocean. On the Prairie we know our earth for what it is, and as we turn our faces to the sky, we know that we are a part of all. The Prairie is clothed by the universal grass and beautified by the flowers that are fitted to it : the pas que flower of the spring, the wild rose of summer, the goldenrod and wild sunflower of autumn. Here we see the sky of a deeper blue, the clouds of a more glowing white, the stars of a brighter twinkle, than anywhere else.-The Prairie is but a desert watered and as has been said, 'the desert is of God, and in the desert no man may deny Him.''' Can you blame those who hail from that state for being proud?

,. \l

Isn't it strange that especially those fellows who have .progressed beyond the 12th grade must walk with head held higher and usually with a black, shiny hat atop as a crowning symbol of superiority? And of all the angles and slants to be found! Small wonder that The Wartburg Trumpet tries to analyze the characteristics to be found under such and such a slant: "A student who wears his hat on the back of his head is jolly, careless, and not inclined to worry over back school work or examinations. "The student who wears his hat squarely on his head is well balanced. He may have troubles but he does not talk much about them. He may be fortunate but he does not let


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The- D. ]\i. T.... C. I\if'ssenger

good fortune upset him. Fortune is something by which students are seldom annoyed. "The student who wears his hat down over his eyes may be a thinker, or a brooder. He lets trouble occupy his entire mind. A bit of advice to this kind of person might be, 'Do not let your hat work a handicap for yOU!'" Which type are yOU? Now don't become self-conscious Or change the angle of your hat, for there's an exception to every rule, and, besides, this is no rule. For many of us failure even in minor things is such a severe blow that it takes an unnecessarily long time for us to gain our equilibrium again. And that isn't even mentioning really serious failures which any of us might easily experience. The Spectator offers a word for consideration: "Many of us are discouraged by failure. We shouldn't be. Many a great man has failed before us. Not only once, but time and time again. In fact, it is to their many failures that great men often owe their success. "Don't let failures bother you. Be like the rubber ball, which every time it is thrown to the ground, bounces back with renewed force! If you can't be kept down-there's nothing for you to do but succeed." We usually imagine that if the presidential election were ever left in the hands of the student body of America, . we would have a Communist or a Socialist for president, but would we? From The Spectator we read: "The youth of America has tried to study the political situation, but always, has found kibitzers. The Democrats are no good, because they spend too much money. The Republicans talk, but accomplish little. Socialism is still pictured as a brown faced man with wire whiskers and a smoking bomb in his: hand. Communism is taboo, because of its principles. 'Look at Russia' settles the issue. . "Because youth sees, little good anywhere, American youth will vote not as a body, but proportionally as the rest of the American citizens." Young America may not be radical, but it does desire change, as can be seen from the prominence of Landon in many college returns. Can we say, "As Maine goes, so goes the Student Body?"


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COLLEGE NOTES On September 20 a harp concert by Otto Baganz was given in our auditorium. His masterful presentation of many of our common hymns led to a deeper appreciation of these sacred songs. A few of his numbers were Ein feste Burg, Jesus, Lover of My Soul, and Wake, Awake, for Night Is Flying. He was accompanied on the vibra-harp by his daughter and his son. Among his classical selections were Sextette from Lucia di Lammermoor by Donizetti and Traeumerei by Schumann. The play Robin Hood was given in the form of a puppet show October 1. The marionettes also presented a Puppet Follies consisting of The Wooden Soldier and the Painted Doll, Bun and Bunny in the Jungle" and scenes from Russia and Italy. This novelty program was quite amusing. The professors repeated their gift of a Hallowe'en picnic this year. There was a full moon on October 29. This made it possible to play the usual out-of-doors games. Later in the evening the seven bonfires were lit and each class finished the evening with hot-dogs and songs. The Phi Delta Sigma Literary Society opened the season this year with a program which had some true literary value. Howard Aufderheide spoke on the captivity of the New Testament church and its association with Luther. The history of Babylon was given by Naomi Sauer. A play, The hanging Gardens of Babylon, stressed the events leading to the building of the gardens and the conditions at the time of Nebuchadnezzar. The play was written by the program committee. Musical numbers were The Sleepy Hollow Tune by the quartet, and a piano solo, The Garden in the Rain by Debussy, was played by Elizabeth Beutler.


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TllP D. 1\1. I,. C. Messeng'er

On November 13 the Melody Masters, a negro quartet, gave a program of Southern folk songs and negro spirituals. They demonstrated the negroes' enthusiasm for their religion. Some of the numbers were Joshua fl't the Rattle of Jericho, In That Great GeUin' Up Momin', Deep River, and I Got Plenty of Nothin'. Our students were also given the opportunity to hear Lindy Lou and Shortnin' Bread sung with true negro dialect.

,

.

This year another group of the national high school instrumental contest winners appeared at our school. Three champions of the brass division played the following numbel's: Poet and Peasant Overture by Suppe, Foldier Bov of 1918, which pictured the soldier's life from the time of his departure from America to the time of his return, and a novelty number, The Circus Parade. Their manager explained the development of the modern instruments from ancient times, and displayed a wonderful collection from all ages. One of the members also gave the oration There is a Way. D. M. L. C. presented Jerold Frederic, concert pianist, November 17. The following are some of his ,numbers: Symphonic Etude, Op, 12 by Schumann, Grandes Variations by Bach-Liszt, a Mazurka, Waltz, and Berceuse by Chopin, Flight of the Bumble Bee by Korsakov-Frederic, and Liebestraum by Liszt. Some of the students expressed the opinion that we should have more programs of this quality. 'The Phi Gama Rho Literary Society program of November 21 centered around the life of Luther. Victoria Becker gave the life story of Luther up to the Diet of Worms. By means of a play and playlet we received a vivid picture of Luther at the Diet. Milton Bradtke played an organ solo, . Fugue in E Minor by Bach. Ein feste Burg was sung by the Marlut Singers and God the Father Be Our Stay by a group of society members. The societies have begun to put some real effort into their programs, so that they will have some educational value instead of serving for the purpose of en~ tertainment only. We hope that they will keep up the good work and not lag in their duty as has been the case during the past few years.

(\\ I


Thp D. M. L. C. Messeng-er'

21

The Christmas program prepared for this year is as follows: 1. Processional

2. Chorus: The Christmas Story Reuter Organ, Gerhard Rolloff Piano, Henry Engelhardt Recitation, Arnold Coppens ~ I

3. Assembly: Come Hither, Ye Faithful Organ, Ruby Holzhueter 4. Chorus: Bethlehem (Folksong of Glatz) ..arr. Dickinson 5. Organ: Offertory on TwoChristmas Hymns....Guilmant Milton Bradtke 6. Chorus: a) Christmas Cradle Song (Bohemian Folksong) Piano, Henry Engelhardt b) 0 Holy Child

arr. Dickinson Jores

7. Assembly: 0 Little Town of Bethlehem Organ, Veleda KeIrn 8. Address: Prof. C. Schweppe 9. Chorus: a) Weihnachtsgesang Reuter Organ, Gerhard Rolloff b) In Bethlehem ein Kindelein Praetorius 1609 10.

Assembly: Der Christbaum Organ, Gertrude Limpert

11. Organ: Christmas Pastorale Winfried Stoeckli 12. Chorus: a) The Little Mother (Trans.: E. H. Sauer, Text by M. Hansmann) b) Hosanna in the Highest 13. Assembly: 0 du froehliehe Organ, Margaret Koehler 14. Recessional

Harker

Backer SOderman


22

The D. ]\f. L. C. ]\fe.senger

THE CO-ED HOBNOBBER Big Auction Sale on Third Floor! Several weeks ago a notice appeared on the bulletin board that a big auction sale was to be held on a certain evening after study hour to which the public was invited. Everybody eagerly awaited the big sale, and practically all the girls in the dormitory were found on Third Floor that evening. Ruby Holzhueter and Gert Walther were the sponsors of the sale who were trying to load their "cast-offs" upon us. When the sale was finally over, everybody was of the opinion that the chief auctioneer, Erna Kuehl, didn't do so well since only a pair of skating socks was disposed of, and these were practically given away for 21 cents. Better luck next time! Also to the "bid-raiser," Eva Taras! A Girl in Pajamas Proves Herself a Heroine Adelaide Nolte turned out to be a drowsy heroine in pajamas by saving Florence Raddatz from the horrible fate of clinging to a chandelier during the wee hours of the morning. The cause for this excitement was a gray little beastie, a timid little mouse, caught in Florence's waste paper basket. Excess Weight Easily Disposed Of! Would anyone care to know how to get rid of excess poundage? If so, please address your letters and questions to our expert dieticians: Agnes Timm, Florence Raddatz, Adelaide Nolte, and Eunice Stern. They just experimented by going on a milk diet, and they guarantee immediate results (for better or for worse!!). Marie Sweeney Gets Married! Can you feature anything like that? It took all of us so by surprise that we're still in doubt as to whether it's really true or not. It all happened during the days we had free because of the teachers convention at La Crosse. She made up her mind right then and there to become Mrs. Joe Hanifl. on November 21, 1'936. Adelaide Nolte and Erna


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

,

,

23

Kuehl had the pleasure of being present at the wedding. Since their return, wedding cake crumbs in envelopes may be found under several of the girls' pillows. Much success and happiness in your wedded life, Marie! Tomcat Causes a Stir in the Dorm! Because of the overabundance of mice around here, Ruby Holzhueter thought it best to get rid of them all by bringing a tomcat into the dormitory. But the poor thing caused such an uproar among the girls that his stay here in the dorm was cut to one day. But still, we're not rid of our mice yet. Only 23 More Days Left!! Everybody is counting the days until we go home, but no one is heralding the arrival of Santa as much as Olga Richter and her "fuchsies," for they're in deep meditation over their usual Christmas decorations. Insertion: Omitted in the Last Issue Due to some misunderstanding I overlooked the names of the following girls who are also newcomers up here: Victoria Becker, Oshkosh, Wis.; Florence Oehlke, Newport, Minn.; Lillian Trapp, Hartland, Wis., and Ruth Schroeder, Larson, Wis. Delicious Suppers Served at Redeker Hall! Among the recent suppers served down at Redeker hall was the one given by Mrs. Redeker for the Redeker "gang" on November 3. Chop Suey was the main dish. Mildred Baumann proved to be quite patriotic, so she served an Armistice supper (contents of a box she had received from home), jam jars serving as cocktail.glasses. Somebody Else Trying to Reduce! The fever must be in the air, because we hear the Redeker "gang" has also indulged in nightly calisthenics, and most of them have already complained of stiff joints. Don't work too hard, girls; take the advice of our experts at Hillcrest Hall some time! "Egg Fry" Proves to Be a Success! The Redeker "gang" went on an "egg fry" on Hallowe'en night since they weren't afraid of ghosts ~ goblins. On the night before, the hall was converted into a small hotel, with nine guests from Hillcrest Hall. The evening lunch consisted of bread, jam, and fudge, and the breakfast of sausage sandwiches. Handicraft Artists Hard At It! A casual visitor will firid the Redeker girls busily occu-


24

The D. ~'L L. C. l\'I~ssenger

pied with needle and thread, and also "Keep Out" posters on the doors. 'The reason for this is the resolution that all Christmas gifts exchanged among the girls must be handmade. Um-m-m-m Birthday Cake! On the morning of November 24th the Redeker girls were surprised to find a birthday cake and a box of candy on their table, the occasion being Gertie's (Gertie Limpert) birthday. By the way, Gert has given up her duties as matron at Redeker nsn; and the new matron is Myrt Pagenkopf. Some People Get All the Breaks! - That's really true sometimes, because Florence Berg always seems to be getting company at some time or other. A few weeks ago her mother pleasantly surprised her by spending a few days up here wich her. Naturally, Florence's mother refilled her food box before she left for home again. Would that Lady Luck would tread our paths some' time! Week-End Jaunts 1. Ruby Holzhueter accompanied Veleda Kelm h0111e to New Prague on Sunday, November 15. 2. Evelyn Hunt had the good fortune of being able to visit her folks over the Reformation holiday. 3. On November 7 Vernice Seibel took Wilma Schultz, Evelyn Hunt, and Mildred Baumann along to her home to enjoy the delicious duck supper served by Vernice's mother. 4. Naomi Birkholz took Dorothy Froehlke along to her home on one of the Saturdays in October. 5. Ern-Gret Birkholz was privileged to enjoy a family gathering at Winthrop several Sundays ago. 6. Hildegarde Bade didn't have an opportunity to go home sucq as the above girls had. Still, she was able to see her folks, who came up to visit her here at the dorm instead. 7. Oh, yes, Cecelia Priesz also was one of the vacationers over the Reformation Day holiday .. 8. Before I forget it, Marguerite Bleck and Pearl Anderson also visited their folks during the holiday.


The D. M. L. C. Me.senger

25

. Big Mixup Around Here! We've been having quite a time trying to keep our two Ruths apart around here-Ruth Koeninger and Ruth Gelhar. To try to alleviate and eliminate the big job we've named Ruth K. "Ruth" and Ruth G. "Ruthie." Another Heroine Among Our Ranks! Since most of the girls around here are afraid to carry out the dead mice caught in the traps. the duty falls upon Hazel Steinberg, who doesn't seem to mind it at all. Aren't we lucky though that we have such a brave girl as Hazel around here? Could You Forget Dinner? Now could you? Well, the other day Geraldine Boelter forgot all ahout going over to dinner; she thought she had another class before dinner! Don't forget yourself next time, Geraldine! Farewell! And now it behooves your old editor to say, "Farewell." With deep regret I must say, "Farewell," but I can assure you that I've enjoyed editing this column. Here's hoping the new editor, Gertrude Walther, gets the same enjoyment out of doing so. Editor's Note Marion Lewerenz paid us a visit on October 17, and her visit brought back memories of her days spent among us last year. Don't forget to visit us again some time, Marion!


26

The D. ~I. L. C. Mes sen ae r

Locals Christmas and the accompanying recess is again upon us--but I am certain it has not found us unprepared. For the past month or more that recess has been the topic of nearly every conversation. Christmas is truly a season of happiness and joy-it should be so. May yours also be a happy and joyful Christmas! The recreation room is now under the able management of Mr. Mittlesteadt. Leo Preuss has developed a strong dislike for that place; he doesn't seem to enjoy wielding a broom. Lux and Schmidt are the proud captors of a live bat, Jimmy by name. Jimmy now resides in an improvised cage -the space between the window and the screen in Lux's room. Leo Preuss when asked whether he wished to contribute a "local" to this column, "This is a dead place-I can't think of any locals !" As a tribute to the University of Minnesota's football team for winning the Washington game, the 10th graders all had their hair cut short-certainly you noticed that strange sight. Roland Preuss feels he is fortunate in having an ear on each side of his head when Lux begins talking-you know, "in" and "out." The II Normals have organized a new club, the D. L. W. Club. Of course the name is still undivulged-maybe it is the "Don't Love Women Club." Melville Schultz has lost faith in "Bulova Watch Time," Central Standard Time, and Ingersoll Time. To him there is no equal to "Star" Time. Did you see Birkholz sleeping with that cat in his arms a few weeks ago? Both were "purring" contentedly.

1

"Billy" Muesing has sore feet. Recently he attended several classes with one shoe "absent." Perhaps it is only myopia, but I am certain Coppens was not unaccompanied on several of his recent Sunday afternoon hikes. .

~'


The D. in. L. C. l\'fess"nger

27

"Peanuts" was too industriously engaged in studies (of sleep) to contribute any locals. Schroeder certainly indulges to the fullest extent in writing letters-home? And have you noticed how enthusiastic Hoefer has been for the coming of our Christmas recess? Dr. Krenz, the super-salesman, has been doing a rush- \ ing business in pennants, feathers, etc. There have been several very interesting literary programs up to date-let's keep up the prevailing good spirit! The quartet sang at the Men's Club on the evening of November 10. Would you believe it? Hoefer retired at least one night before the lights went out this school year-he was ill a few days ago. Strange things do happen; we have even had an auction . in the dormi tory-everything from football shoes to second hand toothpicks was sold. Just by the way. is Schultz's name Edward, Edmund. Ewald, or Ezekiel? He has his initials beautifully inscribed on his new sweat shirt. I'm sure I wasn't mistaken when I saw E. S. Engelhardt and Wiechmann plan to go into business again soon. Watch the bulletin board for further particulars. This year's somnambulists-Howard Birkholz and Julius Ingebritzen. Spaude claims a record. His bed was "dumped" two weeks ago for the first time in two years! We had a most enjoyable Hallowe'en party again this year out on the football field. Young Fuerstenau is much concerned about the great task of printing the Messenger. He wonders whether the printer must set the type by hand. Carl Mischke would like to have the bells ring at least an hour later every morning. I would suggest that he adopt daylight saving time. Kraemer, let this be a warning to you. Gordon Fuerstenau is on the "warpath" and doesn't want his bed "dumped" any more. The II Normal Psychology class recently obtained "concepts" of persimmon, avocado, and pomegranate.

"


28

The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Really "Bob," you shouldn't bring that spit-ball shooter to History class any more. I do not know a great deal about football, but Schultz is still studying some of the signals, I believe.' He keeps repeating to himself, 659-659-659. Couldn't a railing or some kind of net be built around Priesz's bed to keep him from falling out. Robert Nolte and Henry Engelhardt played the piano at the Literary Club, Nov. 4.. "Ray" Wiechmann stopped here during the Thanksgiving holidays. He had an opportunity to "catch" a ride. Quite a number of the boys were not present to partake of the Thanksgiving feast here; many took the opportunity to spend the day at their homes and elsewhere. "Dick" Nitz went home for the week-endof Nov. 9, and forgot to return till the 19th. Was it because of his black eye? Reuben Bode went home for his sister Edith's wedding' the same week-end. The tumbling team began practice Nov. 22 under the supervision of Adair Moldenhauer. Thirty-three reported for the first practice. Is it only because the "hamburgers'; are so good that Wehausen regularly frequents the Weneeda Cafe? "Bob" Meyer pledges never to become ill again. The remedies forced upon him by the boys just "made" him get well. Carpenter and Elmer Bode rode to Nicollet on their bicycles the other week-end, Due to weather conditions, (so they say)-they did not return with them. Gullerud's hat has made the rounds. It has even been at the gray castle on yonder hilltop! "Bull" really "put out the cat" when it entered his room to serenade him at 11:30 p. m. a few nights ago. Little "Willie" Gerlach seems to have trouble keeping his little "paddies" out of mischief in Geometry and German classes. It used to be Bade, now it is Schultz who is devoting all spare time to astrology. Among those who visited here recently are Wallace, Kurth, "Art" Meyer, Julius Wantoch. Albert Brockelman, Erich Sievert, Adolph Wilbrecht, Clarence Radl, and Norwald Behrens. Well,-Merry Christmas.

(~


o

« ::J a (J) _j _j

« m

I-

o o LL

W I I-


-------------------------------------------------------

-

---

--

The D. M. L. C. MeSSenA"H

30

- -'1-1 , 1~ ... ..1.

"

FOOTBALL

The football season and its results at D. M. L. C. this: year were really nothing. much about which to write home. Many things could be said in criticism concerning the Hilltopper eleven, but when we consider the opposition and the breaks which went against our boys, we must admit that. they did about all they possibly could do. Injuries hampered the play of the team throughout the season. Yet the boys enjoyed playing even when on the smaller end of the score. The D. M. L. C. team of 1936 played and lost four scheduled games and was also defeated in a practice scrimmage with St. Mary's of Sleepy Eye by the score of 13-0. Two players, "Pee-wee" Fuerstenau and Ralph Swantz, played every minute of game-time and were the "iron men'" of this year's squad. "Bull" Bradtke was elected captain of the '36 eleven.

-'


The D. iU. L. C. Messenger'

31

Waldorf Swamps D. M. L. C. in Opener On October 10, D. M. L. C. traveled to Forest City, Iowa, but only to be beaten by a much bigger and heavier Waldorf team 45-6. Several times the Waldorf powerhouse sent its runners into the open for long gains and touchdown runs. E.. Olson opened the scoring for Waldorf by sprinting around end for 20 yards. From then on the Forest City team scored in every period. D. M. L. C. made its touchdown on a perfect pass from R. Hoefer to G. Horn. Horn took the ball on the 20 yard line and sprinted the remaining 80 yards without a man touching him. Rolloff's attempt for the extra point from placement went wide. Lineup: D. M. L. C. Waldorf Horn LE Conner Bradtke LT............................ Stephenson Swantz LG O. Olson Winter C Ed. Olson Fuerstenau RG Turner Rolloff RT A. Anderson Moldenhauer RE D. Anderson Bode QB Feeney Mueller LH........................................ Fox Ingebritson RH E. Olson Duin FB.................................... Everts Waldorf 12 12 7 14-45 D. M. L. C 0 6 0 0路- 6 D; M. L. C. Loses to Shattuck October 17 found the D. M. L. C. e1even playing the Shattuck team at Faribault. Again D. M. L. C. was outweighed several pounds to a man. Shattuck made use of its weight on power plays and sent the Hilltoppers down to dedefeat 26-0. 'Ogden scored the first touchdown and Nohl added three more later on. D. M. L. C. showed defensive strength at times and once held Shattuck when they had but one yard to go for a touchdown. But Shattuck's strength and the absence of Duin from the Hilltopper lineup allowed the Faribault runners to score as often as they did. Lineup: D. M. L. C. Shattuck Horn LE Shepard Swantz LT Gaynor Spaude LG..: Rogstad Bradtke C Fredell Fuerstenau RG Glaefke


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

32

Greve Moldenhauer Bode Ingebritson Rolloff Mueller D: M. L. C Shattuck

~

RT RE..................... QB RB" LH FB.......... 0 0 14 0

Dodge Cosgrove Ogden Cowen :.. Thomas NohT 0 0- 0' 6 6-26

St. Peter Noses Out Hilltoppers St. Peter defeated D. M. L. C. in a closely fought game on October 23, 7-0. St. Peter drove through for a touchdown immediately in the first quarter. After this first score, D. M. L. C. held its own and several times drove deep into the opponent's territory, but never were the Hilltoppers able to cross the goal line. The D. M. L. C. eleven was weakened somewhat by Rolloff's absence which was caused by an injured knee. Lineup: D. M. L. C. St. Peter Moldenhauer RE........................................HeiI Greve RT Severson Fuerstenau RG R. Hein Bradtke C.................................. Hanson Spaude LG............................Hermanson Swantz LT E. Hein Horn LE....................... MacDonald Schultz RH Johnson Mueller LH.............................. Langjoen Ingebritson QB H. Langjoen Duin FB Kopp D. M. L. C St. Peter

O 7

0 0

0 0

0-0 0-7

D. M. L. C. Drops Final Game to Rochester D. M. L. C. closed its somewhat tragic football season October 30 by losing to Rochester 32-0. Smith began the scoring for Rochester on a beautifully executed reverse play which sent him sprinting down the field for 60 yards. The Hilltoppers were unable to hold this fast heavy team, and consequently Rochester scored in every period. A highlight of the game was Duin's Runt in the first quarter. Duin, while standing in his own' end zone. got off a punt which (aided by a strong wind) sailed and rolled to the other end of the fieldfor a total distance of 105 yards.


/

33

Th" D. M. L. C. ]\'[~sspnI"Pr

Lineup: D.M.L.C. Moldenhauer Greve Fuerstenau Bradtke Spaude Swantz Horn Mueller Ingebritson Duin

:

Hoefer

Rochester RE \ Lambert RT Pappas RG Williams C.: 路 Hunter LG : Nelson LT Johnson LE Buske QB Graham RH.................................... Smith LH.................................. Derkon FB Wiborg

D. lVI.L. C Rochester J. C

0 12

0

0

6

6

0- 0 8-32

BASKETBALL With the football season gone and practically forgotten, attention now centers about basketball and its possibilities. The team this year has only one letterman returning and thus must be built up mostly of new material. Practice has been held for several weeks. and we wish the boys much success in the games to be played. A new school, Tracy Junior College, has been added to our schedule this year, and we hope to have an interesting and long-continued relationship with this school. Basketball Schedule for 1936 and 1937 Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Mar.

5-Mankato Teachers, here. ll-Bethel, there. 12-Concordia, there. 15-Bethany, there. 13-Shattuck, there. 27-Shattuck, here. 1-Tracy, there. 9- Tracy, here. 13-Waldorf, here. 16-Rochester, there. 19-Concordia, here. 26-Bethel, here. 2-Bethany, here.


34

TTleD. M. L. C. Messenger

Adair: The only differencebetween you and a donkey is that a donkeywears a collar. RolandB.: Well,I wear a collar. SomeBaby "It says in the paper that baby fed on elephant's milk

gained twenty pounds in two weeks." "I don't believe it; whose baby was it?" "The elephant's."-Ex. Eternal Tragedy Fond Parent: "What's the matter, my dear?" Daughter: "Freddie and I have parted forever." Fond Parent:' "Urn! In that case I suppose he won't be around here for a coupleof nights."-Ex. Easily Repaired She: You have broken the promise you made me. He : Don't cry; I'll make you another.-Ex. "Bring me another boiledegg, please." "Anything else?" "Yes, you might bring me a coop. The last one flew away."-Ex. Dumb? Leo Preuss: My brother thinks a football coach has four wheels. Kosman: And how many wheels has .the thing got?


35

The D. 1\1. L. C. Messenger

Etiquette Mother: Stop reaching across the Haven't you a -tongue? Meyer: Yes, but my arm is longer.

table,

Robert.

Fortunate "Did you hear about that fellow who fell asleep in the bathtub the other day, with the wa.ter running?" "N 0, did the bathtub overflow?" "N0, it didn't. Luckily he sleeps with his mouth open." -:BJx. Dumb: I'm doing my best to get ahead. Employer: Well, you certainly need one.-Ex. Traffic Cop: Use your noodle, lady! Lady: My lands! Where is it? I've pushed pulled everything in the carv-=Ex.

and

Sign at Bathing Beach "Dogs unaccompanied by owners not allowed." bet this made the dogs take notice.-Ex.

We'll

Do you know that a dog perspires through his pants? -Ex.

Not a Bad Idea Scientists are working to create a telephone pole that will withstand the impact of a car going forty-five miles an hour. It would be much better to have poles that could jump out of the way.-Ex.

A Hint 'He: There was something I wanted to say to you, but I forgot what it was. She: Was it "Good night ?"-Ex.

What For? Anderson: I want a cake of soap. Clerk: What kind of soap? Anderson: Well, I want to wash my head with it. Clerk : . Then you want Ivory soap.


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EASTER NUMBER

Volume XXVII

Number III MARCH

1937

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AFFERT'S PROVISION MARKET

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-: CONTENTS :LITERARY a)

A Beggar's Eas1ter..................................................2

b)

Religion, Science, and Myself................................4

c)

Robert Burns

5

d)

We're Chasing Our Tails

8

e)

So?

:

10

LIBRARY COMMENTS

11

EDITORIALS a)

Greetings From the New Staff

15

b)

The .Anatomy of Jazz

16

c)

Are We Dead ?

:

17

ALUMNI

20

EXCHANGE

22

COLLEGE NOTES

25

CO-ED NOTES LOCALS A'THLE,TICS JOKES

,

29 :

31

;

34 41


2

'I'll ... D. :rHo I ... C. ~fessenger

A BEGGAR'S EASTER Cold winds were blowing and an icy-cold rain was pouring down from the inky-black heavens, which were intermittently lighted up by sudden flashes of white lightning followed by the long and loud rumbling' and rolling thunder. The little town of Ellesviile seemed deserted; the shops and stores were all dark; only a few dim street lights were burning; all life seemed to have vanished. Along the main street this dreary Easter Eve came a beggar, his thin coat shabby and torn and his old felt hat drooping from the weight of the rain. His face was careworn and sad and seemed to reflect some inner conflictsome disturbance within his heart. He walked slowly along the street, apparently unconscious of the fact that his clothes were wet and that the strong blasts of wind .were chilling him through and through. When he came to the corner, he stopped and looked at the old brick church: its many steps leading to the old heavy oak doors, and the tall tower reaching heavenward. After a few moments, he slowly wa:lked up those old stone steps, hesitated, and then opened the door and quietly entered. Here was a retreat from the unfriendly elements of nature; here was warmth and a place to rest. Being very tired after his day's wanderings, he lay down on one of the rear benches and soon fell asleep. Early the next morning some one was lighting the candles on the altar; the first rays of the sun were lighting up the beautifully colored windows; soft, melodious, heartstirring organ music was being played in the balcony; the air was filled with the sweet perfume that rose from the


The D. lU. L. C. Messenger

3

snow-white Easter lilies which decorated the altar. Slowly the sleeping beggar awoke. He was startled at first; then, gradually the peaceful atmosphere seemed to penetrate into his weary soul. The picture-windows: Jesus Praying in GetJhsemane; Jesus on the Cross; Christ's Burial; and the .Empty Tomb, all reminded him of the Bible Stories which his mother had told him long ago. A tear came to his eye as he thought of her; she had always been happy; she had that indefinable peace which he had sought all over the world and had not found anywhere. What was it that had given her this quality? The beggar was roused from his reverie by the people who slowly began to fill the church. They had come for the Easter Candle-Light Service to praise their Lord with jubilant and reverent songs at the early morning hour. What should he do? Should he quietly leave? No, some inner urge compelled him to stay. The hells in the church tower rang loud and long; the organist played a grand, triumphant Prelude and Fugue by Bach. During this time the beggar began to be restless; he felt that he shouldn't have stayed. The congregation sang "Awake, My Heart with Gladness," but he could not sing along. How many years had passed since he had sung that song. He tried to sing but he couldn't; he had hardened his heart; he did not want to sing; he did not want God. He had decided that years ago before he had set out into the world to seek peace for his troubled conscience. No, he didn't want God. While the choir sang several beautiful anthems, the beggar was struggling with his inner-self': he knew there wasn't such a thing as God; that was just another fairy tale that mothers told their children so that they would be good. Yes, his mother had told him about God. The broad fortissimo ending of "Ghrist the Lord is Risen Again" resounded through the church, and it seemed to make every timber vibrate. He must leave, he must! A sweet voice, like that of his mother, began to sing "I Heard the Voice of Jesus say 'Come Unto to Me and Rest.''' How often his mother had sung that song! He could see her even now as she had sat at the piano in the evening and sung that song which she had loved so well. Yes, she had told him that he should always go to Jesusbut he didn't believe there was such a person. If his mother were only here to help him now. He was so tired so troubled in his heart. That pleading voice sang, "Stoop down and drink and live!" That's what his mother had done, and she had really lived; she had been happy. She had believed in God. Slowly something softened within his heart; he realized that it was his mother's child-like


The D. M. L. C. I1Iessenger

4

faith in God that had made her happy, and that such a faith was the only thing that could give him that peace which he had sought. For the first time since he was a boy he really prayed:. "God be merciful to me, a sinner!" He felt relieved; a peaceful feeling crept over his whole being. The congregation was singing "I Know That My Redeemer Lives l" He sang, too; and his heart sang for joy. He had found happiness and peace and God.

E. B. '38.

RELIGION,

SCIENCE, AND MYSELF

I believe in God. I also believe in science, so to speak. These two statements may seem contradictory. They are not. For me they rather corroborate each other. Religion has to do with faith, science with facts, I with both. Faith comforts me; facts fascinate me. But facts also confirm my faith. Through the ages science has accomplished many wonderful things. One discovery leads to the next. Religion on the other hand has always been a matter of faith. The two seem to be separate. Intrinsically they are, and yet there is some link of 'Connection. Let us speak of chemistry. It had its beginnings before the time of the alchemists. Earth, air. fire, an-I water were thought to be the only elements. Many savages today still believe that. Even we speak of them figuratively as such, The alchemist blasted this theory by finding that substances such as gold were made of one thing only. They realized the .value of gold and snent their lives in vain searching for the philosopher's stone, which would change everything to its elementary substance-sgold. The chemists of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries laughed at the alchemists for believing that gold was the only element and everything else was a debasement of this precious metal. They found that there were many elements. They even found a way to tell how many elements there really are. They believed that everything was made of one or more of ninety-two elements although they have only ninety listed in the periodic law. Before they could find the two missing elements, they' began to experiment with the cosmic ray. They are now at the point of discarding the theory of ninety-two elements. They believed it to be the truth. It was so


The D. lU. L. C. Messenger

5

plausible that everyone thought likewise. I had no room for doubt either. Now, however, it is again believed that there is essentially one element. We laughed at the alchemists. We should laugh at ourselves. And so it is with all branches of science. We discover some fact. We form a theory about that fact. We search till we find sufficient additional facts to prove the theory. We change the theory to a scientific law. We know that it is a law because we see with our own eyes the facts that uphold it. We know. Yes, that is just what the word "science" means. And yet, are we sure that we know? It seems as though the more we learn about something the more there is to learn about it. Each step towards the solution of a problem brings us farther away from it. We thought we had found the ninety-two essences of all matter. We thought that all things had to take place according to all kinds of natural laws which we have made. Instead we find it is not in our power. to carry out these laws. We have to realize our utter helplessness before a more powerful Force. What we have discovered is that there is more to this world that we really know or ever hope to know. Instead of taking us away from God, science brings us to God. Science maintains that it deals with facts only. Everything is proved by laboratory experimentation before the naked eye. Scientists have no room for emotions or speculation but for cold, bare facts only. They are to be admired for their Stoicism especially when they realize that they are not sure of their facts. But why make life so mechanical? Why trust a store of knowledge full of fallacies?

In spite of the fallibility of science I still believe in it. It has made much progress and has served the cause of mankind very much. It has harnessed the water and the wind, produced energy from substances underground, and made innumerable conveniences for man. It is science really that has raised our standard of living by endeavoring to put to some use everything the Lord has given us. Why shouldn't I believe in God and in sciencs ? M. B. '37. ROBERT BURNS Robert Burns was born on January 25, 1759. His father, William Burns, came of a family of farmers and gardeners in the county of Kincardine, on the east coast of


6

The D. i\'[. L. C. i\'[essenger

Scotland. Later he left his native district for the south. Here Robert was born. For a short time they lived on the farm of Mount Oliphant. The father didn't want to send his boys out as farm-laborers, and that is why he rented this farm. In 1777 Mount Oliphant was exchanged for the farm of Lochlea, about ten miles away. Here William Burns lived for the rest of his life. The farm was very poor. William Burns had many debts, and in 1784 in the midst of a lawsuit about his lease. he died. Burns had not neglected the education of his children. Before he was six, Robert was sent to a small school at Alloway Mill. After a few years the father undertook the task of erlucation himself. Robert did much reading during this time. He borrowed books all over. One dav he nurchased a book entitled The Complete Letter-Writer. He got by mistake a small collection of letters by the most eminent writers, with a few sensible directions for attaining an easy epistolary style. This book was to Robert of the greatest consequence. It inspired him with a strong desire to excel in letter-writing. The details, as to the antiquated manuals from which Burns gathered his general information, are interesting'. It is quite evident that Robert Burns was :intellectually far above the average of his class. His schoolmaster Murdoch left quite an impression on Robert. Murdoch said that Burns was very willing to learn something. He took such pleasure in learning, and Murdoch in teaching, that it was difficult to say which of the two was most zealous in the business. Burns lodged with Murdoch a while for the purpose of revising English grammar and studying French. Betty Davidson, an unfortunate relative of his mother's, lived with them, From her he heard many ballads, legends, and songs that were traditional among the peasantry. His mother sang him ballads from his infancy. His early start in poetry was given him by Nelly Kilpatrick. She was his partner in the harvest field. During this period he did not produce many poems of permanent value, but he went on developing and branching out in his social activities, in spite of the depressing grind of the farm. He attended a dancing school (much against his father's will), helped to establish a "Bachelor's Club" for debating, and found time for further love-affairs. Burns had a peculiar characteristic at this time. He always criticized his own poems. He said, "Lest my works should be thought below criticism; or meet with a critic who, perhaps, will not look on them with so candid and favorable an eye; I am determined to criticize them myself." In


The D. 111.L. C. Messenger

7

some poems he said the expression was a little awkward, and the sentiment too serious. He stated which stanzas he thought were flimsy, and also which stanzas he thought were good. He proposed to Ellison Bergbie, but she turned him down. How long he continued to mourn for Ellison is hard to say. He wrote some poems soon after this, inspired, it would seem, by three different girls, which testify at once to his power of recuperation and the rapid maturing of his talent. In 1786, mounted on a borrowed pony, Burns set out for Edinburgh. Here he met a Mr. Dalrymple of Orangefield, who introduced him to Lord Clencairn. He was introduced into society and became one of the fashionable set. Many accounts have been given of his actions at this time. They are all unanimous in praise of the taste and tact with which he acquitted himself. He was neither shy nor aggressive. He impressed everyone with his brilliance in conversation. He was very shrewd in observation and criticism, and his poise and common sense in his personal relations. His manners were rustic, not clownish. His actions were plain and simple. His conversation expressed perfect self-confidence, without the slightest presumption. His dress corresponded with his manner. His address to females was extremely deferential, and always with a turn either to the pathetic or humorous, which engaged their attention particularly. He clearly threw himself into the discussions in which he took part with all the zest of his temperament. In the less formal convivial clubs to which he was welcomed he became at once the king of good fellows. Whatever his vices, ingratitude to those who showed him kindness was not among them. Burns left Edinburgh early in May for a tour in the south of Scotland. He was accompanied by his friend, Robert Ainslie. He had many love affairs during this journey. He fell in love with almost every girl he became acquainted with. He wrote many poems about them. In the spring of 1788 he married Jean Armour. He bought a farm and settled down on it with Jean. His satisfaction in his domestic situation is characteristically expressed in a song composed about ths time. It is entitled, I Hae a Wife. Meantime, his interest in politics had greatly quickened. In his youth he had been a sentimental Jacobite. He received a position by the government and moved with the family to Dumfries. Burns' chief enjoyment in these days was the work he was' doing for Scottish song. He collected and refurbished the words of old songs. He also provided new words for the melodies. This work finally amounted to .six volumes,


8

The D. M. L. C. Messenger

By the autumn of 1795 signs began to appear that the poet's constitution was breaking down. The death of his daughter Elizabeth and a severe attack of rheumatism plunged him into deep melancholy and checked his songwriting. Burns had ne-ver been a slave to drink for its own sake ; it had always been the accompaniment of sociability. Some of his wealthier friends in the vicinity were in this respect rather excessive in their hospitality in Dumfries the taverns were always at hand. And as Burns came to realize the comparative failure of his career as a. man, he found whisky more and more a means of escape. for depression. From the evidence of his physician we find that alcohol had much to do with the rheumatic and digestive troubles that finally broke him down. A pressure from a solicitor for the payment of a tailor's debt of , some seven pounds threw him into a panic lest he should be imprisoned, and he sank into delirium and died on July 21, 1796. Burns began his poetical career with song-writing, and he closed this career with song-writing. It is as a songwriter that he ranks highest among his peers. It is through his songs that he has rooted himself most deeply in the hearts of his countrymen. The best known of Burns' poems are The Cotter's. Saturday Night, To a Mouse, and To a Mountain Daisy. The Cotter's Saturday Night is a picture in detail of a. typical godly Scotch home-s-just such a one as that in which his own childhood had passed. Burns' lines are natural, spontaneous, carelessly indiscreet. There was never a poet who looked more keenly or more sanely into the world of living things about him as Burns did. His interest is in birds and beasts and flowers. -wbove all in men. He sympathized with the revolt against oppression. His wonderful gift of song remains unrivaled in our later literature. H. J. E. '38.

WE'RE CHASING OUR TAILS Americans are just like dogs who try to bite their tails. Around and around, faster and faster they go, trying to catch the end. And just like Bingo, they never succeed but merely exhaust themselves in the attempt. America is known among other nations for efficiency and. speed. Yet we are the people who can never get to a place. on time and who. can never find or come to the end of our work.


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

9

Should we examine the daily schedule of any prominent business man I'm sure we would find that he has but little time to hims~lf. In general, his day runs along something like this: 6 :30 to 7 :45, golf with department heads; 8 :00, breakfast at the club; 9 :00 to 10 :00, work at the office; 10 :00 to 12 :00, office hours; 12 :00 to 1 :00, luncheon with a client; 1 :30, appointment on the other side of town; 2 :00 to 4 :00, office hours; 4 :30, appointment with the mayor, who is inspecting a bridge on the north side of town; 6 :30, diplomatic dinner (and remember, he has to get a shave and a haircut some time between 4 :30 and 6 :30); 9 :30, appointment with a traveling salesman who will be in the city just for the night. After the salesman leaves, he'll probably be whisked off to a poker game. If this is not the case, his wife, whom he sees so seldom, will undoubtedly insist that he accompany her to the charity dance. Very fortunate, indeed, is the man if he gets to bed before the cocks craw. We don't have to pry into other people's lives to observe hurrying. What happens when the six-thirty bell rings? Sometimes nothing happens, but usually there is one grand scramble for the wash bowls. We slap a wet washcloth arou路nd our necks and ears and call it washing. Then we pull on a few clothes, we haven't time to dress fully, and hurry over to breakfast so that we get there when the prayer-bell rings. After gulping down a bowl of cereal, a piece of bread, and a cup of coffee, we hurry back to the dormitory and quickly clean our rooms and get dressed. At eight o'clock we scamper to the recitation hall. Just as the bell rings for devotion, we slide into our seats and gasp, if we have any breath left, "I made it." Immediately after devotion, we run to the library to get a certain book before the other fellow does. Hurriedly we scan it, so that the other fellow can read it too before the next class. All morning we rush from one class to another. At noon we rush to the dormitory to see whether we got a letter. Then we hurry to the dining hall so that we'll surely get a good piece of meat. After dinner we go as fast as we can back to the dormitory to get "first whack" at the piano or the paper. When afternoon classes have been dismissed, we skip down town in order to be back for a practice period at four-thirty. From there we fly to a committee meeting, and thence to supper, after which we have to attend a rehearsal of the Glee Club. From seven till nine o'clock we hurry through our lessons. After nine o'clock we have to fix somebody's hair, darn a pair of stockings, shine our shoes, etc., going at top speed all the time so that we shall be ready for bed at ten-thirty.


10

Thf' D. IVL L. C. lU.... _Rsf"!lfrer

Just where does this hustling lead to? We are, at the end of the day, no closer to catching our tails than we were: at the beginning. It does not bring us closer to our goal; in fact, it spoils our chances of attaining it completely because we are actually hurrying ourselves to death. We are exhausting ourselves in the attempt. Death may even be called a blessed relief in comparison to insanity which results in so many cases. The death rate is highest between the ages of forty and fifty. In the prime of life, so to speak, men and women are dying. Why? Let me ask another question. How can a person endure longer when he travels at our pace? Any machine will last only so' long, and under more than ordinary strain it will collapse even sooner. Why is it that so many people suffer from nervous breakdowns? Nearly everyone has that constant strain, that everlasting hurrying that finally makes something snap. Highway hurry is leading us the shortest and smoothest way to the City of Self-Destruction. Why are we always in the midst of a mad scramble' for something? We 'can't even go to a movie without hurrying. We have to get there, so that we'll get a seat. We rush there so that we can be first in line at the ticket window. We should like people to believe that all this. scurrying is but unmistakable evidence of our progressiveness and our aggressiveness, but let LlS not fool ourselves, for we are not fooling others. 'They realize that we are getting no farther than they are, and they are laughing at us. They work steadily while we work by jerks. Well, you say, why don't we switch to that system. I'm afraid it's too late to do that. We have acquired such momentum that we can't stop even if we wanted to. We, are going around and around, faster and faster, and we shall undoubtedly continue to chase our tails until we drop. dead from exhaustion. V. K. '37.. SO? Goethe listened to Herder, Herder to Rousseau. Rousseau, the Frenchman, said, "Let yourself go!" Then down with all rules; They bind you too much! Down with the unities; Time, place, and all such! So do as you like, This world is free. And, like it or leave it, This sure suits me! K. A. M. '38...


------------------------------------

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The D. M. L. C. Messenger

LIBRARY

11

COMMENTS

A short time ago the beautiful New DIm Library was opened to the public. The genial librarian, Miss Erna Holzinger, deserves the highest of praise for having so quickly accomplished the tremendous task of classifying and cataloging some 7000 volumes. It was a remarkable feat in spite of the assistance she received from a number of public-spirited citizens. New DIm has every reason to be proud of this stately edifice, its marvelous lighting fixtures, its initial collection of books and the interesting exhibits in the museum. We salute Mr. Johnson and congratulate him for having acquired this wonderful building for the city by dint of courageous perseverance and earnest personal endeavor. We also take this opportunity to extend our best wishes to. our colleague, Miss Holzinger. For our students this new library provides an .additional opportunity for study and recreation. We urge them .to spend at least one hour each week there. They will find a number of interesting books which we do not possess in our college library. It is of value to anyone to browse around in a library and get acquainted with the world of authors and books, even if one doesn't take out a book at every visit. We hope our library course will have


12

The D. M; L.

e.

Messenger

enabled you to find whatever you need in the catalog and also on the ,shelves. Perhaps our readers would be pleased to hear about ' some of the new books we have acquired for the library since Christmas. We believe there is something of interest for everyone. CAULAINCOURT, WITH NAPOLEON IN RUSSIA, supplies us with certain intimate revelations concerning this famous man which are taken from the diary of one of his companions at the time of his disgraceful return from Russia. For those interested in natural history, DITMARS, REPTILES OF THE WORLD will .prove a most interesting book. The frontispiece pictures, the only true dragon still existent on this earth, and farther on, you will find a description of this creature, which created such a disturbance when it was first discovered on an island a few years ago. We are gradually completing the series of commentaries on the New Testament written by the late Pastor Lenski. He completed the commentary for every book before his death, but some of these are still in manuscript form. They are being published as quickly as possible. We now possess his books on Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, on the Acts, Romans, and Corinthians. His comments are very refreshing and at the same time scholarly. We are reporting on them here particularly for the sake of pastors and teachers who may be interested in Dr. Lenski's works but cannot afford to buy them. We shall be glad to let them borrow one or the other of these books for a reasonable length of time in order that they may get acquainted with them. ' The outstanding event in the world of sport last year was the Olympic games held in Germany. For a very interesting account of these games we refer our readers to a, new book, STORY OF THE OLYMPIC GAMES, 776 B. C.1936 A. D., by J. KIERAN. Those of us who have been troubled by a case of "nerves" will do well to study carefully a little volume by Dr. Edmund Jacobson entitled YOU MUST RELAX. It has been known for quite a time that nervous tension is the cause of many human ills. Patients have often tried to follow their doctor's suggestion by relaxing but found that they were unable to do so. Now comes Dr. Jacobson with some invaluable advice telling us just how we may go. about it when we desire to relax.


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

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For our fiction-hungry readers we have acquired the following books: THOMAS MANN, THE MAGIC MOUNTAIN; M. LANSING, MAGIC GOLD; E. CUSTER, BOOTS AND SADDLES; H. VAN DYKE, FISHERMAN'S LUCK; LOUIS HE~ON, MARIA CHAPDELAINE; T. HARDY, . DESPERATE REMEDIES, A PAIR OF BLUE EYES; R. C. HUTCHINSON, SHINING SCABBARD. Adalbert Schaller, Librarian.


14

The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not .. accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends. The aim of "The Messenger" is to offer such material as will be beneficial as well as interesting to our readers, to keep the alumni in a closer contact with the college, to foster school spirit, and to give the students an opportunity in the practice of composition and the expression of their thoughts. Entered as second class matter at Post Office of New DIm, Minnesota

Volume XXVII

No.3

.March 1937

-: The Messenger Staff :Editor-in-Chief Business Manager Assistant Business Manager

Robert Nolte Henry Krenz: Edgar Wehausen

Assistant Business Manager Typist Alumni Notes

Bruce Mueller Henry Engelhardt ;..Naomi Birkholz

Exchange : CollegeNotes Co-ed Notes

Estella Albrecht Myrtle Pagenkopf Gertrude Walther

Locals

Adair Moldenhauer

Athletics

; Heine Schnitker

Jokes

,

,

Ruth Gehlar


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

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15

EDITORIAL

• = GREETINGS FROM THE NEW STAFF In the last issue of the Messenger we, the new staff, were introduced to our readers, and in this publication it is our pleasure to make our debut as business men and especially as literatists of this college paper. As we know, the aim of the Messenger is "to offer such material as will be beneficial as well as interesting to our readers, to keep the alumni in a closer contact with the college, to foster school spirit, and to give the students an opptorunity in the practice of composition and the expression of their thoughts." In view of this aim we would first of all like to urge the alumni of our college to give US full cooperation by keeping in touch with our alumni editor. Send in every news item you know of, nothing is too insignificant. In that way you can help to make the Messenger more "interesting to our readers" and "to keep in closer contact with the college" as well as with each other. Also do not hesitate to send in any criticism or advice that you have to . offer, for it may be of great value to us in improving the Messenger. As to the students, we urge them to make use of the "opportunity in the practice of composition and the expression of their thoughts" which is offered them in the Messenger. Usually students must be called upon to write something for the Messenger. We would be very much pleased if sometimes students would volunteer to write articles for "their" paper. One and all, let's join "pens" and "foster college spirit," making the Messenger not merely a paper of the staff but a paper "of, by, and for" the student body and the alumni.


16

The D. M. L., C. ~Ieâ&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ enger

THE ANATOMY OF JAZZ (From an essay bearing the same name by Don Knowlton.) Some people loathe jazz; others say it is art. Both viewpoints are ridiculous. Jazz is a form of musical expression and bears the same r~lationship to music' as does the limerick to poetry. Most of the jazz of today isn't worth mentioning-c-as is the case with limericks; however, there have been some excellent jazz compositions written. Very little latitude of construction is allowed in jazz. T}1'2 person who claims he enjoys Wagner's and Sravinsky's compositions and condemns jazz, displays an utter i-morance of its purposes and structure; and the "jazz-hound" who cries that American "blues" are on a level with Beethoven sonatas, betrays a total loss of musical perspective. Jazz is based on the principle of rhythmic exaggeration. This is a contribution of the negro. Syncopation was first presented 'in a respectable way. People all enjoyed listening to or singing the old negro melodies. If syncopation had been picked up by the social elect, it would have been turned out in good form; however, this set was too deeply engrossed in conducting fashionable experiments on the resistivity of the human ear and discovering new uses for cymbals to develop it, and as a result it was adop ..ed by the cabaret and vaudeville group, who turned it toward their own purposes. Jazz has won and held universal popularity because of its fundamental rhythm, simple harmonies, and standardized form. People like it because its musical form is so easily understood. It is popular because of its simplicity. The success of a popular song depends upon its chorus. The standard chorus consists of 32 measures. The harmonies are also standardized. Most of these songs use only six Dr seven chords. Rhythm is the backbone of jazz. Most modern jazz serves primitive rhythm on a civilized platter. The real jazz time has four dotted eighths on the accented syllables and four sixteenths on the alternated syllables to a basic one, two, three, four in each measure. Syncopation plays an important role. This is a well-established musical device and is merely exaggerated in ragtime. It is- valuable because of its variance. The use of syncopation has led composers of jazz to discoveries in rhythm and mastery of complications which one finds only in the great composers of serious music. Another characteristic of jazz is


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the "break." Here the melody is sustained upon one note, and the rest of the orchestra provides the harmony and rhythm. Jazz uses disonancss with great effect. Straus used disonances and was admired for it. Disonances in jazz are few and simple. In jazz this is all expressed in 32 measures of thirteen chords or less. To make money on a popular song, the publisher must sell many copies; therefore, it is published in such a limited form. This enables the poor player to make use of it also. Experienced players insert "anticipations," "breaks," and disonances. The arranger of jazz steals bits of Bach, Liszt, Mozart, and Wagner for his compositions. The reason why "lyrics" of popular songs are so inane, is because they are written by musicians and vaudeville actors. Writers of English have not been willing to descend to jazz. It is quite evident by the success of some songs that the public would welcome a bit of humor instead of sentimental garbage. It is the music and not the words which has carried jazz. "The discouraging thing about jazz is the fact that it has been viewed in such false perspective-either condemned completely or inordinately exalted." "The encouraging thing about jazz is that in its orchestrations it is initiating countless thousands into sound principles of harmony and counterpoint, and thus definitely raising the average level of musical intelligence. The fact remains that the shop girl who has heard Paul Whiteman has taken a step toward appreciation of Beethoven's Seventh Symphony." H. J. E. '38.

ARE WE DEAD? "This is the worst school spirit I have ever seen." This is a direct quotation made by one student who entered school this last fall. And what is your reaction to such a statement? Don't say that person's talk is foolish. The person is very much aware of the remark and has made it in anticipation that you might be brought to your senses. Are you just going to let it pass without even stirring? If you do, you prove that you have no life left in you. If this. statement does not instill in your mind an urge to eradicate such statements, you are either dead or dormant.


18

'The D. M. L. C. lUes.enger

You are a part of the institution which you attend, and it is up to you to keep your school alive. It is very necessary that everyone take himself and herself to task and ask the question: "Have I been and am I doing my part to establish pride and prestige at my institution?" Regardless of your station, you must realize that you too must help to build the future of your school. You must understand that you are going to build or ruin the standing of your institu tion. Let us turn to athletics. You who participate in sports, are you fair to your teacher as well as to your school by obeying his rules? Or do you say that you just can't quit smoking or the like? Is it your aim to fight for the school athletics, or are you just playing because there is some certain person sitting on the sideline with whom you want >to ingratiate yourself? Are you fighting for. plain hero worship instead of school enthusiasm? Have you become so egoistic as to look only for your own interests? If you are guilty 'Of disobeying any or all of these axioms, it is to you to whom this first statement was. addressed also! And you who sit on the bleachers! You are also guilty of this accusation. Are you doing your part to encourage the players to victory? Or are you one of those who think that it's too much work? If such be your attitude, you should hide your face in shame! If you think that it is beyond your dignity to cheer, remember that you are only a fellow-student and that you owe it to your fellowstudents to give your support. Or have you degraded to such an extent that you even discourage cheering by your' sarcastic remarks? Those who are still alive and are trying to wake you, still have some reasoning power as to the existing school spirit; and you with your sarcasm just show your folly. Come to your senses and actually understand what is being said when the statement is made: "This is the worst school spirit I ever saw." Let us turn to other outside activities. Do you say , that it's just a lot of extra work to belong to these organizations or attend the programs given for enjoyment and benefit? Has all your pride as to the value of these entertainments been swept away, or are you still dormant? These organizations are attempting to elevate you and your school, and you with your indifferent attitude are disheartening all incentive. You cannot have an institution obtain a higher station without work aiming in the same direction. Surely if you have the attitude of "I want some time for myself," you can not gain anything. Many are


The'D. 1\1.L. C. l\lessenger

just too lazy and see no pride whatsoever in membership to organizations, and it is exactly the same group who are fostering the first statement made in this article. You should sooner blush in making such remarks than think yourself brazen or intelligent! You who think it too much work and have no incentive at all are responsible for existing conditions. You have no pride for your school within yourself. How do you ever expect to wipe out such remarks? And if you do not want to aid in wiping out such defying statements, it is urgent that some one have pity on you and enlighten you on your shameful and destroying attitude! . If we want to counteract this statement, we must work as a group in every activity. Let those who have attempted to keep up some school spirit take new courage and continue as nobly as they have done; prove to all others, regardless of who they may be, that you still are doing your part to help in keeping your school alive. And those of you who are dead, wake up and realize that it is also your duty to help these who have not given up.. You who have flung sarcasm because only a small group have kept up what you have so badly neglected, realize that you are destroying your school; you who are too lazy to do your part, rouse yourself and realize that it is your duty to encourage those who are fighting on the field; you who think that you are too refined or popular to let yourself be heard or seen, come down from your horse and realize that you are just another student when it comes to school spirit. Let everyone of us do his part to encourage activities and consequently eradicate the statement: "This is the worst school spirit I have ever seen," and let us rather find "This is the best school spirit I have ever seen."

1111


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The D. M. L. C. Me8senger

ALUMNI NOTES

How do you do, everybody! This is your news commentator speaking, bringing you news from the alumni radio bureau. Our first flash comes from Phoenix, Arizona -Walther Sorgatz '33 and Irma Gallmeyer were married on November 5. The next important news is also from Arizona, but this is from Whiteriver, where Raymond Riess '35 was engaged to Gladys Connelly. Wisconsin gives us the messages that Thelma Borneke, '33 H. S., became the bride of Martin Haas on December 26 at West Salem. At Dale, Leola Roesler and Rev. William Schweppe, '25 H. S., middle-aisled on February 14. ' Since November Mr. and Mrs. Nobel McDaniels are residents at Mayville. Mrs. McDaniels was formerly Wenonah Guenther, '31 H. S. Now I shall give you the flashes from our own state, Minnesota. From Amboy, Irma Engel, '35 H. S., became engaged to Rev. M. Fleischer of Red Granite, Wisconsin. From Sleepy Eye I hear that Gertrude Vogel '34 has become engaged to Waldemar Nolte '36. Rev. Adelbert Hellmann, '26 H. S., and Verona Nerese were married on January 16 at New VIm.


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Ruth Schnitker '35 of Flint, Michigan, and Gertrude Vogel '34 of Sleepy Eye, Minnesota, were visitors at Dr. Martin Luther College after Christmas, From Pennsylvania comes the following bulletin: Born to Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Bauer of Williamsport, a baby girl, Carol Ann, on November 9, 1936. Mrs. Baur was formerly Erna Hinz, class of '21. At New VIm on July 26, 1936, a son, Howard Fred, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Nolte (nee Emma Loeslin) both of the class of '30. Since all the alumni news supply has been exhausted, cheerio, until next time.

1111


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The D. 111.L. C. Messenger

EXCHANGE NOTES Our "mail-shagger" has a sympathetic co-sufferer at Concordia Junior College in Fort Wayne, Indiana. He says in the Maroon and White, "Every morning, Monday through Friday, I take a trip over to the office to get the dailv mail in order to deliver it to all the boys in Crull Hall. I make it a point to leave before classes are dismissed to, avoid meeting anyone over-eager to get his mail, for in this case I am plagued with questions. You may not think that this becomes monotonous, but I dare you to try it for one week. Before I enter the dormitory I am stampeded by expectant people whose only conciliatory desire seems to be to poke their outstretched hands into my face until I have nightmares and resort to counting hands for inviting Morpheus when sheep fail me. Worse still are the threats: 'I'li mop up the floor with your carcass if you don't bring me a letter next week.''' How many of us can plead "not guilty" to these charges ?

* * * * * The Augsburg Echo voices a problem which applies just as readily to D. M. L. C. And if the shoe fits, why not put it on? "How much of your talent and time are you spending in behalf of your school? It is remarkable how some people are able to get through four years of college without participation either in student activities or in work promoting the interests of the school." . So next time


The D. A'1.L. C. i\lessenger

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you are asked to take part in some extra-curricular activity or do some work in the interest of the college, pitch in gladly, realizing that the benefits are as real as the ideal.

* * * * * What is your object in playing basketball-or football, or baseball? To win the game, most of us would say. But the Concordia Courier expresses another ideal in athletics. This applies not only to those participating in the game, but also to those sitting in the sidelines. "Sportsmanship ~physical educators of today can it one of the most important aims of an athletic department. But how many of these same men have actually created or tried to create a genuine spirit of sportsmanship in the students or fans of the school where they have their positions? Don't we get the impression that the winning of the game is their sole object and that creating of noble attitudes is secondary? How many athletic contests are carried on without a variety of 'boohs' coming from the stands? How many of our country's outstanding athletes can 'take it on the chin' even though the decision is undeserved or unfair? An answer is not necessary-the facts are too evident."

* * * * * During his college years the student must build the foundation for his future life. If he uses another student's intellectual abilities as a crutch, he will never be able to stand erect or alone in his future years. The individual must apply himself and cultivate his talents now, for it is what he does now that will make him either a leader or a "leaner" in his life work. The Alma Mater attacks this so-caned college "parasite," who does not realize that he is harming himself more than anyone else: "'I wonder how many of our students will cheat in the finals next week?' a certain senior remarked philosophically. This statement does not look very pretty in print. The existence of this flagrant type at a theological institution is even less pleasant to contemplate.-Why does it persist with such stubbornnsss ? There are dishonest students mainly because the honest students are afraid to do anything about it.-It is time that a new public opinion is formed which will pour out the vials of its contempt upon the classroom crooks. No man alive can' endure the contempt of his fellows. Is there anything more contemptible than cheating one's way into the ministry of the truth?Shall we continue to be amiable weaklings without sufficient Christian manhood to assert our principles or to protect our rights? Shall dishonesty continue to shame hon-


24

The D. M. L. C. Messenger

esty into holding her tongue? Shall the cheating minority continue to rule the honest majority?" In other words, are we all cowards?

* * * * * The Black and Red gives us a new slant on the smoking question, bringing in even some points that the cigarette and tobacco manufacturers forgot. Probably they are just as reliable as the. advertisements you read, but judge for yourself: "We smoke to gain self-confidence. Men need that more than anything else-And so, if we stand in need of a little self-assurance, a fifteen-cent package of smoke is certainly a sane investment, especially in the case of bachelors. "We smoke to pass the time. Now time, as we all know, often has a way of making a mighty lengthy and tedious affair of itself. Furthermore, time is that which lies 'between one cigarette and the next. The more cigarettes we consume, the shorter are the intervals of time. Consequently, smoking seems to make Old Man Time hobble along a bit more spryly. "We think smoking aids digestion. Here our opponent will make a try at waxing witty by comparing us to our sister, the cow. Wen,' we suppose any sort of weapon is fair in debate, but take the word of an inveterate no-lessthan-one-cigarette-a-day smoker." Let's hope that all our abstainers won't take this as final proof and spend their next fifteen cents on cigarettes. However, smoking is not the only way of "passing the time"; the Academy Echo suggests another; and undoubtedly more profitable, method: "Fortunate indeed are those who contrive to make themselves genuine book lovers, for they have some noteworthy advantages over other people. They need never know lonely hours so long as they have books around them; and the better the books, the more delightful is the company. From good books, moreover, they draw much besides entertainment. They gain mental food such as few companions can supply. Even while resting from their labors they are, through the' books they read, equipping themselves to perform those labors more efficiently. They may not be reading deliberately to improve their mind, but unconsciously the ideas they derive from the printed pages are 'stored up; to be worked in their minds for future profit."


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

COLLEGE

25

NOTES

On January 11, another lyceum lecture was given in our auditorium. Robert Wood, artist, gave a very interesting exhibition of his drawing ability with colored chalk. Edgar Priesz became his model for one picture and later was presented with a portrait of himself. The different lighting effects made the pictures seem more vivid. Our new movie machine was first tried on January 12. Many of us were made to appreciate the composer, Handel, after we had seen the handicaps under which he had lived. "The Oregon Trail" gave us a good picture of the pioneer,s of the west. Of course, there was also a comedy-many thought the comedy was the best part of the show. On January 15, the movie "William Tell" was given. Those of our students who had read the drama found it very interesting. We also learned that in Sicily perfume is made from the citrus fruits. Much hand labor is employed in the process, but a very good grade of perfume is the result. The Phi Gamma Rho Literary Society program of January 16 was based on the south and the negro. A humorous selection was given by Richard Nitz and Ralph Swantz : "Soul of the Serf," a trombone solo, was played by Winfried Stoekli, accompanied by Henry Engelhardt; the life of Harriet Beecher Stowe and a summary of Uncle Tom's Cabin was given by Adair Moldenhauer; and a play, written by the committee and based on Uncle Tom's Cabin,


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was presented. The literary programs show that much work has been done in preparing them. Another lyceum lecture was given February 12 by Robert Zimmerman, a deep sea diver. Mr. Zimmerman has traveled around the world three times and has done much work in the East Indies and South Sea Islands. He exhibited the paraphernalia worn when working in the ocean and also had a fine display of deep sea fish. After he had explained the danger of his work, few of us desired to be deep sea divers. The student body received a free period the morning of February 17 when a movie was shown through the courtesy of the Retzlaff Motor Company. Parts of the Olympics of 1936, held at Berlin, were shown and we are proud that the United States won many of the medals. Skiing in the Alps is the ambition of many people. "Swiss on White" gave a good picture of winter sports at St. Moritz, Switzerland. "Horse Sense in Power" demonstrated the danger of speed, but also showed that if every individual would strive to be a safe driver, we would have fewer accidents and deaths, and the enormous death toll from automobiles would be reduced. A cartoon comedy concluded the program.

The D. M. L. C. Concert Choir presents spring concert April 11, 1937 at 8 :15 p. m. 1. Wherefore Now Hath Life-Motet six parts

its annual

for

J. Brahms

2.

Out of the Depth

C. W. Gluck

3.

Judge Me, 0 God-Motet for eight voices Piano: Etude Melodique Henry Engelhardt

1.

Ein Feste Burg-Reformation

2.

In Bethlehem ein Kindelein

3.

Wir Ioben dich

4.

Weit ueber aIle Spheren-Motet Pentecost Organ: Fifth Sonata-Allegro

F. Mendelssohn Moskowsky

Motet.,

H. L. Hassler M. Praetorius

D. S. Bortniansky for J. S. Schicht Appassionato ..Guilmant

Gerhard Rolloff


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Th" D. lIl. L. C. lIlessenger

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

The Little Mother Be Thou Faithful.. Lamb of God Hosanna in the Highest Benediction

E. D. Backer F. Reuter

A. Soedermann A. Soedermann J. S. Bach

It is to be noted, however, that the date of the concert is still subject to change. A two-manual and pedal pipe organ is being presented to D. M. L. C. by the Alumni Association and the college choirs. The organ, built by the Wicks Organ Company, Highland, Illinois, will be installed by May 1. The college wishes to express its appreciation to these organizations for this gif.t, The need for another organ has long been felt, and the present student body eagerly awaits the installment. The specifications are the following: Great Organ 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

8' Open Diapason 8' 8' 8' 4' 4'

Melodia Salicional (Swell) Dulciana Octave-Ext. No. 1.. Flute-Ext. No~ 2

,..73 73 61 61 61 61

pipes pipes notes pipes notes notes

61 61 85 73 61 73 61 61 61 61 .49

notes notes pipes pipes notes notes notes notes notes notes pipes

Swell Organ 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. .13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

16' Bourdon T. C 8' Quintodena 8' Stopped Diapason 8' Salicional.; 8' Dulciana (Great) 4' Flute D'Amour. Ext. No. 9 4' Violina Ext. No. 10 2 2/3 Nazard Ext. No. 9 2' Flautino No; 9 8' Oboe syn 8' Vox Humana

~

Pedal Organ 18. 19. 20.

16' Bourdon ·· · 8' Floute Dolce No. 9 8' Cello No. 10·..·

~

32 pipes 32 notes 32 notes


The D. M. L. C. Meâ&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ enger

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Couplers

Great Great Swell Swell Swell

to to to to to

Great Great Great Great Great

16' 4' 8' 4' 16'

Swell Great Swell Swell

to to to to

Pistons (adjustable at keyboard) Three pistons affecting Great at Pedal... Three pistons affecting Swell at Pedal... General Cancel Accessories

Pedal 8' Pedal 8' Swell 16' Swell 4'

Combination

cancel cancel

Tremolo Bellows Type Crescendo Pedal (without couplers) Wind Indicator Organ Bench Sf'orzondoPiston (all couplers) Great to Pedal Reversible Expression Pedal Console without cover or Roll Top Music rack Motor, blower, Generator or Rectifier ,The new organ will be placed in organ room No. 24.


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29

CO-ED NOTES Woe is me and this cooed column! Atthough still inexperienced, I hope these notes will not prove to be too dull. Finally some long-felt necessities were installed in the Girls' Dormitory. The day after the semester exams were written, several of the girls were pleasantly surprised in their rooms by an electrician. He came to install two new radios-one for the second, and the other for the third floor. They are constantly in use, for who could miss such important programs as the Malt-o-Meal program, and the jokes of Clellan Card, whose favorite expressions seem to be "Termination of joke," and "Now we'll pause for chunks of laughter." Don't get the wrong idea though and think that the girls listen only to such insignificant broadcasts, for symphonies and operas are really quite popular. The Redeker girls also found their new radio a welcome addition to the study room furniture. Fortunately, not one of them insists on listening to cowboy songs. St. Valentine's Day was surely a "heartfelt" day among the co-eds at Hillcrest Hall. Valentines of all sizes and descriptions were received. "Marge" Koehler was the most fortunate of us, since she received three boxes. February 12th was also a big day for the Redeker girls. The decorating committee made the Valentine box and decorated the room with red and white streamers: Then the refreshment committee served an appropriate lunch, after which the entertainment committee came into action. supplying several games and prizes. Everyone of the girls said that it was not a conspiracy, but two of the girls each received three valentines exactly alike. Mildred Bauman added a personal touch to her valentine when she telephoned her parents at Neillsville, Wisconsin. The mailman was also relieved of many boxes at Redeker Hall.


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On January 26th there was really quite an uproar among the girls at Hillcrest 'Hall. The expressman deposited two gigantic. boxes in the reception room. These were eagerly opened by some of the girls, but oh ! the horrified faces they had when they gazed upon the severed head and body of a big black dog! The third floor parties are getting better every time they occur. Now marshmallows are always added to the regular menu, since "Dot" Froehlke contributed a new marshmallow toaster to the list of electrical appliances. However, toast and jam is stilI the main course. Special parties were always held when the Birkholz cousins W211t home over the week-end and brought back a great number of delicious pheasants. Marion Temple and "Omi" Sauer were the guests of "Omi" Birkholz at one of these parties. Birthdays are still celebrated in great style. On January 25th Ruth Gehlhar and Vernice Seibel gave a big party in honor of Olga Richter. Practically all the second floor girls were there. The ethereal odors from their room certainly affected the other girls. The January given in honor isn't known who celebrated a day

birthday celebration at Redeker Hall was of "the illustrious" Estella Albrecht. It got the dates mixed, but the occasion was. late.

Recently a scarlet fever scare was prevalent at the dormitory. Florence Raddatz was sent up to the sick-room in order to smother out some of these germs which she may have had. Fortunately, the scare proved to be but a passing fantasy. However, the flu epidemic was quite popular. Adelaide Nolte, Marguerite Bleck, Geraldine Boelter, and Pearl Anderson all missed several days of school on that account. Wilma Schultz suffered the worst end of the deal, for after she had recuperated from the flu, she had a serious attack of appendicitis. Luckily, she did not have to submit to an operation-to her great joy. Skating and sleigh riding have been two of the sports. in which many of the girls participated during the past month. It's too bad that the skating-rink is so far from the college, for otherwise skating would have been enjoyed still more. Among the mishaps is recorded the stiff neck. of Eunice Stern, which she received one night at a skating party. By the way, Ruby Holzhueter and Eva Taras have new nicknames. They are "Honsia" and "Effie" respectively ..


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â&#x20AC;˘ I

Ruby Holzhueter and Eva Taras have been the society hostesses at the dormitory. Several weeks ago Victoria Becker and Florence Oehlke were their guests. Of course, the usual lunch of pop corn, spaghetti, candy, cookies. and' grapefruit was served. The same thing was repeated several days after their visit, for then Anita Wichman and

Lillian Trapp were the honored guests. All four of the girls received a real taste of dormitory life, in so far that they even had to find their way to bed in the dark. In spite of this, they went home thoroughly convinced that dormitory life isn't so bad after all.

LOCALS Because of the dreary weather which most of us experienced during Christmas vacation, we were all glad to return to school. As usual some sickness came along with us. This year it was the flu. The following were confined to the sick-room with the flu: Edwin Kuesel, Raymond Fluegge, Roland Bode, Elmer Bode, Arthur Krueger, Clarence Witte, Henry Traetow, Edward Peterson, Arnold Wehausen. I'

Since Christmas, the weather has been ideal for winter sports, and the boys are certainly making use of it. Every day they're going skiing or skating. Several of us were surprised to see what we thought was a snowman come from Camel's Bruck. Anybody might guess who it was. Yes, it was Eddie Wehausen. He had spent all the afternoon trying to get down the hill on one ski. Whether he succeeded or not you can judge for yourself. It was indeed a sad week-end shortly after Christmas when we had two funerals in two days. Hank's fish and Lux's bat were the guests of honor. By the way, Krenz tells us the only reason he came to the football games last fall was to look for prospective customers. Not dogs either, as some might believe.

Shortly after the Christmas recess there was a peculiar odor in the dining-hall. The Wisconsinites at the First Normal table brought along a few bricks of their delicious cheese, much to the delight of the other boys of course!


32

The D. 1'11.L. C. Messenger

Don Schultz is back again! He left for home shortly before exams "to stay this time," he said. But as usual he returned. Must be some attraction here! For some reason or other the eleventh and twelfth grades had their class-party together this year. Netzke has acquired the veryimportant job of "pantscreaser" since Dallman left. We hope he has lots of business. He says he likes the jab but for one reason: the steam takes the beautiful waves out of his hair. Who was that handsome fellow on the campus a few weeks ago? Oh, that was only "Tom" Schultz with his hair curled. Some of the fellows went to the high school carnival and came back looking like Indians on the war path. Since that night Don Schultz has made it his ambition to learn to skate as SOOl} as possible, Talking of skating, Ingebritson was quite amused when some of the small boys at the rink composed a rhyme with his nickname, "Inky." "Inky" says that Ray Fluegge is his rival, but in what way, we wonder! A person would think he came into a museum if he happened to walk into the boys' room, with all those relics and pictures hanging on the wall. The First Normals are quite proud of their table. It's the cleanest one in the dining-hall. Just ask the "kitchies" if it isn't! . "Bobbie" Meyer has acquired the new nickname, "Spazzo." Anyone having read "Ekkehard" will, agree it's a fitting name. Birkholz must want to become a great singer. Since he heard that fish peddlers often develop strong voices, he has been yelling "fish" around the campus. Ruben, Wilmer, and Elmer Bode went home the other week-end; just another wedding, that's all. Bob Nolte still believes in the saying, "Go west, young man!" . Karl Mittelstaedt is the nosiest person in our class, but he has no reason to be ashamed of it. He's always prying into the ,secrets told in Church History class. ,

I


The D. 1\1.L. C. Messenger

,

33

Some of the boys' feet felt a little uncomfortable when they put their shoes on the other morning. Upon examination they were found filled with sweeping compound. The janitor must be getting careless, eh boys? Jerry Carpenter must not care very much for our meals. The other Sunday he ate at the C.C.C.Camp. One must admire the way a certain small group is trying to keep up the spirit at basketball games by yelling and cheering. It's too bad that they should be discouraged from so many directions. Krenz evidently had a desire for more knowledge. Recently he purchased a new Webster's-Dictionary! Bull, Schultz, Lueker, and Heckmann are a few of the boys who got such "beautiful" valentines this year. Football ,season is over! Oh yeah! Just watch the First Normal-Twelfth Grade basketball games.' - "Reinie" Nolte has started a new business. For the past two weeks he has been beading different designs for the boys. Stoekli must get tired of these surroundings, for he often goes on week-end trips. Just give Krueger a little war-paint, a few feathers in his hair, and he's all ready to take your scalp! Our basketball team seems to have turned into a flock of nightingales. Did you hear them "sing" when they came in the other night? What! Baseball season is started already? Oh, that's no catcher's mask. It's only Gerlach's glassesguard. Netzke has not only inherited Dallman's job as "pantscreaser," but also has taken it upon himself to keep the walls covered with pictures. Hoboes have their annual convention! Nope, wrong again. It's the First Normal class-party. Wilmer Bode seems to have the record for the shortest stay in the sick-room. He was there just long enough to have his temperature taken. He came out of the door quite suddenly too! . Evidently Moldenhauer didn't get enough sleep on Washington's birthday, for the following day he slept until ten o'clock missing the first two periods.


.'I?h" J!,...M.. L. Câ&#x20AC;˘..l\[e!,s"nger

34

Indians, N egroe,s, .and Mexicans were roaming through the dormitory the 21st of February. Not real ones of course, but some of the boys found a make-up kit and fixed themselves up. We had to look twice to recognize Spaude with a Chinese disguise and Carpenter with Mexican makeup. I'll bet somebody had had dreams that night. Meyer seems tohave his dates mixed, He was decorating his room with a Christmas tree on "February 22," and .what a tree it was! Its ornaments consisted of everything from bedroom slippers to bow-ties, Have you noticed Krueger calls lately?

isn't making so many phone

"Inky" was confined to the sick-room for a few days with a slight concussion of the brain, after he had the misfortune of slipping and falling on the icy sidewalk.

. f

D. M. L. C. LOSES FIRST GAME The D. M. L. C. cagers opened their basketball season on December 5 on their own floor in a game with Mankato 'I'eachers College. A'lthough the locals played good ball they were defeated. by a much stronger T. C. quint. Hoefer led the locals in scoring honors with 6 points while Klaasen led the Teachers with 11 points. The score, 32-16. Box score: D. M. L. C. fg ft pf Swantz, f ..,............. 2 0 1 Geil, f..., 1 1 0 Hoefer, f.. 2 2 2

Mankato Davison, f.. Panzram, f............ Klaasen, f..............

fg 0 0 5

ft pf 0 0 0 1 1 2


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

t

Shultz, f Kraemer, c Seehusen, c Fuerstenau, g Horn, f Bradtke, g Duin, g Ingebritson, g

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0

0 4 0 0 0 0 1 0

35

Armstrong, f ........ Hilger, c................ Gaettle, c.............. Jackson, g... Koff'ron, g.............. Kienholz, g. Halst, g...... Totals

0 2 4 2 0 1 0

0 0 2 1 0 0 0

0 2 0 1 0 1 0

14

4

7

5 6 8 Hockenstad.

Totals Referee:

BETHEL

DOWNS LUTHER

On Dec. 11 the D: M. L. C. quint traveled to Bethel for the first conference game and were defeated by the score of 34-22. Bethel took an early lead and maintained a 17-6 lead at the half. In the second half, however, the Luther five showed great improvement in their playing and held Bethel on even terms. Applequist was high-point man for Bethel, with 7, while Duin led the Luther cagers with 5. Box score: D. M. L. C. Hoefer, f Swantz, f................ Geil, f Kraemer, c Seehusen, c............ Fuerstenau, g Bradtke, g Duin, g Shultz, g Totals Reeree:

fg 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 2 1

fg 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 0

8 R. Cohn.

pf 2 3 3 1 4 2 0 5 2

Bethel Backlin, f Ferre, f.... Sorley, f Richarts Anderson, c.......... Wingblade, c.......... Applequist, g Halmgren, g.......... Young, g Rendahl, g............

fg 1 1 1 3 2 0 3 0 3 0

ft 2 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0

pf 4 2 3 6 5 1 7 0 6 0

6 22 Totals

14

6 34

COMETS SWAMP HILL TOPPERS Saturday evening, Dec. 12, the Hilltoppers met a strong Concordia quint on the Comets' floor and were defeated by the score of 64-19. The score was fairly -close at the beginning, but the Comets ,soon piled up an insurmountable lead. The score at the half was 32-9. Despite the lop-sided score the Hilltoppers played more aggressive-


The D. M. L .. C. Messenger

36

ly than they had in the Bethel game. Mack scored 11 points to hold honors for Concordia, while Kraemer scored 6 for Luther honors. Box ,score: D. M. L. C. Hoefer, f.. Shultz, f.. Swantz, f.. Geil, f.. Kraemer, c , Seehusen, c Fuerstenau, g Bradtke, g...... Duin, g Totals

fg ft pf

0 0 4 1 1 1

Concordia Bartz, f.................. Gericke, f.............. Puseman, f...... Oberhau, f.. Mack, c Lieske, c.. Mueller, g Hasskamp, g........

1 1 2

Rist, g

6

Drew, g Quast, g..........

1 0 0 0 3 0

3 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 3 1 1

7 13

Totals Referee:

fg ft pf 4 5

2 0

3 0

3

2

3

2

0

3

5 1 0 1 0 2 0 1 2 0 2 1 4 0 1 2 0 2

2 0 0 28 8 17

Janson.

D. M. L. C. DOWNS BETHANY

Coming from behind in the final quarter, the Hilltoppers squeezed out an exciting victory over Bethany by a score of 25-24, Tuesday, Dec. 15 on the Bethany floor. Bethany held the lead nearly the whole game and at the half were out in front 14-8. In the last quarter the Hill- . tappers scored 13 points to gain the lead which they held until the end of the game. Box score: fg ft pf D. M. L. C. Bethany fg ft pf Hoefer, f ................ 2 Swantz, f ................ 1 Geil, f ...................... 2 Kraemer, c............ 0 Seehusen, c............ 1 Fuerstenau, g........ 0 Bradtke, g.............. 2 Duin, g.................. 1

0 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 - - Totals ................ 9 7 2

Referee:

Hoerr.

Bolstad, f .............. Heitner, f .............. Peterson, g............ Olson, c.................. Vangen, g.............. Pederson, g............ Ulvisaker, g..........

4 0 1 1 0 1 5 0 2' 1 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2' - - Totals ................12 0 10


The D. 1\1.L. C. Messenger

37

D. M. L. C. BOWS TO SHATTUCK On January 13 the Luthers traveled to Faribault and played the Shattuck Military Academy quint to which they bowed by the overwhelming score of 43-23. The Hilltoppers started the scoring' when Kraemer netted a basket in the first minute of play, but the Cadets soon opened fire and set up a comfortable lead which they held throughout the game. Box score: D. M. L. C. fg ft pf Shattuck fg ft pf Geil, f 0 0 2 Eddy, f 4 0 1 Hoefer, f 2 2 0 Cosgrone, f 2 3 3 Swantz, f ,0 1 0 Sharpe, f 1 0 1 Seehusen, f 0 0 1 Moore, c..... 8 0 2 Kraemer, c... 2 2 2 Thomas, g 2 0 2 Bradtke, g 1 1 2 Morse, g..... 0 0 0 Duin, g 2 0 1 Olson, g 2 0 1 Fuerstenau, g 0 1 2 Hogeboom, g........ 1 0 3 Horn, f.. 0 0 0 Totals 20 3 13 Totals 8 7 10 Reefree : Ed. Dahl. HILLTOPPERS

SALUTE CADETS

On Wednesday night, Jan. 27, Dr. Martin Luther Col1ege played a return engagement with Shattuck on the home floor. The game was an overwhelming victory for the Shads, the final score being 33-10. Seehusen started the scoring by sinking a free throw for the locals. From then on the Shads seemed to find their range and ran up the score of 20-1 before the locals scored again. The Hilltoppers scored only one field goal, the remaining points being scored on free throws . .Box s'core: D. M. L. C. fg ft pf Shattuck fg ft pf Kraemer, f..... 0 1 1 Cosgrone, f..... 2 2 2 Geil, f 0 2 0 Sharpe, f 4 1 2 Horn, f 0 0 0 Eddy, f 2 0 0 Hoefer, f. 0 0 0 Burns, f 0 0 2' Seehusen, c 0 2 0 Moore, c ; 2 0 3 Swantz, g 0 2 0 Olson, g 1 0 0 Bradtke, g 0 0 1 Hogeboom, g 0 0 3 Duin, g : 1 0 1 J. F. Thomas, g 4 0 1 Fuerstenau, g 0 1 '0 J. B. Thomas, g 0 0 0 Totals 1 8 3 Totals 15 3 13 Referee: Hockenstad.

â&#x20AC;˘


The D. M. L. C. J\-Iessenger

3S

TRACY TRIPS D. M. L. C. On Feb. 1, the D. M. L. C. quint journeyed to Tracy, to be defeated by the score of 15-37. The game was close at the beginning, and at the end of first half the score was tied 9-9. The Tracy five, however, soon forged ahead and held a lead until the end of the game. Box score: D. M. L. C. Kraemer, f.. Geil, f.. Horn, f.. Hoefer, f.. Seehusen, c Swantz, c Bradtke, g Fuerstenau, g Duin, g Totals

fg 1 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 1

ft pf 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 3 1 0

6

3

7

â&#x20AC;˘

Tracy Carpen ter, f.......... Miller, f.. Culp, f.. Hansen, f.... Kalbrenner, c........ Kurtz, c Anderson, g Johnson, g Kammerud, g........ Kitterman, g Bisek, g Totals

Referee:

fg 5 0 6 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 15

ft 1 0 4 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

pf 3 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

7

7

Sanbo,

D. M. L. C. AGAIN BOWS 'TO TRACY On Feb. 9 the Tracy cagers journeyed to New Ulm for a return bout with the Hilltoppers and netted themselves a victory by the score of 35-25. In this game the local team showed signs of improvement over former games and it was only because of Tracy's greater strength that they lost the game. Box score: D. M. L. C. Kraemer, f.. Hoefer, f.. Swantz, f.. Duin, f.. Seehusen, c Bradtke, g.............. Fuerstenau, g ........ Totals

fg 2 0 1 0 1 3 2

ft pf 2 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 0

9

7

4

Tracy fg Carpenter, f.. ........ 5 Bisek, f.................. 0 Culp, f.. 5 Miller, f.. 0 Kalbrenner, c 5 Hansen, c.............. 0 Anderson, g.......... 1 Johnson, g............ 0 Kammerud, g........ 0 Totals

Referee:

Anderson.'

16

ft pf 1 3 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 3 12


The D. ~I. L. C. Messenger

39

WALDORF DOWNS D. M. L. C. On Feb. 13 the Waldorf aggregation met the Hilltoppers on the home floor and defeated them by the score of 26-16. The score at the half was 14-6 in Waldorf's favor. In the second half the home team showed great improvement in play and held the foreigners on their own ground. Bradtke was high point man for D. M. L. C. with 7 points, while Roren took honors for Waldorf with 9. Box score:

n, M. L. C. Kraemer, f............ T~Toefer,f Swantz, f.. nuin. f Seehusen. c Geil, f.. Bradtke, g Fuerstenau, g Totals

fg 1 2 0 0 () 0 2 1

ft 0 0 0 0 () 0 3 1

pf 1 1 0 0

6

4 11

;1

0 3 2

Waldorf P. Anderson, f.. .... Olson. f.................. Fox, f Taylor, f Roren, c.................. Connor, c Barber, g Lehman. g............ A. Anderson, g Haglung, g Totals

Referee:

12

ft 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0

pf ~ 1 4 0 0 0 0 1 2 1

2 11

Hockenstad. ROCHESTER

"

fg 2 1 3 0 4 0 1 1 0 0

SWAMPS D. M. L. C.

Feb. 16 marks the date for another defeat for D. M. L. C. This time at the hands of Rochester Junior College. The game was played at Rochester and the sluggishness of the home team may be accounted for as home-sickness. However, they did play good ball in the first quarter, the score being 0-0 at the end. The final score was 41-16. Box score: D. M. L. C. fl{ ft pf Rochester fg ft pf Kraemer ................ 2 1 1 Shultz .................. 5 0 0 T~Toefer .................. 1 0 2 Graham ................ 0 0 1 Fwantz .................. 0 1 0 Smith .................... 0 0 1 T)uin ...................... 1 1 2 Shelsky ................ 2 1 0 "eehusen .............. 0 1 2 ~ Derksen ................ 1 1 3 Bradtke ................ 1 1 2 Wiberg .................. 2 0 3 Geil ........................ 0 0 0 Pappas .................. 6 1 2 Fuerstenau .......... 0 1 3 Peterson .- ............. 1 0 2 - - Fisk ...................... 0 4 1 Totals ................ 5 6 11 Zick ...................... 0 0 1 - - Totals ................17 7 14 Referee: Ed. Dahl.


The路 D. lU. L. C. Messenger

40

D. M. L. C. DROPS ANOTHER TO COMETS Yes, the Comets again defeated the Hilltoppers but this time they had to work for it, too. The Concordia team came here on Feb. 19 and took an early lead in the game, but during the last quarter the. locals got together and tied up the score. The final score was 30-30. However, in the overtime period the Comets scored six times while the locals only scored twice, Fuerstenau sinking two free shots, Bradtke and Seehusen were high for D. M. L. C. with 10 points while Mach was high for the Comets with 12. Box score: D. M. L. C. Kraemer Hoefer Swantz Duin Seehusen Bradtke Fuerstenau Totals Referee:

fg 0 0 0 1 5 5 1

ft pf 0 2 2 1 0 2 1 1 0 2 0 1 5 2

12

8 11

Terry.

Concordia Gericke Quast Puseman Oberheu Mack Lieske Hasskamp Drew

fg 4 2 1 1 5 1 2 0

ft pf

Totals

16

4 12

o 2 o 0 1 2 o 0 2 2 o '4 1 1 o 1


The D. M. L. C. Mes8enger

Gerlach: Fluegge:

41

Why are you eating with your knife? My fork leaks.

Careful Nolte: What's the big idea, wearing my raincoat? . Hoefer: It's raining. You wouldn't want your suit to get wet, would you? Warning Mother: Sonny, don't use such bad words. Son: Shakespeare used them. Mother: Well, don't play with him.-Ex. "How old. were you on your last birthday?" "I don't know. I haven't had my last birthday yet." Ruby: Say, Gertie, you look swell tonight, but I notice you're wearing one black shoe and one brown one. , Gertrude: Isn't that funny? My sister had the same trouble this morning. Dentist (to patient): I told you not to swallowthat's my last pair of pliers.-Ex. "I think my wife is part Indian." "Why?" "Every time she walks in her .sleep, she takes the blanket with her."-Ex. "I'm crossing homing pigeons with parrots." "Why, what's the big idea ?" "Say, listen, if a pigeon gets lost, at least he can ask his way home!"


42

The. D. 路M.L. C. Messenger

Joe Lewis-Vic Young is such a punk golfer that two ants climbed on top of his ball to keep from getting killed while Vic was making a shot.-Ex. "Yes, the bullet struck my head, went careening into space, and-" "How terrible! Did they get it out ?"-Ex. Menz: Listen here, Weindorf, you forgot something. You forgot that you owe me two bits Weindorf: No, I haven't forgotten. But give me time,-I will! Adair (sitting at window with back to Krenz): I see there's a fight down on the corner. Krenz: That so! I wish I was facing that way. Without Cream, Too 'I dreamed last night that I had invented a new type of breakfast food and was sampling it when-" "Yes, yes, go on." "-when I woke up and found a corner of the mattress gone."-Ex. Schultz: Well, Schroeder, how do you like Shakespeare? .Elroy S.: VeIl, Shake's peer iss goot, but I like Looie Schmit's petter! . And then there's the one about the Scotchman who washed his bacon in Lux, so it wouldn't shrink.c-Ex. Driving Instructor: "Well, do you understand the car now?" Adelaide: "Perfectly. There's only one thing I'd like to know. Do you put the water and the gasoline in the same hole?" Proved It "She seemed like a good sensible girl." "Yeh, she wouldn't pay any attention to me either." A Close-Up First Dumb Hunter: How do you detect an elephant? Guide: You can smell a faint odor of peanuts on his breath.-Ex.


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List of Advertisers. Saff'ert's Provision Market F. J. Backer & Co. Eugene Koehler Barber Shop Dr. G. J. Hiebert Mr. Albert FloI' The 'Bee Hive J. C. Penney Co. Drs. Schleuder Somsen, Dempsey, Johnson & Somsen Fink's Store New DIm Grocery Simons Lumber Co.. Farmers and Merchants State Bank ModelBarber Shop Wicherski Shoe Store Salet's Department Store Crone Bros. Company Erickson and Graff National Tea Store Drs. Hammermeister and Saffert


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â&#x20AC;˘


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SPAULDING ATHLETIC GOODS -at-

Robert Fesenmaier, Inc. Special discount given to students

EUGENE KOEHLER BARBER SHOP Hair Cuts 30c Efficient Service and Courteous Treatment NewUlm

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Office Phone 260

DR. F. H. DUBBE PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON NEW ULM,

MINNESOTA


THE SCHROEDER BAKERY THE FLOWER OF NEW ULM

JUST LIKE THE BREAD MOTHER MAKES

PHONE 232 AID ASSOCIATION FOR LUTHERANS APPLETON, WISCONSIN In its various plans of life insurance, the Aid Association for Lutherans, the largest legal reserve fraternal life insurance society for Lutherans in the United States and Canada, and operating strictly within the various Synods of the Synodical Conference, offers that absolute SAFETY which all who purchase life insurance to create an earning-ability estate are seeking. INSURANCE IN FORCE

-----------

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ASSETS,Dec. 31, 1936

$21,612,383.63

Total Benefits paid to Certificateholders and Beneficiaries since organization . --

$16,577,087.30

Alex. O. Benz, President Wrn. H. Zuehlke, Treasurer Wrn. F. KeIrn, Vice President Albert Voecks, Secretary Otto C. Rentner, General Counsel


I~

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Our

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Everything of a banking nature entrusted to our care receives our best attention. We shall be glad to have a share of your business.

State Bank of New VIm Member Federal

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ARTCRAFT PHOTO SERVICE We Have It!

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Phones 52-341


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PINK'S STORE Where the Newest Styles Are Shown First The Smartest Wear for Young and Old At Prices You Expect to Pay

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Buy Rexall Merchandise SUPERIOR QUALITY AT LOWER PRICES

REXALL DRUG STORE Walter Muesing-Walter W. Hellmann "SAVE WITH SAFETY"

NEW ULM STEAM LAUNDRY OTTO F. OSWALD & SONS

Phone No.5 For Your Dry Cleaning, Laundry or Hat Work We assure you prompt and efficient service and invite you to visit our modern, up-to-date plant at 107-109So. Minn. St.


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When in Need of Electrical Supplies and Radios or Service call on

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-I

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I'


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COMMENCEMENT NUMBER

VOLUME XXVII-

NUMBER JUNE

1937

IV


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-: Contents . CLASS OF 1937...................................................................... 2 CLASS HISTORY

:,

12

HISTORY OF 1937 HIGH SCHOOL GLASS

13

LrTERARY a)

Vacations

14

b)

Color

16

c)

Yonder Grass

;

18

LIBRARY COMMENTS

23

EUITORIALS a)

Thoughts and Feelings at Graduation

27

b)

Come On, Gang!

28

ALUMNI

29

EXCHANGE

30

COLLEIGE NOTES

33

CO-ED NOTES

37

LO'GALS

~

40

ATHLETICS JOKES

43 ,

45


CLASS OF 1937

Class Motto:

Feed My Lambs

Class Colors:' Brown and Yellow Class Flower : Yellow Daisy

CLASS OFFICERS President Vice President Secretary-Treasurer

Arnold Coppens Veleda Kelm Ruby Holzhueter


_l

MILTON BRADTKE Lake Benton, Minn. Phi Gamma Rho, 4; President, 1; Band, 1; Concert Choir, 8; jJi{a?'lu,t Sing6?"S, 3; Director, 1; Basketball. 2L; F'ootball, 3L,; ]I[essenger Staff, 2; Presulent of St.uden; Body.

ARNOLD COPPENS Green Bay, Wis. Phi Delta Sigma, 4; Class President; Football, 3L; Concert Choir, 4; ]J[a?'lu,tS'ingM路,., 3; Messenge?' Staff', 2.


CATHERINE

GUNN

La Crosse, Wis.

Phi Delta Sigma, 4.

RUBY HOLZHUETER Waterloo, Wis. Phi Gamma Rho, 2; Secretaru, 1; Class Secretars) and Treasurer, 1; Girls' Glee Club, 2.


VELEDA

KELM

New Prague, Minn. Phi. Delta Sigrna, 4; Concert Choir, 6; 7l1essen.qe1路Staff, 2; Class Vice President,

MARGARET

KOEHLER

Milwaukee" Wis. Phi Gamma Rho. 3; Concert Cho路j,t. 3; Messenaer Staff, 1; Gi1'1"' Glee Club.


ERNA KUEHL Mound City, S. Dak. Phi Delta S'igma, 3; Concert Choir, 2; Girls' Glee Club, 1; Gil'ls' Athletic Board,2.

GER'fRUDE

LIMPERT

La Crosse, Wis. Phi Delta Sigma, 4; OonC01路t Choir, 4; Gil'ls' Glee cua, 3; Director, 1; JJr[ eesenper Staff, 2.


HELEN JANE MVELLER New VIm, Minn. Phi Delta Sigma; Concert Ohair.

ESTHER PAAPE New VIm, Minn. Phi Delta S'igma.


CECILIA PRIESZ Montevideo, Minn. Phi Gamma Rho, 4; Concert Choir, 2; ai-iÂŤ Glee Club, 1; G'i1'/'"Athletic Board,2.

FLORENCE

RADDATZ

Clements, Minn. "h'i Gamma Rho, 4; V'ice President of O. G. S.


OLGA RICHTER Fr-azee, Minn. Phi Gamma Rho, 4,' Secretaru of PM Gamma Rho, 1; Gi?'ls' Glee OI?Lb, 3; Concert Choir, 3.

GERHARD

ROLLOFF

Calvary, Wis. Phi Delta S'ig111,a.3; lIfarlttt SingM's,. 2; Concert Ohoi?', 3; JJlessengM' StaU', 2; Band, 2; F'ootball,. 2L.; Baseball, 3L; Basketball ManaoeÂť, 2L.


WINFRIED

STOEKLI

Wonewoc, Wis.

Phi Gamma Rho, 4; President, 1; Band, 4; Director, 1; Concert Choir, 1;; Ma1'1~,tSinge1's, 4; Basketball Manager, 1L; lIiessenge1' Staff, 3.

EVA TARAS Ixonia, Wis. Phi Delta Sigma, 2; Club, 2; Concert Ohoir, 2.

oi-iÂŤ

Glce


AGNES TIMM Milwaukee, Wis. Phi Gamma Rho, 3; Concert Choir, 2; Girls' Glee Club, 1; Sec1'etary of O. G. S...1.

LILLIAN

TRAPP

Hartland, Wis. Phi Gamma Rho, 1.


12

The D. l\f. J,. C. MesSenlrH

CLASS HISTORY, AS SEEN BY HERMANN Through the many years that I have .been perched upon this my pedestal, gazing upon the landscape below, I have most often let my eyes rest upon the camp us of Dr. Martin Luther College. I have seen the students come and go and class after class graduate. This year another class will receive diplomas and after tha:t join the many numbers which have gone 'before them. As I gaze upon the members of this class. I recall how in 1934 they came to this institution as I Normalites. They came from various schools. Twelve had formerly been high school ,students at Dr. Martin Lut.her College: Norwald Behrens, Milton Bradtke, Arnold Conpens, Walter Goeglein, Catherine Gunn, Veleda Kelm, Gertrude Limnert, Esther Paape, Cecilia Priesz, Florence Raddatz, Olga Richter, Winfried Stoekli; the rest, as follows: Fred Schoenherr and Dorothy Trommer from the Seminary at Saginaw, Gerhard Rolloft' from Winnebago Academy, Erna Kuehl from Mobridge, Margaret Koehler and Agnes Timm from the Milwaukee Lutheran High School. These students elected Walter Goeglein as their first president, who after remaining with them one year, left Dr. Martin Luther College the following spring. Dorothy Trommer and Fred Schoenherr also decided to remain at home the next fall. At this time it would be in place to mention the party which this class had during the course of the year. I can still hear the members tell the story of how Tutor Dalhke -chaperon for the evening-rolled a potato across the floor with his nose. With interest I watched the return of this class in the fall of '35. Three new faces came to replace those who had left: Ruby Holzhueter and Eva Taras from Northwestern College and Helen Jane Mueller of New VIm., This year the class proved its eccentricity, which I had noted before. There were no class officers and neither did they hold any class meetings until May, when they were quietly informed about their duties as hosts and hostesses to the graduating class. Immediately they began preparations for the picnic which was to be held in honor of the graduates, and for the commencement exercises. Since this class was to be the graduating class the next fall, I expected no new faces ; but lo! and behold r there was one, Lillian Trapp from Hartland. In vain I looked for Norwald Behrens, and soon I found that he had been obliged to teach. I also overheard that Arnold Coppens was president; Veleda Kelm, vice president, and


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

13

Ruby Holzhueter, secretary and treasurer, As I see them now, they are excitedly awaiting their calls and making preparations for the banquet which i,s to be held May 29, and for their graduation on June 10. HISTORY OF 1937 HIGH SCHOOL CLASS Class Motto God Is Our Refuge and Strength Class Colors Blue and White Class Flower White and Blue Carnations September 1933Thirteen ambitious boys and girls entered D. M. L. C. with the intention of absorbing knowledge. After roaming through the halls, looking into each and every door, they finally found their destination, which was Professor Levorson's class room. They were the smiling faces of Hilma Albrecht, Gilbert Fischer, Ernst Gurgel, Robert Hammermeister, Evelyn Hunt, Victor Kraemer, Dorothy Kreuger, Verna Laudenschlager, Bruce Mueller, Adelaide Nolte, Melville Schultz, Wilma Schultz, Ivan Raddatz, Fern Stechman, and Hazel Steinberg. Time marches on. September 1934Again these people with the exception of Ernst Gurgel and Robert Hammermeister entered D. M. L. C., but this time Carlheinz Neumann joined the group. After a few weeks Ivan Raddatz left for Concordia College at St. Paul. Time marches on. September 1935The happy group returned. They were joined by Marjorie Larson, Julius Ingebritson and Richard Nitz. Time marches on. September 1936This school year brings with it a new member, Norman Tradup. Since the year has drawn to a close, we, the members of the class of 1937, sincerely hope that the Juniors of 1937-1938 will take as much pleasure in listening to Prof. Blief'ernicht's lectures as we have in the past two years. We also hope that they will be able to listen to the beautiful strains of our class song, "Immer langsam voran." Until 1940 when we hope to meet again-cheerio!


14

The D. 1\1.L. C. Uessenger

VACATIONS Another vacation has just passed and already we are looking forward to the next one. Indeed vacations have peculiar characteristics. Usually so many events and incidents are crowded into these few free days that it is only after we have returned again to our regular work that we realize all that has happened. Undoubtedly vacations are of great value to practically all people. It does one good to be as free from care and worry as a bird. Most people recognize the fact that it is tiresome and nervewracking to remain at one special work for any length 'Oftime, especially if this work demands great exactness, thoroughness, and concentration. A doctor who has been answering sick calls, administering medicine, performing 'Operations all day, and then perhaps is called out yet at night for some cause or the 'Other, certainly needs a vacation at regular intervals, a time when he is free from all responsibilities and given a chance to rest and enjoy himself in whatever manner he pleases, When one hears the word vacation, he immediately associates it with the idea of rest. But is a vacation a period of rest? In a certain sense, yes. It is, or at least should be, a rest from the work in which we are regularly engaged. Perhaps a better word to use would be change. for if some people saw what we do during vacation, they would call this free period anything but a rest. My idea of a perfect vacation is plenty 'Ofice and snow for skating, skiing, and the other popular outside winter sports. During the summer months I usually try to get in several weeks of farm work, such as making hay, setting up shocks of grain, and threshing. After one has been at


The D. 1\'1.L .. C. Messenger

15

work such as this for a time, then school work becomes a pleasure and it seems almost as if another vacation has begun. Because of the benefit derived from a change, it is best for a person also to select a change of scenery and surroundings when considering a place for vacationing. A person living in or near the mountains would find little pleasure in visiting some mountains similar to those which he sees in everyday life. The seashore is the place for such a person to go, a place where things are entirely different from his home surroundings. A person who has been working in a large, busy city would derive most benefit from a vacation by going to some quiet resort. We can easily see that if would seem foolish for a salesman who has been on the road most of the time to drive about from one place to another whenever he has a day free. And thus it is in all types of work. For a rest a man wants a change, and, therefore, we have so many and varied vacation spots. In our modern era we perhaps need vacations more than ever before. Our daily work is always a rush to get as much accomplished in the shortest time possible. Consequently we are driven at a high rate of speed and given very little time for relaxation. We are in the midst of a wild stampede, endeavoring to keep up with the terrific pace the leaders have established. We can keep up for a time, but soon we become fatigued and realize that unless we drop out of this mad chase for a few weeks, we are bound to "crack up" sooner or later. This is the time when one considers a vacation, which is not an unpleasant thought by any means. .The only difficulty now lies in selecting the place. If there are five members goinv on a trip, there will very likely he five different places suggested. This can also be easily understood, for the United States has so many ideal places for vacationing that it is indeed difficult to make a choice. The west has its beautiful mountains and national parks; the east has its seacoast resorts and interesting manufacturing centers. The other sections of the country also have certain features about them which attract thousands of vacationers each year. Today some people are taking vacation the year around. They travel about the country from place to place in a car with a house on wheels following behind. It may be great while it lasts, but I wonder whether these nomads won't ,soon tire of this life. Certainly, it is a novelty now to go when and wherever you please, but I still prefer a home. Yet in spite of these people who are vacationing all the time, vacations for most of us will continue to come


16

The D. M. L: C. Messenger

and go. And what more could we wish? The important thing is to make use of these periods of rest in ,sucha manner that they let us forget our worries instead of adding: more to them.-G. R. '37.

COLOR In spite of snow, chilblains, and northerly winds. spring is here-definitely and finally. How do I know? Because the calendar says it is April and April is snrino;'s month as much as January' is winter's, April is showers and sunshine. pussywillows and crocuses. birds and music. laughter and lightheartedness. cockeyed hats and new spring suits, the month before May, and color. Because it is spring. someonehas made a list and caned it "we believe in spring" that I found very interesting and I thought you might enjoy it also. Here it is: 1. We believe that the most forbidding business men should wear blue cornflowers in their buttonholes. 2. We believe in going to the country and looking at a new calf, wobbly and grave. . 3.. We believe in putting ruffleson the pantry shelves, and red geraniums in the bathroom. 4. We believe in sitting on some old stile just before dark and listening for a whippoorwill. 5. We believe that the first small intolerably ,".Teen leaves will make you want to cry. 6. We believe that the rain in spring is different, that it beats against your heart. Of all the things I mentioned that spring and Avril are, I think that color is the most important and interesting. After a long winter of living in a world that is a study in black and white, like some gaunt silhouette, any color is nothing less than food for our souls. Colors are so very important in our lives and we meet with them in so manydifferent ways in our sojourn here below that it is more than fun to make our own observations. concerning them and listen to other people's ideas on the subject. One of my favorite poems is that one called "Color" by a certain Phoebe Crosby Allnut, who must be a romantic


The

D.

~I. L. C. Messenger

dreamer, if ever there was one, for only a romanticist, a poet, or a dreamer could talk as she does. She starts out by saying, "I am so glad of the color of things." I like that because there are so many in this world who do not know or care if red be red, or blue be blue. Color means nothing to them, and how much they are missing by being so ind路ifferent. Night to her is blue, and it is blue, isn't it? The sky that magnificent blue that is almost black, the color of deep blue luxurious velvets.c=and then on cold winter nights it is an icy blue-s-beautiful but cold-like diamonds. Morning, she says, is red and yellow like a tulip. Red and yellow like a tulip! Sunrises are always magnificent spectacles of beauty and splendor, aloof and awful, but now because someone had said they are like so many red and yellow tulips they take on a new kind of beauty-a more gentle and understandable kind. Religion, to Miss Allnut, is purple, a radiant rosy purple, seen by her only once in northern lights. Religion might also be golden, the color of gold seen in warm, rich looking oil paintings. Adventure is golden also, because of the sun shining on brass helmets. Can't you just see the youth marching on to new adventures, the sun on their heads and a song in their hearts? Yes, adventure is golden, a shining and gleaming gold. Church going is another purple-the dull flat purple of a prayer book marker, and that does seem to describe it quite perfectly. Don't you think so? Then she goes on to talk about voices and tells of some one whose voice is like the green of a breaking wave. Cool and quiet and serene, I should imagine. Some one I know has a voice that is silver-icy, high-pitched and most aloof, and then there are the brown voices of most men-deep, rich, and warming. Listen to other people's voices and try to tell what color they are, I can assure you it is as interesting as any kind of game you have ever played. There are red voices, blata:nt and demanding; black voices, somber and melancholy; and most little children's voices are blue, the sweet lovely blue of a shiny new hair ribbon. Love, to Miss Allnut, and to most of us I am sure, is white and glowing. This observing color, as I have said, is very interesting and every day color plays a part in our life. It has a way of affecting our moods and dispositions. Even those who maintain that nothing affects them one way or the other are not immune. In the morning when you awaken, yOU'are greeted by golden yellow sunshine, Dr the cool gray softness of a cloudy day. If the latter is the case, you might take a hand in brightening things up by choosing a dress, a tie,


The D. 1\1.L. C. MesS'enger

18

or a sweater that is gay and colorful. When you go down to breakfast you are greeted by more color. Warm golden brown toast on which to spread smooth yellow butter or glowing red strawberry jam. Your coffee is "heisz wie die Holle, und schwartz wie die nacht," or your milk is white and foamy. On your way to school or to work you breathlessly note the golden rays of the sun shining on the windows, blessing those that live within. At school Dr work you notice the bright dresses and colorful handkerchiefs of the girls, and the more conservatively colored ties of the men. Red, blue, green pencils flash across paper, and brown, red, green, blue books burst open. Everything is a riot of color from chapel time to choir period. Dinner is a study in green and brown-s-tender brown roast beef, snowy white potatoes, fresh green peas, crisp green lettuce, and finally green apple pie, whose crust is done to that desired brownness. Your afternoon is equally as colorful. Walk in the woods where the earth is slowly awakening and ,sending forth green fingers to touch the sky, and multicolored flowers are beginning to listen to spring's beckoning call and you delight in the sheer beauty of it. Spend an afternoon on the links hitting around a little white ball over a green velvet carpet and you can't help but notice the colorful dresses, socks, bandanas, and sweaters, For supper you have a fruit salad that is a study in pastel shades-the yellow of the pineapple and the banana, the red coated apple, the green grapes, the red cherries and the oranges, You can't escape it no matter how hard you try. Your letter and work in the evening is written on white, blue, green, red or yellow paper, with brown, blue, silver, green or red ink, and finally you go to bed between cool, white sheets, covered with a blanket of almost any shade, It's everywhere around us; the world is mad with color. How fortunate for us that it is! From red fingertips to the heavenly blue of night, I am all for color. I am with Phoebe Crosby Allnut when she says, "I know what I'll do! I'll gather them all together and make a stained glass window of them inscribing it thus, 'To the glory of God in loving memory of my days on earth.' "-II. J. M.'37.

YONDER GRASS Characters:

Six 'college girls.

Time: About 5 :45 p. m. on an evening two weeks before Easter vacation.


The D. 111.L. C. Messenger

Act I-Scene:

19

A study room in a girls' dormitory.

The room is not too tidy, and as the scene opens, the girls are seen scattered about in the most comfortable positions the straight-back chairs will allow, and all are occupied in some manner. The door opens and Gretchen enters. ago.

'Gretchen: Say, kids, the bell rang a few minutes How about starting up to supper?

Marian: And get there early just to wait for the door to open? No, thanks. I'm finishing this story first. Cleo: Quarter of six, did you say? Well, It's about time. I'm on the verge of starvation, no kidding. Lorraine: So am I. Wonder what we'll have tonight! Hope it's something good. Cleo: love it.

Don't

worry.

We'll have hash-and

how I

Lorraine: Oh, not hash. We had that the other night and we don't get it oftener than once a week. Gretchen: I'll guess bread pudding, becau,se I saw plenty of dry bread out in the kitchen the other day. Hope my guess is right. And say, it's ten to six. Doris: What! You like that watery bread pudding? If you're right, I'll fill up on bread and butter. .Mariari: Stop your grumbling and let me read in peace. Why kick? We seem to be thriving on the food we get, don't we?

'Gladys: Who wouldn't thrive on bread and butter? But what I'm hungry for is a nice crisp salad, Oh, the thought of it makes me weep! Doris: Or a nice juicy steak smothered in onions! Well, girls, in two weeks we'll be home, and steak is going to be the first thing I order. Lorraine: You mean in thirteen days. Exactly thirteen days from this moment we'll be having supper at home. . And I won't be eating watery bread pudding. I want creamed beef on toast, lettuce salad, and cherry pie. Gretchen: Come on, kids. It's seven minutes to and I don't want to be late again. I'm going. Marian: Same here. I can't finish this story anyway. (Marian and Gretchen each grab a coat from the back of a chair and leave, struggling into it.)


20

The

D. 1\'1. I~.C. ~(ess('ngf'r

Gladys: I copied a recipe for the most deliciouslooking chocolate chip cake and a glossy chocolate frosting. I won't fail to try that, and if it gets good, I'll bring some back. Cleo: . Oh, don't forget about Bavarian cream. At least, I won't. And for some of Mom'sdeliciousdill pickles -big, crisp, juicy ones. Doris: We have to have cream puffs at least once, and I'm going to have bacon and eggs on toast every morning just to get my fill of it for once. Gladys: And orange or tomato juice every morning, too. And I've got to have roast chicken and rieed potatoes. Lorraine: And baked ham, too. But we'd better hustle up to supper. It's exactly three minutes to six. Cleo: Your watch must be fast. It can't be more than fiveof. Doris: That's what you think. My time says only two minutes. Lorraine: Hope we have dessert. If some one doesn't' like his, I whack it. Gladys: Don't worry. There won't he any left to whack, unless we get those floury cookies. Doris: Say, now we have to hustle, or we'll be late. Hurry up, now! (A scramble for coats.) Cleo: Here goes for hash or bread pudding. Come on, gang. Doris: Oh, we'll survive for two more weeks, I guess. (All run off.) Act II-Time: 5 :45 p. m. on an evening two days after school has been resumed after the Easter recess. . Scene: The same as in Act I. All of the girls except Marian are in the room. Gladys: Isn't it about time for supper? I'm famished. Cleo: How in the world can you eat supper on top of all those cookiesyou ate this afternoon? Glady,s: How about yourself! I didn't notice that you were so sparing with that divinity fudge.


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Doris:

21'

Well, if you want to know, it's past a quarter

of. Gretchen: We'd better be on time tonight. make a better showing than we did before Easter.

Let's

Doris: You know, we're kind of lucky not having to get supper ready. That's what I don't like about being at home-trying to decide what to have for every meal and then having to spend an hour at getting it rigged up. Lorraine: It's a funny thing, but when Mom asked me what I wanted for dinner the first day, my mind went complet~ly blank. I couldn't think of any of those things we had planned to have. Gretchen: Oh, I could think of plenty, but Mother usually had something else planned, or we wouldn't have time to fix it, or there'd be something left over that had to be used up first. Say, Glad, did you try that chocolate chip cake? Gladys: Oh, don't mention it. I tried it all right, but something went wrong and the thing went straight up in the middle. ) Doris :

Too much flour, I'd say.

Gladys: And that glossy frosting didn't pan out so well. At least, I failed to see the gloss, and by the next day it was as hard as cement. We managed to eat it, though. ing?

Marian (peeking in at the door): It must be high time.

How about start-

Gretchen: Some showing we'll make, coming late right off the bat. Cleo:

Why go so early just to stand around and wait?

Gretchen: Lorraine: rush anyway. Doris:

But it's late! Run along, Gretch. You're always in a You'll get your share of fried potatoes.

Don't mention it!

And delicious beet pickles!

Marian : Well, I like the beet pickles we get, and as to fried potatoes, they're not half bad if you're hungry. Cleo: That's just it. Who's hungry? - I don't want to see cookies or candy for weeks. Too much sweet stuff gets me down.


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The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Lorraine: Don't worry. If we hadn't eaten it all this afternoon, you'd be willing to dive in again tonight. Cleo: . Not the way I feel now, but I s'pose you're right. Marian: Sure, she's right, Look at the bright side of things once in a while. We don't have to plan and prepare meals. We don't have to wash dishes. We don'tDoris: Stop Iecturing l I'd rather get ten meals ready and have the things I like. Marian: And wash all the dishes, too? #1 Doris: Well-yes, I would. Much rather. Marian: You can't convince me, but I don't mind. Now, how about going to supper? It must be practically six o'clock. (They scramble for eoats.) Gretchen: It is! A dandy bunch we are. Lorraine (as they rush off): Says you! THE END G. L. '37.


The D. ]\1. L. C. Messenger

23

Libwaey Comments It is with great pleasure that we introduce our COMMENTS for this edition of the MEISSENGER with an expression of gratitude. Visitors to our library will observe with appreciation two new pictures on our front wall. One of these pictures is a painting depicting the LAST SUPPER. We owe this beautiful and "remarkable painting to Mrs. Henry Weede of Balaton, Minnesota. While we make no claims whatever of being an art critic, we believe we can truly say that Mrs. Weede has proven herself to. be an artist of no mean rank by her pictures and we are happy to possess and to be able to display one of her reproductions in our library. We take this, opportunity to thank her in the name of the institution for this splendid gift. The other picture is a large replica of a painting of George Washington. This picture was presented by Mr. Walter Mussing. The Buenger Furniture Company of New Ulm very kindly consented to frame the picture for us, furnishing both the material arid the labor free of charge. We assure both Mr. Muesing and our dear friends of the Furniture Company that we deeply appreciate this most generous gift. Among the new books purchased for the library since the last issue of the MESSENGER are reprints of four old novels gotten out by the American Book Company. They are SATA<NSTOE, by JAMES FENIMORE COOPER; HORSE-SHOE ROBINSON, by JOHN P. KENNEDY; MODERN CHIVALRY, by HUGH' H. BRACKENRIDGE; ORMOND, by CHARLES B. BROWN, and THE YEMASSEE, by WILLIAM G, SIMMS. In a postscript to the first volume of MODERN CHIV ArLRY the author, Mr. Brackenridge, wrote': "I hope to see it made a school book; a kind. of classic of the English language." This was in 1792. The present reprint is edited by Claude M. Newlin of Michigan State College. In a preface to the book Mr. Newlin has the following to say: "Appearing almost a century and a half after the publication of that volume (the one to which the author had added the above postscript), this early American classic is for the first time made available in its entirety to students of American history and literature. None of the previous reprints include all the material contained in the first editions of the various parts. In preparing both the introduction and


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The D. M. L. C. Messenger

the text I have attempted to make clear the relation of' MODERN CHIVALRY to the succession of events and conditions which caused it to be written. . . . Each addition being written to satirize some new folly or absurdity in American life." While this book may prove of very great interest to the more mature readers and students of American history, it will not soon show frayed edges on its cover because of a tremendous circulation. On the other hand, another of these reprints, THE YEMASSEE, will attract quite a few more of our young readers. The preface to this book has the following to say: "The historical romance in English acknowledges only two masters, Scott and Cooper. In the next rank the highest honors would probably go, in America at least, to William Gilmore Simms. . . . Written. almost precisely a hundred years ago, THE YEMASSEE retains much of that subtle spell which is the sine qua non of romance." It is "a glamorous tale of the faraway and long ago." Still more limited, we fear, will be the number of readers who will check out another reprint, a German one .this time, entitled DIE FELSENBURGER, by JOHANN GOTTFRIED SOHNABEL. Written in Germany almost exactly two hundred years ago under the original title INSEL FELSENBURG, this is perhaps the first imitation in Germany of the. so-called "Robinsonaden" or Robinson Crusoe stories, the most popular kinds of fiction in the eighteenth century. The book should prove an incentive to those who are desirous of improving their knowledge of German by reading German fiction. To friends of nature and students of botany in particular we offer a new guide to the classification of wild flowers by Norman Taylor. We still remember the difficulties we had to cope with as students many years ago when we tried to classify and analyze flowers according to the MANUAL by Gray and the one edited by WOOD. This present volume seems to have taken the drudgery out of the task of identifying flowers. We suggest that students of Botany try it out. We have finally acnuired two other books for which. we have long felt a hankering. They are HUNGER FIGHTERS and MICROBE HUNTERS, both by PAUL H. DE KRUIF. In the first of these titles Mr. De Kruif presents brief biographical sketches of a group of experimenters whose work has resulted in .increasing the supply or improving the quality of certain necessary foods, where-


The D. M. L. C; Messenger

2.5

as the second book brings the stories of men who have devoted and risked their lives. in attempting to discover the secrets of contagion. Both books are written in an extremely popular and dramatic form. When next we meet for our little chat in these columns, it will be September路and the beginning of a new school year. By that time we hope to report on a number of new books again and to meet many new readers together with many of the old. Adalbert Schaller, Librarian.


The

26

n.

lIf. L. C. Messenger

-

......

The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends. The aim of "The Messenger" is to offer such material as will be beneficial as well as interesting to our readers, to keep the alumni in a closer contact with the college, to foster school spirit, and to give the students an opportunity in the practice of composition and the expression of their thoughts. Entered as second class matter at Post Office of New Ulm, Minnesota

Volume XXVII

June 1937

No.4

-: The Messenger Staff :Editor-in-Chief Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Typist

Robert Nolte Henry Krenz Edgar Wehausen Bruce Mueller Henry Engelhardt

Alumni Notes Exchange CollegeNotes

Naomi Birkholz Estella Albrecht Myrtle Pagenkopf

Co-ed Notes Locals Athletics Jokes

/ '

Gertrude Walther Adair Moldenhauer Heine Schnitker Ruth Gehlar


The D.1\'[, L. C. Messenger

27

EDITORIAL

â&#x20AC;˘ = THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS AT GRADUATION Since the school-year is rapidly nearing its close, I think it as good an opportunity as any to talk about the thoughts and feelings of every prospective graduate. I do not maintain that I have become so learned in the subject of psychology or have penetrated so deep into its secrets as to even venture to guess what is going on in the minds of some concerning that day, but I will in a general way try to tell about them as I imagine them to be. Probably for the majority of those who are to become alumni' of our school the thoughts uppermost in their minds will be rather sad. After seven years, or less as the Case may be, of hard, conscientious work (it is hoped) they have finally attained their goal. Their minds will revert to the happy times they have had in the past, which are now gone forever. and of the hard work before them. These thoughts naturally make them somewhat depressed and downcast. But happily for them, and for others too, this mood is sure to pass on in a day or two, leaving no bad effects. For the sentimental it may last even longer, but they too eventually return to normal. Some of the graduates undoubtedly have feelings of an entirely opposite nature. For them it is a period of relief. They do not, as those spoken of before, think' in terms of the past but rather of the future. For them the day 'of graduation marks-the end of a seemingly everlast-


28

. The D. M. L. C. Messenger

ing drudge, a life of hardship and toil, and an exceedingly unhappy existence. The future probably seems rosy to them and consequently their mind dwells on those things to come. Finally there are those who in regard to their graduation are rather apathetic about the whole matter. It doesn't mean much to such a person, except in so far that graduation marks the end of another school-year. The fact that their life will be an entirely different one in a matter of three months or so doesn't concern them much at the present time. Either they give it no thought at all, or they simply decide "to cross their bridges when they reach them." Apparently the ceremony of being graduated doesn't affect them either; it is only a school activity which, when over, isn't thought about any more. I have tried to describe as best I could the f.eelings and attitudes of three types of graduates, but how well I have succeeded, I do not know. Without doubt there are many more ways of looking at the matter than those in the preceding paragraphs. I myself am not in a position to state which of the three I have mentioned is the best or the correct way to feel 'on graduation day; therefore I will not attempt a solution, since my assertion would probably be erroneous.-E. D. :37.

COME ON, GANG! Do you take an active interest in the Messenger ? It is the paper of our school. Staff members do their part. Why can't the rest? Everyone is willing and ready to read it and pass destructive criticism when something does not appeal to them. How many care enough about it to help by doing a little extra work themselves? Any story. essay, or poem will be of help. Do you say that you can't? You can! Your first attempts may be failures. Don't let that bother you; only try again. Won't you? How about the Locals? Can't you contribute something? Don't tell me you sleep all the time! Every boy could at least add some mat-erial. That this column has been sadly neglected lately is no fault of its editor. Why don't you open your mouth when he asks you for articles, instead of wondering why they don't appear in. the next issue? Speak, but not too late! Henceforth, let's all try to work for our Messenger. Let's make it a paper by the student body.-R. S. '38.


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

29

A

There seem to be only a few sure signs of spring among the alumni. Elsie Prosek '35 is engaged to Richard Stetzer of Banger, Wisconsin. Lanita Uetzmann became the bride of Edward Krieg ex, '31, of Gibbon. Mr. and Mrs. Krieg are now living at Tracy, Minnesota. Rosina .Ossirmeier of Pipestone and Melvin Swantz, H. S. '32, of Hendricks are engaged. Helen Gabrysh '30 of Kenosha, Wisconsin, is engaged to Otto Beute, also of Kenosha, Say, but you should come up here some week-end and meet some of the alumni who have been visiting D. M. L. C. You could have met Louise Baumann, Gertrude Vogel, Renate Bussmann, Adeline Bode, Albert Brockelmann, Raymond Duehlmeier, Julius Wantoch, Arthur Glende, Immanuel Bade, Donald Schaller, and Ray Wiechmann. Mr. John Gawrisch '13 of La Crosse, Wisconsin, and Mr. Fred Meyer '13 of Milwaukee visited classes on May 8. Isn't it a shame that there just aren't any more happenings that I can jot down. Come on, Alumni, let's send some news to the D. M. L. C. Messenger!


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The D. M. L. C. Messenger

1 am sure that this little article from the Maroon and White expresses a sentiment all of us have felt at some time or other-although we have never lost the assurance that it will not be allowed to happen too often: "I looked into the speaker's eyes. A peculiar feeling, originating somewhere in my stomach, seized me. 1 was awed by this momentous occasion. My mouth dropped open in bewilderment. My feet were alternately cold and hot. The three little words 1 had been waiting years to hear had just been spoken. It seemed as though my ears had deceived me. 1 looked at the s-peaker of this statement in surprise and wonder. Then those three awe-inspiring words were repeated-'No Greek Assignment!'" It is sometimes startling to find that a hitherto wellestablished fact suddenly loses its foundation and crumbles' to the ground. From The Spectator we learn that we know not even our ABC's. "General opinion has it that the alphabet was transmitted to us, from, the Greeks through the Phoenicians. It appears, from a recent announcement of Julius Obermann, professor of Semitics at Yale University, that we inherited our ABC's from a little known people of northern Syria. Basing' his conclusions on the study of cuneiform alphabet writings on clay tablets unearthed six years ago at Ras Shamra in Syria, Dr. Obermann claims that the Greeks really borrowed an archaic form of this Semitic alphabet and preserved it. "Meanwhile, the Semitic form changed, 'developed in its home country, and evolved into the alphabet used by


The D.1\'[' L. C. Messenger

31

the Phoenicians, the Moabites, and the Hebrews. Tracing the alphabet to Ras Shamra dissolves the perplexities of ABC historians," he explained. "The Greeks used many mOI1esymbols than the Phoenicians did. Accounting for the non-Phoenicians elements was a problem. Now these elements can be shown 'one and all to be present in the cuneiform alphabet from Ras Shamra.' " From the Alma Mater we hear that "for the first time in the history of Concordia Seminary its graduating class will wear caps and gowns at the commencement exercises. The hard-fought decision of the class was ratified by the faculty in its meeting, Monday afternoon, April 5." The inauguration of this custom is very appropriate, since caps and gowns were originally worn only by the clerical graduates. We ourselves can be proud of the fact that it has been introduced here. A system of extra-curricular awards, the topic of a great deal of discussion in many schools, has become a reality at Concordia College, Milwaukee. The Concordia Courier defines their purpose and value: "Without a doubt this step is one in harmony with our goal-a bigger and better Concordia, The awards will be an incentive to students to participate in extra-curricular activities, which give one the experience in organization and leadership so necessary for a rounded-off-minister. It should be an incentive to students to broaden themselves toward other than book and classroom knowledge, and thus in the final analysis raise the standards of the school. It will cause the book-worm to look up from his desk and become a more integral part of the life about him, and it will bring a token, a visible reward for the time and labor spent, to those who have earned it." Recently we have heard much of the persecution of the Jews in Germany-oppression to such an extent that many were forced to leave the country. The Spectator informs us that the hatred for the Jewish neonle is so deen that the Nazis, in attacking them, have threatened to undermine the sole basis of Chriatianitv-c-th> Pihle, "Today throuvh the influence of Adolph Hitler, Germany's dour dictator and demagogue, Martin Luther's translation of the Bible has been revised and changed according to the principles of Nazism. Proclaiming the Christian religion to be a philosophy of Jewish life and character. a special Nazi committee has published a new German Bible, wherein the various prophets, apostles, and Christ have German names, and the devil and Judas have been cast as lascivious and venomous Jews. In ignoring the almost completely Jewish character


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32

of the Bible, this committee ha,s sought to establish a Holy Writ as a German Hebrew race in every manner possible. In some instances, entire passages have been changed to suit this new interpretation. "Let us understand the full extent of this blasphemy. The Word of God cannot be changed. No man can proclaim a new conception of the Word by aligning it with precepts of human philosophy and power. This antiJewish revision is not the Word or work of God. Let them who would seek glory in the Glory of God beware!" The Augsburg Echo presents a list of definitions collected from the various exchange papers. May they be of service to some of our students who have an antipathy toward dictionaries! Flip---the name of a man-Flip Adam-a

small particle-an

Vampire-one game. Balm-hobo, Diploma-a Cinch-to

Morris.

adam of electricity.

who calls balls and strikes at a ball as "Youse is a balm."

man you get when the pipes burst. burn lightly.

Kinetic-a

state.

Censor-a man who sees three meanings to a joke when there are only two. Typify-to

write something on a typewriter.

Frustrate-what you feel. Lymph-to Stoic-a babies.

you say when some one asks you how

walk lame.

long legged bird that's supposed to bring the

Pest-s-opposite of future.


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

33

0LLEGE

The life of Joan of Arc was the theme for the Phi Delta Sigma literary program of March 6. The following took part in the program: Erna Kuehl gave the childhood and youth of Joan: a soliloquy of Joan from the "Jungfrau von Orlean," by Schiller, was read by Veleda KeIrn; Ger- . hard Rolloff played an organ solo; Ruth Koeniger told of the part Joan of Arc played in the 100 Years War; Elizabeth Beutler and Gertrude Limpert played the duets "Sextette from Lucia d' Lammermoor," by Donizetti, and "Czardes, Hungarian Dance," by Brahms; Dorothy Froehlke gave the story of the trial and death of Joan of Arc; the closing number was "Christ the Life of All the Living" by the Marlut Singers. On March 10 several movie reels about the telephone were shown through the courtesy of the Retzlaff Motor Company. We learned that the telephone girls in China town of San Francisco are required to memorize the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of over 2000 subscribers. The Chinese have no fixed alphabet, They are also required to speak both the English and Chinese languages fluently. The movie also showed how telephone cables are made. The Phi Gamma Rho literary society decided to make its program on April 17 of a more humorous type. Their amateur hour was a success. The opening scene took place in the boys' dormitory where some of the students decided to enter the contest. With Ralph Swantz as the announcer everything went along smoothly. One never knows what talent there is among the pupils until it is' tested. The harmonica soloist was Melville Schultz; Elroy Schroeder's poem about his wife really surprised us; Ruby Holzheuter proved to be almost a wizard at the piano; Roland Bode gave a most striking impersonation of Adolph Hitler;


The D. M. L. C. ]\fessenger

34

Hazel Steinberg and Ruth Gehlar played Beethoven's "Minuet in G" as a duet; everyone was astonished when Ervin Lux as "Sonny boy-age 10 years" played the piano; "Bin ein und au,sgangen" was sung by Robert Nolte, tenor; Julius Ingebritzen played a tune on water glasses; Milton Bradtke, the cowboy soloist, was the 'Only one stopped by the gong; the German band under the leadership 'Of Louie (Gilbert Fischer) won first prize. Do you suppose any of them will ever be on the radio? The concluding number on the program was a dialogue between Florence Oehlke. the professor, and her mischievous pupil, Robert Meyer. The two-manual and pedal pipe organ which was presented to the college bv the Alumni Association and the College choirs arrived May 5. The graduating- class has first choice of the periods for the rest of the school year. The organ was built by the Wicks Organ Company, Highland, Illinois. For this valuable gift the college again expresses Its appreciation to these organizations.

THE ANNUAL JOINT CONCERT of the Marlut Sngers. D. M. L. C. Band and Girls' Glee Club was given May 7. The program was as foIIows: Marlut Singers Milton Bradtke, Director

o Lord,

I love Thee from my heart..

Seth. Cavilius

Christ Crucified is Risen

C. Stein

How radiant shines the morning star

arr. by F. Damrosch

The Commodore Polka Paris Chambers Cornet Solo-Gerhard Horn Accompanist-Henry Engelhardt Morg:enstaendchen

J. C. Metzger

Das ist der Tag des Herrn A Spirit Flower Vale of Tuoni.. The Scissors Grinder

C. Kreutzer ,

Campbell-Tipton Jean Sibeluis Flemish Folk Song


The D. M. L. C. Me88enger

"-

I

35

D. M. L. C. Band Winfried Stoeckli, Director The Trumpet Corps-March E. K. Heyser Dance of the Imps=-Schottische K. L. King Roll of Honor-March ~ K. L. King The Iron Count-Overture K. L. King Sabbath Morn-Organ Voluntary Fred Jewell 32nd Division-March Theo. Steinmetz arr. by John L. Bach Henry Engelhardt In Autumn Moritz Moszkowski

May

Girls' Glee Club Gertrude Limpert, Director ~

_

Hugo Kaun

Ciribiribin Pestalozza- Moore Fallen Leaf Frederic Logan A humorous selection by Margaret Koehler Girls' Glee Club De Sandman : Cradle Song

D. Protheroe Joh. Brahms

DR. MARTIN LUTHER COLLEGE New Ulm, Minnesota i,

COMMENCEMENT CONCERT Wednesday, June 9, 1937, 8 :15 P. M., College Auditorium

"

PROGRAM 1. Concert Choir: a) Wherefore Now Hath Life Been Given....Brahms b) Lamb of God Soederrnan c) Be Thou Faithful... Reuter d) In Bethlehem ein Kindelein Praetori us e) Judge Me 0 God..Mendelssohn f) The Benediction Bach


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The D. M. L. C. Messenger

II. III.

Organ:

Adagio, from the Fifth Sonata ....Guilmant Winfried Stoeekli

Marlut Singers: A Spirit Milton Bradtke, Girls' Glee Club: F'aIlen Gertrude Limpert,

Flower ....Campbell-Tipton Director Leaf 路 Logan Director

IV. Piano-Organ: Grand Aria Demarest Piano: Elizabeth Beutler; Organ: Milton Bradtke V.

Chorus:

VI.

Piano:

VII.

a) b) c)

a) b)

Waldeinsamkeit F. Abt Waldandacht F. AM "An den D. M. L. C. Alumni" E. D. Backer (An old folksong in a modern setting. The Alma Mater addresses the alumni association) Gavotte Valse in A flat Major Henry Engelhardt .

Spanish Serenata Music of Spring

Gluck-Brahms Chopin

~

Granados

.Ivanovici

COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM June 10, 1937 1,

Hymn:

Christ, Thou Art the Sure Foundation Organ: Milton Bradtke (,50, All St.)

2.

Scripture Reading and Prayer

3.

Hymn:

4.

Address: Prof. Walter A. Schumann Northwestern College, Watertown, Wis.

5.

Choir:

6.

Presentation

7.

Hymn:

8.

The Lord's Prayer

9.

The Benediction

Come, 0 Come, Thou Quick'ning Spirit Organ: Winfried Stoeckli

Be Thou Faithful

Unto Death

of Diplomas:

C. L. Schweppe, President

Tak,e My Life and Let It Be Organ: Gerhard Rolloff (186, All Stanza's) (Unison)

Reuter


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

37

Tap, tap, tap! There's that old woodpecker outside our window again, making an exceptionally senseless outcry. Don't let it irritate you, girls, because it's only the new co-ed correspondent tapping out the news with the aid of his exclusive Morse code. Have you noticed the itchy fingers of the girls on their tennis rackets lately? It's no wonder at all, for many of them are eagerly anticipating the touch of their light, fantastic toes on a genuine tennis court. The ineffable weed patch nO' longer meets our gaze, due to the untiring efforts of the stronger sex. What makes Hillcrest Hall look like a Hall of Mirrors? The fair damsels in that building surely had to use plenty of elbow grease to pound the rugs and polish the windows up to perfection. The members of Agnes Timm's room set a precedent for the rest 'Of us the Saturday before. When it comes to juggling storm windows, ask Omi Birkholz, Florence Raddatz, Agnes Timm, Eunice Stern, and Adelaide Nolte for advice. Have any of you heard of the new D. P. W. Club? The seeds of :his famous organization took root on Arbor Day when thirteen maidens donned the official D. P. W. placards. Members 0f this club toiled vigorously under the able leadership of Ruby Holzhueter and Marge Koehler .: The girls' rakes did swing with the "schone cowboy Musik" (as Bessie Kelm would say) .which floated across the campus from the radios in the dormitory. Honors of the day for mixing drinks went to "Snod" Birkholz with her prizewinning recipe-a mixture of three different kinds of soda water plus a certain fluid 'Or liquor made with malted grain. Who worked the longes t on Arbor Day? Most of the girls had completed their assigned tasks at noon. However, Ruth Koeninger, Omi Birkholz, Eunice Stern, and the Redeker girls showed exceptional ambition when they


38

The D. M. L. C. Messenger

hauled leaves far into the afternoon. sults were blisters and sore muscles.

The inevitable re-

Do the occupants of Erna Kuehl's room still practice light housekeeping? It surely looked that way when Pearl Anderson came into the room with two cans of pork and beans, two cans of tomato soup, and two cans of mixed vegetables. Where did she get them? Oh, she just happened to be lucky at Bingo one Friday night. Did some one say that spring was here? In case you're in doubt, just walk around the campus and convince yourself. Roller-skating, ropejumping, bicycling, "shagging," and sun bathing have all assumed an air of utmost importance. Outstanding figures in these activities are = roller-skating-i-Raddatz; Kuehl, and Boelter; rope-jumping -Hazel Steinberg, Hildegard Bade, Pearl Anderson, and Adelaide Nolte; bicycling-Eunice Stern and Marguerite Bleck. Honors in "shagging" go to Dot Froehlke, Ruth Gehlar, Adelaide Nolte, Ruby Holzhueter and Evie Hunt. Omi and Snod Birkholz, Florence Berg, Ruth Koeninger, and Hazel Steinberg take the sun bathing prizes. The Redeker girls usually spend the time before study hours jumping rope. Some of the girls there have chosen Thursday as their regular hiking day. What does the woodpecker tell us about members of the second floor? First of all, he brings a message about Eunice Stern. It must be ','a sure sign" when people have to wear rubber boots in the deluge and still have the usual after-supper rendezvous in front of the girls' dormitory. What ho! Community singing in Room 6? No, it was a birthday party for Ruth Gehlar with Olga Richter and Vernice Seibel acting as hostesses. It must be extreme penury that causes the guests to eat that luscious je110from the floor. The guests showed their gratitude to the hostesses by raising their celestial voices in a "DreimaI Hoch." Why that sparkle in Geraldine Boelter's eyes? It isn't ---'s influence this time, but it was caused by the recent visit of her friend, Norma Meyer of Milwaukee. Don't some girls get all the breaks? A few week-ends ago Erna Kuehl and Agnes Timm visited at the home of the latter's brother at Arlington. Both Vernice Seibel and Florence Raddatz see their respective homes quite frequently. Wilma Schultz had the pleasure of spending the week-end of May 8 at her home in Truman.


The D. 1\'1.L. C. Messenger

39

. Where were Eva Taras's thoughts on May 6? Imagine a III Normalite taking an English hymnal to German services! Maybe it was due to the visit of her sister from La Crosse, Wisconsin. Not only Eva, but the entire third floor derived a great deal of pleasure from her visit. The lunch and the entertainment furnished by her are still a much talked-of topic in "die windige Eck." How do the third floor girls satiate their enormous appetites after study hours? What a commotion was aroused when the usual hamburgers, Pepsicolas, and candy bars entered the dormitory via the wrong route! Even flashlights were necessary in this procedure. Wh~t could be the matter with the appetites of the four girls in Bessie Kelm's room? There certainly must be something radically wrong when they can't eat a pie, light doughnut's, and two quarts of ice cream themselves without inviting the rest of the third floor girls in for assistance. Is dormitory life getting stale for some of the girls? Mildred Baumann, Betty Beutler, Dot Froehlke, and Gertie Walther broke the regular dormitory routine on May 1 when they spent a most enjoyable time as the over-night guests of Erna and Marie Hinnenthal. Who's the botanist down at Redeker Hall? That honor rightfully belongs to Gertie Limpert. Several small plants which she received on a recent excursion through the woods now occupy a prominent place on her window sill. How did the Redeker girls' spend Ascension Day? The answer is simple, for they went on an all day picnic. Their dinner was almost upset by pigs which happened to amble along their way. They all returned with bouquets of violets and marigolds. Betty Beutler and Myrtle Pagenkopf received rather severe cases of sunburn as a result of this little outing. Alas, the tappings of the woodpecker seem to be growing fainter, so probably we had better let him rest until next time before his beak will be "chiseled to a frazzle."


40

The D. ~I. L. C. Messenger

After Easter vacation, the general gossip around the boys' dormitory was about how the Easter vacations were spent, but we must admit Bobby Meyer's was the most novel. He accompanied Moldenhauer to Wisconsin at the expense of a 3000 word composition for leaving a day too soon. For a week after, he kept the boys spellbound with stories of the wonders of Wisconsin,but what interested us most was that .he always kept repeating, "Yes, I can hardly wait for 'June' to come around again." "Vic" Kraemer is the lateSitone to take up astronomy. Schulz will have to hand over his sweatshirt soon. Some of the first signs of spring: Professor Schaller ordering a new supply of pencils. Krenz coming out of his hibernation to play horseshoe. The telephone is busier than usual Sunday afternoons, and boys arguing which day would be the best to have Arbor Day. Of course, the day most of us were looking forward to after Easter was Arbor Day, but due to the wet weather it was delayed until April 23. The weather did not look-any too encouraging on the morning of that day, but it turned out to be a wonderful day for Arbor Day. Had anyone come to the campus just to watch on


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

41

Arbor Day, here are a few of the things he might have seen: Inky continually running into the dormitory for a glass of water, two raking gangs leaning on their rakes and _arguing as to which gang had done the most work, the leaf-hauling gang-s spending most of their time in the girls' section, Prof. Bliefernicht, carrying the. same cane and dodging candid photographers, the "town kids" coming up just in time for lunch, the girls spending more time taking pictures than raking leaves and threatening to go on a strike if the band wouldn't play after lunch time, the tumbling "experts" "showing off" on the lawn during the noon hour, some of the girls riding on the trucks and screaming when Prof. Palmbach took a corner too fast. Because of the ideal weather, the campus was cleaned in record time this year, and it gave the boys plenty of time to clean un for the "free" evening, Were they disappointed when later in the evening" it began to rain! Almost half of the boys got "soaked." Meyer must like getting caught in the rain. been caught in three showers already.

He has

Heckmann won't try catching without a mask again. FTe tried it last month and received a beautiful "shiner" when the ball hit him in the eye. Because the frogs are so abundant down at the Cottonwood, Carpenter has been capturing them and bringing them back to the dormitory, hoping that they'll stay in his aquarium. He plays his phonograph for them almost every night too. Not long ago some of the boys -took the microphone used in a Literary program, made believe _that they nlugged it into an ordinary light socket, and told Art Krueger to listen to the radio, that he would be able to hear them talk. Krueger spent a perfectly good evening trying to "tune in" on the boys who he thought were upstairs, but who were in reality peeking in the door of the radio room and enjoying his disappointment when he heard nothing. I believe he'll first find out it was a hoax when he reads this. "Chuck" Winter has inherited the local "Dear-slayer."

Meyer's job of being

We wonder what Prof. Klatt meant when he told Bode and Boelter that he was no minister. Bode must have known, for he blushed.


42

The .D. M. L. C, Messenger

Oh, for the patience out on the football field ceived a "Major Hoople" hot sun beating down on

of a fellow like KueseI! He sat all day snaring gophers and renose as a result of the extremely him.

When Mentz starts something, he really goes at it with a vim. Recently he started to learn to play the drum. He drummed all day and even forgot it was study hour, until he was told. Wanted: a pair of baseball pants for "Pee Wee." pair he has now is decidedly form-fitting. "Inky" has finally decided to settle down. his shelf shortly after Easter vacation.

..

...

The

He put up

Schroeder says that nowhere in town do they have Coca Colas as good as those at the Rexall. Only Coca Colas? Not long ago, certain business men downtown were sort of perplexed when 'Oneperson after another carne running in for a sales slip, bottle cap, time table or a certain magazine. It was only a scavenger hunt held at Al Retzlaff's party. . "Howie" Aufderheide says he's getcing quite accustomed to be hailed as a "taxi." When the College truck took the tenth grade down to the fair grounds for a baseball game, they we're squeezed in so tight that it would make any can of sardines green with envy. Since the Choir trip to Truman, taken a liking to licorice.

"Gil" Fischer

has

"Little Willie" Gerlach wants to resign his job as dorm mail-shagger. He says it's too dangerous when he can't produce a long-awaited letter for certain upper classmen. "Chuck" Winter is one baseball player who would like to play Waldorf again, at Forest City, just so he could stop at Swea City and eat dinner there again. They have nice meals there, haven't they, "Ohuck"? For four years Schulz has been trying to yodel, but it finally took Bob Nolte to show him how in the last literary program. Since that time this hill has Hounded like a peak of the Alps. Even the girls are getting it into their blood. The other day when Rolloff visited Kindergarten he tried to run away with the sand-table. At least he carne away with a pocket-full of sand.

.'


The D. ~I. L. C. Messenger

43

- --1-l ,, I~ .... 11 . ... BASKETBALL Despite the fact that D. M. L. C. started the basketball season with a rather weak team, the boys really worked hard and by the end of the season were able to playa good game of ball. The last two games of the season were won, they being against Bethel and Bethany. Although the scores were fairly close the team certainly played well.

BASEBALL This year the baseball team started out with a rather short supply of players, there being only two lettermen back from last season. However they did not make such a poor showing in their first game against Bethany, which was won by the team with a score of 19-9. In the second game they were defeated by Waldorf, the score being 23-1. The game was at its worst in the fourth inning when the Waldorf team gathered sixteen runs. Because of lack of time the game was called at the end of the seventh inning.


The D. l\I. L. C. Messenger

44

However, don't judge the team by the first two games. Most 'Of the players are inexperienced, and by the end 'Of the season we should have a fairly good team.

"â&#x20AC;˘ D. M. L. C. Downs Bethany Bethany Heitner, 31b........ Bolstad, ss........ Petersen, 1b...... Pedersen, p........ Schuett, If..~ H. S. Olson, c H. G. Olson, cf.. Madson, rf........ Ylvisaker, 2b.... *Faugstad, cf.. ..

AB

H

R

4 5 4 4 5

1 1 3 1 2 1 1 0 0

1 1 3 2 0 1 0 0 1

0

0

5

5 5 2 1

40

D. M. L.

C.

AB Moldenhauer, cf 6 Duin, 2b.. 7 Fuerstenau, 1b.. 5 Tradup, 3b........ 4 Ingebritson, c 4 RDIIoff, ss 6 Winter, lf.. 6 Kraemer, rf 3 Schultz, p 6 **Gullerud, rf .. 2

9 10

H 2 1 2 3 1 2 3 0 3 0

R 1 2 2 5 2 2 3 0 2 0

49 17 19

*Batted for Ylvisaker in 8th. **Batted for Kraemer in 6th. Waldorf Trounces D. M. L. C.

D. M. L. C.

AB

Moldenhauer, cf 4 Duin, 2b.............. 3

H

R

Waldorf

0 0

0 0

H. Holton, lf.. , 2 Hauen, 1b 5 Barber, 2b 5 Gunderson, rf 2 J. Olson, ss '3 A. Andersen, p .. 1 Connor, cf. ......... 3 R. Anderson, c.. 4 'Taylor, 3b.......... 4 'J:esdel, If............ 2 Willis, rf 2 Oppadoll, p........ 1 Benson, cf..... ..... 1

Fuerstenau, lb., 3

0

0

Tradup, 3b Ingebritson, c.... Rolloff, ss Winter, If.......... Kraemer, rf Schultz, p Wehausen, p...... Gullerud, rf.. ......

3 3 2 3 2 3

0 2 0 2 0 0

0 0 1 0 0 0

0

0

0

1

0

0

27

4

1

AB

37

H

R

1 2 2 1 3 0 0 1 3 0 1 0 0

2 3 3 2 5 2 2 2 1 0 1 0 0

14 23

"


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

45

A teacher was telling a pupil that there was no difficulty in the world that could not be 'Overcome. The pupil asked, "Have you ever tried squeezing tooth paste back into the tube?"-Ex. Lillian S.: Why, Doctor, you told me to show you my tongue, but you haven't even looked at it! Doctor: No. It was only to keep you quiet while I wrote out the prescription.

Conscience Hurts Two men were seated in a crowded railroad car. One, noticing that the other had his eyes closed, said: "Bill, are yer feelin' well?" "I'm all right," said Bill, "but I do hate to see ladies stancl!ing."-Ex. "So your wife is deceitful?" . "Yes, she allows me to think she believes the lies I tell her!"-Ex. Only Way Out 'I had a beard like yours and when I saw how ugly I looked, I shaved it off." "Is thet so! Well, I had a face like yours and when I couldn't cut it off, I growed this beard."-Ex.


46.

The D. ]\'[. L. C. ]\'1essenger

Flash! Gan our D. M. L. C. baseball stars boast this also? "Was I fast when I played for the Giants; every time I hit one of my many home runs, I reached first base before the spectators could hear the crack of the bat. When I reached second,the secondbaseman usually-said something that made me sore, so I slapped the third baseman on the catcher's mouth." A teacher was taking her pupils through the zoo and they stopped before a deer. She asked: "What is that. Johnny?" Johnny: "I don't know." _ Teacher: "You don't know.- What does your mother call your father?" Johnny: "Don't tell me that's a louse!" The Water Test He (twice nicked by razor): Barber, give me a glass of water. Barber: What's the matter? Hair in your mouth? He: Naw, just want to .see if my neck leaks. Ex. Chemistry Prof.: Kramer, what does HN03 signify? Kramer: Well, ah, er's-I've got it right on the tip of my tongue, sir. Chemistry Prof'.: Well, you'd better spit it out. It's nitric acid. Lady (at almondcounter): Who attends to the nuts? Clerk: Be patient, I'll wait on you in a minute.-Ex.

Goody, Goody

Mamma Mosquito: If you children are good, I'll take you to a' nudist camp tonight.-Ex.

"Your wife is a very systematic woman, isn't she?" "Yes, very! She works on the theory that you can find whatever you want when you don't want it by looking where it wouldn't be if you did want it."-Ex.


STUDENTS! BEFORE BUYING CONSULT THE ADVERTISING SECTION

Patronize

Our Advertisers

Without Them

THE MESSENGER Cannot Exist

List of Advertisers. Saffert's Provision Market F. J. Backer & Co. Eugene Koehler Barber Shop Dr. G. J. Hiebert Mr. Albert Flor The Bee Hive J. C. Penney Co. Drs. Schleuder Somsen, Dempsey, Johnson & Somsen Pink's Store New Ulm Grocery Simons Lumber 90. Farmers and Merchants State Bank ModelBarber Shop Wicherski Shoe Store Salet's Department Store Crone Bros. Company Erickson and Graff National Tea Store Drs. Hammermeister and Saffert


State Bank of New VIm

Muesing Drug Store Eichten Shoe Store Herzog Publishing Company Kemske Paper Co. Weilandt and Stegemann New VIm Greenhouse Rexall Drug Store Eagle Roller Mill Co. Eibner and Son Schlumpberger's Grocery Hummel Bros. Dr. A. L. Kusske Vlrich Electric Company Tauscheck and Green Buenger Furniture Company Citizens State Bank Dr. E. G. Lang Robert Fesenmaier, Inc. Silver Latch Inn Mr. T. O. Streissguth Retzlaff Motor Company Retzlaff Hardware Company New VIm Dairy Henry GoedeStudio Lang's Master Barber Shop Fred Meine ClothingCompany New VIm Steam Laundry Schroeder Bakery Dr. F. H. Dubbe Schuck's Tailor Shop Dr. Von Bank Gastler Studio Vnion Hospital E. C. Vogelpohl Aid Association for Lutherans A. C. Ochs Brick & Tile Yards August Schell Brewing Company The Hauenstein Company

~-


THE SCHROEDER BAKERY THE FLOWER OF NEW ULM JUST LIKE THE BREAD MOTHER MAKES

PHONE 232 AID ASSOCIATION FOR LUTHERANS APPLETON, WISCONSIN In its various plans of life insurance, the Aid Association for Lutherans, the largest legal reserve fraternal life insurance society for Lutherans 'in the United States and Canada, and operating strictly within the various Synods of the Synodical Conference, offers that absolute SAFETY which all who purchase life insurance to create an earning-ability estate are seeking. INSURANCE

$172,249,019.00

IN FORCE- _

ASSETS, April 1, 1937 ,,

_

$22,798,548.29

Total Benefits paid to Certificateholders Beneficiaries since organization

and

Alex. O. Benz, President Wrn. F. KeIrn, Vice President

Wm. H. Zuehlke, Treasurer

$17,002,265.54

Albert Voecks, Secretary

Otto C. Rentner, General Counsel


COMPLIMENTS

OF

T. O. STREISSGUTH Modernizing, Maintaining, Tuning, Repairs, Service, Sales

Reconstruction, Installation, Additions, Blowers, Chimes, Harps

Wicks Pipe Organs ERNEST C. VOGELPOHL ORGAN ARCHITECTS AND BUILDERS New Ulm, Minn.

405-409 North Broadway

When in Need of Electrical Supplies and Radios or Service call on

Ulrich Electric Company Electric Service at Its Best-Buy

With Service

Phone 148

,,__

HENRY GOEDE STUDIO

i

We Make Photos STUDIO

That

4 :

.., I

_~ .L....

Satisfy

170 North Broadway

Phone 315

Res. Phone 311 Always a Good Barber Waiting to Serve You At

LANG~SMASTER BARBER SHOP Individual Neck Duster with Each Hair Cut No Mug-We Use Bar-Soap Lather Machine-No Brush All the Latest Sanitary Equipment Shower Baths Shoe Shines


BREAD! Helps You Off to School W,i1lhNeeded Food Energy Your Baker Makes The Finest, Most Delicious, Wholesome Bread EIBNER'S BREAD IS GOOD Eat More Of It And Keep In Tip-Top Condition

EIBNER f1 SON BAKERY and ICE CREAM PHONE 128

Established 1883

ALBERT D. FLOR Attorney at Law

New DIm, Minnesota

SALET'S DEPARTMENT STORE-NEW

ULM, MINN.

EVERYTHING TO WEAR FOR HIM OR HER WEAR SALET'S FAMOUS $1.98 FOOTWEAR

H'ghest

QunWy and of Course

"YOU ALWAYS SAVE AT SALET'S"

SILVER LATCH INN "The Pride of New DIm" Fountain Service-Lunches-Meals Dining Room Service


SPAULDING ATHLETIC GOODS -at-

Robert Fesenmaier, Inc. Special discount given to students

EUGENE KOEHLER BARBER SHOP Hair Cuts 30c Efficient Service and Courteous Treatment New Ulm

20 N. Minn. St.

.I

AMERICA'S FINEST SUIT VALDES See the Beautiful Patterns on Display in our Window. Come in and Feel the Luxurious "Meaty" fabrics $15.00 - $17.50 - $21.50 - $25.00 The Biggest Money's Worth You Ever Saw

HUMMEL BROTHERS New DIm, Minn.

14 No. Minn. St.

BANK WITH

FARMERS ~ MERCHANTS STATE BANK New Ulm, Minnesota

FIHENDLY HELPFUL SERVICE AT YOUR COMMAND TAILORED TO MEASURE SUITS

$23.50, $25.00 and up

S~=~T~;G ~::~:~ING

No Deposits-No

C. O. D.'s

All kinds of Repairing

215 N. Minn St.

Residence Phone 150

i

Phone 498

Office Phone 260

DR. F. H. DUBBE PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON NEW ULM,

. I路

MINNESOTA


DANIEL WEBSTER FLOUR PERFECTED

Makes More and Better Bread

EAGLE ROLLER MILL CO. NEW ULM, MINNESOTA

PINK'S STORE Where the Newest Styles Are Shown First The Smartest At Prices

Wear

for Young and Old

You Expect

to Pay

The Store Where You Feel At Home DEER BRAND BEER .'-"-"_.,-"_._ ,-"-"_.,-,._'.

AUGUST SCHELL BREWING COMPANY I

NEW ULM,

MINNESOTA


CRONE BROS. CO. Always Show The Latest in Young Men's Clothes and Furnishings Reasonable Prices

Geo. D. Erickson

John W. Graff

ERICJ{SON

& GRAFF

Attorneys at Law New VIm, Minnesota

Best

OUf

Attention

Everything of a banking nature entrusted to our care receives our best attention. We shall be glad to have a share of your business.

State Bank of New Ulm Member Federal Deposit Insurance Fund

MUESING Drug Expert

Store Prescription

Service

ARTCRAFT PHOTO SERVICE We Have It!

Will Get It!

Or It Isn't Made!

Phones 52-34I


SCHLUMPBERGER'S GROCERY Groceries-Fruits-

Vegetables-Smoked

Phone 182

Meats

New VIm, Minn.

WILLIAM J. VON BANK, D.D.S. Dentist OfficePhone 237

New Ulm, Minn.

Residence Phone 797

\Ve WeIcome You to the

NEW BEE HIVE New DIm, Minn.

J. A. OCHS & SON, Inc. Every Article Brand New Store Open After October 5th

F. J. BACKER & CO. HARNESS DEALER Kwik-Pak Parcel Post Laundry Cases Trunks, Traveling Bags, Suit Cases. Purses . and Other Leather Specialties

E. G. LANG, D. D. S. Office above State Bank of New Ulm Oflice Phone 472

Res. Phone 1172

THE GASTLER STUDIO For Quality Photographs Also Kodak Finishing


Buy to the Li~lt Save to the Limit If Savings Mean Anything at All to You, You'll Stock Up at Penney's

J..C. PENNEYCO. Corner Minn. and 2nd North

St.

Give Your Eyes a Chance We fit your eyes right, grind lenses in our own shop and replace broken lenses on short notice. After October 1st we will open up in our new bulldinz at 102 No. Minnesota St.

DRS. SCHLEUDER Optometrists New DIm

Telephone 87

Phone

For Printing and Supplies

3 7 0

KEMSKE PAPER CO.

Towels and Toilet Paper

102 N. Minn. St.

Mimeograph Stencils and Ink Filing Equipment and Office Supplies

Safes

NEW

ULM

Desks

DAIRY

THE HOME OF

Pure Dairy Products

-EN~OY

;J)~ ICE

CR.EAM

Phone 104

SOMSEN, DEMPSEY, JOHNSON and SOMSEN Henry N. Somsen Russell L. Johnson Attorneys

New Ulm,

W. H. Dempsey Henry N. Somsen, Jr. At Law Minnesota


NEW ULM GROCERY CO. Wholesale Grocers Distributors STOKLEY'S CANNED VEGETABLES LIBBY'S CANNED FRUITS

Service and Satisfaction . at the

MODEL BARBER SHOP ALFRED H. KUESTER, Prop..

Footwear Athletic Footwear and Sox Ladies' Smart Styles Attractively Priced

EMIL WICHERSKI For Greater Values and Service See Us

COAL . Lumber-Millwork Cement-Sewer

Pipe

and all other Builders Supplies.

HENRY

SIMONS LUMBER CO. DEPENDABILITY


We Have "Steinies" HAUENSTEIN BEER and PALE DRY CARBONATED BEVERAGE SERVED AT ALL PLACES New Ulm, Minnesota Telephone No. 1

Buy Rexall Merchandise SUPERIOR QUALITY AT LOWER PRICES

REXALL DRUG STORE Walter Muesing-Walter

W. Hellmann

"SAVE WITH SAFETY"

NEW ULM STEAM LAUNDRY OTTO F. OSWALD & SONS

Phone No.5 For Your Dry Cleaning, Laundry or Hat Work We assure you prompt and efficient service and invite you to visit our modern, up-to-date plant at 107-109 So. Minn. St.


A. C. OCHS BRICK & TILE COMPANY Executive Office and Plant Springfield, Minn.

General Sales Office 906 Foshay Tower Minneapolis Manufacture

Artistic Face Brick Various Colors -

Also-

Load Bearing Tile' and complete line of

Building Tile and Common Brick WHY IT WILL' ...

PA Y YOU TO BUILD with FACE BRICK Face Brick offers the widest choice of color tones, both in artistic blends and even shades. Colors and textures burned in becoming lovelier with age. A Face Brick Home offers you less upkeep over a period of years. Lessened heating cost and greater comfort in winter and summer. Greater resale value. Easily financed because loan companies prefer the known merits of Face Brick houses,

Our Products Are Sold in the New Vlm Territory by

NEW ULM BRICI{ & TILE YARDS


Buy Where

r au See

This Sign

YOU BUY BETTER BECAUSE WE BUY BETTER Our 500 Store Buying Power Makes Possible the Low Prices on Our Quality Merchandise

F. H. RETZLAFF HARDWARE COMPANY

D,rs. Hammermeister

~ Saffert

Physicians and Surgeons Office Over State Bank of New VIm

QUALITY CLOTHING Correct F'it.ting and Standard

Lines

TAUSCHECK ~ GREEN

Drive With Dodge

SAFETY

RETZLAFF

Plymouth

MOTOR COMPANY


WHEN IN NEED OF FOOTWEAR Be Sure and Call on Us We carry a complete line of men's, ladies' and children's shoes We appreciate your business. Our prices are always the lowest, Qualitconsidered

ATHLETIC SHOES OUR SPECIALTY TRY OUR REPAIR DEPARTMENT

FOR GOOD WORK

P. J. EICHTEN SHOE STORE New Ulm, Minnesota

FINE FOODS QUALITY GROCERS OF THE MIDDLE WEST

Weilandt & Stegeman

HART SCHAFFNER

& MARX

Contractors and Builders

SUITS AND OVERCOATS

Correspondence Solicited

O'DONNELL SHOES

W/ork Done in Any Section of the Community

JOHN B. STETSON HATS

Plans and Specifications Furnished Estimates Cheerfully Given Office 1100 Center St. Phone )71 Auto Glass Replaced to Order

Complete Line of Men's and Boys' Clothes

Fred Meine CI. Co.

NEW ULM GREENHOUSES

WE TELEGRAPH FLOWERS

Flowers For All Occasions

NEW ULM. MINNESOTA

--._


UNION HOSPITAL NEW ULM, MINN. A modern, well-equipped, and fireproof hospital supervised staffed with registered nurses.

by and

PHONE No. 404

A. L. KUSSKE, M.D. Practice Limited to Eye, Ear: Nose and Throat and Fitting of Glasses In Weiser Block Over Silver La'ch Cafe New DIm Minnesota

Tires Goodyear Radios-Accessories HAROLD RIESS Center and Minnesota

Batteries ALBERT HELD

Sts.

Phone 1040

G. J. HIEBERT, D~D.S. OfficeOver Rexall Drug Store Office Phone 241 Residence Phone 1547 New Ulm, Minn.


We Turn a House Into a Home

'BUENGER FURNITURE

Stores:

CO.

New Ulm and Sleepy Eye, Minn,

Distinctive Funeral Service

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CITIZENS STATE BANK New VIm, Minnesota Under provisions of the Banking Act of 1933 Our Deposits Are Insured


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1936-1937 DMLC Messenger Vol. 27  
1936-1937 DMLC Messenger Vol. 27