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VOLUME XXVI

NUMBER I

SEPTEMBER 1935


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AFFERT'S PROVISION MARKET

Where You Buy Quality!

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Wholesale

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New Ufm, Minnesota

Retail

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- ,: CONTENTS

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VALEDICTORY:

CLASS OF 1935

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INTERVIEW ON THE SYNODICAL CONVENTION THE D. M. L, C. MESSENGER

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EDITORIALS: On Changing the Messenger to a SchoolNewspaper., 7 Blessings of the Depression?..........................

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What Can You Do to Boost Our Athletics?

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EXCHANGE

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ALUMNI

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LIBRARY ........•.......................................................................15 COLLE'GE NOTES CO-ED NOTES 'LOCALS

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ATHLETICS JOKES

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VALEDICTORY Class of 1935 Fellow Christians, To each and everyone of you the class of 1935 extends the hand of welcome and thanks you for having considered . this' our commencement day important enough to come here and help us observe it in a proper manner. For us, as a Class and also as individuals, this day is indeed a significant one. We have, by the. grace of God, now reached a certain dividing line in the history of our lives. Behind us lie the years during which we have prepared ourselves for the future; before us remain the tasks which we are about to undertake. At this point it is but natural that we should pause a moment to view our position. If we permit our thoughts to return to the past and consider everything that has happened, we can immediately see that we have not come thus far through our own efforts. In various ways the Lord has helped us in reaching it. First of all, He gave us Christian parents. Through them we were brought to our Savior and from them we learned the fundamental doctrines of Christianity. After they had. brought us to the point where we, in confirmation, publicly accepted Christ, our Lord saw fit to call us to this school. This was another great blessing for us. Here, under the guidance and admonitions of Christian teachers, we were safely led through some of the most critical days of our life. We have been kept in the one true faith. This fact alone would justify our seven years' stay here, but, over and above this, we received even more. We now possess a Christian education and training. Everything we have learned has been taught to us in relation to the Word of God. In this way we have been prepared for the future. In view of these facts we cannot fail to see that the Lord has been very gracious to. us. During our school life we all met problems and difficulties-some great and others small. At times we became discouraged and looked upon ourselves as helplessly lost. Where, however, did we find help and assistance? We went to the Lord in prayer, and He never failed us. Without Him we should never be where we are today. After con-


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sidering all things, we must with Samuel confess, "Hitherto hath the Lord helped us." 'This is and should be a great comfort for anyone. We can all be certain that if the Lord has helped us thus far, He will not fail us in the future. With this thought in mind we can all begin our assigned tasks, and know that we shall not be unsuccessful. We are soon to enter the classrooms as Christian teachers. We have been called to do one of the most pleasant tasks that can be performed by man. We are to be the guardians over the immortal souls of children and show them the way to salvation. With the Gospel at our disposal we can work wonders. Our path will undoubtedly not be strewn with roses, for we know that opposition will arise wherever the Word of God is taught. The worldly minded will never fail to sneer at us and look upon our work as insignificant. This, however, should not discourage us. Our Lord tells us that wherever His Word is taught in its truth and purity, it will without ceasing do great things. In other words, we have a promise for success. What other occupation offers us so much? Luther, in evaluating the work of a teacher, says, "If I were not a preacher, there is no other calling on earth I would have rather than that of a schoolmaster. We must not consider how the world esteems it, but how God looks upon it." Should this not give all of us more zeal and courage to carry out our tasks in the best possible manner? In looking at our work from another angle, we cannot fail to see the responsibilities it brings with itself. Our professors have not failed to stress this side of the situation. We are to be servants of both God and man and we must take an active part in spreading and maintaining the Kingdom of God on this earth. To our care will be entrusted the souls of the children, and for these we must some day give an account. Everything in our life must be of such a nature that we offend not the little ones. We, however, are prepared and willing to carry these responsibilities, and if we faithfully abide by those things which have been taught to us, we have no reason to fear anything. ,t.

Our workshops, the Christian Day Schools, should always be uppermost in our minds. These schools, one of the direct results of the Reformation, began under extremely deplorable conditions. What, however, was the result? We all know that they grew and prospered. The conditions in our land are today much better than when Luther worked for their establishment. He succeeded. We have exactly the same things to work with. The Work of God


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is just as powerful as it ever was, and the hearts of the people will bring forth fruits as readily as ever. It is therefore the aim of each and everyone of us to go out and do his part in furthering the cause of these schools and make them stand forth above all other types. We are now about to part, dear classmates. We will undoubtedly be scattered over various parts of our country. Let us, however, not grieve us. We have all taken up the banner of Christ and have entered the field for His cause .. No matter where we are we know that we are all united in spirit and are striving for one goal. If we, according to our motto, fight the good fight of faith, we shall in a short time be reunited to hear the words of our Lord. "Well done, thou good and faithful servant; thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will make thee ruler of many things; enter thou the joy of the Lord." In conclusion, 1. in behalf of the graduating class, wish to thank each and everyone who has taken part in making our commencement day a joyous one. Our professors do we thank for their untiring efforts in our behalf. We can never hope to repay them for what they have done for us, but by our life we intend to show them that their work was not in vain. To the II Normal class we express our gratitude for their efforts in beautifying our auditorium. And now to you all-classmates, and friends, I bid farewell.

schoolmates, teachers

Raymond Duehlmeier, '35.

INTERVIEW ON THE SYNODICAL CONVENTION Courtesy of Edwin A. Nolte "What was your general reaction to the Synod Convention ?" "It made me hope that every communicant member might be present at such a convention, in order that the work of the Synod might become more widely known." "What portion of the discussion interested you in particular? " "There were many interesting subjects discussed, but the thing that impressed me most was the last hour's exciting debate about the immense debt which is hampering our missionary work."


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"What is your opinion in the matter?" "I stand behind those who moved to completely erase this debt during the next biennium. It can be done. Too many asked the question, 'Is it possible?' That is just a little weakness in faith. How many of us are giving tithes? How many are giving five percent of our income? I venture to guess that the average is about two percent. This can be doubled by all of us. It takes a little effort, that is all. If we pastors and teachers would begin in this matter and set the examples we ought to, things would fare better. We think too much of our own needs; yes, and too often pleasures come next, and then what is left is given for the Lord's work. Let each one ask himself, 'Am I giving as much as I can?' So many justify themselves by saying that they have reached their quota: Let us forget to stop there. Give as He has given to you. If God had given us the quota we deserve we would not have anything. - "We are now paying about $30,000 annually for interest on borrowed money. That .amount ought to be used for expanding our mission fields. Our debt is standing before us like a giant stop sign beyond which no one dare pass. Let us pay that debt and stop the use of that old alibi, 'We are still in the depression,' so that we may continue in His work and further carry out His command, 'Go ye!' "

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The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business -communications should be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends.

Entered as second class matter at Post Office of New Ulm, Minnesota

Volume XXVI

September 1935

No.1

-: The Messenger Staff :Waldemar Nolte Editor-in-Chief Winfried Stoekli Business Manager Arnold Coppens Assistant Business Manager Gerhard Rolloff Assistant Business Manager Veleda KeJm Alumni Notes Gertrude Limpert............................â&#x20AC;˘........................... Exchange Ruth Uhlig College Notes Julius Wantoch Locals Beata Moldenhauer Co-ed Notes Milton Bradtke Athletics Adele Nommenson : Jokes


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EDITORIAL

ON CHANGING THE MESSENGER TO A SCHOOL PAPER Several weeks ago it was suggested that the Messenger Staff consider the possibilities of changing the quarterly D. M. L. C. Messenger into a monthly or perhaps even a bi-weekly schoolnewspaper. This however is merely a suggestion and as yet no definite action has been taken either for or against it. There may be good reasons for making such a change, but I for one believe that the Messenger issued quarterly is the better and more satisfactory paper for all concerned. In writing this I am trying to take the viewpoint of our subscribers. Very likely publishing a monthly or bi-weeklypaper would mean much extra work for the staff members. but we will not discuss that. The interest of the alumni and other friends of 'Dr. Martin Luther Collegewho are not in immediate contact with the school is held mainly, yes, practically entirely by means of the D. M. L. C. Messenger. Most of the alumni are not interested in every little detail concerning the happenings in and about our school. Yet if several pages of material are to be filled every month, many incidents would have to be recorded that are of only minor importance. Many subscribers would not be able to understand the whys and wherefores of these happenings since one must be in almost every-day contact with the students in order to "get the drift of things." However, the quarterly issued Messenger presents in a somewhat summary form only the most


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striking and important incidents which are of interest to every subscriber. Only the best articles that have been written during several months' time are printed and thus literary work is held up to a high standard. But I imagine there are some people holding the opposite view and would like to see a change made. If so, write us and give us your reasons either for or against a change in the D. M. L. C. Messenger. We are trying our best to please our readers and if we are not, we certainly wish to know the reason why not.-G. R. '37.

BLESSINGS OF THE DEPRESSION? It was last spring that I together with many other students realized that "Herman" had improved his environment. All winter long men who otherwise would have been out of a job, helped "Herman"to remodel his home. The result is something of which they can be justly proud. This is only one very small change brought about by the depression. I mentioned it first because it concerns a place well known to many of us. It has been estimated that millions of dollars are being saved through the reforestation and reclaiming of degenerated land. We realized long ago that something had to be done with the soil which once gave us our vast forests. but now offers only brush and sand dunes. What was to be done? Who was going to do it? How could such a big problem be undertaken? These were some of the questions which arose.-Now, during our depression, we have seen this immense problem partly solved through the C. C. C. Did you ever notice the changes which took place about the home of the average citizen? Rock gardens, flower beds, lawn furniture, and general improvements, all products of Mr. Average Citizen's own hands, have helped to remind him that he was given a home and garden to dress. Gone, to some extent because of lack of funds, is the popular craze of running around. The result is that Mr. Citizen has found an interest in his home and home life. Many libraries have, in the last two or three years. noticed an. increase in the number of books withdrawn. People who were out of a job had time on their hands. What were they to do with uo money with which to entertain


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themselves and no means to get about? Many discovered, as the little lame boy did, that they could do their traveling and adventuring through books. It may be supposed that once this latent power of reading was discovered and enjoyed, many people continued to exercise it after they found employment. Modern educators tell us that one of their aims in education is to teach a person to think straight in order that he may be better equipped to meet life. If this be the case, I believe many a young man has gotten a better education through his recent difficult experiences than he would have been able to sift out of four years of modern college life. I have laid before you only a few thoughts; perhaps by now you are thinking of many more. On the surface this depression, if you would call it such,' presents a very black picture, but beneath all the gloom and hardships it is attempting to instruct and teach us that there is something better to be had in this world than a mere harvest of wealth and honor.-A. W. C. '37.

WHAT CAN YOU DO TO-BOOST OUR ATHLETICS? There is an organization at our institution called the D. M. L. C. Athletic Association, the aim of which is to assist the athletic director in supervising and conducting all athletic activities of the school. Every male member of the student body is a member of this organization. This Association is managed by an athletic board constituted of the managers of f'oocball, basketball, baseball, tennis, horseshoe, and two other members elected from the student body at large. 'These are elected at student body meetings. It seems that even if you do not take, part in any of these sports, you, nevertheless, would be interested enough to attend such meetings. As a member of the Athletic Association it is nOGonly your privilege but also your duty. You may think that it is of no use because you personally get no good out of it. Athletic activities for one are just as important and necessary as they are for you. The athletic director and the board are interested in YOUR physical education. Let's cooperate with them. Your interest in athletics is an interest in yourself.-M. B. '37.


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Does it seem as though our summer vacation was just ages ago? Does our Christmas recess seem to be so far ahead that it is quite improbable that we'll ever reach it? What is it that makes time creep slower than a tortoise? Why, it isn't time that creeps, but we show ourselves the creepers even as we idle away the very moments in which we allow such questions as those above to occupy our minds. A snatch from the Bethany Scroll should provide a bit of encouragement for you: "Time should not hang heavily on our hands, nor should we be dismayed in its passing too quickly if we absorb ourselves in present joys and in work which makes. us forget time. We become unmindful either of its dragging or its flying when we concern ourselves with work that is a 'steady delight.' Each entry upon a new school year or upon a new vocation holds interests and joys which can come only once and ought to be enjoyed to the full. "But many of us have formed the habit of looking ahead in anticipation of the end of our day, of the week, or of the year and in so doing we lose a great many time- . passing moments in rather futile occupation. Sometimes it is called day-dreaming. Good it is, of course, to have certain ideals and goals to strive toward, but too often these are merely used as excuses for present idleness. "So, as John Muir would have it: 'Grasp time by the forelock;' make the best possible use of our ability for 'steady delight'-not tomorrow or the next day, but today!" The Red and Whi~e, publication of the Immanuel Lutheran College at Greensboro, North Carolina, has summed up its well-intended endeavor in the following little rhyme: "If any Ii,tle word of ours can make one life the brighter; If any little song of ours can make one heart the lighter; God help us speak that little word, and take our bit of singing,


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And drop it in some lonely vale, and set the echoes ringing." The tone of this simple little verse is so cheerful that its wish is practically fulfilled without seeking any further. This year three college publications, The Concordia Comet, Alma Mater and The Spectator are observing anniversaries of their years of service. The Concordia Comet has been in existence for ten years, and during this time the two features of the magazine which have remained constant are the name and the front cover. In interpreting the comet design it is interesting to know that "the six tails of the comet represent the six classes. They are spreading the honor of Concordia over the lands, 'but they themselves are uplifted. Each class should strive to fly as high as possible. The kernel, or nucleus of the comet is the seal of the college and all that it stands for.-The inscription reminds the six classes to have a determination to make forward strides in literature and learning, but to place the spiritual, external values above everything else: The lamp reminds them that intelligence is above all, but that real intelligence comes from above-from God. The two pens, that a student must learn to wield a pen and become a good writer, but that he also must make use of the pen that others have put to paper. The moccasin flower, the state flower of Minnesota, reminds them of required patriotism." The Alma Mater is completing its twenty-fifth year of service, and though during this period of years it has been in the hands of twenty-five staffs, it has held its aims high and always worked toward their accomplishment. Ten years ago November 2, the first issue of The Spectator appeared. Recently it was changed from a monthly to a bi-weekly publication, and has added a section called The Collegiate Digest which deals with college li'fe in the United States. We hope that these publications will continue as successfully as they have in the past. The Viking, yearbook of the Winnebago Lutheran Academy, is certainly worthy of praise, and even' to a greater extent when we learn that the academy has decided not to publish the Viking at the close of this school year, so that it can help to finance improvements to be made upon the school. The academy is certainly displaying a fine spirit in sacrificing its year book, and we extend three hearty cheers.


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Perhaps I'm a bit tDD poetically minded today, but this little poem from the Bethany Scroll struck my fancy, and I can't pass it up. Only a few words-yet they contain a store of thoughts. Were YDU ever stirred By a leafy climbing vine? By a little bird Or a tall green pine? Has a cloudless sky Reflected in a stream With a mill near by Ever made YDU dream?

ALUMNI

ALUMNI NOTES Party

Line

A party line is usually more of a nuisance than anything else, but this is 'One time when it proved to be a convenience. "Hello, hello? 0, it's you, Emily. have to put my cake in the oven -

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Wait a minute, I'll Hello?"

"Yes ?" "Emily, do you know what I heard the other day at Ladies Aid? Rev. and Mrs. Sprengeler, nee Erna Albrecht '27 of Bylas, Arizona, have a baby boy since May 31. They named him Orville Paul. Mrs. Sprengeler's sister, Ethel Albrecht ('30 H. S.), visited with the Sprengelers this summer, and she brought back the news. By the way, Ethel thinks Arizona is quite an exciting place after all. And talking about Erna Albrecht, reminds me that ... Professor and Mrs-: Emil -B~.Backer- are the- proud parents of Jeanette Elizabeth, born August 17. Mrs. Backer was also Erna Albrecht before her marriage. Professor and Mrs. Backer are of the classes '14 and '19 respectively.

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Marie Wells was at the Aid too. She just returned from Milwaukee, and, of course, she told us all about it. Mr. and Mrs. Hilbert Wiedenkeller-you'll remember her as Antoinette Nolte '24-have an increase in the family in the person of Carla Emily, born June 15. And you'll remember Erwin Bartsch '27 ? Well, he and Mrs. Bartsch were made happy by the arrival of a baby boy. Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Meyer also have a baby boy, who was born on August 12, and was named after his father. Mr. Meyer was graduated in '30. 0, yes, I almost forgot about the wedding. Miss Ruth Gieschen of Milwaukee became the bride of Otis Stelljes on July 6. Did you hear about Meilahn Zahn '32? Did he give an organ concert? Well, maybe he did and maybe he didn't, but you'd scarcely expect a man to play his own wedding march. He was married to Miss Erna Mueller of Picketts, Wisconsin on July 27. Gilbert Timm '32 acted- as best man. I've also heard that wedding bells chimed for Miss Elfrieda -Hillmann and Henry Gruenhagen of West Bend during the latter part of August. Mr. Gruenhagen was graduated in '32. . You haven't heard about all the weddings yet. On August 31, Miss Irma Meier '30 was married to Arthur Bentz of Rockfield, Wisconsin. Sylvan Broker '31 is married too. He was married on August 1, to Miss Margaret Trieloff of Lake Mills, Wisconsin. Floyd Broker '34 attended as best man. And do you remember the girl who so severely chided us for even thinking about romance? Well, she's married! Yes, Edna Steinberg '33 is married to Barbee Cummings of Whiteriver, Arizona, since August 28. Her sister, Martha '29, was maid of honor and Vera Hafenstein '33 played the wedding march. Some time during the latter part of July, Emma Kirchhoff '32 and Ray Behmer '32 were married. Louise Kelm '32 and Randall Reneke of Sleepy Eye, Minnesota, were married on June 8. Miss Vera Hafenstein again played the wedding march. Well, I guess that concludes the weddings, but I'll bet you can't guess who is engaged. It is Roland Jacobs '34. Miss Audrey Hoffmann of Oshkosh is the young lady in question:


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I heard that quite a few alumni of D. M. L. C., attended the summer session of Concordia Teachers College at River Forest. Illinois. Esther Bucholz '28, Emmanuel Arndt '32. Meilahn Zahn '32, Armin Schmidt '30 and Edgar Wiechmann and Arthur Meier '33 are said to have been there. Three of the Alumni have decided to make a change. Adolf Wilbrecht '33 'has gone from Kenosha to Fort Atkinson. Wisconsin; Roland Jacobs from Oshkosh to Juneau, Wisconsin, and Floyd Broker has gone from New Prague to Webster, Minnesota. Mr. and Mrs. Ed Nolte and family, both of '30, took a trip through the Twin Cities and Duluth, the iron mines at Eveleth and Virginia, northern Minnesota, North Dakota and Winnipeg, Canada. They were gone exactly two weeks visiting relatives and friends. I..

my cake must be burning!

Good-bye."

To those who again remembered to send in some news, I wish to express my thanks. I hope I shall hear from you again and also from others. The Class of 1935 is stationed as follows: Ida Clements Boyd, Minn. Raymond Duehlmeier Maribel, Wis. Herman Fehlauer Appleton, Wis. Gerhard Gilbert. Milwaukee, Wis. Henry Hasse Stevensville, Mich. Vera Lawrenz Kirchhayn, Wis. Ada Nantke West Bend, Wis. Elsie Prosek. Bangor, Wis. Clarence Radl. Johnson, Minn. Martin Rauschke Marinette, Wis. Doris Sauer Baraboo, Wis. Ruth Schnitker Flint, Mich. Linda Teske Montello, Wis. Helen Weyland Xeenah, Wis. Raymond Riess New VIm, Minn. (no position)


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Library Notes ,.;.

It may be of interest to our readers to know how the library acquires the funds necessary for the purchase of new books. The main support has been received from the Synod. For quite a number of years the annual budget has contained the sum of $100.00 appropriated to the Dr. Martin Luther College library for the purchase of new books. The largest source of income is the endowment fund of our library. This fund was founded in 1923 and has received sums from individuals and groups. The amounts vary greatly. The smallest donation of this kind was a memorial fund for the amount of $11.50, while the largest gift came to us from the estate of Mr. J. J. Hadler in the sum of $4000.00 The total endowment fund of our library now amounts to $8672.50. This money is in the hands of the Synod's Committee of Funds and has been invested by them. The interest accruing from this money is turned over to the treasurer of the Synod annually, and he in turn sends it to us. Last year this interest amounted to a little over $200.00 Occasionally we also receive gifts from individuals with the understanding that the sums which they donate may be used at once for the purchase of books. Thus the Alumni Association of our institution has been annually presenting the library with a donation of $25.00 with the stipulation that this money is to be used for nonfiction books. It is our custom to make a note on the flyleaf of books bought from these donations stating by whom the books were donated. During the summer and fall the library has acquired a number of new books which will prove interesting and helpful to the student body as well as to the members of the faculty. Perhaps the most valuable among these is the History of England by John Richard Green in five volumes. In a review on this set of books we find the following statement: "No English history except Macaulay's has gained such favorable acceptance for general reading." Another valuable addition is a volume of nine plays by Bernard Shaw. This is a premium received from the Book-Of-The-Month Club, to which the library subscribes every year. Another interesting volume from this book club is the book entitled: Road to War, by Walter Millis, which claims to be "the true story of that fantastic period when America made its last frenzied journey along the road to war" in 1914.


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We also wish to, call attention to Bartlett's Familiar Quotation, a book which has now appeared in its tenth edition. The publishers describe it as follows: "An invaluable book for every household and library, every scholar and wtiter-1472 pages of the wit, wisdom and poetry of the ancients and moderns. A 400 page index gives almost 50,000 references." The Chicago Tribune makes this crisp statement about the book: "If it isn't there, the quotation isn't worth using." For lighter reading we recommend two books which were ra.ed among the best sellers during the past year. One is: Good-by, Mr. Chips, by Hilton; the other: While Rome Burns, by Alexander Woollcott. You will also find Kingsley's Westward HoI, The Woman of Andros, by Thornton Wilder, and All Ye People, by Merle Colby in the fiction section as soon as they can be entered. We must not forget to mention a most valuable gift received from Mr. Arnold Wilbrecht. It is a beautifully bound set of ten volumes containing Shakespeare's works. We take this opportunity to express our sincere thanks to the kind donor. On September 11, at seven o'clock in the evening, we路 opened our library course. All students of the eleventh and twelfth grades and of first year college are expected to take part in this course. It will comprise about seven lectures. We again express the hope that these talks on the library will aid the students in the successful use' of the library. Adalbert Schaller, Librarian.


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COLLEGE NOTES

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The "back to school" movement has been completed and the campus is again a place of life and activity. The enrollment has increased to 146, 15 more than last year. We extend a hearty welcome to all of the new students. We extend our wishes for success to Miss Ingebritson, the new matron in the girls' dormitory. Professor Bliefernicht has regained his health and is back in the classroom again. May his good health continue, through the grace of God. As usual, the faculty was widely spread during the summer vacation, but all excepting Professors Voecks, Palmbach, and Janke returned for the conference of the joint-synod which was held at D. M. L: C. The sessions lasted from August 7-13. Many former D. M. L. C. students attended the conference. On September 8 the students were the guests of the faculty at a "get-acquainted party" given for the purpose of acquainting the new students with their classmates and teachers. A supper was served for the entire student body in the dining rooms of the service building. We take this opportunity to thank the faculty for a pleasant time. Many of the students expressed the idea that "we ought to get together oftener." The Third Normals are "shaking in their boots" over the new experience of practice-teaching. Oliva Stindt and Ruth Seehusen are veterans already; they had to open school. Elizabeth Berg and Albert Brockelmann followed and now Frances Meyer and Beata Moldenhauer are teaching. The large choir began its rehearsals on September 16. The choir is larger this year than it has been for several years. The band under the direction of Norwald Behrens and the Marlut Singers under Waldemar Nolte's direction have also started rehearsing. The Marlut Singer group is also larger than it was last year. The two literary societies will begin their work about October 1. The following officers have been elected for the year: Phi Gamma Rho-President, Milton Bradtke; vice president, Robert Nolte; secretary, Florence Raddatz; treasurer, Waldemar Nolte. Phi Delta Sigma-President, Julius Wantoch; vice president, Gerhard Rolloff; secretary, Oliva Stindt; treasurer, Arnold Coppens. The Girls Glee Club, under the direction of Miss Ingrebritson also has opened the season for practice;


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Empty rooms and a new bathroom greeted Beata and Adele as they arrived at the dorm a day early. This addition was perhaps the most talked about and also the most welcome innovation ever introduced at Hillcrest Hall. Miss Ingebritson, the new matron, was the next arrival. On her first day at least, she received a good impression of order and quiet. because the aforementioned girls were nowhere around at the time. All the girls are glad to have her here, and are trying their best to make her stay with us very pleasant. Ora Wollenberg was appointed matror at Redeker Hall. According to all reports, she is taking her task very seriously and making a success of it. Veleda KeIrn decided it was more fun to work in a canning factory than to come back to school. She did manage to get back on September tenth. There was the usual shift of boarding places for reasons mostly unknown. Frances Meyer went to Redeker Hall; Evelyn Hunt moved in with Agnes Strege at Paape's; Florence Witte and Margaret Wegner have taken up light housekeeping; and Vernice Seibel has moved to the dorm. We hope everybody is happy. Ruby Holzhueter has us all a little puzzled. She eats salt and pepper on her cheese. masquerades in a manner to make her almost unrecognizable, and finally walks in her sleep at the most opportune times (or wasn't it, Ruby? Next time tell Eva to sleep more soundly when you are going on such a trip). If you don't know what dumped beds look like, ask Marie Sweeny. She's been pretty busy these nights after nine. And she probably won't forget that she had to remake her bed twice in one evening.


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Vernice Seibel, Omi and Ern-Gret Birkholz have managed to see their respective parents over the weekends. The rest of us kept the mosquitoes company on the campus. Pardon me, they weren't all mosquitoes. The new coeds that have enrolled are: Eva Taras Ruby Holzhueter Estella Albrecht Gertrude Walther Florence Berg Marie Sweeney Anita Wichmann Marjorie Larson Ern-Gret Birkholz Irma Bode Marion Lewerenz Elnora Menk.

Ixonia, Wisconsin Waterloo, Wisconsin Backus, Minnesota Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin Sparta, Wisconsin La Crosse, Wisconsin Burt, North Dakota : Hanska, Minnesota St. James, Minnesota Vernon Center, Minnesota NeiIIsviIIe, Wisconsin Sleepy Eye, Minnesota

Adelia Falk, Ruth Fritz, Leorda Gieseke, Mary Gieseke, Martha Riess, Charlotte Sauer, Margie Scharf, Betty Jane Schweppe, Ruth Struss and Loraine Ulrich all from New Ulm. We have a very gifted young lady in the person of Ern-Gret in our midst. She writes poems, dumps beds, keeps a roomful of girls in gales of laughter, uses Phillips 66 tooth paste, and is the cause of constant astonishment to all. She's at her best when her hair is in curlers or if there is a mouse in the vicinity.

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The seemingly impossible has happened. The girls' tennis court is finally in a fairly¡ good condition. A few of the girls, after two years of hoping, finally played a few sets on September sixteenth, a day which really ought to go down in history. Raddatz, Omi, Ruth, Ern-Gret, C. C., Olga, Agnes, Cat, Wilma. Erna and Gert Limpert went out on a hike that ended in one of these "bean frys" that Omi and Ruth have made so famous. Marie Sweeney's mother and father spent a Sunday with her, and her brother was here for an entire week end. Lucky Marie!


20

The D. M. L. C. Messenger

Florence went home one week end so she could attend the "Balloon Day" in the famous little town of Clements. Don't ask us how much fun she had, 'cause we won't tell. Studying has been carried on lately to the accompaniment of coughing, sneezing, blowing noses, and all the noises that go with colds. Multiply this by twenty-four, and you have an approximate idea of how quiet our study hour is.

LOCALS On September 5, D. M. L. C. opened its portals for another year of work. Nearly all of the old students are with us again. This year the enrollment of new students is larger than it has been for several years. We extend a hearty welcome to the new students and wish them success during their stay here. The following are the new boys in our midst: Roland Hoefer, Kenosha, Wis.; Ervin Lux, Saginaw, Mich.; Karl Mittelstaedt, Wisconsin Rapids, Wis.; Roland Bode, Vernon Center, Minn.; Harold Kuether, Kewaunee, Wis.; Julius Ingebritson, Albert Lea, Minn.; Richard Nitz, St. Paul, Minn.; Arvid Gullerud, St. Peter, Minn.; George Heckmann, St. James, Minn.; Gerhard Limpert, Altura, Minn.; Arnold "Lueker, Gibbon, Minn.; Harvey Balko, Redwood Falls, Minn.: Howard Birkholz. Redwood Falls, Minn.; Wilmar Bode" Courtland, Minn.; Gordon Fuerstenau, Hazel, So. Dak.; Vernon Gerlach, Arlington, Minn.; Vernon Greve, Aurora, So. Dak.; Gerhard Horn, Zumbrota, Minn.; Arthur' Krueger, Corvuso, Minn.; Edwin Kuesel, Spring Valley, Wis.; Mentor Kujath, Oronoco, Minn.; Roland Netzke, Smiths Mill, Minn.; Reinholdt Nolte, Fairmont, Minn.: Roland Preuss. Benson. Minn.; Luther Spaude, Lake Benton, Minn.; Henry Traetow, Fairmont, Minn.; Clarence Wi~te, Stewart, Minn. Erwin Pretzer has been appointed official mail "shagger." Waldemar Nolte, another member of the III Normal quintet is our new Music Hall inspector. ' The band under the leadership of Norwald Behrens has begun rehearsals. A large number of recruits were ready to fill vacancies and a successful year is expected.


The D. M. L. C. Me ....enger

21

'The midget of the dormitory this year is Vernon Gerlach. Harold Kuether takes first honors in the class of tall men. "Charlie" Brockelman was the first one of the III Normal boys to be called "teacher." Why suffer from aches and bruises? Straighten out those knotty muscles and enjoy life. Old Country Liniment is the only and best remedy. We have a limited supply. Get your bottle now!-Ray Wiechmann and Engelhardt. Paul Fuerstenau, the "mighty man," has been elected to take charge of the reading room management. Weare assured that he will be an efficient manager.

Athletics

J~. f

S.M.J.C.C.BASEBALL Team W. L. Pct. D. M. L. C 7 1 .875 St. Paul Luther 6 2 .750 Concordia 5 3 .625 Bethel.... 2 6 .2'50 Bethany , 0 8 .000 Waldorf Jr. College, .having played only four games, could not qualify for championship; therefore their games are not counted in the above standings. We are truly proud of a championship team under the able direction of Coach Voecks. The team made a good showing of fine sportsmanship, hard work, and smart baseball. The support of the student body and local fans was also commendable. We're ready to do it again, so why not repeat next spring?

FOOTBALL September 27-Waldorf. here October 2--St. Mary's, there October ll-Rochester, there October 18-St. Peter, there October 25-0pen November 2-Shattuck, here


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

23

What will the thirty-two husky lads that reported for football training on September 6, do to the above schedule? The prospects are good. The 'spirit is fine. The schedule is interesting. Consider these facts and then realize that along with the array of new but experienced men twelve of last year's lettermen will be at their posts. A perfect set up for an exciting season. Huddle gang!

THE BATTLE OF A CENTURY September 8 found the combined powers of the mental and physical forces of the faculty battling for honors of the day, only to be set back by the timid and green underdogs, the student body kittenball team. The underdogs surprised the eyes of the sport world by taking a five point lead in the first frame. A second inning rally by the faculty failed to overcome this lead but made it look sick. This made the understudies get down to business. They retained their lead and came out on the long end of an 11-8 score. As the score indicates the game was a slugfest. It was rumored that major league scouts were in the crowd and were 'disappointed in finding no material but were pleased with the officiating of the umpires. Maybe the faculty thinks differently.

GIRLS' ATHLETICS At a meeting of the girls. the following members were anpointed to the Athletic Board: Erna Kuehl, nresident; Naomi Birkholz. secretary; Cecilia Priesz, Myrtle Pagenkopf and Ruth Uhlig. At the meeting of the Board, the following plan. suegested by Professor Voecks, was adopted: Each girl has to go out for some activity at least twice a week. She is given a chart on which these activities are tabulated, so that a record is had of all points earned when it is time to give out the awards. Kittenball and tennis started the fall season. A little more interest than usual is being shown this year, and the time will probably come when our girls find that going out for a little exercise does more good than harm. The captains for the kittenball teams are Erna Kuehl, Adelaide Nolte, Cecilia Priesz and Melba Gieseke.


24

The D. M. L. C. Me"senller

Customer: Butcher: Customer: Butcher: deer.-Ex.

What kind of meat have you to-day? Mutton and venison. . Is your mutton dear? No, the mutton is sheep. The venison is

The explorer who had blundered into a cannibal settlement was trying to be nonchalant. "Do you belong to any civic bodies, Chief?" "What are they?" "Oh, The Chamber of Commerce,the P..W. A., City Planning." "Just a luncheon club," responded the chief significantly. Grandma Tellem says: I kin remember when Friday afternoon papers were not so large because Saturday was baking day 'stead of bargain day. Behrens: country. Stoekli: Behrens: kitchenette at

Polygamy would never work in this Why? Think of getting several women into a one time.

Just a Few Definitions ACCOUNT-A scrap of paper which is tossed into the fire as soon as received but, like the fabled Phoenix, rises from its ashes and in thirty days returns bigger than ever. ACCUSE-To defend oneself.


The D. M. L. C. Me"..enlier

25

ADAMANT_:_The hardest known mineral. Not so hard as a woman's "will" and much softer than a woman's "won't." ACOUSTICS-Something in a theater that is supposed to carry the voice of the actress as far into the auditorium as the fourth row. AGE-An unknown quantity. ALP-A Swiss apology for a skyscraper. ANON-The only famous poet who has never had his picture in the paper. APPLE-An antidote for doctors. APPLESAUCE-What a doctor may tell you. BACHELOR-A matrimonial Window Shopper. BAGPIPE-A Scottish instrument of torture. BALM-An ancient face cream highly prized by the debutantes of Gilead. BANK-A fussy old thing, ignoring the rule that one should not judge by appearances, informs you every now and then that your "account appears to be overdrawn." BATON-A stick waved by a conductor of an orchestra in the vain hope of distracting the attention of some of the, musicians from their score sheets to himself. BAZAAR-An amateur department store, run at a great financial loss, to raise funds for Charity. . BED-A sleeping couch occupied by a debutante from sunrise to midday, by a working girl from midnight to sunrise. (Not the same bed, of,course.) BEE-The winged symbol of honest toil. The farmer keeps a Bee to provide him with honey. The politi- . cian has one in his bonnet to provide him with publicity. BRAT-Someone else's "Angel Child." BYS'I1ANDER-Aninnocent person who is killed instead of a bandit by a cross-eyed or careless policeman. BULL-Bovine. A ferocious beast with horns greatly feared by lady pedestrians-generally a cow. BORE-A lady who tells you about her operation when you want to tell her about yours. Naomi to Ruth: I turned him down cold. He said he was in the movies and I saw him driving a furniture van. '


26

The D. M. L. C. Me.....nller

It was the history lesson.

"Jimmy," said teacher, "tell the class what you know of the peculiarities of the Quakers." The boy got falteringly to his feet, but not a word came to his lips. "How does their way of speaking differ from yours and mine?" "Well, Sir," said Jimmy, "they don't swear."

Some of those so-called optimists we meet are like the chap spoken of in the Passing Show, London. "I am quite confident of the future." "Then why do you look so worried?" "I am not certain that my confidence is justified." -Ex. Aviator: Do you wanna fly? Gushing Young Thing: Oh, I'd love it. Aviator: I'll catch you one.-Ex. Sonny: Dad, what's a committee? Dad: A committee is a body that keeps minutes and wastes time. "You think me a perfect idiot." "Well, perhaps you're not as perfect as I thought." "How are you getting along in arithmetic, Sam?" "Well, I don' learn to add up the noughts, but de figgers still bother me."-Ex. She shut off the radio and turned excitedly to her father. "Dad," she said, "that is the latest kind of jazz. Did you ever hear anything so wonderful?" Father, who had been trying to read his evening paper, grunted. "No," he replied wearily, "I can't say I have, although I once heard a collisionbetween a wagon load of empty cans and a farm-cart filled with ducks."


STUDENTS! BEFORE BUYING CONSULT THE ADVERTISING SECTION

Patronize

Our Advertisers

Without Them

THE tvlESSENGER Cannot Exist

List of Advertisers. Saff'ert's Provision Market F. J. Backer & Co. Eugene Koehler Barber Shop Dr. G. J. Hiebert Mr. Albert Flor The Bee Hive J. C. Penney Co. Drs. Schleuder Somsen, Dempsey, Johnson & Somsen Fink's Store New Ulm Grocery Simons Lumber Co. Farmers and Merchants State Bank ModelBarber Shop Wicherski Shoe Store Salet's Department Store Crone Bros. Company Erickson and Graff National Tea Store Drs. Hammermeister and Safferl


State Bank of New UIm Muesing Drug Store Eichten Shoe Store Herzog Publishing Company , Kemske Paper Co. Weilandt and Stegemann New Ulm Greenhouse Rexall Drug Store Eagle Roller Mill Co. Eibner and Son Schlumpberger's Grocery Hummel Bros. Dr. A. L. Kusske Ulrich Electric Company Tauscheck and Green Buenger Furniture Company Citizens State Bank Dr. E. G. Lang Robert Fesenmaier, Inc. Silver Latch Inn Mr. T. O. Streissguth Retzlaff Motor Company Retzlaff Hardware Company New Ulm Dairy Henry Goede Studio Lang's Master Barber Shop Champion Shoe Shop New Ulm Steam Laundry Schroeder Bakery Dr. F. H. Dubbe Schuck's Tailor Shop Dr. Von Bank Gastler Studio Union Hospital E. C. Vogelpohl Aid Association for Lu.herana A..C. Ochs Brick & Tile Yards

August Schell Brewing Company The Hauenstein Company _I


A. C. OCHS BRICK & TILE COMPANY General Sales Office 906 Foshay Tower Minneapolis

Executive Office and Plant Springfield, Minn.

Manufacture

Artistic Face Brick Various Colors -

Also-

Load Bearing Tile and complete line of

Building Tile and Common Brick Our Material stands every Test, and was used in hundreds of Government, State, Public and Private jobs in every state of the great Northwest and Canada. Some of them being-The last twelve new buildings on the University of Minnesota Campus, numerous large business blocks and other buildings.in the City of Minneapolis, such as the New Nicollet Hotel, Sheridan Apartments, Cleveland School, St. Mary's Hospital, Swedish Hospital, Calhoun Beach Club, etc., etc., two Lutheran churches of Springfield, Immanuel Lutheran Church of Mankato, Lutheran Churches in Brewster, Lake Benton, Blue Earth, Wanamingo, Westbrook, Wood Lake, Alden, St. Paul, Morgan, Odin, Ceylon, Clara City, Jackson, Delano; Devils Lake, Arnegard in No. Dakota; Dimock, Roscoe,Huron, etc., in So. Dakota, the Dr. Martin Luther College and the Union Hospital of New Ulm, the Lutheran School at Sleepy Eye, together with others built prior and since the above mentioned. Veterans buildings at St. Cloud, Minnesota and Rapid City, South Dakota, the new seven story First National Bank at Fargo, North Dakota, also large public and private buildings at Brookings, Watertown, Lennox, Lyons, Huron, South Dakota; Willmar, Hendricks, St. Paul, Marshall, Tracy, Rochester, Winona, Minnesota and many others all over the four States.

Our Products Are Sold in the New DIm Territory by New DIm Brick & Tile Yards


COMPLIMENTS

OF

T. O. STREISSGUTH Reconstruction, Installation, Additions, Blowers, Chimes, Harps

Modernizing, Maintaining, Tuning, Repairs, Service, Sales

Wicks Pipe Organs ERNEST C. VOGELPOHL ORGAN ARCHITECTS AND BUILDERS 405-409 North Broadway

New Ulm, Minn.

When in Need of Electrical Supplies and Radios or Service call on

Ulrich Electric Company ELECTRIC SERVICE AT ITS BEST BUY WITH SERVICE

Phone 148

HENRY GOEDE STUDIO We Make Photos That Satisfy STUDIO

170 North Broadway

AIways a Good Barber Waiting to Serve You At

LANG'S MASTER BARBER SHOP No Mug We Use Bar-Soap Lather Machine

No Brush

ABSOLUTELY SANITARY Shower Baths

Shoe Shines


Buy to the Limit Save to the Limit If Savings Mean Anything at All to You,

You'll Stock Up at Penney's

J~C. PENNEY CO.

Corner Minn. and 2nd North St.

Give Your Eyes a Chance It isn't right to toil under the handicap. of defective eyesight. Poor eyes make backward students. They not only affect your work, 'but your nerves and health as well. We fit your eyes right, grind lenses in our own shop and replace broken lenses on short notice.

DRS. SCHLEUDER Op ometris s and Eyesight fpecialists Telephone New Vim

102 N. Minn. St.

for Printing and Supplies

Phone

370

KEMSKE PAPER CO.

87

Towels and Toilet Paper

Mimeograph Stencils and Ink Filing Equipment and Office Supplies

NEW

ULM

DAIRY

THE HOME OF

Pure Dairy Products PASTEURIZED MILK, CREAM, BUTTER and

ICE

CREAM PHONE 104

Route and G. unter Service

SOMSEN, DEMPSEY, JOHNSON and SOMSEN Henry N. Somsen W. H. Dempsey Russell L. Johnson â&#x20AC;˘ Henry N. Somsen, Jr. Attorneys At Law Minnesota New Vim,


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We Turn a House Into a Home

BUENGER FURNITURE

CO.

Stores: New Ulm, Sleepy Eye and Gibbon

SUCCESSFUL PLANNING Everything in co-operation and accommodation consistent with courteous and sane banking principles is added to "YOUR AOOOUNT"at this community financial institution.

CITIZENS STATE BANK New DIm, Minnesota Under provisions of the Banking Act of 1933 Our Deposits Are Insured


Geo. D. Erickson

John W. Graff

ERICKSON & GRAFF Attorneys at Law New UIm, Minnesota

EUGENE KOEHLER BARBER SHOP Hair Cuts 30c Efficient Service and Courteous Treatment 20 N. Minn. St. New Ulm AMERICA'S FINEST SUIT VALUES See the Beautiful Patterns on Display in our Window. Come in and Feel the Luxurious "Meaty" fabrics $15.00 - $17.50 - $21.50 - $25.00 The Biggest Money's Wort.h You Ever Saw

HUMMEL BROTHERS

14 No. Minn. St.

New Ulm, Minn.

BANK WITH

FARMERS ~ MERCHANTS STATE BANK New Ulm, Minnesota

Fi~IENDLY HELPFUL SERVICE AT YOUR COMMAND TAILORED TO MEASURE SUITS

$22.50 No Deposits-No

$25.00and up

C. O. D.'s

All kinds of Repairing

CLEANING AND PRESSING

SCHUCK

TAILORS

215 N. Minn St.

Phone 498

Residence Phone 150

Office Phone 60

DR. F. H. DUBBE PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON NE\V ULM,

MINNESOTA


SCHLUMPBERGER'ยง

GROCERY

Groc-ries-c-Fruits->- Vegetables-Smoked Phone 182

Meats

New VIm, Minn.

WILLIAM J. VON BANK, D.D.S .: Dentist Office Phone 237

TRY THE

New Ulm, Minn.

Residence Phone 797

BEE HIVE

FIRST

fAVORITES I J. A. DellS & SON, Inc. New Ulm, Minn. The Busiest Store in Town-There Must Be A Good Reason Why EVE'RYTHING FOR THE CO-ED . . AT RIGHT PRICES

F. J. BACKER & CO. HARN ESS DEALER Kwik-Pak Parcel Pust Laundry Cases Trunks. Traveling Bags. Suit Cases. r'urses and Other Leather Specialties

D~.E. G.LANG DENTIST Office above State Bank of New Ulm Oflice Phone 472

Res. Phone 1172

THE GASTLER STUDIO For Quality Photographs Also Kodak Finishing


CRONE BROS. CO. Always

Show The Latest Clothes

and Furnishings

Reasonable

Our

in Young Men's

B est

Prices

A t t en t ion

Everything of a banking nature entrusted to our care receives our best attention. We shall be glad to have a share of your business.

State Bank of New VIm Member' Federal

Deposit Insurance

Fund

SPAULDING ATHLETIC GOODS -at-

Robert Fesenmaier,

Inc.

Special discount given to students

MUESING Drug Expert

Store Prescription Service

ARTCRAFT PHOTO SERVICE We Have It!

Will Get It!

Or It Isn't Made!

Phones 52-34I


WHEN IN NEED OF FOOTWEAR Be Sure and Call on Us We carry a complete line of men's, ladies' and children's shoes We appreciate your business. Our prices are always the lowest, Qualitconsidered

ATHLETIC SHOES OUR SPECIALTY TRY OUR REPAIR

DEPARTMENT

FOR GOOD WORK

P. J. EICHTEN SHOE STORE New Ulm, Minnesota

THE NATIOI\' AI...TEA CO. FOOD STORES GROCERS AND BAKERS New Ulm, Minnesota

G. J. HIEBERT, D~D.S. OfficeOver Rexall Drug Store Cffice Phone 247 Residence Phone 1547 New Ulm, Minn.

Weilandt & Stegeman Contractors and Builders Correspondence Solicited ,路YorkDOllein Any Section of the Communty Plans and Specifications Furnished r>timales C'vecr+ully Given Office 1 100 Center St. Phone 571 Auto Glass Replaced to Order

Champion Shoe Shop A Pleased Customer Is Best Advertisement

Our

We also have a good supply of new shoes. E. FREESE, Proprietor 24 So. Minn. St.

NEW ULM GREENHOUSES New Ulm, Minn. - Phone 45


DANIEL WEBSTER FLOUR Produces More and Better Bread

THE BEST IS ALWAY,S THE OHEAPElST

EAGLE ROLLER MILL CO. NEW ULM, MINNESOTA

PINK'S STORE . Where the Newest Styles Are Shown First The Smartest Wear for Young and Old At Prices You Expect to Pay

The Store Where You Feel At Home DEER

AUGUST

BRAND

BEER

SCHELL BREWING COMPANY

NEW ULM,

MINNESOTA


HA UENSTEIN BEER and PALE DRY CARBONATED BEVERAGE SERVED AT ALL PLACES New Ulm, Minnesota Telephone No. 1

Buy Rexall Merchandise SUPERIOR QUALITY AT LOWER PRICES

REXALL DRUG STORE Walter Muesing-Walter

W. Hellmann

"SAVE WITH SAFETY" For Your Dry Cleaning, Laundry or Hat Work We assure you prompt and efficient service and invite you to visit our modern, up-to-date plant at 107-109So. Minn. St.

NEW ULM STEAM LAUNDRY OTTO F. OSWALD & SONS

Expert Dry Cleaners and Hatters Phone No.5


NEW ULM GROCERY CO. Wholesale Grocers Distributors STOKLEY'S CANNED VEGETABLES LIBBY'S CANNED FRUITS Service and Satisfaction at the

MODEL BARBER SHOP Alfred H. Kuester, Prop. Footwear Athletic Footwear and Sox Ladies' Smart Styles Attractively Priced

EMIL WICHERSKI For Greater Values and Service See Us 1

i

!

COAL

Lumber-Millwork Cement-Sewer Pipe and all other Builders Supplies

HENRY

SIMONS LUMBER CO. DEPENDABILITY


Buy Where r ou See This Sign YCU BUY BETTER BECAUSE WE BUY BETTER Our 500 Store Buying Power Makes Possible the Low PL ces on Our Quality Merchandise

F. H. RETZLAFF HARDWARE COMPANY

D,rs. Hammermeister 8 Saffert Physicians and Surgeons

MINNESOTA

NEW ULM,

QUALITY CLOTHING At

.

$17.50 to $35.00

TAUSCHECK ~ GREEN Dodge

Plymouth


BREAD! Helps You Off to School W.ith Needed Food Energy Your Baker Makes The Finest, Most Delicious, Wholesome Bread EIBNER'S BREAD IS GOOD 1

Eat More Of It And Keep In Tip-Top Condition

EIBNER ~ SON BAKERY and ICE CREAM PHONE 128

Established 1883

ALBERT D. FLOR Attorney at Law New DIm, Minnesota

SALET'S DEPARTMENT STORE-NEW

ULM, MINN.

EVERYTHING TO WEAR FOR HIM OR HER WEAR SALET'S FAMOUS $1.98 FOOTWEAR

Highest Quality and of Course "YOU ALWAYS SAVE AT SALET'S"

SILVER LATCH INN '~ThePride of New DIm" Fountain Service-Lunches-Meals Dining Room Service .


UNION HOSPITAL NEW ULM, MINN. A fireproof hospital supervised by graduate best service.

nurses giving the

PHONE No. 404

A. L. KUSSKE, M.D. Practice Limited to Eye, Ear. Nose and Throat and Fitting of Glasses In Weiser Block Over Silver Latch Cafe New DIm Minnesota

SUBSCRIBERS, ATTENTION! When You Change Your Address Be sure to notify the Business Manager The Messenger Is Never Forwarded By Your Local Postmaster


THE SCHROEDER BAKERY

THE FLOWER OF NEW ULM JUST LIKE THE BREAD MOTHER MAKES

PHONE 232 AID ASSOCIATION FOR LUTHERANS APPLETON, WISCONSIN The largest legal reserve fraternal life insurance society for Lutherans in the United States and Canada, and operating strictly within the various Synods of the Synodical Conference. 33 YEARS' RECORD

1902 1912 1922 ", , 1932 .. 1933 1934 July 1, 1935 '" ,,'

F'

No. of Branches 33 234 ,942 2,128 2,187 2,273 2,314

Insurance In Force $

760,000.00 7,404,500.00 26,25-8,018.00 125,-864,133.00 131,328,055.00 144,75-8,113.00 152,016,926.00

Total Admitted Assets

$17,719,202.61 Total Benefits Paid to Certificate-holders and Beneficiaries Since Organization, . .. ,. . $14,274,276.04 ALEX O. BENZ, President Wm. F. Kelm, First Vice President Albert Voecks, Secretary Wm. H. Zuehlke, Treasurer


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AFFERT'S PROVISION MARKET

Where You Buy Quality!

Wholesale

.: .

New UIm., Minnesota

T

Retail


I

. .1

-: CONTENTS

:-

LITERARY: a. The Giver of Gifts

:......................................... 2

b. A Christmas Gift

3

c. Why Should We Study Physics?

6

LIBRARY COMMENTS.......................................................... 8 EDITORIALS: a. The New Staff

11

b. Slander

13

ALUMNI

14

EXCHANGE

17

COLLEGE NOTES

20

CO-ED NOTES

23

STUDENTENWISSENSCHAFT

27

LOCALS

28

ATHLETICS ··..·..·..·..···..·····..··.· · JOKES

u

29 35


2

The D. M. L. C. Me....enller

THE GIVER OF GIFTS Christmas! As though by magic a fairyland of lights, trees, gifts, and beautiful music appear before us in grand array. Our hearts swell with happiness when we think of home, friends, and parents with whom we shall soon be. We rejoice, because everything seems absolutely perfect at Christmas time. The entire world seems to have a halo of beauty over it, which even the poorest and the least thought of feel. Little enough do the true thoughts of Christmas enter our hearts and minds. "Unto us this day was born a Savior which is Christ the Lord." He is the Gift that has been given us, and is also the Giver of all gifts we receive. Because of Him our hearts should swell with joy and happiness. Every gift, every tree, every light should remind us of Him. The songs we sing should swell forth in praise and adoration for Him who lowered Himself to lie in a manger on that beautiful night so many years ago. No wonder there is a halo of beauty over the world, for our Savior has come to take away our sin, and in our happiness we see the beauty of all the gifts of the Giver, and can sing Let us all with gladsome voice Praise the God of heaven, Who to bid our hearts rejoice His own son hath given. -B. N. M. '36.


The D. M. L. C. Me ......n ... r

a

A CHRISTMAS GIFT "What you gon'a get for Christmas, Billy?" Billy Marshal turned about. It was his little friend, Henry Nelson. "Oh, Daddy said I could have anything I want. I'm going to get a pair of skiis, a big toboggan, and, oh, just oodles of other things!" returned Billy. From the . time that these two boys could run about, they had been the closest friends. Henry Nelson, about ten years old, was the son of a poor widow living in an old, dilapidated house on the outskirts of a small New England town. His father had died when Henry was a small baby; and since then, his mother had managed to earn a living for herself and her son by doing washing and sewing. Henry was now attending the Parochial school. His friend, Billy Marshal, was the only son of a rich and prominent banker of the town. They lived in a large, .white mansion situated several blocks from Henry's home. As Billy's father and mother did not go to any church, Billy knew very little abou t religion. Henry had tried to tell. him something about Jesus, but it did not seem to have any effect upon him. It was only a few days before Christmas when a heavy snow storm set in. The snow fell continually for two days. The day after the storm had abated, Billy's mother gave him permission to take his little sled and coast down the hillside. He, therefore, went to Henry's' house. Henry was just eating his breakfast as Billy came into the room. "You want to go coasting? The snow is just right today," burst out Billy. With a beaming but inquiring face Henry turned to his mother. "You may go if you wish," she said, "but be sure to dress warm." The two boys were soon on their way to the hill, which was located a short distance outside of the town. Upon approaching the hill, they saw that they were not the first ones there. The hill was long and rather steep; therefore Henry decided to start from half. way down. The first few times, they went down together. Later on each one went separately, and in this way most of the forenoon was spent. "Isn't this just loads of fun?" ejaculated Henry. "It's all right, but I think it would be lots more fun starting from the top," replied Billy indifferently. "I'm scared to try it from the top; but you can go first if you wan'a," said Henry.


4

The D. M. L. C. Me.u,en4..r

Billy took the sled to the top of the hill and decided to try it. "It does look a little steep, doesn't it?" he mumbled half under his breath. Nevertheless, he didn't want to be a coward; therefore he gave himself a push and down he flew. "Good luck to ya," shouted Henry after him. The first half of the trip was made safely, but by this time: Billy had gained such speed that the sled was out of his control. After swerving from side to side a few times, he shot off to the side and crashed into a fence post. Henry sawall this from the top of the hill with terror in his eyes. What was to be done? He ran to some bigger boys who, were skiing on the hillside. "Please help me! Billy Marshal ran into a fence post with his sled. I-I think he's dead!" The boys were greatly alarmed at this and rushed to Billy, who was lying lifelessly on the white snow. From a distance could be seen crimson blood spots on the white snow. Oh, how terrible it all was. Henry burst out into a flood of tears while the boys lifted the unconscious boy from the snow and rushed toward the town. They realized that Henry's statement, that Billy was dead, might be true. Within fifteen minutes the boys had re-ached the small hospital and had laid Billy down on a bed. Every one in the hospital rushed about to fill the doctor's ordersand to help him in every way possible. Henry did not stay at the hospital but went to Billy's home to inform his parents of what had happened. They rushed to the hospital and there were met by the doctor. The sad look upon his face revealed more to Billy's mother than words could tell. "Doctor! It isn't possible!" she cried and fell into the arms of her husband. After she had regained consciousness, the doctor explained the situation to them. "I am afraid your boy is hurt quite badly," he said. "His shoulder was crushed in that accident and he also must have received a severe blow on his head. But," he added, "there is still hope. He may recover." This was at least some comfort for the Marshals. With sad hearts they went home. They thought of the sad Christmas it would be for them and especially for their boy. Then there were all those many Christmas gifts which Billy would not be able to enjoy. All thissadness had been brought about in the twinkling of an eye; it was almost unbelievable! It was also destined to be a sad Christmas for little Henry. His mother, too, was grieved at the story which was told to her by her son. That night before retiring.

,


The D. H. L. C. H ........ nller

5

Mrs. Nelson and Henry had their evening devotion. With tears in their eyes they prayed that the Lord might spare Billy's life and restore him to health again. The following day Billy was still unconscious, and therefore he could be visited by no one; however, the doctor noticed a marked improvement in the healing of the shoulder. Also Billy seemed to be slowly regaining consciousness. The second day, being the day before Christmas, the doctor was extremely surprised to find Billy had regained consciousness. Mrs. Marshal was called to his bedside in order to help him reestablish his mental capacities. She began to talk to him, "Billy, my boy! Mother is here." "Mother!" whispered the lad in a surprised tone, as though he had now been brought back to real consciousness. A few seconds elapsed; then he added, "Where is Henry? Oh, I want to see Henry!" "Henry is not here now. but you may see him this evening if you like." answered his mother. That evening Mrs. Marshal informed Henry that Billy wanted to see him very much. Henry was overjoyed as he walked into the little hospital room and was greeted by Billv with a smile. Of course Billy could not talk very much; therefore Henry decided to tell him the Christmas story. He began, "Billy, do you know that tonight is Christmas Eve?" "Christmas Eve?" he whispered in a surprised tone, for his mother had not told him this.

I

Henry continued, "Long. long ago in a little town way out east, a baby was born. There wasn't any room in the inn; so the baby's father and mother had to stay in a stable. Here they wrapped the baby in swaddling clothes and laid him in a manger. Out in the pasture near the town, shepherds were watching their flocks when all at once a bright light shone from heaven and an angel said to them that they shouldn't be afraid, for in the city of Bethlehem was born their Savior, which is Jesus. The shepherds went to the stable where the angel had said He was and found the little child Jesus in the manger. These shenherds then went out and told all the people whom they met that Jesus the Savior was born. We celebrate Christmas because Jesus, if we believe in Him, will take all our sins away."


6

Billy lay there with his eyes filled with interest wonder. "Is Jesus my Savior too?" he asked.

and

"Of course," replied Henry. "He is everybody's Savior." It was now time for Henry to go home. "You'll tell more about Jesus when I'm better. won't you Henry?': asked Billy. "Of course I will," replied Henry and went off to his home.

me

After he had related his visit with Billy to his mother, she said, "Henry, I am proud of you. You have given Billy the best Christmas gift he ever received, Jesus!" -R. D. N. '38.

WHY SHOULD WE STUDY PHYSICS? How often hasn't that question rung in my ears when problems got to be too difficult for diminutive comprehensions, and how much hasn't it been argued-often till the lights went out! Personally, I have always liked the study of physics, why, I cannot say. To those who dislike it, it proves to be an everlasting bugbear. But why should that be? Let me cite but a few examples to show that we cannot live without the influence of physics. This might sound rather odd, but doesn't our density determine whether we are to be prominent in the business world or in the scientific world, or whether we shall just belong to the common mold? Likewise, it is our specific gravity compared to that of other people which will decide who will be our companions throughout our life. It seems possible too that some time in the vague future the American people might become convinced that the Metric System of weights and measures offers the easiest way of finding any size, shape, or weight. If we learn that system now, it might save us from getting a few gray hairs later on. Physics states that all matter is impenetrable and porous, while specific kinds may be tenacious, brittle, ductile, or malleable. I fear that our professors can well vouch for the fact that our impenetrability has often tried


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Th" D. M. L. C. Messenol..r

7

their patience, while it is the porosity of our heads that allows us to absorb any knowledge at all. It is tenacity or, to speak plainly, stick-to-it-tiveness, that finally makes us finish our work. I think that those of us who have inhabited the dormitories for a year or more can say that such life soon wears off the brittle edges and makes us all more ductile and malleable. . Physics cannot even stay out of amusements. If Archimedes' principle of buoyancy were not a fact, we should not be able to swim. When some one does by accident sink, what should it be but the principles of air pressure, discovered by Torricelli and Pascal, that allow some one else to save him by artificial respiration? Even such entertainment as playing ball and going hunting can't get along without physical laws to regulate them-Newton's laws of motion. If these were all of the laws-but physics must even be applied to the most common topics of daily conversation, time and weather. It is the vibration of a pendulum, invented by a physicist, that shows us the time. Without the barometer, weather map, and thermometer, discovered and used by physicists, we couldn't tell what the weather was at present or what it would be in the future. Are we all convinced that the study of physics is necessary? Remember you can't drive a car, listen to a radio, talk over a telephone, go to a movie, or use any electrical appliance without applying some principle of physics. You can't even see, hear, or transport yourself from place to place without using your physical organs . . -R. G. '39.


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8

The D. M. L. C. Me"8"nllpr

Library Comments. Let us begin our library chat with a short review of the new books which have been entered and will appear in the library stacks in a short time. We have acquired a. copy of Roget's Thesauros of English Words and Phrases Classified and Arranged So as To Facilitate the Expression of Ideas and To Assist in Literary Composition. The book is, famous in spite of its title. In fact, it has been considered an outstanding book in the English language since it was first published in 1852. The Greek word Thesauros can best be rendered in English as "a treasure." To put it briefly, Peter Mark Roget's Thesauros is a treasure book of synonyms. Continuous changes have been made in this book since its first publication. New words and meanings. have been added. Originally the book had an exhaustive index referring to each word in its various meanings and relations. Our new copy is the 1935 edition, which is arranged in dictionary form. The index has thus become unnecessary and is omitted. For the benefit of those students who have not as yet used a book of this type we might add a brief explanation of its use. Let us say you are looking for a term which you wish to use in a composition. You have a certain word in mind, but it doesn't seem to be exactly the expression you should like to have. By turning to the word in the Thesauros, which you have in mind, you will find there a list of words which have the same or nearly the same meaning. From these it will be easy to make the correct choice. Let us say, for example, that you are looking for a word similar to the word stay. In our new book of synonyms you will find the following given under the term stay: cease, stop, discontinue, desist, hinder, detain, prevent, continue, last, endure, rest, wait, halt, tarry, linger, sojourn, abide, dwell, live, reside, fasten, hold, brace, truss, prop. And if you want a noun similar in meaning, there is the additional note: See Cessation, hindrance, remainder, support. Be sure to give this new book a tryout. You may very likely want a copy of it for your future private library. Other books which will be of help or interest to students are Nine Plays, by George B. Shaw; Teaching the


The D. M. L. C. Me â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ enller

9

Bible Story, by A. Schmieding; Stamp Collecting, by H. Renoul; Creating- the, Modern American Novel, by H. H. Hatcher; Readings in Psychology, by Charles E. Skinner; Historic Chapters in Chris'ian Education in America, by E. M. Fergusson. This last book brings a fairly detailed history of the Sunday school in the United States. The most beautiful new addition to the library and a most fascinating book for all lovers of wild flowers is the book entitled Wild Plowers, by Homer D. House. We find the following statement in a review about the book: "Here, for the first time, are actual color photographs of hundreds of wild flowers, published in a single volume with complete text. The combination of pictures and descriptions makes it possible to identify any wild flower quickly and easily, beyond the shadow of a doubt." The course in library instruction was concluded in November. In spite of the efforts made to acquaint the students of the upper classes with the workings of the library, there were some students who didn't consider it worth while to attend these lectures. As a result, there have already been complaints by some of the instructors, that some students in their classes seemed perfectly helpless when it came to look for material in the library. In view of this situation the faculty may deem it advisable to make the course in library training obligatory for all students next year. In such an event the course would become part of the curriculum, including a final exam ina- . tion and grades for work done during the course. The group taking the course next year will comprise the entire eleventh grade. all new students entering twelfth grade and the college department, together with those students' who were expected to attend this year and didn't, as well as those who were absent for three or more lectures.

f

.'

Again we wish to acknowledge a donation for the library by Mr. Arnold Wilbrecht. This time it is a set of books entitled The Best of the World's Classics, edited by Hen-ry C. Lodge. We herewith extend our hearty thanks to the kind donor .


The D. M. L. C. Me â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ enlter

10

The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The sub. scription price is seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has expired; unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates. will be furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends.

Entered as second class matter at Post Officeof New Ulm, Minnesota

Volume XXVI

No.2

December 1935

-: The Messenger Staff :Waldemar Nolte Winfried Stoekli Arnold Coppens Gerhard Rolloff Veleda KeJm Gertrude Limpert. Ruth Uhlig Julius Wantoch Beata Moldenhauer Milton Bradtke Adele Nommenson

Editor-in-Chief Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Alumni Notes Exchange College Notes : Locals Co-ed Notes Athletics Jokes


11

EDITORIAL

â&#x20AC;˘ THE NEW STAFF Again a staff has completed its term of service. As usual a new staff will replace the old. The New Staff, however, will have twelve members instead of eleven, because a typist has been appointed to type out the manuscript. We who are now discontinuing our duties on the staff extend our best wishes for a year of fruitful work. The members have been appointed to their positions as follows: Editor-in-Chief Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Typist Alumni. Exchange College Notes Co-ed Notes Locals Athletics Jokes

Milton Bradtke Arnold Coppens Robert Nolte Henry Krenz Henry Engelhardt Veleda Kelm Gertrude Limpert Myrtle Pagenkopf Margaret Koehler Winfried Stoe kli Gerhard Rolloff Ruth Gehlhar


The D. M. L. C. Me....enller

13

SLANDER Keep thy tongue from evil, and thy lips from speaking guile. Ps. 34:13. One of the worst instruments to ruin some other person's repute is the tongue of slander. How often do we not find ourselves or others defaming or ridiculing a third person, usually not present? The Twentieth Century gossip cannot be carried on without bringing some one's reputation into question. It seems as though slander and defamation are compulsory if you wish to be recognized by the society of this "enlightened" age. Ridiculing or relating and perhaps exaggerating the bad report of some questionable character, defaming and lowering him in people's estimation, seem to be the jest and life of a party! Without this poisonous and ill-bred concoction the party cannot exist! Is this not a most deplorable fact in existence today?-to ruin some one's entire life with all its enjoyments and successes, to degrade him to everyone's estimation and to put him to shame? Is there nothing else in this great, wide expanse that could be used in our conversation? Don't tell me there isn't; because there is! If you don't know of anything else to talk about, sooner keep your mouth closed than to put other people to ruin. -H. K. '39.

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14

The D. M. L. C. Me"senli.,r

ALUMNI NOTES Well, ladies and gentlemen, it's your old friend the> Alumni Reporter, bringing you bits of news from here and there. . When in 'my last conversation with you I mentioned the names of several people who had attended the summer sessions at River Forest Teachers College, I believe I slighted some, for which I am very sorry. Here they are: The Misses Zelma Hill of Two Rivers, Beata Hoffmann of Faribault, Olive Olson of Milwaukee, Olivia Tjernagel of Winona, and the Messrs. Carl Wacker of La Crosse and Edgar Backer of Milwaukee. At some time or other these people have attended D. M. L. C., but they believe in keeping up with all new developments in their profession. It is a good idea too-one worthy of mention. It surely is odd! Of course, a woman has the right to change her mind. but anvway-. There is that old saying about the woman's place being in the home, which is constantly and very vehemently being disputed by women everywhere, but they usually end there anyway. On August 8 Gertrude Dey '28 became the bride of Sylvester Voss of Neenah, Wisconoin. Since the wedding took place at Vergas, Minnesota. Herman Fehlauer '35 was privileged to be the organist for the occasion.

.-


The D. M. L. C. Messenl! ..r

15

On October 12, Wilma Genz and Victor Lehmann, both of '32, were married. Congratulations! The Steinberg girls are rapidly leaving the ranks of the single. Edna is already married and now Martha, '29, is engaged to Mr. Ralph Jankowski of Chicago. Another to leave the ranks of the single and join that of the coupled is Irma Boettcher, '30, who is engaged to Mr. John Kehl of Neenah, Wisconsin. May you be very happy! In West Allis there were two very happy people on October 4. They were Mr. and Mrs. Martin Roehler, the former of the class of '30. Why? It was Helen Jeanne's birthday. November 12 proved to be quite an exciting day for Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Kiecker, nee Gertrude Seehusen, H. S. '28, of Gibbon, Minnesota; for that day marked the arrival of a baby boy. From the Apache Scout, I gathered that Mr. and Mrs. Walter Huber of White River, Arizona, have an addition to the family in the person of Norman Walter. Because it was only October 1, we were rather surprised to see Clarence Radl, '35, but we enjoyed his visit nevertheless. Come again. On October 3, Armin Huhn, '32, of West Salem journeyed to New Ulm to be best man for his brother's wedding. Need the practice, "Chick"? Oliver Althoff, H. S. '34, let the hardware business at Cannon Falls, Minnesota, take care of itself on October 6, and looked up old friends and classmates at D. M. L. C. Thanks for the visit! Gerold Becker, '32, of Waverly, Wiechmann, '33, of St. James attended on November 2. I hope they enjoyed as I did, and incidentally did not freeze

"

Minn., and Edgar the football game the game as much as much as I.

Arthur Meier, '32, of Sleepy Eye was fortunate enough to be able to attend the performance which the William Lee Trio gave in our auditorium on November 8. There has been quite a shift of positions among the fairer sex of the alumni. Mildred Scharf, '32, formerly of Sleepy Eye, Minnesota, has accepted a call to Appleton, Wisconsin. Gertrude Vogel, '34, of Goodhue, Minnesota,


16

The D. M. L. C. Messenger

h-as taken Mildred's place at Sleepy Eye and Esther Gehlhar, H. S. '28, is now teaching at Goodhue. I hope everybody is happy. "Dem einen sein Unglueck, ist des anderen Glueck." Raymond Duehlmeier, '35, was compelled to take leave from his duties at Maribel, Wisconsin, because of illness, Eldor Kopitzki is temporarily taking his place. _Harry Diersen has no call yet. We hope that soon we Christians will not only give him. but also all available candidates a charge in some little corner of God's vineyard. He who waits patiently will be rewarded. Raymond Riess has been without a position since his graduation in June. Not so long ago he received a long distance call from Milwaukee and was instructed to leave for Arizona immediately. May success be yours. Thanksgiving Day brought quite a number of visitors to D. M. L. C. Armin Huhn, '33, of West Salem, and Adolf Wilbrecht, '32, and Wally Goeglein, H. S. '34, of Fort Atkinson came all the way from Wisconsin to eat a good old Minnesota Thanksgiving dinner. Wallace Kurth, H. S. '34, of Hutchinson, Minn., ate his dinner at home and came here the following day. So long, folks, until next time. -v. K. '37.


The D. M. L. C. Meâ&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ enl1er

17

We can well surmise that at some time sooner or later we will meet with a crisis, but how to meet it will be another question. An article in the Augsburg Echo makes clear to us that it is our daily conduct upon which our decision will depend if ever we must make a specific one. "It is the everyday walk which tries us and proves whether the source of our strength is divine or human. It is so easy to forget to be diligent in little, unobserved tasks. . . . If we let Jesus rule our forgotten minutes, then we need not fear the hour of crisis. If we can, by the power of God,be exceptional in ordinary things, the exceptional events will be met with sufficientpower." The Concordia Seminary at St. Louis realizes that its unfinished tower should be completed,and an article in the Alma Mater devoted to this cause also suggests that if the tower could be built. a carillon of sixty bells could be installed by having each former graduating class provide a bell as a memorial, and the future classes also add bells from time to time. We surely agree with. the students when they say, "Our unfinished tower is no credit to us. Scoffers and heretics have jested long enough about 'those Lutherans who started something and then were afraid to finish it.' Its stumpy appearance not only mars what might be a most perfect architectural group, but its very presence is symbolic of something that we must root out of our circles, if we are to make the forward strides that the Lord expects of us."


IS

The D. M. L. C. Metlsentler

All of us occasionally allow ourselves to form in our minds some goal or ideal for which we consider it our life work to strive. Perhaps we might term it our philosophy of life, although that term doesn't seem so pleasant or inviting. It usually happens that those who can state their life's philosophy in so many words are the ones who fail to abide by it. Our actions may show just what we are striving for, although we may not realize that we have an ideal. In an article in The Black and Red, the writer gives some thoughts which just seem to express his philosophy in life, if he is being fair with himself, and which may come very close to ours, or be just the opposite. In speaking of accommodation as a virtue, he states that "by not placing ourselves in the place of and with people of a lower level than ours we often hurt our neighbor, an act which must be avoided. For the broadminded see a kernel of truth if it is present. The narrowminded see only the differences. For if you want enemies, excel others; if you want friends, let others excel you. And thus if you agree by thinking your share and not saying it, you are considered a smart person. People who pass out compliments are often ridiculed, but it should be kept in mind that we must accommodate ourselves and become one of these ridiculed people occasionally, because nothing makes people so worthy of compliments as occasionally receiving them. To do the thing one fears to do is the first law of greatness. It is worth remembering then that true happiness is not in doing what one likes but in liking what one has to do.. . Whatever happens matters little and for a short time; how you take it matters much and forever." The Wartburg Trumpet, the new publication of the Wartburg College since its removal from Clinton to Waverly, Iowa, is certainly worthy of our best wishes for its success. Keep it up! Students of many of our sister colleges were greeted with improvements this fall. Bethany College at Mankato boasts of a new stairway with one hundred thirty-six steps, quite an upward stride from the former rugged trail. The interior of the Concordia Teachers College has undergone decided changes under the hands of twentyeight student painters. The college also applauds a new dormitory-for girls. But why couldn't an "honest-togoodness" one have been placed on the Bethany campus .to soothe the poor student who so mournfully bemoans his lot and that of his fellow inmates, ending his plea so pitifully


The D. H. L. C. M..""enl!"r

I~

-"And now I must raise my faint voice to beg for equality -Equality that the Pilgrims and our forefathers sought for when they came to found this home of the free. But it is all in vain; my feeble voice is drowned out by the idle prattle and contented giggle of these, the members of the gentler sex." Perhaps our "thinkers" are just about worn out, and it really is a wonder that we can make them carryon until the Christmas holidays. It must be just a case of "have to." At any rate, The Spectator published a concentration test which should be of interest: "A brakeman, a fireman and an engineer are employed on a train. Their names are Robinson, Smith and Jones; not respectively. On this train are three passengers with the same names, who will be referred to as 'Mr.' to distinguish them from the three trainmen. 1. Mr. Robinson lives in Detroit. 2. The brakeman lives halfway between Detroit and Chicago. 3. Mr. Jones earns exactly $2000 a year. 4. Smith beats the fireman at billiards. 5. The brakeman's nearest neighbor, who is one of the three passengers, earns exactly three times as much as the brakeman. 6. The passenger living in Chicago has the same name as the brakeman. What's the engineer's name?" Just time yourself from the time you start reading the problem until you have arrived at the correct answer, to,see how you will compare with Concordiastudents whose average is thirty-seven minutes. It's really not difficult.'


20

The D. M. L. C. Me ..~eJlller

The series of five entertainments planned for the student body was opened on September 25 with a lecture by Mr. Sidney R. Montague, a Canadian Mounted Policeman. Mr. Montague held his audience spellbound for over an hour while he told of his life among the Eskimos and showed Eskimo clothing. snowshoes, dog harnesses, dog whips, a harpoon, and various other articles. At the end of the lecture. the folding doors into the gymnasium were opened and Mr. Montague showed us how to crack a fortyfive foot dog whip. The second prog-ram was given by the William Lee Trio. consisting of Mr. Lee. tenor; Miss Franck, violinist; and Miss Crouse. pianist. The audience was delighted to hear such old favorites as Serenade, by Schubert, The Rosary, by Nevin, When Irish Eyes Are Smiling, and Goin' Home. The next entertainment will be a program of magic, ventriloquism. and sleight-of-hand by the Loring Campbell Company on January 20. On February 11 we shall be made acquainted with "our friends, the snakes," by the Johnson Brothers, Lew and Elmer. At the closing entertainment on March 30. Harry C. White will demonstrate some of the wonders of science to us. On October 1 all classes were given a free period in order to give them an opportunity to listen to the National Music Ensemble. These five musicians were winners of state and national contests from 1932 to 1935, and they carried $2000 in musical instruments, including flute, oboe, English horn, French horn, clarinet, and bassoon. Among . other numbers on their pro rram were the William Tell Overture and Pilgrim's Chorus from Tannhauser.


The D. M. L. C. Mes ..en!ler

21

The literary season was opened by the Phi Gamma Rho Society on November 2. The theme of the program was Columbus. The high light of the evening was a comic selection in low German by Miss Beata Moldenhauer: Wie Columbumbus Amerika Entdeckte. On November 30 the Phi Delta Sigma presented a program which had for its theme the holidays in November: Luther's Birthday, Armistice Day, and Thanksgiving Day. And speaking of Thanksgiving Day, have you heard about the Thanksgiving dinner the students received? Many thanks to the members of the St. Paul's congregation. The band is busy preparing a play, Hello Neighbor by G. L. Wind. The following cast was chosen: Johnny Richards, a young one......... Gilbert Fischer Lucy Richards, a young one. Adelaide Nolte Pa Richards Gerhard Rolloff Emmy Richards, his "old maid" sister Eva Tarras Ma Richards, his wife Gertrude Limpert Kitty Richards, his beautiful daughter Ruby Holzhueter John Winter, a neighbor Milton Bradtke Mrs. Winter Adele Nommensen Pansy Blossom, an old maid next door Erna Kuehl Dave Winter, handsome son next door Raymond Wiechmann Billy Winter, young one next door Roland Bode The Phi Delta Sigma Society has a play under preparation. It is Clara, also by Wind, and will be given immediately after Christmas vacation. Christmas vacation is coming all too soon, especially for the III Normals, who find it hard to realize that it will be "our last program." Prof. Backer is preparing to have the following program presented: 1. Processional 2.

Die Weihnachtsgeschichte Wehrmann Vortrag: Beata Moldenhauer Orgel: Ruth Uhlig Piano: Henry Engelhardt

3.

Versammlung: Herbei. 0 ihr Glaeubigen Orgel: Julius Wantoch路


The D. M. L. C. Me....eDlI..r

22

4.

Chorus:

5.

Organ: Paraphrase on "From Heaven Above" and a theme by Handel.. Hayer Waldemar Nolte

. 6.

Then Spake Maria In Mirth and Gladness

Assembly:

7.

Chor:

8.

Address:

9.

Assembly:

10.

Choir:

11.

Piano:

Hassler Niedt

From Heaven Above

Christkindleins Wiegenlied v. Othegraven Ehre Sei Gott in der Hoehe ..Mayerhoff-Reuter Organ: Rudolph Weyland Altgeistliches Wiegenlied Backer Prof. A. Schaller The Christmas Tree Organ: Adele Nommensen

The Virgin's Song to Her Baby Christ ..Hamer A Knocking on the Stable Door Thiman

0 Sanctissima Henry Engelhardt

12.

Versammlung : 0 du froehliche Organ: Albert Brockelmann

13.

Recessional

.Spindler


Th., D. M. L. C. Me"â&#x20AC;˘ .,nller

23

5

CO-ED NOTES I've often wondered if there weren't quite a few people who would like to be one of the little mice that we have in great abundance in order to get a "mouse-eye view" of what really goes on in the girls' dorm. It certainly would be fun to watch our little Kiddie, otherwise known as Ruby, Eva, and Koehler as they worry about all those little grey "beasties" that bother them. And who wouldn't get a kick out of watching Kiddie get everyone of those "ducky" little curls into place! I haven't been in there myself during that time of the night when Koehler and Ruby plan all those bright ones that they manage to pull during the course of the day; but they must figure them out then, otherwise they wouldn't be as clever as they are. The mouse had decided that this was really a fascinating room to watch until Eva said that she had just carried out the sixteenth mouse, and wouldn't go home for vacation unless she had caug-httwenty. Very quietly this little explorer went over to Room 9.

On the door hung a big sign which said, "Tread gently, or the radio will go burp." It sounded as thought the radio were having a fit. Omi, who seemed to be the only one that knew anything at all about radios, was trying her best to show the girls that her skill. would come to the rescue. Finally the radio was again on its best behavior, but the noise went on. Bessie, Ernie, Beata, and Omi were having a party with Dells and Daisy as guests. A friend had generously remembered the girls' capacity for anything good. It didn't take long to figure out that "squirrelly" little Ernie was the life of the party and practically the death of her roommates, The conversation wandered, but never lagged, and finally rrrived on the subject of the visitors they had. Esther Frey and Bernice Winter of


24

The D. M. L. C. Me....eflller

Hoskins, Nebraska, had spent a Sunday afternoon with them. Well, thought the mouse, they're having a good time, but it's lucky they don't get a box like that every day. The next room to take a peek into was the one where Marion, Florence, and Hazel lived. They were joyfully remembering the days when Marion's mother and grandmother, and Florence's mother had been there for a visit. What a jolly time was had by all! Just as the little mouse was ready to go down to second floor, Florence Raddatz, who had deserted us for the quieter hospital rooms, came up the steps. She had to come back to see whether those roommates of hers had learned to behave. They most likely hadn't. but we hope that she soon feels well enough to try dorm life again. Aha. it was quieter on second floor tonight. The first room on the trip is the one over which the famous directress, Liz Berv, has charge. She directed the Three Musketeers in a famous and successful concert tour of the rooms. We firmly believe that she is the one who taught Sweeney how to sing "Lonesome and Blue." Believe you me, she sounds lonesome when she sings it and maybe even blue, because that is the impression that she so vividly implies. Erna Kuehl is the third member of this trio. She has the information on making beds, and is trying her best to teach Liz the new fundamentals. Go to it, Erna! And now, on to the room where the Priesz sisters and Wilma Schultz live! This is where the famous R. Priesz fire sales take place. Everyone is welcome and you can buy everything from gunny sacks with zippers to slightly dilapidated wigs. Her sister, C. C., is at nresent nursing a sore toe by bathing it in hot water. The little mouse daren't show itself, or Wilma most probably would have a dish of hot water on her head. Across the hall the much-enlightened mouse finds a little quieter atmosphere tonight. But she should have been there the night Olga had a party, or when Vernice celebrated her birthday. Maybe we shouldn't forget Ruth Gehlhar's rather effective siege against mice. It wasn't so quiet then. Last, but we certainly daren't say least, is Room 7. Here live Agnes, Dells, and Adelaide, the three proud aunts who are always bragging about those nieces and nephews


The D. JU. L. C. Mes8en1ler

25

that they have. This room is famous for many other things too, namely, its pictures; the supply of gum on the rod of Adelaide's bed; the many girls that manage to crawl into Dells' single bed; malted milk spilled over Adelaide's quilt, if you wanted some, you'd have to drink it from there. Well, thought the mouse, I wish I could stay, but I must go on to Redeker hall. Before I go, however, I must needs tell about a few more things. One day some very generous boys sent Sweeney and R. Priesz three dead mice for an early Christmas gift. Kiddie spilled (purposely) a bottle of one cent per gallon perfume in Bess's and Beata's bed. Hallowe'en was celebrated very quietly indeed. Out of fear of what might happen, some girls locked their rooms. We have some expert locksmiths around here; the door was opened, and the procession entered, headed by Ruth Priesz, who was carrying a beautifully carved pumpkin. And that was the end of the celebration! At this writing, I'm told that there are only twenty days till Christmas. Except for a few uncomfortable persons (as result of that marvelous Thanksgiving dinner) everyone is talking about going home. This reminds mousie that it is time to be going. Redeker Hall reminds the traveler very much of the third floor of the dorm. First on the rounds is Gertie Walther's room. She has this room by herself, but tonight there are all kinds of girls there. She is busy telling them what a good time she had the night before sleeping with Eva at the dormitory. What a noise! Now we come to the abode of Myrt and Irma. Irma spent a week-end with the Gieseke girls. As a result there was no one to answer the telephone. My, Myrt does look so grown up! And why? She has sprouted one of these things that one calls a. pug. The next room for inspection is the home of Gert Limpert and Cat Gunn. Cat found she was heavier than she thought. It was because of her weight that the bench in the dark room took a notion to collapse. Gert must have just oodles of friends who know how much fun it is to get packages. She got nine for her birthday-s-and did. the girls ever have a feast! Marge Larson and Honig Albrecht, who live next door, are star basketball players. We've often wondered how they kept in such excellent condition in their shooting.


26

The n. M. L. C. M......enol..r

Now the secret is out. They practice shooting at a waste paper basket that they have fastened above the ~oor. In the last room on this trip live Ora and Frances. Frances proved to be a good matron during Ora's absence. We're all glad to see Ora back. She was home because of the accidental death of her father. We all extend our sincerest sympathy to her in her bereavement. It's time for the mouse to take a peek somewhere else. The next place is the apartment where Wegner and Witte live. They're having a grand time doing their own cooking and housework. So far no one has suffered serious effects. Melba and Mary Ann have tried this mode of living and also find it quite successful. Our little investigator found the maze of streets quite a problem and lost its sense of direction. All of a sudden it found itself near Ruth Seehusen's home, where she and Anita Wichmann were writing poems dedicated to Bessie and-. In order to assure itself of a place of refuge for the night, the little busy body went back to the dorm to rest after so strenuous a pilgrimage. And for me too, it's time to say, "I'm leaving you." I hope I've made these notes interesting for all of you, for that was my aim. The famous III Normalite saying, "This is the last time," is very appropriate here. They usually say it with a long face and so do I. May Margaret Koehler have as much fun with the column as I did!


The

D.

MoO LoO CoO MessenQpr

27

..

Studentenwissenschaft! VISITING THE BOYS' ROOM The Boys' "Room" and its inmates, too, Is a drama worth to view When authorities come in Stopping all the fun and din. There is a Duin, who studies hard With Aufderheide-no retard Until they all their work have doneThen they too enjoy the fun. Schaller in the window sits, Eating nuts and throwing pits, Calmly looks to see how they Basketball so oddly play. "Freshies" haven't much to say; In one corner they must stay. Hempel, Wagner, Fischer, and Mueller do this all demand. Alvin Retzlaff, "Innocent," On some mischief's always bent. Seehusen and Heine hear How the plays come ringing clear. "Schwepp" and Becker too look on As the rest in unison Stage their play or fighting bout Loud enough to be heard without. Who do you suppose comes in Stopping all this fun and din? This is no one else but he Who is an authority. I don't think I'll name the cast; If I would, you'd be aghast. They, however, do behave Till some fun again they crave. "Doctor."


The D. M. L. C. Me ..... nller

LOCALS Although our football season closed early in November, the football spirit prevailed among the boys much longer. Every Saturday afternoon the radio room was filled with enthusiastic fans. The climax of the season came when Minnesota so mercilessly defeated both the Michigan and the Wisconsin elevens. While speaking of football, I wish to say that Edgar Wehausen was almost unanimously elected manager for next year. May success be yours, "Eddie"! . Vernon Gerlach spent a week's vacation at home. He, however, did not go home alone; he was accompanied by the mumps. This year Hallowe'en was spent in a rather quiet manner. The student body still is waiting for a party, such as was given by the faculty last year on Hallowe'en night. Winter has again arrived. It has brought with it work for ambitious young boys in the form of snow to be shoveled. Several of the boys were fortunate enough to go home during the pheasant hunting season and bring back samples of their noble efforts. Hurrah for Thanksgiving! Many boys spent the day at home; others, who do not live nearby, were satisfied to eat their Thanksgiving dinner in the college dining hall. On October 14, a number of students attended the dedication of the site where the New Ulm Public Library and Historical Museum is being constructed. We are all looking forward to the time when it will be ready for use. Quite a number of alumni made short visits here during the last two months. Fishing is not so good this year. Why? The aquariums are empty. One evening Hans Wagner received a large portion of the mail. He was rather disaonointed. He wonders why everybody thought of his birthday on the same day. If you' have trouble in forming suitable endings for your chapel hymns, ask Brockelman to show you a few of his own invention. Arnold Coppens has again organized a tumbling team. Come on boys and show your tricks!


The D. M. L. C. Me ....enller

29

FOOTBALL

I

As far as victories and scoring are concerned, the football season was not so successful as it might have been. Opponents crossed our goal line for a total of 89 points while the Maroon and Gray were able to collect but 17 points. More than half of the opponents' points, however, -52 to be exact-were made in one game. Comparing the team with others we have had in the past, we nevertheless must admit that this year's team was possibly the best one during the short history of football at our school. Last year's team was more successful in scoring and victories, but competition was not quite so keen. Of the lads who upheld the Maroon and Gray, tribute goes to the following in the form of letters: Habben, Duin, Schweppe, Lindemann, Austad, Raabe, W. Nolte, M. Horn, G. Horn, R. Wiechmann, Coppens, P. Fuerstenau, Rolloff,Swantz, Kuether, Mau, and Bradtke. It is interest-


The D. M. L. C. Me ....enger

30

ing to note that among these we have two "iron-men." Duin and, Habben saw action during every minute of playing time. Honors go to Lindemann and Schweppe as cocaptains. In addition toCoach Voecks, a new face appeared on our coaching staff. The line was especially benefited by the direction of Jack Meinhardt.

D. M. L. C. Loses Opener The season opened with the Maroon and Gray falling victims to the Waldorf eleven under the lights on September 27. During the first period no score was made. In the first few minutes of play the D. M. L. C. team was weakened considerably by the loss of Austad, who had to be removed because of an ankle injury. The D. M. L. C.. defense was unable to hold in the second and third quarters, when Waldorf made all of their points. At no time during the game did the D. M. L. C. offense function any too well, never threatening the Waldorf goal once. The outstanding feature of the game was the beautifully executed cutbacks on the part of the Waldorf team. Lineup:

D. M. L. C.

Waldorf

R.E.

Schweppe Habben M. Horn Bradtke Swantz Fuerstenau Coppens Duin Lindemann Raabe Austad

G. Anderson A. Anderson Norland , Fox Wernett Stevenson Severeid Olson Brown Feeney Everts

R.T. R.G.

C. L.G.

L.T. L.E. R.H. L.R.

Q.B. F.B.

Score by periods: Waldorf

D. M. L. C

,

0

12

6

0-18

O

0:

0:

O~ 0


31

St. Mary's Defeats. D. M. L. C. St. Mary's of Sleepy Eye has been D. M. L. C.'s oldest foe in football, our team having gone down to defeat before them in its first football game. In view of the decisive victory gained over them last year, the defeat suffered at their hands on Oct. 2 is a hard pill to swallow. St. Mary's defense in the first quarter' 'stubbornly refused to let D. M. L. C.'s first string cross their goal line although the ball was in scoring territory most of the time. During the second quarter the preps let St. Mary's catch them on an end play which resulted in the only score of the game. The rest of the game proved tobe a deadlock, neither team getting any breaks. Lineup: D. M. L. C. Schweppe Habben M. Horn Bradtke Swantz Rolloff Duin Lindemann Raabe Mau Score by periods: st. Mary's D. M. L. C

St. Mary's Longworth Hansen Peters Mauer Kestner Maxwell Rothmeier Forester Sellner Hittesdorf

R.E. R.T. R.G.

C. L.G. L.E. R.H. L.H.

Q.B. F.B.路 0 O

6

o

o o

0-6 0-0

Rochester Swamps D. M. L. C.

[.

On October 11 D. M. L. C. suffered its worst defeat in two years at the hands of the Rochester Medics before a large homecoming crowd. At the half the Medics had gained but two touchdowns and converted only once, making the score 13-0. During the last two quarters, however, they opened up, and not so much through sheer power, but by speedy reserve strength brought their total to 52. D. M. L. C., however, was not blanked. In the last quarter they advanced the ball to the Rochester 22 yard line, where Lindemann kicked a field goal. I


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

32

Lineup: Rochester

D. M. L. C.

North Tulare Von Kirk Spurgeon Lagerwald Weiberg Harron Fischer Smith Stussey Krebsback

R.E.

W~Nolte Habben M. Horn Bradtke Swantz Austad Coppens Duin Schweppe Raabe Lindemann

R.T. R.G.

C~ L.G. L.T.

L.E. R.H. L.H. Q.B. F.B.

Score by periods: Rochester

7

6

21

18-52

D. M. L. C

O

o

0

3- 3

D. M. L. C. Trips Saints On October 18 the Maroon -and Gray traveled to St. Peter to seek revenge of¡ losses in former years. They outwitted the jinx and spoiled the St. Peter High School's homecoming in the bargain by keeping on the long end of a 14-7 score. In the first quarter St. Peter tallied by virtue of a lateral pass after having advanced the ball to' the 5 yard line by rushing and passing. The rest of the game was decidedly in favor of the Hilltoppers. In the first quarter Rolloff had to be removed from the game with a bad ankle. Austad was pulled out of the line to replace him. With Austad plunging through the line and Lindemann consistently gaining around end, D. M. L. C. scored â&#x20AC;˘ in the second and third stanzas. Defensive work by the locals, especially during the second half, was also commendable. Lineup: St. Peter

D. M. L. C. Schweppe Habben Wiechmann Bradtke Swantz

R.E. R.T. R.G.

C.

L.G.

Johnson Kopp Olson Freeman Meagher


33

The D. M. L. C. Messelliler

Krohn Wettergren McMillan Davis Langsjoen McDonald

L.T. L.E. R.H. L.H. Q.B. F.B.

Austad Coppens Duin Rolloff Raabe Lindemann Score by periods: St. Peter

7

o

o

0- 7

D. M. L. C

O

7

7

0-14

Shattuck Noses Out D. M. L. C. The last game of the season on November 2 again spelled defeat, but the local boys put up just as good a showing as the visitors on a field frozen hard. The outcome of the game was decided by a break. In the waning minutes of the first quarter Shattuck recovered a fumble which gave them the ball within 6 yards of a touchdown. The second play of the second frame gave them their 6 points. During the remainder of the game the ball was between the two thirty yard lines, excepting towards the end of the game, when Shattuck showed its first real power. The Maroon .and Gray, however, staved off any more scoring by a goal line stand. Lineup: Shattuck

D.M.L.C. G.Horn Habben Wiechmann Bradtke Kuether Fuerstenau W. Nolte Duin Lindemann Raabe Austad

Shepard Bigelow Welsh Fredell Glaefke Nohl Vieregg Thomas Warren Ogden Rogstad

R.E. R.T. R.G. C. L.G. L.T. L.E. R.H. L.H. Q.B. F.B.

Score by periods: Shattuck

0

6

D. M. L. C

O

o

o o

0-6 0-0

<


34

The D. M. L. C. Me....enller

BASKETBALL The basketball season at D. M. L. C. is again under way. Class-games have already begun and since the II and III Normal classes joined, the teams are all well balanced. Even the "freshies" have a strong aggregation this year. The collegesquad has four lettermen returning and with the aid of some experiencednew material should develop into a fast, smooth-workingteam. However, the schedule is a difficult one and undoubtedly the fans will witness some close, exciting games. The schedule for this season is as follows: Dec. 5-Mankato CommercialCollege,here. Dec. I2-Shattuck, there. Dec. I6-Bethany, here. Jan. 10-Rochester, here. Jan. I8-Mankato CommercialCollege,there. Jan. 28-Shattuck, here. Feb. I-Concordia, there. Feb. 8-Concordia, here. Feb. I5-Waldorf, there. Feb. 2I-Bethany, there. Feb. 28-Bethel, there. March 7-Bethel, here.


The

D. M. L. C. Messenaer

She: "Sometimes I don't speak for hours at a time." He: "Thanks for those voids."-Ex. A judge's little daughter, who had attended her father's court for the first time, was very interested in the proceedings. After her return home, she told her mother, "Papa made a speech and several other men made speeches to twelve men who sat all together, and then these twelve men were put in a dark room to be developed."-Ex. Professor (in physiologyclass): to the liver?" Ruth Priesz: "The bacon."

"What comesnext

"In Russia children are brought up by the state." "Well, it would take an act of congress to do anything with mine."-Ex.

35


36

The D. M-.L. C. Messenller

Can YOtt Imagme? Gerlach guarding Kuether at a basketball game. Ruby without Eva. Hillcrest Hall without mice. The boys'. room quiet for more than ten minutes .. Olivia getting here before 3 minutes to 8. Schultz and Kraemer without pipes. Lux weighing 300 lbs. Omi without curlers. Schimmel's desk without a picture. Julius debating for three and a half hours on Nebraska. Sweeney not pestering somebody, The teacher had given the class a lesson on courtesy. The following day while examining the home lessons, his eyes lit up with pleasure when he found an all-correct paper. "Jones," he called to the pupil, "I am very pleased with you. All your answers are correct, but why have you put quotation marks to all of them?" "Out of courtesy to father, sir," came the reply. -Ex. "Ray, doesn't your conscience tell you when you've done wrong?" "Yes, but I'm mighty glad it doesn't tell Mom." How's Business? "Business is poor," said the beggar. Quoth the undertaker, "It's dead." "Falling off," said the riding school teacher, The druggist, "Oh, vial," he said. "It's all write with me," said the author. "Picking up," said the man on the dump. "My business is sound," said the bandsman, Said the athlete, "I'm kept on the jump." The bottler declared, "It is corking." "I make both ends meat," said the butcher. And the tailor replied, "If suits me."-Ex. . Homer: "Why are yon painting one side of your car red and the other blue?" , Reck: "It's a fine idea. You should hear the witnesses contradict one another."


37

The D. M. L. C. Me ....enller

"Mother," said Bessie after coming home from a walk, "I've seen a man who makes horses." "Are you sure?" asked her mother. "Yes," she replied. "He had a horse nearly finished when I saw him; he was just nailing on the back feet." Howie: "To what do you owe your extraordinary success as a house-to-house salesman?" Chris: "To the first five words I utter when a .woman opens the door-'Miss, is your mother in?' " Wantoch's definition of cupidity-It to do with a bow and arrow.

has something

Neighbor: "So your son got his B.A. and his M.A. ?" Dad: "Yes, but his P.A. still supports him." -Ex. Teacher: "Are there any more questions you would like to ask about whales?" Small Girl: "What has the Prince got to do with them ?"-Ex.

"Those poor boys next door have no mummy' or daddy or dear Aunt Emmy," said a mother to her little son. "Now wouldn't you like to give them somethingJust a little present?" "Yes, rather," he replied quickly. "Let's give them Aunt Emmy."-Ex. Ruby says that mistletoe is all right, but holly has its points. Mother: "Who is the brightest boy in your class, Tommy?" Tommy: "Bill Smith ! He pretends to be loony so that he won't have to study."-Ex.


38

Gurgel: lenge him?" Pewee:

The D. M. L. C. Messenger

"He called me a donkey!

Should I 'chal-

"You might, to prove it."

Guest: "Do you' make reduced rates at this hotel if one stays more than a week ?". . Porter" 'Deed, I don't know, Boss. Nobody has ever been able to stick it out here as long as a week." --Ex. Uncle: "I'll give you a penny if you stop your crying." Small Nephew: - "Yes, but I've cried a nickel's worth already."-Ex.


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Champion Shoe Shop A Pleased Customer Is Our Best Advertisement

We also have a good supply of new shoes. E. FREESE, Proprietor 24 So. Minn. St.

NEW ULM GREENHOUSES New VIm, Minn. - Phone 4!l


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Buy Rexall Merchandise SUPERIOR QUALITY AT LOWER PRICES

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CITIZENS STATE BANK New Ulm, Minnesota Under provisions of the Banking Act of 1933 Our Deposits Are Insured


UNION HOSPITAL NEW ULM, MINN. A modern, well-equipped, and fireproof hospital supervised by and staffed with registered nurses. PHONE No. 404

A. L. KUSSKE, M.D. Practice Limited to Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat and Fitting of Glasses In Weiser Block Over Silver Latch Cafe Minnesota NeW Ulm

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I


SCHLUMPBERGER'S Groceries-Fruits-

GROCERY

Vegetables-Smoked

Phone 182

Meats

New VIm, Minn.

WILLIAM J. VON BANK, D.D.S. Dentist路 Residence Phone

OfficePhone New Ulm, Minn.

237 TRY THE

797

BEE HIVE

FIRST

fAVORITES! J. A. OCHS & SON, Inc. New DIm, Minn. The Busiest Store in Town-There Must Be A Good Reason Why EVERYTHING FOR THE GO-Eb . . AT RIGHT PRICES

F. J. BACKER & CO. HARNESS DEALER Kwik-Pak Parcel Post Laundry Cases Trunks, Traveling Bags, Suit Cases. Purses and Other Leather Specialties

DR.E. G.LANG DENTIST Office above State Bank of New UIm OfIice Phone 472

Res. Phone 1172

THE GASTLER STUDIO For Quality Photographs Also Kodak Finishing


Buy to the Limit Save to the Limit If SavingsMean Anything at All to You, You'll Stock Up at Penney's

J. 路C. PENNEY CO.

Corner Minn. and 2nd North St.

Give Your Eyes a Chance It isn't right to toil under the handicap of defective eyesight, Poor eyes make backward students. They not only affect your work, but your nerves and health as well. We fit your eyes right, grind lenses in our own shop and replace broken lenset on short notice.

DRS. SCHLEUDER Optometrlsts and Eyesight Specialists

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Phone

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PHONE 104 Route and Gunter

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SOMSEN, DEMPSEY, JOHNSON and SOMSEN Henry N. Somsen Russell L. Johnson Attorneys

New Vlm,

W. H. Dempsey Henry N. Somsen, Jr. At Law

Minnesota


A. C. OCHS B,RICK & TILE COMPANY路 General Sales Office

~Executive Office and Plant Springfield, Minn.

906 Foshav Tower Minneapolis Manufacture

Artistic Face Brick Various Colors -

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Building Tile and Common Brick .Qur: Material stands every Test, and was used in hundreds of Government, State, Publi : and Private ~olJs in every state of the' great Northwest .and Canada. fome of them being-The last twelve new buildings pit the University 0: Minnesota Campus, numerous large business blocks and other buildings in the City of Minneapolis, su-h as the New Nicollet Hotel, Sheridan Apartments, Cleveland School, St. Mary's Hospital, Swed-ish Hospital, Calhoun Beach Club, etc., etc., two Lutheran churches of Springfield, Immanuel Lutheran Church of Mankato, Lutheran Churches in Brewster, Lake Benton, Blue Earth, Wanamingo, Westbrook, Wood Lake, Alden, St. Paul, Morgan, Odin, Ceylon, Clara City, Jackson, Delano; Devils Lake, Arnegard in No. Dakota; Dimock, Roscoe, Huron, etc., in So. Dakota, the Dr. Martin Luther College and the Union Hospital of New Ulm, the Lutheran School at Sleepy Eye, together with others built prior and since the above mentioned. Veterans buildings at St. Cloud, Minnesota and Rapid City, South Dakota, the new seven story First National Bank at Fargo, North Dakota, also large public and private buildings at Brookings, Watertown, Lennox, Lyons, Huron, South Dakota; Willmar, Hendricks, St. Paul, Marshall, Tracy, Rochester, Winona, Minnesota and many others all over tlie~ four States.

Our Products Are Sold in the New Ulm Territory by New DIm Brick & Tile Yards


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BREAD! Helps You Off to School With Needed Food Energy Y OUl' Bakel' Makes The Finest, EIBNER'S Eat

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1936


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- :-

CONTENTS

-: ..

LITERARY a)

2

Spring

__b). Herman Melville..................

3

c)

Our Greatest Tyrant-Convention

\

d)

Lucy Gayheart..

:.................9

LIBRARY COMMENTS

8 ,

ll

EDITORIALS a)

Education

b)

"A Man's a Man for A' That"

\

15 16

ALUMNI

18

EXCHANGE

19

COLLEGE NOTES

.

_

;

22

CO-ED NOTES

23

LOCALS

27

ATHLETICS

31

JOKES

39


The D. 1\'1.L. C. Messenger

2

SPRING Spring, And growing things, And life and love; Moss, And budding trees, And God above; Soft, gently-blowing breezes And grasses turning green, ,A. little bit of solitude, A little time to dreamOh !-these

are bits of Paradise

That God has not withdrawn, And any man can find them In an early April dawn. R. U. '3G


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

3

HERMAN MELVILLE Whenever the name of Herman Melville is mentioned, immediately Moby-Dick and the adjective vague force themselves into my consciousness. Indeed, it is not strange that the title of this book should appear, because it represents and portrays Melville. To me Melville and MobyDick are so closely fused together that I think of them as synonymous. But what should cause the adjective vague to rise together with the title of this author's book? Is it because my knowledge of Melville is so weak that my mind refuses to associate a better adjective with him? Or, perhaps, is my intellect true to me and attempting to tell me that, as far as it knows, vagueness is all that it can gather from the source material on Herman Melville? I do not mean to say that I could not gather any information on Melville. As far as his biography is concerned, there is, in addition to his biographies, a wealth of material to be gotten from his works; such as Redburn, Typee, Billy Budd, and Moby-D'ck, But in spite of this material there still exists that vagueness about Melville which does not disappear under the analytical eyes of literary critics. Herman Melville, together with several other noted men of literature and history, was born in 1819, during a .time known in America as the "era of good feeling." He was born into a household of moderate means. His father, Allen Melville, was a trader in French Goods. He was of Scottish descent and could trace his ancestry into the nobility of that country. In spite of the nobility found on the side of Melville's father, it was his mother, Maria Gansevoort, who gave to him a greater share of family distinction. She was a descendant of the Dutch merchants of whom Washington Irving writes in his Knickerbocker History of New York. These families, through landholding, had created for themselves quite a prestige. But Herman Melville was not always to enjoy the gifts of a moderate home and the prestige into which he had been born. In 1832 his father died and left his mother to care for and rear several children. As any normal boy, Melville had dreams of the future. He dreamed of going to college, of being an orator like Patrick Henry, of becoming a great traveller like his father and Uncle John, and of bringing honor and prestige to the name of Melville. This light toward which young Melville had been gazing was suddenly snuffed out. He began to grope around in life as if he had found himself in a dark,


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The D. 1\1. L. C. Messenger

gloomy, unknown cavern. All the natural ambition of youth had suddenly left him.

optimism and

In order to help support the family, his uncle, being a trustee of a bank, got him a position with the banking house. He did not remain long. The next year he was clerking in his brother's hat shop. Soon after that he was teaching in a school which, in those days, called for a goodly portion of brawn and muscle. When the school term ended, he visited the rest of the family, who now lived in a little village near Albany, N. Y. After the visit had worn off, he realized that he was another mouth to feed. What was he going to do? He had had several jobs, but none of these seemed to appeal to him. It might have been that at this time he recalled the happy hours he had spent before his father's death, when his parent had fired the children's imagination with his many travels and visits in England. This fact might have been a deciding point in Melville's choosing to go to England and visit those places which his father had so vividly described. After thirty days on board the ship in the forecastle instead of the stateroom, Melville soon forgot that he was a "Gansevoort, a pupil of the Albany Academy, a relative of a regent and a general, a reader of books, and a member of the Juvenile Total Abstinence Association and the AntiSmoking Society." Melville had' thought of traveling in the terms of a traveling gentleman, such as his father. It was for this reason that Melville felt the bottommost depths of despair in his young heart. After spending some time in London, he returned to America and taught school in Albany from 1837 to 1840. This is an obscure period of his life and little is known about it. Not until 1841, when he joined the crew of the whaler Acushnet, did Melville set out on another adventure which greatly influenced his life and writings. From this point Melville's biography can be taken from Typee, Omoo, White Jacket, and Moby-Dick. When Herman Melville shipped aboard the Acushnet, he was twenty-one years of age. The next three years were full of events and experiences which so engraved themselves on his memory that he consciously or subconsciously felt their influence in all of his later writings. Before proceeding, it would be well to pick out those things which influenced Melville's career and enlarge on the most important. The first event to influence Melville's life was the untimely death of his father. It was this event which


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5

first crushed the youthful, optimistic view of life within him, and left him as one writer puts it, "with as much ambition as an old man of sixty." In a few years followed the second large influence on his career. This consisted of the sea voyages which began aboard the Highlander and ended upon his release from the U. S. Frigate in Boston harbor in the year 1844. His experiences aboard the whalers, the Acushnet and the Australian ship, are the most important if one looks at them from the viewpoint of Moby-Dick as a story of whaling and the whale. There has been some debate whether Melville wanted Moby-Dick to be a mere story of the whale. Whether he did or not is not important at this time, but the fact remains that Moby-Dick is a very complete and exact story of the whale and the whale fisheries. His imprisonment on the cannibal island furnished the material for Typee and helped embellish many of his other works. In Moby-Dick the character of the savage harpooner, Queequeg, is no doubt drawn from his experiences and observations among the Typees. He not only describes Queequeg in minute details, but through the tongue and actions of the savage Melville tells us of cannibal life, customs, and philosophy. This could not have been done if Melville had not had his rich store of experience from which to draw this particular character. The latter part of his three years' adventure was spent in the service of the U. S. Navy aboard a frigate. These experiences found their way into a novel called White Jacket. This novel like most of the other works of Melville, carried, threads of his own biography. White Jacket derived its name from a white jacket which Melville had waterproofed at one time. This jacket later was the cause of one of his narrow escapes from death. This novel appeared in the year 1850, just before Moby-Dick. It showed many of the characteristics which appeared in the latter novel. At the age of thirty Melville was beginning to feel the full power of his writing ability. In White Jacket he handled all characters from the common sailor in the forecastle to the captain on the bridge with equal forcefulness and maturity of style.路 He knew not only how to express his character, but he also knew what he should express. He had worked, lived, and faced death with each of these characters on his three years' wanderings. Moby-Dick is considered Melville's greatest novel and contribution to American literature. In order that we can duly appreciate this man and fully understand his impor-


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The D. ]II. L. C. ]I'lessenger

tance in our literature, it is proper that we give some thought to his best known work. It seems strange that the novel which was at first most widely denounced should some sixty years later be most extensively praised and recognized as the work of a master. The natural question that might arise is this: "Why should this author's work remain obscure so long?" In answer to this question there are many things which should be considered and discussed, but offhand the following may be stated. The reading public, in general, 'is interested in a novel in which the story moves, and out of which they get the greatest enjoyment with the least effort. In Mobv-D'ck was found a narrative full of life and expression, but it had to be gleaned from the exact and faithful description which characterized Melville's writings. Naturally, those who were looking for a novel in mere story form were disappointed, and they, no doubt, led the cry which denounced Moby-Dick as a novel. Since its first renunciation by the public, Moby-Dick was not altogether cast into the ash heap. No, quite the opposite was true. The fact that Moby-Dick has withstood the test of time, and, in spite of its poor send-off, has, within the last few years, found itself among the greatest American novels, furnishes infallible proof that both itself and its author were of true literary greatness. It has been said that Moby-Dick can be read from several different angles and views. It can be read in the following ways: "1. As a study of the whale. 2. As a study of monomania. 3. As a study of the characters of all races. 4. As the chasing after a delusive fanthom. 5. As a fight between the spiritual and the carnal. As a study of the whale and the whaling industry, as found in its prime, Moby-Dick is in a class by itself. Faithful and copious description is some time classed as one of Melville's faults, but in this case I believe it could be considered a strong point. As a rule the average reader skims over description whenever he comes in contact with it. Moby-Dick is not written from the viewpoint of a mere novel, but as a treatise of the whale and the whalingindustry. It is for this reason that Melville is justified in using description. A person who reads Moby-Dick in this light expects faithful description so that he can more clearly understand the subject. Melville did not make it a dry, hair-splitting, scientific paper on the whale; neither did he describe the whale in general terms. What Melville did was the work of a master. He used enough scientific data


The fl. M. L. C. ~Iessenger

7

through which he would satisfy the scientific profession and embellished this data in such a way that the average reader did not lose interest in it. Melville was a true observer and he was only being true to himself and to his own observations when he interwove these observations into his narrative. His information of the whale is so exact and universally accepted that to this day other treatises on the same subject have not surpassed it. I am sure, if we think of Moby-Dick in this light, we shall not be so ready to condemn its author as mediocre. If Moby-Dick is read as a character study, it will be found to contain a host of material on this subject. The sea is the property of no one race, and, yet, it is the property of all races. This is one of the reasons why Melville found himself among cosmopolitan companions on his voyages. Melville portrayed all manner of character: from the pagan savage, Queequeg, to the pious Captain Bildad; from the likable Jack Chase in White Jacket to the hated Captain Ahab. Is it any wonder that some people interested in this subject realized the greatness of Melville? Some people have gone a little beyond the mere narrative or treatise and found in Moby-Dick a higher and nobler strain. They pictured the struggle between Captain Ahab and Moby-Dick as a "fight between the spiritual and the carnal nature of man," as a "parable of an eternal strife." The people who take this and similar views have very good and substantial reasons for doing so, but I am a little hesitant in following in their footsteps because such surmises leave too much leeway for a person's imagination. And to say that an author meant this or that in an allegorical sense smacks just a little bit of guess work. Melville, Hawthorne, and Cooper are placed together as America's greatest writers. There must be some reason besides the contents of Melville's work that made this possible. If an author has the richest material with which to work, but lacks the ability to tell this in an interesting and intelligent manner, he is "washed-up" as an author. Melville combined rich experiences and a good style to make Moby-Dick a lasting success. Of what did Melville's style consist? In general it consisted of "lucid easy narration, skillful portraiture, and faithful description" embellished with compound words, large metaphors, and Biblical allusions. Melville also had a knack of making the sound of his prose harmonize with the contents. He made use of onomatopoeia in prose as his contemporary, Poe, made use of it in poetry.


8

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Moby-Dick represents the height of Melville's literary powers. He combined his individual style together with a rich store of experience and produced a work of literature that was so far above the heads of the general public that it took sixty years for the same public to realize its contents and true literary value-A. C. '37.

OUR GREATEST TYRANT-CONVENTION I am-as most other people are-a conformist. I conform to rules of etiquette laid dawn at some time or other by some one of whom I have never heard. It must have been a woman who started the crazy idea. I lay my knife across my plate and get the handle smeared full of gravy instead of putting it in a place where it couldn't mingle with the food; I try to use the right fork 'Or spoon for the food for which it was intended although I can't see any reason for having two or three different kinds of forks and spoons; I am polite to the women-imagine that, polite to the women who are the cause of all these foolish rules of behavior. I conform to styles in clothes. My suit coat has a belted back; my overcoat has a belt that I can nearly wind around myself twice; my pajamas are a beautiful anricot color; my socks are unhampered by garters. And why? Because THEY are wearing the clothes in such styles; THEY don't wear garters any more; and THEY are observing such and such rules of etiquette. Some time-I think it is going to be in the very near future because I can't endure it any longer-I am going on a rule-breaking spree. I am going to start out some morning and see how many accepted rules of behavior I can transgress during the day. Maybe after that I will feel a little better, and I will be able to go along for awhile conforming to everything that other people do. But I am going to enjoy life for 'Oneday without being tied down by a lot of rules. If I had enough nerve I would continue after that day to be a non-conformist, but I'm afraid that I am not courageous enough. Probably everybody would shun me after that. I would be characterized as very illmannered and very uncouth. My friends would not seek my society any more. In short, I would not be a gentleman.


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

9

There is one question for which I am seeking an answer. What in the world is a gentleman? I have been under the impression that a gentleman was a man who had acquired a certain amount of education and polish, a man who could feel at ease in any kind of company. But J find that that isn't the case. A gentleman is one of these creatures who infest the parlors and drawing rooms. These bowing, fawning creatures who can flatter the vain women. They have a "line" that is a sort of sales talk, and the thing they are selling is themselves. They resort to this "line" to make themselves popular, but it soon fails if they use it too often in the same place. I don't wish to imply that a man should not show a certain amount of politeness to a woman. There are some customs which are many years old that should be observed; but most of the new rules are-to revert to slang-a lot of hooey. The really great men of the world are non-conformists. That is the thing which makes them great. Instead of thinking all the time of a lot of silly rules that govern dress and behavior, they spend their time on things that are really worth while. They don't, if invited to a dinner or a par sy, sit at home the night before reading a book on etiquette. Those things don't bother them at all. What do they care if they use the salad fork for their meat, or eat peas with a spoon, or make a noise when eating soup? Most people, when attending a dinner party, don't enjoy themselves because they are worrying about whether they are doing what the book of etiquette says they should do. I know that I have -never enjoyed a meal at a party, especially when I have had to sit next to a woman. "Don't stab your food. Don't cut more than one piece of meat at a time. Use your salad fork for your salad. Don't lean your knife against your plate; lay it across the plate." Those are a few of the things I've heard. At times I have felt like upsetting the table and shouting at the top of my voice. But I suppose I shall go on trying to do what THEY say is correct. I shall never get enough nerve to rebel against what society terms correct dress and behavior.

LUCY GAYHEART In her latest novel, Lucy Gayheart, Willa Cather has again gone back to the prairies of Nebraska for her characters. She does not depict the primitive life of pioneers


10

The D. ~I. IJ. C. Messenger

she showed in 0 Pioneers and My Antonia, but her main character, Lucy Gayheart, comes from the Platte country. Willa Cather is still a realist, but her story doesn't depress you; there's always a pleasant warm feeling. Lucy Gayheart is the younger daughter of a gracious, old watchmaker who spends most of his money to give Lucy the musical education she needs to develop her talents. Lucy goes to Chicago and studies under Prof. Auerbach, a kindly old music master. Through him she meets the great Clement Sebastian, a famous musician. She becomes his accompanist and then follows the happiest period of her life. Lucy falls in love with Sebastian, and even though she knows she can never marry him because of his estranged wife, she is content in knowing he loves her with heart and soul. She truly possesses a gay heart now. But tragedy enters when she hears' that during a storm on Lake Como, Sebastian is drowned while trying to save a friend. Lucy, stunned by grief, returns home. She gives her family absolutely no explanation, speaks to no one, visits no one. She lives among her memories, no longer a little gay heart, but broken in spirit. Naturally since the neighbors have no clues, they invent some; many are untrue, and Lucy finds little sympathy at home. Little'Lucy Gayheart finally meets the same fate as Sebastian-a watery grave. After her death Lucy's friends sing her praise, and wish they had been a bit kinder to her. In my opinion Willa Cather has drawn one of her sweetest, most human characters. She portrays the joys and agonies, hopes and fears this young woman must have gone through. Even though all ends in a tragedy you feel that Lucy was far happier that way. that ters and the and

Willa Cather has written the book in a simple style must touch the heart of all who read it. Her characare human, as the jealous Pauline, who always does says the wrong thing even though she may mean well, obnoxious, sneaky Mockford, the kindly old Auerbach, the typical "small-town big-shot," Harry Gordon.

All in all I find Lucy Gayheart one of the most enjoyable books I have ever read, a book which I can pick up at any time and read and reread and enjoy all over again. O. S. '36


The J). M. L. C. Messengt'r

11

L I路B RA RY COMMENTS If our kind readers permit, we shall attempt to bring to their notice a bit of information about the card catalog of our library. In devoting a part of the space granted to us by the editors of the Messenger to this subject, we hope to accomplish a two-fold purpose. To the students who have taken the library course, it might be a welcome form of review and aid them in retaining important points concerning the library catalog. For the wider circle of readers it may prove a helpful source of information tending to make the library to which they have access of greater benefit to them. To anyone who looks for material of some kind in a library, the card catalog is a valuable as well as an indispensable tool if its arrangement and purposes are clearly understood. It gives the reader and student a pleasant sensation of independence if he can step into a library anywhere and find what he wants through the aid of the catalog without having to go to the librarian's desk for help. The cards in the catalog are arranged like the words in a dictionary according to the first words on the top line of each card. Even to a casual observer it will soon become evident that not every card in the catalog stands for one book. It is true that occasionally a book in the stacks may be represented by only one card in the catalog. More often, however, there are two cards in the catalog for one book, sometimes three or four or five, and possibly as many as twenty. That explains the size of the card catalog. For every book in the library, therefore, there will be found at least one card in the catalog. Now the basic card for a book is called the Author Card, or the Main entry, or simply the Main card. On the top line of this card will be found the name of the author in inverted form, e.g., Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. If there is a set of cards for a book, this Author Card is the daddy of the set. It serves the librarian as the sample for preparing the rest of the cards in the set. The Author Card is the only card in the catalog of which both sides are made use. If. you will examine the back of an Author Card, you will find there


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~I. L. C. Messenger

certain symbols written with pen and ink by the librarian, such as t, s, anal, jt a, etc. These symbols are designated as tracings and tell the librarian at a glance, how many cards are in the catalog for this book outside of the Author Card and where he may find them. If a book should happen to disappear from the library or is destroyed for some reason, the librarian reads the tracings on the Author Card and knows at once where to find the cards representing this book, so that they can be removed and destroyed. Not all cards having the name of an author on the top line, however, are Author Cards. If the name is printed in red ink, it is a Biography Card, telling you that this book brings a biography of the person whose name appears on the top line. There will be found also for this book a real Author Card and that is the Main Entry Card for the book. The Author Card tells the searcher other things of interest. He may want an up-to-date book on a subject; this card shows the copyright date. The publisher is given, since you may wish to order the book yourself. The card also states how many pages the book contains, whether it has illustrations, bibliographies, maps, etc., since a reader may want to know one or the other of these facts before he goes to the stacks to look. for the book. If the book contains several stories, or dramas, or articles by the same or by several authors, you will find a convenient table of contents at the bottom of the Main Entry Card. From all this the reader can gather the importance of the Author Card and he will do well if he studies the various details on this type of card when he refers to the card catalog for some book he wishes to read. It is more proper to speak of this card as the Main Card, since in many cases the upper line often does not carry the name of an author. You may find there instead a pseudonym, or the name of a periodical, such as Scribner's Monthly, or the words, Brooklyn Daily Eagle Almanac. The Main Card for anonymous books and sacred writings obviously cannot carry the name of an author on the top line. The reader will understand, for example, why the man who wrote the following book would not advertise his name: German army from within, by a British officer who served in it. Main Cards for sacred books have such headings as: Bible, Koran, and anonymous classics have such headings as Beowulf, Arabian Nights, etc. Finally we also find books published by corporations and branches of the government. In such cases the name of the corporation or branch of government will take the place of the author's name on the top line and

:::


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

.:!

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again we have a card which should bear the name Main Card rather than Author Card. Here are sarnnles of such so-called corporate entries: Massachusetts. Auditor's office; United States. Geological survey; Conference on Scr'pture teaching in secondary school. In our next article we expect to treat of the Title Card. Since the title of a book also appears on the top line, our readers may wonder how one can tell a Title Card from a Main Card, which hasn't the name of an author on the top line. In other words, how will one know whether the heading Bible or Arabian Nigh's is that of a Main Card 'Or that of a Title Card? 'The answer is quite simple. Most library cards have a double red ruling on the left side, two parallel vertical lines. On every Main Card, and only on a Main Card, bhe printing on the top line begins at the first line or first indentation, while all other types of cards begin at the second vertical line. So you see it would be quite easy for you to go through the cards 'Ofa card catalog and pick out the Main Cards. So much for the library lesson. And now a request. There is a new periodical in circulation which bids fair to become a very worthwhile publication. In fact, we are convinced it has all the earmarks of such an one right now. We refer to the School Bulletin. Since this publication began its career at our institution, we feel that our library files should havâ&#x201A;Ź a complete set of the school bulletin. Unfortunately this happy thought came to us only recently and we are having trouble in acquiring some of the first numbers. Mr. Sitz has very kindly furnished us with all back numbers except 1 and 2 of volume I and 1 of volume two. Since our college paper reaches most of our Alumni, we herewith appeal to them to look through their files for the three numbers which are missing and kindly forward them to us if they are willing to part with them. We are ready also at this time to furnish the list of books bought with the gif;t of the Alumni amounting to $25.00, which was presented to the library last year: The Lake of Geneva, by Treves; The Lyric F'outh, by Hibbard; Henrik Ibsen, Plays and Problems, by Heller; The Gathering of the, Forces, by Whitman; History of the English People, 5v., by Green; Familiar Quotations, by Bartlett; Road to War, America 1914-1917, by Millis; While Rome Burns, by Woollcott ; What Happens in Hamlet, by Wilson; Creating the Modern American Novel, by Hatcher; Thesaurus, by Roget; Links between Shakespeare and the Law, by Barton; Cambridge Modern History, Vol. XII. Thank you, Alumni !-Adalbert Schaller, Librarian ..


The D. lU. L. C. Messenger

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The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. AIl business communications should be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends.

Entered as second class matter at Pest Officeof New DIm, Minnesota

Volume XXVI

No.3

March 1936

-: The Messenger Staff :Editor-in-Chief Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Typist Alumni. Exchange College Notes Co-ed Notes Locals Athletics Jokes

Milton Bradtke Arnold Coppens Robert Nolte Henry Krenz Henry Engelhardt Veleda Kelm Gertrude Limpert Myrtle Pagenkopf Margaret Koehler Winfried Stoekli Gerhard Rolloff Ruth Gehlhar


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EDITORIAL

EDUCATION "Why do I have to go to school 1" You may have at some time or other, asked this question and received the answer, "To receive an education." It may not have satisfied you, and yet it is a good answer. Education implies muchmore than we think. Fundamentally the aim of education is three-fold: intellectual, physical, and moral. People often have the mistaken idea that the aim of education is only intellectual. They are the ones who ask, "Why do I have to go to school 1" They argue "experience is the best teacher." Granted! But who wants to live like Thoreau and accept no secondhand knowledge whatsoever 1 On the other hand, what you learn in school is really only experience. Experiences of others have been collected and systematized for your benefit. Why not make use of them 1 Little need be said of physical education. No one has ever begrudged his school days because of his physical activities. Who is there that does not recognize the truth of the saying: "A sound mind in a sound body." The moral aim of education is really what is misunderstood by most people. In fact some modern educators themselves have an incorrect opinion. They maintain that the business of the school is to teach only facts. How pitiful! Most of our public enemies know facts, and yet we should not regard them as educated. Much of the political,


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The D. i\'L L. C. i\'lessenger

homemaking, vocational, and recreational side of life depends upon the moral education of the people. The three R's are still taught, but the most important function of the school is character building. It is true that the home and the church .must be and are the chief factors in character building, but it is the foremost error of the school to neglect it.

CIVIC,

"A MAN'S A MAN FOR A' THAT" Wherever we go, especially in larger gatherings, we generally find that the agriculturalists are looked upon as inferior and less important than the people from the city. This ought not be. Although they have no doctor's degree, although their etiquette is not of the latest fashion, although they use not the "absuhrd" and "rawther" of society, still they ought not to be degraded and disrespected. Without this group of people the professionals and society could not exist. The farm is the heart of our country, and you, and each and everyone of you, regardless of your rank, who despise. look down upon, or ridicule the farmer or the farm boy or girl, you are the ones responsible for the ruin of this country, because it is vou who turn the youth of our country toward the city, which, overcrowded, breeds all sorts of vices and pauperism. Instead of talking remedies on how to better conditions on the farm, you who look down upon the farm as inferior should respect those who produce in some form everything that you have and realize the importance of that group. Such disrespect begins already in the children. The farm children may not be so "smart" as the city boy or girl; nevertheless they are not to be disregarded or ma 'e the laughing stock of the other youngsters. Such children show not only ill-breeding by the parents, but also inconsideration of obstacles the farm child must meet. It is most pitiful to see the less fortunate children abused and chided by the bold, audacious. Why is it that statistics a short time ago showed a drift toward the city? The farm youth of our land felt out of date and inferior to the cities' young men and women. Who is at fault? Those and everyone of those young people who snubbed the rural people! Those and everyone of those who refused to recognize the rural people even on the streets, to say nothing of their gather-

t


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ings! Those and everyone of those who ridiculed the rural people because they were rural! It is most disgraceful and disgusting to see such things happen. It shows that the egoistic "intellectuals" are ignorant even of the common law of respect! Why should not the youth for their own pride's sake attempt to be recognized by the young people in their social gatherings? This led to the' cityward drift, the ruin of the farm, the ruin of the country. . The farmer cannot keep pace with the "white-collar" man. It is irnnossible. The farmer must do what some of the "refined" people call "filthy work." He must work day after day. He has no five-hour day with nineteen hours of leisure. recreation, or banquets, in which to read and learn the latest fashions and modes of society-which one of the half-dozen forks at a plate is to be used for conveying food and which of them are set for ornaments. He must work hard through the course of the year that you who consider him inferior might live and wear white collars! The farmer in the heat of summer and his brow's sweat must harvest the grain so that the population of our country has food, while many of the professionals lounge at bathing beaches and summer homes! Ldo not want to imply that professionals do not have to work and perhaps work hard at their tasks and do not deserve vacations; but that some of them consider themselves superior and more important is an outrage! It is most deplorable that at institutions where the future of our youth is cast and molded, the impression still prevails that he is a "hick kid" just because he was reared on a farm! He who grasps the opportunity of defaming the farm and boasting of his or her extensive travels, and of his or her popular and important ancestry, and who in some manner puts the farm boy or girl in the background as unimportant and of no use, is too narrow to understand the importance of agriculture! Such actually is the air about some of the student body and instructors also. This is most discouraging and disgusting, and those who are at fault ought to reflect and realize that such actions prove only their own ignorance and stupidity!-H. F. K. '39.


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Things seem to have been exceptionally quiet in the realms of alumni, and since the last time I wrote the only two places that proved to be centers of excitement were Jefferson, Wisconsin and Plainview, Minnesota. On December 25 Mr. and Mrs. Louis Zahn of Jefferson, Wisconsin, announced the engagement of their daughter, Hilda L. Zahn, ex '32, of Watertown, Wisconsin, to Prof. Heinrich J. Vogel of the Winnebago Lutheran Academy at Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. The wedding will take place in June. Congratulations! On December 27 the Lutheran church at Plainview, Minnesota, was the scene of a very pretty wedding in which the principals were Ruth Zabel ex '33 of Plainview and Emanuel Arndt '32 of North Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. Among the attendants were Molly Engel '30 of Saginaw, Michigan; Irene Kremmer ex '32 of Fond du Lac, and Frederick Manthey '32 of Rhinelander, Wisconsin. Meilahn Zahn, classmate of the groom, played the organ. Mr. Zahn also resides in Fond du Lac. Scarlet fever is really an awful thing to have but it has its advantages. At least, that is what Doris Sauer '35


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thinks. Quite a number of her pupils at Baraboo, Wisconsin. were so unfortunate as to acquire the disease, and consequently the school was closed, giving Doris a chance to come to New Ulm. According to all indications she thoroughly enjoyed being a student again. '",

-'"

Miss Gertrude Vogel '34 and Arthur Meier '33 of Sleepy Eye are the only alumni who braved the snowdrifts (and water puddles) to come to see us. We were sorry to hear of the sudden OMo Boerneke of West Salem, Wisconsin, Boerneke '12 and mother of Marcella H. Angeles, California and Thelma H. S. '33, To the bereaved family I wish to extend sympathy.

EXCHANGE

death of Mrs. wife of Otto S. '31 of Los of Milwaukee. my sincerest

NOTES

In the Bethany Scroll we are told that we Americans, because we do everything rapidly and without thought, have become the most slovenly people in the world in regard to speaking our own language. Yet the abuses of our language could well be enumerated, for the general errors are few. "How often we find ourselves growing careless of our speech only because we do not value correct speech enough to pay the price of continually applying our mind to our conversation. Make a study of words by reading good things. Give constant attention to your language. The result will be an enriched vocabulary which will help you to express your meaning with clearness, beauty, and accuracy even if our speech cannot win commendation for its perfection, at least we shall not be scoffed at for our scanty knowledge of the English language.


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It is a well-known fact that the greatest men in history have found time to devote to their God each day, in spite of their pressing affairs and duties. It was this "quiet time" spent with their Lord in prayer that was the greatest attribute to their success. An article in The Augsburg Echo emphasize's especially the fact that both Luther and Wesley grounded their activity on prayer. Shouldn't we also take this example into our lives? "We wonder sometimes why our poise of soul and mind is shattered before the day is over. We feel an absence of unity and purpose. Unresponsiveness, indifference, lack of genu':' ine enthusiasm appear. We become critical, hasty in our judgments, and irritated. May it not all be traced back to the absence of a 'quiet time?' Let us search our lives. It is impertinent for us to get through the day on our own strength."

I~

Since we have survived such a trying winter of mercurial despondency, it is not amiss to speak of the "mercurial temperament." From the Bethany Scroll"The small ups and downs in man or weather we readily forgive if they stay within comfortable range. But when the mercury bounces up to ninety or one hundred degrees we purse our lips and say 'There's no excuse for that!' The same holds for man. He's a congenial sort of a person if he holds his temper, but let him fly into a rage and we lose all respect for him. The Greeks considered moderation in all things the highest virtue, and of all self-control was most highly esteemed. The biting, blustering winds and snappy cold are very like a person when he feels icy in disdain or freezingly sarcastic, bitterly resentful." Such a temperament is anything but satisfactory, so perhaps it is best if we stay close to 70° F. avoiding the ups and downs as much as possible. As the spring days draw nearer, the philosophy of classroom windows as found in The Black and Red will come into play even more prominently than it has. But winter is no. exception to the rule, especially since we have experienced such blustering, drifty days. We see these same scenes about us every day as we walk about the campus, but dreamily to view them from the classroom window is a diversion most gratifying. "It seems that all objects, no matter how commonplace they may be, possess some irresistible charm when viewed through a window,

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especially if the observer's vantage point be a classroom." But "the window-gazer often becomes obsessed and overindulges; he forgets that the primary function of a window is that it transmit light, and aid in ventilation, not that it serve as an object of admiration and means of distraction continually. Yet it would be impracticable to entirely eliminate windows merely to remedy this abuse. In short, this mystic power which a classroom window seems to exert is really very simple. In his effort to escape the learned atmosphere of the classroom for a bit of mental relaxation, the student necessarily makes use of the window, to explore the landscape with his eye and allow his fatigued mind and penned up imagination to wander whither it listeth." But we should make an earnest attempt to hold that wandering mind from seeking too frequent and lengthy intermissions from duty.

Everyone of us has an inward determination to be successful; but the question is, how will we attain success? According to the Concordia Courier, "One secret of success and, concomitantly, of happiness, is steadiness .. '1'0 succeed, one must do the same type of high-grade work day in and day out. A worthy goal is not attained by working intensely for onâ&#x201A;Ź week and then easing off. Steadiness requires courage and perseverance-qualities that, in some part, are denied to no one. And if you cultivate these qualities, you can enjoy some measure of success throughout your school life."

Has it ever occurred to you that there is a world of difference between the processes of sitting down and sitting up? It isn't only that we sit down if we have been standing, and sit. up if we have been reclining. When we sit down, there seems to be a letting go. Our spine becomes as limp as a string, and away we slump! All attention and interest in classwork is sacrificed. On the contrary, when we sit up our back bone is put to action, and we straighten up in an attitude of attention. The, Augsburg Echo brings an encouraging result of sitting up. "The person who sits up instead of slumping will probably stand up without slouching, That person will look the world squarely in the face and carry his responsibility on shoulders that do not sag. Perhaps there will be room, also, for the load of another who has more to bear than he. Sit, up and smile!"


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0LLEGE:

Two more of our scheduled programs have been presented. The magic and sleight-of-hand performances of the Loring Camobell Company were so convincing that the volunteer from the audience was frightened off the stage. In the other program the Johnson Brothers told us many interesting facts about "our friends, the snakes." Marie Sweeney and Naomi Sauer were esnecially attracted by the snakes. for, contrary to all expectations, they seemed to find enjoyment in fondling the largest reptiles. We congratulate the girls! On March 30 Harry C. White will demonstrate sr.me of the wonders of science. This will be the last of our series 'of programs.

Clara, the Phi Delta Sigma literary society play bv G. L. Wind, was finally given on February 25 after having been postponed three times because of weather conditions. The transformation of Clara. the social secretary of the rich McDonaIds, from an educated spinster to a lovable debutante was exceptionally striking,

On January 13 Maurice Dumesnil, the French pianist, presented a concert. Dumesnil studied in France and gave us some interesting facts about the lives of some of the composers. Among the compositions he delivered were Polonaise by Chopin, The Fountain by Ravel, and The Hills of Anacapri by Debussy. The Donkeys, a humorous sketch by Grovlez, was. very entertaining.


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The college students certainly appreciated the fact that on the very cold Sundays of this winter the professors delivered meditations in the college auditorium. Thus, the students could attend services regularly in spite of the _30 zero weather. 0

The Concert Choir is working diligently on its Easter program and prospects are also favorable for a spring tour.

s CO-ED NOTES "This is Television Station C-O-E-D, broadcasting a program from Hillcrest Hall. Draw up your chairs close to your television set and you shall presently see what is taking place at the Girls' Dormitory." It is a quiet evening at the dorm; everyone is asleep, and whom do we see stalking along the halls but a figure dressed in red pajamas. Don't be alarmed folks; it must be either Bessie or Lizzie practicing somnambulism again. You don't know. what somnambulism is? Well, in plain English it's "sleep-walking." It must have been the result of one of those famous tea parties they had again in Room 8. And whom do we hear calling, "Ruby, Ruby!" but good old Eva. She's trying to protect her little "fuchsie" from falling down the stairs. â&#x20AC;˘ Oh, yes, talking about Eva, did you hear the latest? Eva forgot to-come to English class one morning, and after 10 minutes she finally came to the realization that she should be in English class. I wonder who detained her!


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And who is this walking around on crutches? It's Omi Birkholz, being ably assisted by her "side-kick" Ruth Priesz. Yes, folks, it's basketball which wrecked Omi's foot, not her heart! What's all the rushing around for? Don't you see,. everybody's packing suitcases, buying tickets, and getting ready to go home for Christmas vacation. Folks, excuse me please, but the next blank space will denote the Christmas vacation. Nothing happened around the dorm during this time, since no one was here, everyone: having gone home for her vacation. The next scene will be that of a cold Sunday afternoon soon after Christmas vacation. Several of the girls are reading and studying, while others are out tobogganing .. What, ho! It's Marion returning from the toboggan slide with an injured spine. Oh, for a few weeks' vacation such as she had-only not an injured spine. And is she ever surprised! It's her mother coming to stay with her for a few weeks so that she doesn't become homesick. And who is that Freshie running around outside? It must be "Snod" Birkholz, or rather Ern-Gret, either making mud pies or picking up nut shells ! Yes, folks, I'm not fooling; things like that happen around here at times. Next scene-semester exam "vacation"-C. C. Priesz: and Erna Kuehl are having a swell time at Raddatz's. I wonder whether they behaved like good "big" girls too, or whether they were as noisy as they usually are around the dorm. The next scene takes place in Chapel. "Say, Gert, what's this pocket doing back here? Oh, I put my sweater on backwards!" Such things happen to Gert Walther when she forgets about her work and has other things (or should I say a person!) occupying her mind .

.

Folks, you'll have to look closely if yOUwant to see the mailman in the next picture. He must be beneath all those packages and boxes he's carrying. You see, it's Valentine's Day, the day for candy hearts, etc. I won't tell you who received all those heart boxes, you'll have to see the girls about that. I guess practically everybody received a box or two on that day, either f'rom home or from????? Who's this happy girl in the next scene? It's only Florence Berg rejoicing over the week-end visit of her sister, LaVerne. I bet LaVerne enjoyed that visit, for just

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look at them rushing around from home to home, making calls. Next blank space-free day-Lincoln's Birthday, February 12. Everybody is taking time out to catch up on some sleep. Next scene-Girls' Dining Hall-What are those people over at the corner table talking and laughing about anyway? It's everything from to !! ("soup to nuts"!). And who's that brave girl walking up to the counter with two plates of cookies? It's only Hilma Albrecht, showing us what a big heart she has by giving all of 'those-cookies to the boys. I bet the boys would never think of doing a thing like that! And speaking of' big hearts-the' Board had a heart too, and gave us some new lamps for our study hall. Now we won't have to strain our eyes any more when we study our dictionaries! Talking about the subject of hearts, the next scene really deals with hearts-it's Valentine's Day at Redeker Hall and a party is in progress. All nine of the Redeker Gang are partaking of a splendid dinner consisting of three courses. First course is college soup, being served on a bed sheet. Of course, they need entertainment, and whom do we see supplying it but Myrt and Marge. The party is a roaring success, and everyone awaits with anxiety the opening of the Valentine box which was made by the decoration committee. Next Scene-clean-up at work .

committee, Gert and Cat hard

. We're still at Redeker Hall, so we'll show you a few more scenes which take place here. We see Frances walking around, looking like a lost sheep. You want to know the reason why? Ora's missing; she's at the hospital, having her tonsils removed. All of a sudden we see Frances' face brightening up again. Ora's back again, and we're glad' she has completely recovered. Next scene-10 :45-one of the Redeker Gang has stubbed her toe on the hall light. You may ask why she doesn't walk on the floor. Well, there's a new ruling at Redeker Hall which says that all feet must be off the floor by 10 :30; that's why they have resorted to flying down there.


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Now folks, I'll take you back to the rooms of Hillcrest Hall again. The next scene which will appear on your set will be one snapped in Room 9 around 11 :30 p. m. In. one bed we see Ern-Gret and Omi, sleeping peacefully. In the opposite bed we see Beata, alone in her bed tonight, Why? Bessie got the mumps today, and she had to. go up to. the: hospital. Is it lonesome up there, Bessie? Oh, no, it can't be any more, because today Adelaide got the mumps too .. I wonder how many more will get them around here before. vacation. Now I'll take you back to Second Floor again. Next room-Room 7. Are they ever having fun in here, because.. their "buck" is gone ! Yes, Dells is getting some teaching experience out at Mission, South Dakota. Don't worry ; that noise won't last long, Agnes and Florence; Dells will be back again in a week or so. I'm sorry, folks. but my time is up now and I'll have to sign off. Hope to see you next time; perhaps then I'll have some more interesting scenes to show you. So until next. time, this is Station C-O-E-D signing off. Toodle-loo."

GIRLS BASKETBALL STANDINGS Kelm_... . Albrecht Birkholz . Koehler. .. Pagenkopf Hinnenthalc..; .._._. ._

_.._

Won 9 8 7 ,6 _.__ _.._ _..3 _._ _._._ .. _ 1

HIGH POINTS Albrecht __ .._.._ _.._. .__ __ _ _.._ N ommensen_ _.__ _ _ _ Koehler _ _ _ _ Kuehl _ _ Birkholz .._ _ _ , _

Lost 2 4 4 5 8

10

_ 84 _.. __ ..80 -.-..-..61 _..57 _ ,51

Pct.

.81S, .666: .636: .545. .273 .091

points. points. points. points. points,

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LOCALS Arguments! You haven't heard anything if you missed those verbal controversies as to who shoveled the most snow during the past few weeks. However according to his own testimony. Neuman has out-distanced them all. At present Julius Wantoch is rather worried about the future-he has not yet arrived at a solution to the problem of what the "foxes" can now be set to do since all the snow has been shoveled. Any suggestions would be welcomed.

'"

As a result of the deep snow, mail service was temporarily suspended; however blockaded roads did not seem to interfere with "local" mail-for particulars see Rudolph Weyland. While speaking of snow, ambitious! Perhaps it does Habben, Horn, R. Wiechmann, night till twelve o'clock; but much they accomplished.

well, some fellows must be not sound credulous but and Wehausen shoveled one they refuse to divulge how

After Christmas vacation the Wiechmann Ford, "Lucy," arrived here safely to the great delight of "Ray" and "Hardy."


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The D. lVI. L. C. Messenger

Have you heard that the kitchen force intends to cut down the quality and "quantity of "sick meals"? Perhaps that will help some fellows stay well. Many of us are still wondering who talks the most_: "Kris" or Raabe. "Ray" Wiechmann entertained a number of his "pals" on his birthday, March 3; a sumptuous repast was enjoyed by all. "Ray" does not, however, approve of the use of boards as paddles. A reception was held one night a few weeks ago for Hoefer and Lux. The committee in charge was somewhat disappointed when they arrived unaccompanied. As a result their sleeping quarters were thrown into confusion. An announcement-Wiechmann and Engelhardt, Inc., are no longer dealers in "Old Country Liniment." Our hopes are high that soon some other firm will assume their task of supplying the dormitory with this necessity. Bade has been forced to give up his nature studies as he does not have his binoculars with him at present. "Charlie" says there are only 79 days left till school is out-for some reason he seems very eager to get home. Because his roommates were not sure of the specific: date of his birthday, Reinholdt Nolte suffered for several days instead of only one. Are you a dramatist? The III Normals would be willing to relieve you of several of your productions I'm sure .. Many of the boys are still unable to understand far away look so prevalent in Hoefer's eyes of late.

that

Several members of the senior class have not yet reached that age when one should assume the dignity of upper classmen-they even coaxed a stray dog to visit classes with them one day in January. Spaude, our amateur radio expert, insists that he had station LOKO, Germany, several times this winter on his crystal set. When Schultz is ill he demands warmth! Several of the fellows solicited blankets, quilts, and even mattresses throughout the dormitory to insure his rapid recovery.

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The box score: D. M. 'L. C.

fg ft pf

Schweppe Lindemann Backer Horn r¡T abben Wiechmann Raabe Austad Bradtke

1 2 3 1

0 0 3 0

1 1 0

4

2

O. 3

0

0

0

0 0 1 0 0

0 0

0 1

9

3 11

M. C. C.

fg ft pf

Steinmetz Meier Hackney Jarman Sullivan Johnson Murphy MacArthur Landkamer Hardyck Kirby

1 0

1

0

0

O'

3 2 0 0 1

1 0 0 0 0

2 2 1 1 1

0

0

2

1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

8 2 12 Luther Loses to Shattuck December 12 found D. M. L. C. dropping its first outside game to the Shattuck Military Academy team 29-16. Cur boys were decidedly off form and their poor passing and shooting accounted for the loss. Shattuck's forwards and center were constant threats and made use of all the breaks offered them. The box score: D. M. L. C. 2chweppe Lindemann Backer Horn Habben Paabe Wiechmann Bradtke

fg ft pf 1 2 0 0 1 2 0 0

1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0

1 0 2 2 1 0 1 0

Shattuck

fg ft pf

Betcher Macomber Nohl Vieregg Thomas

5 3 2 1 1

1 0 2 2 0

0 0 4 2 3

12 5 9

647 D. M. L. C. Wins First Conference Game The last game before the Christmas recess found the Maroon and Gray team in jubilant spirits and in this mood they trounced Bethany 36-23. The game was very rough, thirty-six fouls being called in all. Lindemann with 16 points was the highest scorer of the evening .

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The box score: fg ft D.M.L.C. Schweppe . 220 Lindemann . 4 8 Backer . 2 0 Horn . 1 1 Habben ; . o 0 Raabe . 113 Wiechmann . 000 Austad . 000 Bradtke .; . 121

pf 4 4

3 2

---.

Bethany Bolstad .. Ylvisaker Milne Meyer Madson Heitner Peterson Munson

fg fg pf 2 2 4 0 0

3 3

0 4

1 0 0 1 1

5 0 0 0 0

2 4 0 4 1

5 13 19

11 14 17

Luther Defeats Rochester Christmas vacation had no ill effects on the boys as far as basketball was concerned for on January 10, D. M. L. C. defeated the fast Rochester Junior College 30-22. This game was close and exciting throughout and it was only in the last few minutes that D. M. L. C. forged ahead. This was our second conference victory. Backer led the locals with 10 points. The box score: Rochester J. C. fg ft pf D. M. L. C. fg ft pf Paul 0 4 2 Raabe 0 0 1 Woodbury 2 0 4 Lindemann 3 3 2¡ Hosfield 2 1 3 Schweppe 1 0 0 Hargesheimer 0 0 2 Backer 4 2 4 Herron 1 1 4 Austad 1 0 3 Fisk 3 0 1 Horn 2 0 1 Stussy 0 0 2 Wiechmann 0 0 0 Smith 0 0 1 Bradtke 1 0 0 Lampland 0 0 0 Habben 0 1. 0 12 6 11

8 6 18

Mankato C. C. Avenges Previous Defeat Although the Christmas vacation had no ill effects on the players, yet the extremely cold weather in January and February seems to have had. The Maroon and Gray lost three successive games during this time. January found the M. C. C. team trouncing D. M. L. C. 45-19 at the Mankato Y. M. C. A. gymnasium. The Commercials were decidedly "on" and no arrangement was successful in stopping them.


â&#x20AC;˘ The

The box score: D.M.L. C. Lindemann . Backer . Schweppe .. Habben .. Horn .. Raabe . Wiechmann . Austad .. Bradtke ..

n,

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J\'[. L. C. Messenger

fg ft pf

210 020 1 0

0

013 003 101 130 1 0 0

o

1 1

M. C. C. Hackney Jarmen Sullivan Steinmetz Landkamer Pennington MacArth ur Meier Hardyck Kirby

fg 6 2 2 3 0 1 5 0 0

ft 2 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 0

pf 1 2 2 0 2 0 1 0 0

0 0 0

679

19 7 8 Shattuck Defeats D. M. L. C. Again Shattuck in a return game played January 29 on the D. M. L. C. floor, defeated the Hilltoppers again 32-24. Although the score was tied at the half 12-12, Luther only doubled its score in the next period whereas Shattuck added 20 points to take the game. Lindemann led the Collegians with 10 points. The box score: Shattuck fg ft pf D. M. L. C. fg ft pf Betcher 2 1 1 Lindemann 2 6 0 Eddy 5 0 1 Backer 2 1 2 Bixby 3 1 4 Schweppe 0 1 1 Thomas 1 0 4 Horn 2 0 2 Macomber 0 0 4 Austad 1 0 0 Hogeboom 2 0 0 Bradtke 0 0 1 Landes 1 0 0 Raabe 1 0 1 Olson 1 0 1 Cosgrove 0 0 0

887

15 2 15

Concordia Overwhelms Luther 65-33 February 1 was a fatal day in the history of the D. M. L. C. basketball team. On that day the Hilltoppers traveled to St. Paul to meet Concordia, the defending champions. The' "Comets" showed their scoring power and smooth team work by crushing D. M. L. C. with 29 field goals and 7. free throws. Mack and Petersen, star center and forward, led the scoring with 25 and 16 points respectively.


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The box score: D. M. L. C. fg Lindemann 4 Backer 2 Schweppe .: 2 Horn 1 Bradtke .. 0 Raabe 1 Kraemer 1 Austad 1 12

ft 4 1 0 1 1 1 1 0

pf 3 2 2 3 1 1 0 2

Concordia Petersen Schroeder Mack Buck Lieske Muske Hassamp Cuseman

9 14

fg ft pf 8 0 3 3

11 3 2 1 0 1

0

0

3 0 2 3 1 3 1 2 0 2 0 0

29 7 13

Hilltoppers Nose Out Sleepy Eye For two weeks the cold and snow had prevented the playing of any games. Therefore, when the opportunity came for a practice game wit h Sleepy Eye on February 18, the most was made of it. Sleepy Eye had an exceptionally strong team for a high school and offered stiff competition throughout the game. The score was tied 25-25 in 'the last minute and then Austad, with 15 seconds left to play. ended the scoring with a free throw. The Maroon and Gray team benefited materially with the addition of "Pop Eye'" Foss to the line-up. The box score: fg ft pf Sleepy Eye fg P pf Q. M. L. C. . ....................... 2 0 3 2 Beil ............ 1 4 Lindemann Hedenstad ............ 2 1 4 Backer .................. 1 0 4 Kuester ................ 1 4 2 Schweppe .............. 1 0 1 Youngman ............ 2 3 1 Horn ...................... 0 2 1 Theobald .............. 1 1 3 Foss ...................... 3 1 2 Snow ...................... 0 0 2 Raabe .................... 0 3 0 Barnes .................. 0 0 1 Wiechmann .......... 0 1 1 - - Austad .................. 1 3 2 8 9 16 Kraemer ................ 0 0 0 J

-

-

-

7 12 15 Luther Takes Third Conference Victory February 21 D. M. L. C. traveled to Mankato and in a slow stalling game defeated Bethany 19-10. Bethany with a zone defense allowed little chance for scoring and D. M. L. C. with a lead throughout the game was content to keep control of the ball.


37

The D. M. L. C. Messenger

The box score: D. M. L. C.

fg ft pf

Lindemann Backer Schweppe Horn Foss Habben Austad

2 2 0 0 2 0 0

2 1 3 0 0 1 0

0 3 3 2 0 0 0

6

7

8.

Bethany

fg ft pf

Thoen Bolstad Milne Madson Meyer Ylvisaker Peterson

0 1 1 0 1 0 0

0 0 0 0 4 0 0

1 3 4 0 1 0 1

3

4 10

D. M. L. C. Defeats Bethel The next Friday, February 28, the D. M. L. C. team made the trip to St. Paul and returned with a 32-27 victory over Bethel to their credit. Lindemann sinking baskets from all angles and positions scored 21 points to keep his team continuously in the lead. The box score: fg ft pf

D.M.L.C. Lindemann ............ Backer .................. Schweppe .............. Horn ...................... Foss ...................... Raabe .................... Austad .................. Habben ..................

5 3 1 d9 0 0 0 3 1 2 0 2 1 1 0 3 - - 12 8 17 8 0 0 2 1 0 1 0

fg ft pf

Bethel Peterson ................ Backlin .................. Richert .................. Wessman .............. Young Westman .............. Frans .................... Olson .................... •••••• 1•••••••••••••

0 1 5 0 5 0 0 0

0 1 0 2 2 1 0 2 2 3 1 2 0 0 0 0 - - 11 5 11

Luther Defeats Conference Champs March 1 the Maroon and Gray, by playing its best game of the season, handed Concordia its only defeat of the season 30-27. D. M. L. C. had a slight lead throughout most of the game. Concordia's high-scoring men were closely guarded and could get away for very few "set shots." Backer, playing his best game of the season, led the Hilltopper attack with 15 points. .


The'D.

38

M. L. C. Me.senger

The box score: fg ft pf

D. M. L. C. Lindemann .......... Backer .................. Schweppe .............. Horn ...................... Foss ...................... Raabe .................... Austad .................. Habben ..................

1 7 1 0 4 0 0 0

-

3 .1 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 2 -

13

fg ft pf

Concordia Petersen ................ ~chroeder ............ Mack .................... Buck ...................... Lieske .................. Pusemann ............ Mueller .................. Hassamp ..............

2 0 4 2 1 0 0 1

-

-

10

4 11

0 0 5 0 0 0 2 0

4

1 1 2 4 0 0 0

-

-

7 12

D. M. L. C. Drops Final Game D. M. L. C. had never defeated Bethel on the college floor and March 7 was not the day on which they were going to do it either. For a time there was a possibility of Luther coming out on top. The score was tied at the half 12-12, but in the second period, Bethel sank several long shots to take a comfortable lead. The box score: fg ft pf C. Lindemann .......... 2 3 3 Backer .................. 0 1 2 D.M.L.

1 3 2 0 1 0 2 0 - 5 10 14

0 Schweppe Horn ........,............. 1 Foss ...................... 1 Raabe .................... 1 Wiechmann .......... 0 Habben ................ 0 Bradtke ................. 0 Austad .................. 0 00 ••••••••

0:

••

0 2 2 0 2 0 0 0

Bethel

fg ft pf

Peterson ................ 1 Backlin .................. 0 Richert .................. 3 Young .................. 2 Wessman .............. 1 Westman .............. 0 Frans .................... 0 Wingblade ............ 0 Rendahl ................ 0 Olson .................... 1 8

2 1 0 4 1 0 2 ·2' 3 2 1 2 1 1

0

1

0 0 0 1 - 10 14


The

n,

M. L. C. ~Iessenger

39

Little Brother (speaking to his big brother just home from college): Say. did you have any geometry at college? Big Brother : Yes. Little Brother: Very much? Big Brother: Why, a whole bookful. Little Brother: Well then, how many angles are there in an angleworm ?-Ex.

Kelm (during a discussion of a practice lesson): How do you get the inferences? fish around until you get them? Professor: Oh, I don't know. All you have to do is bait the hook right.

There being so much snow this winter, traffic was and still is rather slow. In fact, it was so slow at times that some one remarked that an infant in the car ahead of them was teething on a hitchhiker's thumb.

Boarder: This egg is bad. Landlady: Well, what do you expect when you come down so late for breakfast ?-Ex.

"I hear you and your husband had some words." "He still has his. I didn't give him a chance to use them."


40

The

n, lU. L. C. Messenger

Answers on Fifth Grade Test Papers Rule for safety: "Don't run in front of a car until it is gone." A function of the skin: "Keeps the dirt from getting into the blood." Definition of a queen: "A king's husband." "George is just crazy about me." "Don't take too much credit to yourself. crazy before you ever met him."

He was

A lady school teacher was walking down the street when one of her pupils passed her without greeting her. She called after her, "Hello, Rosalie, don't you know me?" Rosalie turned and said, "Oh, I thought you were a lady!" A Scotchman returned to this country after ten years in his homeland to be greeted at the wharf by two men, so heavily bearded as to be unrecognizable. They said, "Hello, brother." He then realized they were his brothers and asked, "What happened to you while I was gone 7" "Well," they replied, "you took the razor along." How to Get on Relief "I don't suppose you don't know of nobody who don't want to hire nobody to do nothing, do you ?"-Ex. Father Said No More. "Jimmy, I wish you'd learn better table manners; you're a regular little pig at the table." Deep silence on Jimmy's part. So father, in order to impress him more, added, "I say, Jimmy, do you know what a pig is ?" "Yes, sir," replied Jimmy meekly; "it's a hog's little boy."-Ex. It's the little things that bother us-you mountain but not on a tack! !-Ex.

can sit on a


41

The D. M. L. C. Messenger

"We got a hen over to our place that laid an egg six inches long." "Oh, that's nothing; we can beat that over to our place." "How?" "With an egg-beater, of course."-Ex. "How much did you weigh?" "One hundred and twenty-five pounds." "But that was with your fur coat on, wasn't it?" "Oh, no; I took it off and held it on my arm."-Ex. Behrens: What became of that portable garage of yours? Stoekli: I tied my dog to it the other day and a cat came by. Professor:

Tell me all you know about the Mongolian

race. Hempel: game.

I wasn't

there.

I went

to the

baseball

Ern-Gret thinks that chicken thieves ought to be good basketball referees because they know all about fowls (fouls) . Howard Birkholz maintains-and is a bit "pestimistic.'

correctly so-that

he

On February 25 Bade said that spring was here because he had seen a caterpillar. Upon closer investigation it was found that the same was pushing a snow plow. Kris : Thanks for the cigarette. Raabe: Oh, don't mention it. Kris : I won't.


STUDENTS! BEFORE BUYING CONSULT ADVERTISING

Patronize

THE

SECTION

Our Advertisers

Without Them

THE tviESSENGER Cannot Exist

List of Advertisers. Saff'ert's Provision Market F. J.:Backer & Co. Eugene Koehler Barber Shop Dr. G. J. Hiebert Mr. Albert Flor The Bee Hive J. C. Penney Co. Drs. Schleuder Somsen, Dempsey , Johnson & Somsen Fink's Store New DIm Grocery. Simons Lumber Co. Farmers and Merchants State Bank Model Barber Shop Wicherski Shoe Store Salet's Department Store Crone Bros. Company Erickson and Graff National Tea Store Drs. Hammermeister and Saffert


State Bank of New Ulm Muesing Drug Store Eichten Shoe Store Herzog Publishing Company Kemske Paper Co. Weilandt and Stegemann New Ulm Greenhouse Rexall Drug Store Eagle Roller Mill Co. Eibner and Son Schlumpberger's Grocery Hummel Bros. Dr. A. L. Kusske Ulrich Electric Company Tauscheck and Green Buenger Furniture Company Citizens State Bank Dr. E. G. Lang Robert Fesenmaier, Inc. Silver Latch Inn Mr. T. O. Streissguth Retzlaff Motor Company Retzlaff Hardware Company New Ulm Dairy Henry Goede Studio Lang's Master Barber Shop Champion Shoe Shop New Ulm Steam Laundry Schroeder Bakery Dr. F. H. Dubbe Schuck's Tailor Shop Dr. Von Bank Gastler Studio Union Hospital E. C. Vogelpohl Aid Association for Lutherans A. C. Ochs Brick & Tile Yards August Schell Brewing Company The Hauenstein Company


SPAULDING ATHLETIC GOODS -at-

Robert Fesenmaier,

Inc.

Special discount given to students

CRONE BROS. CO. Always

Show The Latest Clothes

and

Best

Men's

Furnishings

Reasonable

Our

in Young

Prices

Attention

Everything of a banking nature entrusted to our care receives our best attention. We shall be glad to have a share of your business.

State Bank of New Ulm Member Federal

Deposit

Insurance

Fund

MUESING Drug Expert

Store Prescription

Service

ARTCRAFT PHOTO SERVICE We Have It!

Will Get It!

Or It Isn't Made!

Phones 52-34I


Buy Where

r ou See This Sign

YOU BUY BETTER BECAUSE WE BUY BETTER Our 500 Store Buying Power Makes Possible the Low Pr.ces on Our Quality Merchandise

F. H. RETZLAFF HARDWARE COMPANY

D,rs.Hammermeister 8 Saffert Physicians and Surgeons

MINNESOTA

NEW ULM,

QUALITY CLOTHING At

$17.50 to $35.00

TAUSCHECK 8 GREEN

Plymouth

RETZLAFF MOTOR COMPANY


A. C. OCHS BRICK & TILE COMPANY Executive Office and Plant Springfield, Minn.

General Sales Office

906 Foshay Tower Minneapolis Manufacture

Artistic Face Brick Various Colors -

Also-

Load Bearing Tile and complete line of

Building Tile and Common Brick Our Material stands every Test, and was used in hundreds of Government, State, Public and Private jobs in every state of the great Northwest and Canada. Some of them being-The last twelve new buildings on the University of Minnesota Campus, numerous large business blocks and other buildings in the City of Minneapolis, such as the New Nicollet Hotel, Sheridan Apartments, Cleveland School, St. Mary's Hospital, Swedish Hospital, Calhoun Beach Club, etc., etc., two Lutheran churches of Springfield, Immanuel Lutheran Church of Mankato, Lutheran Churches in Brewster, Lake Benton, Blue Earth, Wanamingo, Westbrook, Wood Lake, Alden, St. Paul, Morgan, Odin, Ceylon, Clara City, Jackson, Delano; Devils Lake, Arnegard in No. Dakota; Dimock, Roscoe, Huron, etc., in So. Dakota, the Dr. Martin Lutter College and the Union Hospital of New Ulm, the Lutheran School at Sleepy Eye, together with others built prior and since the above mentioned. Veterans buildings at St. Cloud, Minnesota and Rapid City, South Dakota, the new seven story First National Bank at Fargo, North Dakota, also large public and private buildings at Brookings, Watertown, Lennox, Lyons, Huron, South Dakota; Willmar, Hendricks, St. Paul, Marshall, Tracy, Rochester, Winona, Minnesota and many others all over the four States.

Our Products Are Sold in the New DIm Territory by New DIm Brick & Tile Yards


THE SCHROEDER BAKERY THE FLOWER OF NEW ULM JUST LIKE THE BREAD MOTHER MAKES

PHONE 232

AID ASSOCIATION FOR LUTHERANS APPLETON,

WISCONSIN

The largest legal reserve fraternal life insurance society for Lutherans in the United States and Canada, and operating strictly within the various Synods of the Synodical Conference.

33 YEARS' RECORD

1902 1912 1922 1932 1933 1934 July 1, 1935 Total Admitted

No. of Branches 33 234 942 2,128 2,187 .2,273

Insurance In Force $

760,000.00 7,404,500.00 26,258,018.00 125,864,133.00 131,328,055.00 144,758,113.00 15路2,016,926.00

2,314

$17,719,202.61

Assets

Total Benefits Paid to Certificate-holders ficiaries Since Organization

and Bene$14,274,276.04

ALEX O. BENZ, President Wrn. F. Keirn, First Vice President Albert Voecks, Secretary Wrn. H. Zuehlke, Treasurer


We Turn a House Into a Home

BUENGER FURNITURE Stores:

CO.

New Ulm, Sleepy Eye and Gibbon

SUCCESSFUL PLANNING Everything in co-operation and accommodation consistent with courteous and sane banking principles is added to "YOUR AOOOUNT" at this community financial institution.

CITIZENS STATE BANK New UIm, Minnesota Under provisions of the Banking Act of 1933 Our Deposits Are Insured


BREAD! Helps You Off to School With Needed Food Energy Your Bakel' Makes The Finest, Most Delicious, Wholesome Bread EIBNER'S BRE,ADIS GOOD Eat More Of

It

And Keep In Tip-Top Condition

EIBNER ~. SON BAKERY and ICE CREAM PHONE 128

Established 1883

ALBERT D. FLOR Attorney at Law New DIm, Minnesota

SALET'S DEPARTMENT STORE-NEW

ULM, MINN.

EVERYTHING TO WEAR FOR HIM OR HER WEAR SALET'S FAMOUS $1.98 FOOTWEAR

Highest Quality and of Course "YOU ALWAYS SAVE AT SALET'S"

SILVER LATCH INN "The Pride of New DIm" Fountain Service-Lunches-Meals Dining Room Service


- ---

------------------------------------------

SCHLUf~PBERGER'S GROCERY Groceries-Frui

~s- Vegetables-Smoked

Phone 182

Meats

New VIm, Minn.

WILLIAM J. VON BANK, D.D.S. Residence Phone

Office Phone

TRY THE

797

New VIm, Minn.

237

BEE HIVE

~

FIRST

..

vfAVORITES ! J. A. OCHS & SON, Inc. . The Busiest Store in Town-There EVERYTHING

FOR THE CO-ED

New DIm, Minn. Must Be A Good Reason Why . .

AT RIGHT PRICES

F. J. BACKER & CO. H.-\RN ESS D-EALER Kwik-Pak Parcel Post Laundry Cases Trunks, Traveling Bags, Suit Cases. Purses and Other Leather Specialties

DR.E. G.LANG DENTIST Office above State Bankof New Ulm Oflice Phone 472

Res. Phon~ 1172

THE GASTLER STUDIO For Quality Photographs Also Kodak Finishing


DANIEL WEBSTER FLOUR Produces

More and Better

Bread

THE BEST IS ALWAYS THE OHEAPEST

EAGLE ROLLER MILL CO. NEW ULM, MINNESOTA

PINK'S STORE Where the Newest Styles Are Shown First The Smartest

Wear

for Young and Old

At Prices You Expect

to Pay

The Store Where You Feel At Home DEER

BRAND

BEER

AUGUST SCHELL BREWING COMPANY NEW ULM,

MINNESOTA


WHEN IN NEED OF FOOTWEAR Be Sure and Call on Us

J.

We. carry a complete line of men's, ladies' and children's shoe. We appreciate your business. Our prices are always the lowest, Qualitconsidered

ATHLETIC SHOES OUR SPECIALTY TRY OUR REPAIR

DEPARTMENT

FOR GOOD WORK

P. J. EICHTEN SHOE STORE New VIm, Minnesota

THE NATIONAL TEA CO. FOOl) STORER GROCERS AND BAKERS New VIm, Minnesota

G. J. Hn~BERT, D~D5S. OfficeOver Rexall Drug Store Office Phone 247 Residence P:!-'ow-: 1E47

N'?w DIm, Minn.

Weilandt & Stegeman Contractors and Builders Correspondence Solicited "'/ork D,me in Anv Section of the Conununitv Plans and Specifications Furnished Estimates Cheerfully Given Office I 100 Center St. Phone

571

Auto Glass Replaced to Order

Champion Shoe Shop A Pleased Customer Is Our Best Advertisement

We also have a good supply of new shoes. E. FREESE, Proprietor 24 So. Minn. St.

NEW ULM GREENHOUSES New UIm, Minn. - Phone 45


HA UENSTEIN BEER and PALE DRY CARBONATED BEVERAGE SERVED AT ALL PLACES New' Ulm, Minnesota Telephone No. 1

Buy Rexall Merchandise SUPERIOR QUALITY AT LOWER PRICES

REXALL DRUG ST.ORE Walter Muesing-Walter

W. Hellmann

"SAVE WITH SAFETY" For Your Dry Cleaning, Laundry or Hat Work We assure you prompt and efficient service and invite you to visit our modern, up-to-date plant at 107-109 So. Minn. St.

NEW ULM STEAM LAUNDRY OTTO F. OSWALD

& SONS

Expert Dry Cleaners and Hatters Phone.No.5


Save to the Limit Buy to the Limit If Savings Mean Anything at All to You, You'll Stock Up at Penney's

JQ C. PENNEY CO. Corner Minn. and 2nd North St.

Give Your Eyes a Chance It isn't right to toil under the handicap of defective eyesight. Poor eyes make backward students. They not only affect your work, but your .nerves and health as well. We fit your eyes right, grind lenses in our own shop and replace broken lenses on short notice.

DRS. SCHLEUDER Optometrists and Eyesight Specialists 102 N. Minn. St. Phone

370

New Ulm

Telephone 87

For Printing and Supplies

Towels and Toilet Paper

KEMSKE PAPER CO. Mimeograph Stencils and Ink Filing Equipment and Office Supplies

NEW

ULM

DAIRY

THE HOME OF

Pure Dairy Products PASTEURIZED

ICE

MILK.

CREAM, BUTTER and

CREAM PHONE 104

Route and Cc unter Service

SOMSEN, DEMPSEY, JOHNSON and SOMSEN Russell

New Ulm,

Henry N. Somsen L. Johnson Attorneys

W. H. Dempsey Henry N. Sornsen, Jr. At Law

Minnesota


UNION HOSPITAL NEW ULM, MINN. A modern, well-equipped, and fireproof hospital supervised staffed with registered nurses.

by and

PHONE No. 404

A. L. KUSSKE, M.D. Practice Limited to Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat and Fitting of Glasses In Weiser Block Over Silver Latch Cafe New Ulm Minnesota

SUBSCRIBERS, ATTENTION! When You Change Your Address Be sure to notify the Business Manager The Messenger Is Never Forwarded By Your Local Postmaster


COMPLIMENTS

OF

T. O. STREISSGUTH Reconstruction, Installation, Additions, Blowers, Chimes, Harps

Modernizing, Maintaining, Tuning, Repairs, Service, Sales

Wicks Pipe Organs ERNEST C. VOGELPOHL ORGAN ARCHITECTS AND BUILDERS

New

405-409 North Broadway

Uim, Minn.

When in Need of Electrical Supplies and Radios . or Service call on

Ulrich Electric Company ELECTRICSERVICE AT ITS BEST BUY WITH SERVICE

Phone 148

HENRY GOEDE STUDiO We Make Photos STUDIO

That

170 North

Satisfy Broadway

Phone 315

Res. Phone 311 Waiting to Serve You Always a Good Barber At

LANG'S MASTER BARBER SHOP No Mug Shower

"Below Silver Latch Inn" We Use Bar-Soap Lather Machine ABSOLUTELY SANITARY Baths

No Brush Shoe Shines


Geo. D. Erickson

John W. Graff

ERICKSON & GRAFF Attorneys at Law New UIm, Minnesota

EUGENE KOEHLER BARBER SHOP Ha'r Cuts 30c Efficient Service and Courteous Treatment 20 N. Minn. St.

New Ulm

AMERICA'S FINEST SUIT VALUES See the Beautiful Patterns on Display in our Window. Come in and Feel the Luxurious "Meaty" fabrics $15.00 - $17.50 - $21.50 - $25.00 The Biggest Money's Worth You Ever Saw

HUMMEL BROTHERS 14 No. Minn. St.

New Ulm, Minn.

BANK WITH

FARMERS ~ MERCHANTS STATE BANK New Ulm, Minnesota

FRIENDLY HELPFUL SERVICE AT YOUR COMMAND TAILORED TO MEASURE SUITS

$22.50 No Deposits-No

$25.00and up

C. O. D.'s

All kinds of Repairing

CLEANING AND PRESSING

SCHUCK

TAILORS

215 N. Minn St.

Phone 498

Residence Phone 150

Office Phone 260

DR. F. H. DUBBE PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON NEW ULM,

MINNESOTA


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NEW ULM GROCERY CO. Wholesale Grocers Distributors STOKLEY'S

CANNED VEGETABLES

LIBBY'S CANNED

FRUITS

Service and Satisfaction at the

MODEL BARBER SHOP Alfred H. Kuester, Prop.

Footwear Athletic Footwear and Sox Ladies' Smart Styles Attractively Priced

EMIL WICHERSKI For Greater Values and Service See Us

COAL Lumber-Millwork Cement-Sewer

Pipe

and all other Builders Supplies

HENRY

SIMONS LUMBER CO. DEPENDABILITY


"

t,


A

.

irhe

ll.•.~.er. lIe$$en er

COMMENCEMENT NUMBER ~l\I[

VolumeXXVI

I

JUNE 1936

NumherIV


Better Meats

Cleaner Meats Quicker Service

CITY MEAT MARKET Hugo M. Schnobrich-Oscar A. Schnobrich Proprietors New DIm, Minnesota

'"

Delicious Home Made Sausages


: CONTENTS: CLASS OF 1936

2

CLASS HISTORY CLASS WILL

: :

TERTIA CLASS WILL LITERARY

11 13 ,15

a)

Edgar Allen Poe

16

b)

Music of Modern Ages

22

LIBRARY COMMENTS EDITORIALS

24

a)

Commencement

28

b)

She Said That He Said.,

29

c)

Satisfaction

30

ALUMNI

32

EXCHANGE

33

COLLE,GE NOTES

36

CO-ED NOTES ,

40

LOCALS

42

ATHLETICS JOKES

:

46 51


CLASS

OF 1936

Class "Motto:

Be Thou Faithful

Class Colors:

Yellow and White

Class Flower:

Unto Death

Tea Rose

CLASS OFFICERS

President

Vice President

.Iulius

Wantoch

Florence

Witte

I

.11. Secretary-'freasurer

Margaret

Wegner


ELIZABETH

BERG

Bangor, Wisconsin Gi1'18'Glee Clnb, 2; Concert Choir, 3; Phi Gamma Rho, 4,

ALBERT

F, BHOCKELMAN

Yakima, Washington Concert Choir, 2; Large Chorus, 4; Phi Gamma Rho, 4; Football, 1L; Athletic Board, 2; Secretary,

â&#x20AC;˘


FRANCES MEYER Watertown, South Dakota Lm'ge

cu«, 4; Phi

Gamma

tu«. 4.

BEATA MOLDENHAUER Iron Ridge, Wisconsin PM Gamm.a tu», 3; Concert ois«, 3 .. M» .•senae» Staff. S; Athletic Board, SL: Glee Club.


WALDEMAR

NOLTE

Claremont" Minnesota NJa1'Zut SingM"s, 4; Football, 2L; Concert Choir, 4; Phi Gamma Rho, 4: Meesenoe» Staff, 2%.

,

ADELE

NOMMENSEN

Columbus, Wisconsin Concert Choir, 3; Messenger Staff, 1.: Athletic Board, 3; Glee ctos,».


ERWIN

A, PRETZER

Sagina.w, Mlchigan Phi Delta S'igma, 3; Lm'ge Ohoil', 3; A thleti,c Board, 2; Baseball,

RUTH J, SEEHUSEN New Ulm, Minnesota Phi Delta S,jgma, 4; Laroe 1L.

Choir,

6; Athletics

.1


OLIV A STINDT New DIm, Minnesota Phi Delta S'igma, 4; Concert Choir.. 6; Glee Club, 4.

AGNES South

STREGE

Shore, South Dakota

Phi Delta Sigma, 4; Concert Choir, 2.: Glee Club, 1.

,


RUTH

UHLIG

Backus, Minnesota Phi Delta Si,qm,a, .'J; Concert ousÂŤ. .'J: Glee Club, 2; Me,Yseng()1"Staff, 2.Athletic Boord, 1.

JULIUS

WANTOCH

Stanton, Nebraska Phi Delta Sigma, 4; President, 1; Studen; Body President ; Otoee Pre.9ident, 2,' Concert Choir, .'J; M a'/'Zut SingM's, 1; MessengM' Staff, 2; Football Mana,qer, 2; V'aledictoriam,

t,


'.

".

l MARGARET WEGNER Van Dyne, Wisconsin Phi Delta Sigma, 3; Concert Choir, 3: Glee Club, 2; Class SecretaruT'reusurer, .2.

RUDOLPH WEYLAND Larsen, Wisconsin Concert cioÂŤ, Phi Gammo Mo.rlsu. SingerR.

Rho:


FLORENCE Hutchimon,

WITTE Minnesota

Phi Gamma Rho, 4; Cone=rt 011.0"1". 2; ou芦 cio禄, 1; Class Vice P?路esidon t, 2.

ORA WOLLENBURG Pickett, Wisconsln 1;;

Concert Ohair, 4; Phi Delta Si.gma, Gi?路ls' Glee ouu, 1.

..


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

11

CLASS HISTORY A Synopsis of a Modern Realistic Drama The entire drama takes place in an educational institution where a group of young people are striving to overcome the obstacles which will prevent them from becoming ministers and teachers. Act I. Scene: Classrooms of a college. Time: September 1929-June 1930. Characters: Forty Freshmen and assorted professors. As the curtain rises, Prof. Levorson is giving to the "Forty Freshmen" a program which elicits gasps from several. As the action progresses in the following scenes, we see them successfully overcoming obstacles through the guidance of the previously mentioned professor. Act II. Time: September 1930-June 1931. Characters: Thirty of the "Forty Freshmen" and three new members. All are now classed as Sophomores. The action is much the same as in the first act. The climax of this act comes on May 16, when the atmosphere of study is momentarily eased by an important picnic at which, however, nothing worse happens than the breaking of a truck window by a pair of feminine heels.

J

Act III. Time: One year later. Characters: Thirty Juniors. This act is chiefly exposition. Its otherwise ordinary progress is relieved by a party at which potato chips furnish some very interesting comedy. Act IV. In this act the list of characters is important. The Senior graduating class was composed of: Adeline Bode, Thelma Boerneke, Albert Brockelman, Elizabeth Berg, Arnold Coppens, Myrtle Dahms, Henry Ellwein, William Grenz, Edgar Guenther, Karl Gurgel, Alice Hantelmann, Gretchen Kelpe, Ruth Larson, Frances Meyer, Waldemar Nolte, Esther Paape, Ruth Seehusen, Armin Schuetze, Oliva Stindt, Agnes Strege, Harold Riess, Erwin Ulrich, Julius Wantoch, Victor Weyland, Florence Witte, Ora Wollenberg.

I


12

The

n,

M. L. C. Messenger

The climax of the act takes place at a picnic for the future ministers at which everyone weeps copiously. The reason fbr this is soon made evident for on June 16, the future ministers, William Grenz, Edgar Guenther, Karl Gurgel, Henry Ellwein, Armin Schuetze and Victor Weyland leave the school forever. Act V. In this act the cause for the tears in the previous act is clearly seen, for only thirteen of the old students appear, while three new ones, Adele Nommensen, Erwin Pretzer, and Margaret Wegner, vainly endeavor to take the place of the other thirteen. This act contains some striking pageantry in the last few scenes which portray the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the institution. This act also brings the f.ounding of the Nut Club by five members of the class. Act VI. The class reassembles, and this act rivals the next in gayety. It is the lightest of the seven acts. It covers a picnic for the III Normals, decorating and serving for their banquet, choir trips, and garland and arches on the stage for commencement. Act VII. Time: September 1935-June 12, 1'936. The plot thickens; Rudolph Weyland enters the class. The Nut Club has become an institution. Witte and Wegner have decided to try light-housekeeping. Nevertheless, the class is still of one mind. They elect Julius Wantoch president, and he fills not only this office capably, but also that of student-body president and valedictorian. The first group of scenes ends with the III Normals giving a lusty cheer because they have successfully overcome the obstacles put in their path by semester exams. In the last group of scenes they are guests at various dinners in their honor. Most of them are fortunate in being members of the small choir which goes on a tour. The last scene shows a stage decorated in yellow and white, with a motto, "Be thou faithful unto death," susponded before a large pipe organ. On a piano stands a vase of tea roses. As the class passes before Professor Schweppe to receive diplomas, the names are read: Elizabeth Berg, Albert-Brockelman, Frances Meyer, Beata Moldenhauer, Waldemar Nolte, Adele Nommensen, Erwin Pretzer, Ruth Seehusen, Oliva Stindt, Agnes Strege, Ruth Uhlig, Julius Wantoch, Margaret Wegner, Rudolph Weyland, Florence Witte, Ora Wollenberg.


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WILL OF THE III NORMAL CLASS OF 1936 I, Elizabeth Anne Berg, do hereby will and bequeath my ability to keep the III Normal girls quiet and orderly in the dormitory to Florence Raddatz; my duties as Chief Recorder of important events to Marie Sweeney; my technique for rehearsing conducting lessons to Erna M. Kuehl. \"

I, Albert Brockelman, do hereby bequeath by "Last Appeal" for the West to the unconverted of the East: May their Fords wind a weary path to Yakima. I, Frances Sophia Meyer, do hereby will and bequeath my Stahl's Kirchenmusik to the College Library to be used as reference material for future III Normal Classes. Additional notes may be had at request; my voice of experience to Lux; the privilege of writing my final exams to the next one who gets a call to South Dakota. I, Beata Naomi Moldenhauer, do hereby will and bequeath my care of Snod to Bessie, with that, plus Daisy, her III Normal year should be a busy one; my empty candy boxes to Ruth Gehlhar to keep her notes in; so that Professor Bliefernicht doesn't miss me too much, I donate my arguments with him to Ruby Holzhueter. I, Waldemar Nolte, do hereby bequeath my sleepy eyes to the starlit nights I spent in communion with the bird kingdom and my organ abilities to the next class in organic chemistry. May the telephone wires burst forth in songs of love. I, Adele Esther Nommensen. do hereby will and bequeath my room to Agnes Timm. May she put up more pictures in it than I have, if that is possible. My excuse of a bathrobe to Hazel; my knack of holding pitch to Gertrude Limpert.

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I, Erwin A. Pretzer, do hereby bequeath my workmanship of hitting a foul ball through the middle pane on the top half of the extreme east window of the southernmost classroom on the first floor to future D. M. L. C. sluggers. I, queath the III picnic. dramas

Ruth Johanna Seehusen, do hereby will and beto my sister Arlene my job of bringing up lunch for Normal class and furnishing dill pickles for every To Carl Mittelsteadt I leave my ability to read and give English speeches.

I, Oliva Adelheid Stindt, do hereby will and bequeath to Helen Jane Mueller the full-moon-date of each month.


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To future III Normal classes I leave my yellow and white dress which has caused so much controversy. To Winfried Stoekli I leave my duty as chauffeur of the Nut Club. I, Agnes Helen Strege, do leave to Henry Krenz my position as chief custodian of Mrs. Steinberg's "Blums ;" my colds, growing pains, quinsy, tonsillectomy, and bronchitis to Esther Paape, I, Ruth Louise Uhlig, do give and bequeath to Henry Engelhardt my position as defender of the German course. May he defend it as vociferously as I did; to Gerhard Rolloff I will my a.biHty to play baseball and to all future treasurers my ability to balance books even when dues do not come in. I, Julius Wantoch, do hereby bequeath my executive abilities to the "Rose of the Heather" and my ability for finding amiable companions to that "Lonesome Pine." May its needles sprout forth in eternal spring. I, Margaret Esther Wegner, do leave to Florence Raddatz my share of the Witte-Wegner apartment; my ability to get "by with it" to Florence Berg, and my ability to open molasses cans to Arthur Krueger. . I, Rudolf Weyland, hereby bequeath my love to any one who can take it (appended as a premium, a super surplus of avoirdupois). My meticulous manners and heartrending phraseology I duly will to him whose pyrogenous . amorosity will derive most benefit therefrom. I, Florence Marie Witte, do bequeath unto Evelyn Hunt my high soprano voice, my extreme interest in German literature to Marion Lewerenz, and my extra names, such as Esther and Frances, to the next occupant of my seat in Prof. Schweppe's classroom. I, Ora Ann Wollenburg, as secretary of our Triple Alliance, do hereby give and bequeath our charter to Stoekli, Bradtke, and Behrens and may they also live happily ever after; my success as matron to the next matron of Redeker Hall; my extreme interest in athletics to Hilma Albrecht. We, as the class of 1936, do leave to the next III Nor. mal class our undivided mind, our ominous silence in the library, our extreme dignity, and our good example in all things. Witnesses: 'l'he New Baseball Trophy The New Furniture in Hillcrest Hall The Next Eclipse of the Moon.


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TERTIA CLASS WILL We, the members of the Tertia Class of 1936, our thirst having been quenched by water and milk, do in general leave our accurate translations of famous and beloved authors to the next unfortunate class with sincere wishes that they "slip by" successfully as often as we did. And in particular: I, Edgar Duin, bequeath my vast knowledge of Latin to Professor Voecks, from whom I originally received it. May he especially enjoy Vergil as much as I did. I, Albrecht Habben, do hereby bequeath to Brainerd Otto my beloved Milton and his flowery speeches. My shattered crushable hat I leave to Marie Sweeney. May sl:e use it for a nobler cause than I have. To Professor Voecks I bequeath my love for flowers. May he see the beauty in dandelions as I have. I, Marcus Horn, the strain of recent years weighing heavily upon me, do consign to Adelaide Nolte my Stetson hat, hoping that it may some day find as noble a resting place as it has had heretofore. My professional knowledge of the universe I leave to Arthur Bade. May he with this and the aid of his powerful binoculars discover the longsought heavenly body called "Sun." To Karl Mittelsteadt I leave my ability to remain awake at least after classes are over. I, Lloyd Uecker, hereby bequeath to Julius Ingebritson my ability of doing conscientious studying, and to Arnold Lueker I give my love for reading and translating Latin poetry. I, Ray Gabrilowitch Wiechmann, do hereby will and bequeath to Hazel Steinberg my new (?) toothbrush. My position as College Barber I leave to little Vernon Gerlach. May he reach his goal without too many steps. In conclusion we wish to seal this will with a can of "kniep."

Witnesses : "The Wind" by the Girls' Glee Club Kuether's Toothpick "Doc" Krenz's Corncob.

.z


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EDGAR ALLAN POE Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) was probably the most pitiful figure in literature. He certainly was the strangest, and most peculiar person in American literature. Poe possessed a dual personality-sternness and kindness. Those two. characteristics appear repeatedly in his works. Now let us examine Poe's life more closely and see why and how his career was so pitiful. Edgar Poe was born of parents who were actors. At the age of three he was left an orphan. Already as a child he had an inferiority complex; he became morose and disliked associations with people. However, soon John Allan, a wealthyrelative, adopted Edgar and promised to care for him. Under Allan's care Poe grew to manhood. But to what kind of manhood? Already as a youth he had acquired the taste for liquor. Some time later he was sent to attend a school in Europe. Here he wasted his time and very much of his guardian's money. Upon his return to America, he attended the University of Virginia. Here he contracted large gambling debts which John Allan was finally forced to pay. After a short stay at West Point, Poe severed all connections with Allan. From the time of that separation to his death, Poe lived entirely by his pen. The first recognition he received was by winning a contest sponsored by' a well-known newspaper. His winning effort was entitled A Manuscript Found in a Bottle. The theme for that selection he obtained by reading Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. He then accepted a position as editor of the G'outhern Literary Messenger. At this post he was very successful. But the time he had


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spent at Allan's home and also at school had really "spoiled" him. Poe drank, never excessively; but, since he was never physically well, the liquor affected him severely. Drink eventually lost him all his favorable positions. Then he had to resort to traveling up and down the Atlantic sea board. He always wrote whatever he could, but these attempts never brought him much money. While he was in such financial straits, he' married his thirteen-year old cousin, Virginia Clemm. Because of improper medical care, she soon died of tuberculosis. This was one of Poe) most bitter experiences. Her death was also used as the theme for Annabel Lee, one of Poe's best poems. After that harrowing period, followed his frantic years. He was occasionally insane; this prompted some of his friends to name him "Mad Edgar." Now he again began his wanderings. Finally he also became a dope fiend. On election day in 1849, he was found unconscious in the street. Whether he, was over-drugged or whether he over-drank has never been ascertained. Poe was not a member of any literary group; he may be called the loneliest figure in literature. It was always for him to battle against many inherited and acquired weaknesses. Usually he was victorious in those attempts. Poe was distinguished as a writer of criticism, short stories and poems. His attempts at criticizing, though often harsh, were serviceable' in establishing standards. His short stories were noted for their emotional effect. They never contained an abundance of characters or incidents. His poems were always short and highly musical. The material he drew from unhuman ideas and imaginations. But now let us examine more closely Poe as a critic. Our knowledge of Poe must not rest upon his fame or personality. For a better understanding we must observe his works. Although Poe's literary output was not great, it was varied. In a thorough discussion of Poe, his criticisms should come first, for it was through them that he received a national reputation. In these criticisms he exposes the principles of literature to which he adhered in the production of all his works. His criticisms are more than an introduction to his works ; they have also a great historical value in American literature. They serve as witnesses to Cooper, Bryant, and Irving, and they clearly show the greatness of Lowell, Hawthorne, and Emerson. But it was Poe, who first truthfully admitted that as a poet Longfellow was a failure. He wrote one sharp article against Longfellow. That article, bitter as it seemed then, is now


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realized as only too true. A famous American writer said, "Those literary criticisms of Poe are the comments of a genius." Finally, Poe's criticism was different from that of other criticizers for the simple reason that his purpose was different. The construction of the short story and poem appealed to him far more than to any other critic. He never criticized the content, but, on the contrary, he examined the form. He always asked this question: How might this have been done better? After closely examining the material, he continued to dissect the sentences and to comment on ideas that marred the unity. "Totality of effect" became his password. Words, sounds, rhythm, paragraphs, plots, and backgrounds had to be .i oined in order to obtain the desired effect. The range of Poe's criticism was very wide. He discussed novels, poems, people, papers, foreign governments, songs and music, short stories, dramas, and yes, even his own literary efforts. Next let us examine Poe, the poet. In writing poetry he uses the art of prolonging in order to arouse the reader's curiosity. He is also the artist of repetition. Repetition in his poetry is not a means of emphasizing thoughts.' but that is the manner he uses to obtain melody and rhythm. He also uses those repetitions to link verse to verse and stanza to stanza in an unbroken manner. His poem Bells is the world's best example of onomatopoeia. That is the attempt to imitate the desired sounds with words. That's exactly what Poe accomplished in that poem. Where did Poe get the suggestions for his type of poetry? The only pieces similar to it are ballads. Most likely he heard many of them sung while he was journeying in the SouthernStates. A person may conclude by saying that Poe's poems in reality are ballads. The greatest of his peculiarities is that he is not a poet of smiles and tears, of joy or sorrow, but a poet of a single mood-a dull despairing mood without hope of comfort. Poe believed that the merit of a poem depends on melody and sound .. For that reason all his poems should be read aloud. What is there to say about his themes? An his poems, it seems, are examples of beauty. As a critic, Poe held beauty as 11poet's true goal. He himself says that :the death of a beautiful woman is unquestionably the most poetical topic in the world. However death and separations are only used by him as long as they contain some

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form of beauty. Other laws which regulate his poems follow: I-A good poem must be short. 2-Each poem must be different in structure. 3-Every good poem should produce a melancholy effect. 4-The most melancholy theme is the .death of a beautiful woman. There is no doubt that he lived up to that theory. The short story is recognized as the most distinctive contribution that America gave to the world's literature. The short story is the newest of all literary types, and its masters are easily recognized. Poe can not be called the founder, but he was the man who standardized it, By many he is known as the perfecter. Poe followed very closely the rules set down by him in his literary criticisms. Since then, those rules have been followed by practically every other short story writer. There are several major divisions to Poe's stories. I-The Tales of Death The Fall of the House of Usher-In this story he attempted to produce the effect of desolation and despair. 2-Old World Romances The Masque of the Red DeathThe Cask of Amontillado-In these stories he depicts horror and vengeance. 3- Tales of Conscience The Black Cat-Here horrors.

Poe turned to physical

4- Tales of Pseudo-Science Descent Into the MaeJstrom-In this Poe tries to show the impossible. 5-Analytical Tales The GoldBug-sThe Purloined Letter-In these two stories Poe solves the mystery by a process of analysis. Through the writing of The Purloined Letter Poe became the originator of the detective story; through The Gold Bug he became the forerunner of all treasure stories. , Before Poe ever wrote a story, he asked this question: What is the object? Usually he wanted to shock. But the answers were varied; that is the reason for so many different types. The suspense, usually beginning in the first


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paragraph, was always intensified and is only relieved at the end. Since Poe depicts tragic suspense, the story has to be short, and the end could never be delayed. T~e other style used by Poe preserved the suspense and then III a second part continue's to explain the mystery of the first part. The Purloined Letter is a good example of that type. Poe was also an American frontiersman of a very special style of literature. 'Those efforts cannot be readily classified since they consist of many fables and essays. Those literary works were forerunners for all other American writers. The story of Poe's conquest of world opinion is more dramatic than any story he ever wrote. He had to overcome handicaps of habit and health and poverty to give the rest of the world a good and lasting conception of American literature. Russia was the first country abroad to accept Poe as a genius. Soon Germany regarded him as a typical and characteristic writer. In Italy, Poe's fame was not very widespread, but in Spain, and especially in France, Poe was, without a doubt, considered the best American author. A certain Spanish critic said, "Never since Shakespeare has the Engl1sh language been handled with such art. He always used the right word; his work will endure forever because it is a child of beauty and grief." The 1910 Edinburgh Review said the following of Poe: "His: appeal as a story teller, the universality of his themes, the purity of his style, his studied avoidance of slang and local- / ism, his wealth of intellect and ability for constructive imagination, together with his uncanny feeling for form and color and for the fitting melody and background, put him in a class alone, and these have given him .a recognition in foreign lands not equaled by any other American writer." Through some of his stories with a French setting Poe soon was awarded the following acclaim by critics: "No writer of the English language has penetrated so profoundly the consciousness of all the writers of all the lands as Edgar Allan Poe. In Francs he is as truly alive today as most living French authors." Tennyson said, "1 know several striking poems by American poets, but I think that Edgar Poe is the most original genius." In Japan, as late as 1920, copies of Tl-e Gold Bug and The Raven were used for the instruction of English in the schools. I shall now enumerate several reasons why Poe gained so much fame at home and abroad. Poe continued the work Brown had begun; he wrote gothic literature because that was the popular demand at that time. Another fact

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that prompted him to write such stories was the training he had experienced. Poe was also the originator of several new types of short stories. As I have already said, he established the detective and treasure stories, but in addition to that, he introduced foreign plots and very 'often dealt with the sciences. As a poet he gained renown by writing unique selections. Nobody really is able to tell what The. Raven wishes to portray. The fact that all his poems are written in the same hopeless mood makes them outstanding. Another of Poe's great abilities was the fact that he was able to produce the right word and then use it in the correct place and manner. He could readily form stories from very insignificant statements. Take The Fall of the House of Usher for example; he had read an item concerning a premature burial; the story followed. Once an observer asked this: "Why are Poe's stories usually bloodcurdling?" A noted critic answered, "They are merely reflections of himself." That seemed to be a satisfactory reply, for after consulting his life, we find that he was extremely morbid. He was always working on his nerves. And finally, Poe took a great interest in supernatural things. Those statements surely give us a background for many of his stories. The explanation of Poe's popularity as a writer and his unpopularity as a man is to be found in the fact that his imagination was out of proportion with his other faculties. From the above discussion the only conclusionthat can be drawn is that Poe was a master in poetry and in the short story. But he will never go down in the annals of literature as an immortal because his poetry didn't inspire, and inspiration is a necessity of good, lasting poetry. In all his writings a sense of humor was missing. No author can be great without wit. The other thing that keeps him from the class of greats is ascribed to the fact that he failed to write about contemporary life. He lived in a world of fancy. He will never be great since all immortal writers reflect the spirit of their times. I suppose I must confess, together with the other readers of Poe's selections, that I enjoy reading them. In every story and poem the suspense is held to the end; the endings are always abrupt. However, one thing I disliked when I read certain of his short stories was that there were so many strange words. Often the meanings were vague until I looked up the correct definition.


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Before I read the life of Poe, I had no idea that his experiences were so strange. Now I clearly understand the statement that "his stories are merely reflections of himself." It surely is strange that a man could overcome so many mental and physical hazards and then rise to fame .. Such a person is surely worthy of praise.-H. S. MUSIC OF MODERN AGES Music as a well defined art really did not exist before. the classical period. Prior to this period we find a gradual evolving from the experimental stage, or the stage of striv-ing for certain standards as to form and content. At the time of Bach and Haendel music adhered most rigorously to' form. This was necessary if it ever was to be classed as an art. We know that a work of art possesses value in proportion to the thought involved and the degree of success with which this thought is presented. To be of value, art must submit to form, which in turn seeks to combine a succession of relative and cumulative details into a unified expression of a central idea. Some say that, because of the indefinite and immaterial character of music, it developed later than the other arts. Please do not misunderstand; systems of music have existed. They have also passed with scarcely a trace to prove their former existence. The systems that existed were, in general, not uniform. They were constructed to gratify immediate needs and were therefore not sufficiently broad in scope to be of lasting value. The content of the music in the classical period was governed and developed by the rules of form and the ingenuity of the composer to force his idea-free as life itself-a-into an almost heartless, life-destroying world. The music as an art was still in its incipiency. However, cornposers did try to stray from the forms of purely abstract music to a -certain type of programmatic or descriptive music. But the nature of the thing, the immaturity of the art as a whole, did not permit this divergence to become successful. Music expressed noble and lofty ideas in an equally noble, abstract manner. Nevertheless, one must agree that the classicists remained true to the principles of art. In spite of this apparent repression they developed countless forms of music to which very few have been added in later times. Very few of these forms have been modified or expanded so that they would be recognizable . .-- Next came the romanticists with their ideas of eternal spring and ever blossoming flowers. This period gave to

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the world Beethoven, Weber, Schuman, Schubert, Brahms and Berlioz, all of which were much saner than the literary leaders of this period. Biographers spoke and wrote of their idiosyncracies after the composers had died. But in reality they were not peculiar, nor even so peculiar as you and I. They were human beings who worked hard in their profession-to earn, for the most part, a livelihood. The striking feature that presented itself in this period was that composers did not write music in such rigid moulds any more. The forms became more pliable. The door had been opened to the expression of a more sensuous beauty. Emotions were depicted more broadly and definitely than heretofore. More and more successful attempts were made at direct imitation of natural sounds. This movement naturally tended to the next, namely, that of realism. During the period of romanticism we find the orchestra growing to undreamed of proportions in order to satisfy the varied and extreme tastes of composers. Richard Strauss and his followers tried to depict real or fantastic situations by producing tonal effects that almost perfectly impersonated or characterized the real. The characters and happenings in their music could be associated with motives ever recurring on the scene as if it were a real drama. Typical examples of this school of music are Death and Transfiguration and The Merry Pranks of Till Eulenspiegel by Strauss. The next period, that of impressionism found .its stronghold in France. Objects, characters, or situations were not any more depicted as such, but the impression of these was recorded and has thereby left everything to the imagination of the audience. Debussy and Ravel are the outstanding proponents of the new type of music. This music included an intermingling of tonalities arid harmonies, the use of old modes and the whole tone scale, the avoidance of conventional progressions, and finally the use of a very conservative orchestra. The freedom of this group of composers led to the daring of a Honegger with his ideas of polytonality, He and several, such as Arnold Schoenberg and Paul Hindemith, have completely exploited the use of the orchestra or the pliability of music itself until at this time one would like to brand the whole lot from romanticism on, excluding a few such as Beethoven and Brahms, as gross exploiters of tonal possibilities-but not of music. Quite meekly many of our recent radicals have left their fold only to come back to the saner type of composition with a Leipsic or Bach flavor. This may be only a moment of remorse after a wild and hilarious spree. Let's hope it isn't.-R. W. '36.


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LIBRARY COMMENTS . In the last issue of the Messenger we devoted the greater part of the space allotted to our library comments to a discussion of the author, or main entry card. In making cards for the library catalog, the librarian asks himself for what the students and readers might be looking and adopts the type of cards accordingly. Since the patrons of a library most commonly inquire about books written by a certain author, the most important card is the author card. But very often readers ask for books by their titles because they do not happen to recall the name of the author. Therefore a title card is indispensable in every complete card catalog. Before we begin with the discussion of the TITLE CARD, let us recall that the author, or main entry card serves as the basic card for most other entries in the card catalog. By this we mean to say that the librarian reprints the wording of the author card on every other card -the title card, the subject card, the biography card, the analytical card, etc.-merely moving the entire contents down one line on the card and leaving the top line for the particular heading which this card is to represent. The Library of Congress prints its own cards for nearly every book published and copyrighted in the United States. These cards are prepared in greater detail than the cards we print ourselves, noting the size of the book in millimeters, the number of pages in the introduction (usually printed in Roman numerals) and many other details which are of value to a large library. These Library of Congress cards are for sale to any library at a very reasonable price and our readers will find quite a few of them in our card catalog. But of course the Library of Congress card is always only an author card. We order as many of these for a book as we intend to use for it and merely print into the open space at the top the title or the subject for the book, adding also the call number for the book in the upper left-hand corner. nne of the cards, of course, we use just as it is as the author card, merely adding to it the call number for the book. These Library of Congress cards simplify the work of the librarian to a great extent, particularly if many cards must be made for a single book. We have for instance just received a book entitled "THE BEDSIDE BOOK OF F AMOUS AMERICAN AUTHORS." For this book we shall


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have to make 40 cards! Now that would be quite a task if each card had to be printed on the typewriter. But by using the Library of Congress cards, we need only to add the top line and the book number. On a Title Card, therefore, you will find exactly the same wording as on the author card, only that the author's name is not on the first, but on the second line. On the top line is found the title of the book, indented three typewriter spaces, The title is copied exactly from the title page of the book, without changing the form or the order of words. The articles "the" and "a" are enclosed in parentheses and are not considered in entering the book into the card catalog. We do, however, sometimes omit unnecessary introductory words of well-known titles. Instead of using the complete title, "Personal History and Adventures of David Copperfield," we merely use the abbreviated title, David Copperfield, since that is the title which ninety-nine out of one hundred readers will look for. Perhaps it should be also stated here that we do not have a title card for every book in the library. We have them only for so-called distinctive titles: Thus quite a few books have the title, Collected Works. Such a title tells us nothing whatever about the contents of a book and therefore we make no title card for it. The same is true for books which have titles such as Botany, History of English Literature, Poems, etc., since they are too general in content, and because books with such titles are just as easily found under subject headings. It happens occasionally, that a book is best known by a part of the title. Thus the book entitled Ordeal for Richard Feverel is oftenest called for by the title, Richard Feverel, In such cases we make two title cards, one for the regular title, the other for the abbreviated title, the latter being commonly called catch-title. In the fall issue of the Messenger, we expect to treat of the Subject Card. But before closing these comments, may we be permitted to have a little book chat. Last fall we received a donation of $15.00 for our library from the Rev. John Plocher of Saint Paul. We wish to give the list of books purchased from this gift. These are the titles: Tidwell, The Bible, Book by Book; Fergusson, Historic Chapters in Christian Education in America; Schmieding, Teaching the Bible Story; The Goodspeed Bible; Polack. The Story of C. F. W. Walther; Kiessling, Early Sermons of Luther and Their Relation to the Pre-Reformation Ser-


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mon; Flick, Decline of the Medieval Church, 2V.; Dallmann, John, Disciple, Evangelist, Apostle; Dallmann, Peter: Life and Letters; Weizsaecker, The Apostolic Age, 2V. We wish to take the opportunity at this time of thanking Pastor Plocher most heartily for his very kind gift. He has thereby enabled us to add some very worthwhile books to our. library. At the close of this schoolyear our library numbers 7760 volumes, an increase of about 160 volumes since September of last year. It may interest some of our readers to see a list of the more important books most recently bought for the library. They are: Gilbert, Vanishing Virgin, a terrible inditement against the kind of training and education to which Christian young men and women are exposed in some of our state universities; Evolution, the Root of All Isms, by the same author; Walzel, .Cerman Romanticism; Brion, Story of the Huns; Weber, History of Philosophy; Adamson, Life and Works of Fichte; Young's Concordance of the Bible; Matheson, Representative Men of the Bible; Parrington, Main Currents in American Thought, 3V. ; Mead, See These Banners Go~the story of the Protestant churches in America; Compton, The Freedom of Man; Machen, The Christian Faith in the: Modern World; Road to Oregon; Santa Fe Trail; Anna Hoppe, Negro Slavery; Marie Antoinette; Nero; Riehelieu. Lately we have had the pleasure of loaning library books to some of our pastors and teachers. We wish to take this opportunity to invite others to make use of this. privilege. Write to us for books that you would like to see or study. If they are not used by our students, we shall be only too happy to send them to you at no cost beyond that of mailing. Adalbert Schaller, Librarian.


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The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published quarterly during I the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies.twenty cents. Stamps not accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has 'expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends.

Entered as second class matter at Post Officeof New Ulm, Minnesota

Volume XXVI

No.4

June 1936

-: The Messenger Staff :Editor-in-Chief Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Typist.. Alumni. Exchange College Notes..: Co-ed Notes Locals Athletics Jokes

Milton Bradtke Arnold Coppens Robert Nolte Henry Krenz Henry Engelhardt Veleda Kelm Gertrude Limpert Myrtle Pagenkopf Margaret Koehler Winfried Stoekli Gerhard Rolloff Ruth Gehlhar


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M. L. C. Messenger_

EDITORIAL

• COMMENCEMENT The past weeks have been filled with bustle and excitement. Concerts! Picnics! Examinations! But the end is 'in sight. June 12 will end it all. Just what does June 12 mean to us? Some of us will-begin our vacation with a sigh of relief, having no thought that September and another school year are "just around the corner." It is good that that is as it is. But for some of our midst June 12 is Commencement. When one merely hears the word, he associates with it something pleasant, for that is the end. Such a gross error! Would not the word then be a contradiction in itself? Surely those who are graduating this year realize the true meaning of the word. For them the summer will be spent, for the most part, in planning and preparing for their future work. They have chosen to labor in the Lord's field. They have been thoroughly trained; above all they have the best means with which to work, the Gospel. Conditions in the world may seem disheartening. But theirs .is no longer a question of capability. They have the assurance of conviction. They will let the power of the Gospel work faith in the hearts of those among whom they work. And so with Commencement they will realize the full meaning of the command and promise in Rev. 2 :10. Be thou faithful unto death, and I will give thee a crown of life.


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SHE SAID THAT HE SAID

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She said that he said that Jack said that Sally had said -never mind. We all know just how it goes. It is an old story. And as far as I know it has never done anyone any good, in fact, most usually harm. As the story goes along it gets twisted, the facts are exaggerated, and finally the story is so different that the person who told it first would never recognize it. . Gossip seems to be present everywhere. We usually associate a small town with gossiping, although large cities have their share. Everyone knows everyone else's business, and if he doesn't he makes it a point to find out. Just let a car stop in front of the Jones' residence in any small town, and the tongues begin wagging. The neighbor lady. Mrs. Brown, cautiously, or not so cautiously, peeks through the kitchen curtains. "Hmm," she says to herself, "nice looking young man-and such a nice car too. Johnny, go outside a while." Johnny gets the drift. He has done this before. While he is outside, she continues to look. "Ma, rna!" he comes running. "The car has an Iowa license, and there are all sorts of packages and bundles in the back seat. Some of them look like guns! Maybe he's a gangster!" "Yes?" says Ma, outwardly calm but inwardly nearly frantic with curiosity. "Hmm, Miss Alice met him at the door. t shouldn't wonder if that isn't Miss Alice's feller. She's such Ii- snob, would never go with any of the hometown boys since she's been to college. Tom Williams always liked her but she wouldn't have a thing to do with him. She had to get herself some fellow from Iowa, who's probably a gangster. If he were not, why would he carry guns. Well, if she marries him-etc." This is just a good beginning. Now Ma Brown has to call Mrs. Nelson, and Mrs. Nelson will call Mrs. Briggs, and Mrs. Briggs will call Mrs. Smith. Finally the story reads: Alice Jones is getting married to a gangster from Iowa. He has a big car and is very nice looking. The true story is that Alice, who has just come home for a week-end, happened to let in that insurance man who has been pestering dad for the past week. He was driving to a friend's hunting lodge and just dropped in to see whether Mr. Jones had not changed his mind about the insurance. In Chicago Miss Adams made the remark that she should like to go to Milwaukee and hear Helen Jepson at


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the Pabst Theater on Friday evening. Tille next day Miss Kent tells Miss Faye that Jane is going to Milwaukee. When Jane doesn't appear at the party on Friday, every. one knows why. She's in Milwaukee-only she happens to be in bed with a bad cold. A pen is lost. We all know who did it. Proof? Wen, didn't Mary Anne see Jack coming away from that locker during first period, and wasn't the pen gone after the first period? Of course Jack took it. But he didn't. True, he did come from the direction of that locker at that time, but he had merely taken a book from the locker next to the one from which the pen had been taken. As far as the students and teachers were concerned, Jack was the thief. She said that he said that she said we had an invitation to Fond du Lac; now we shall surely go on a tour. The next persons says, "Kids, we're going to Fond du Lac." To the great disappointment of all of us, however, we find that Professor Sauer, the manager of our choir has not had a letter post-marked Fond du Lac for months. Did you see so-and-so talking together in the hall '[ Since when has that been going on? I don't see what she sees in him-Don't be alarmed. It was only the editor-inchief asking Helen to write an editorial for the next Messenger. It's abominable, this gossiping! What can we do about it? The remedy is very simple, but personal. Make up your mind and say to yourself, "If I hear a story, 1 will not repeat it .."-V. K. '37.

SATISF ACTION A .certain class has not geen getting along because one section simply never was satisfied with what the other chose. If a few wanted pastel shades for class colors, the others were sure to want blue and red. It is hard to say whether it is laughable or pitiable to see them squabble. But no matter what comes up, some part of this class is always dissatisfied. Have you ever heard the expression, "The dormitory is a regular prison"? Well, many of us can testify to the

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fact, when really called on to do so, that it is rather silly. But if one asks for permission to go out for an evening and is refused because we have already had several free evenings, the rumble of dissatisfaction arises like a swarm of grasshoppers. If we go out to witness one of our baseball games and see a certain player being put into the infield that has been playing in the outfield, or if we see some one else going in to pitch, a rather ominous roar is heard immediately from the sidelines. I've given a few examples that occur not only once, but regularly. Do you find yourself among these? Just because I've picked these, does not say I omitted your pet grumble intentionally. Daily, in fact hourly, we hear some one kicking here, some one there. Why can't we be satisfied with what we're getting? Come on, some of you grumblers, take a look at yourself as others see you. We need some one who is willing to push along, not against. Be satisfied with what you have at least once in the while.-B. M. '36.


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ALUMNI

(In the language of faculty members.) "Well!" (spoken as only Prof. Schweppe can speak it), "Jacobs ('34), what kind of mischief have you been getting into lately? I hear you were married on Easter Sunday to a Miss Audrey Hoffmann of Oshkosh. 'Well,' it may be a good thing for you! Let me congratulate you! What? Oh, Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel Arndt (,32 and ex-'33 respectively) and Elmer Behrens ('34) were guests and Meilahn Zahn ('32) was an attendant? 'Well,' that must have been quite an occasion." "Heh, heh, heh, heh!" (Anyone who ever attended Prof. Palmbach's classes will remember that snicker) "'and so' Norbert Berndt is engaged to Miss Virginia Hackly of Kenosha. 'Therefore,' let me congratulate you." "'Also,'" (as accented by Prof. Janke) "die Edith Bode ('32) von Baraboo ist auch verlobt! She is about to leave the profession of teaching for that of housekeeping, due to the sound arguments of Mr. Edward Pettengell of Baraboo. Congratulations." Helen Weyland ('35) will undoubtedly teach at Neenah for several years. It is such a nice place. "'Nichts komm raus aus Dutchman's Haus'" (says Prof Bliefernicht). "She is engaged to Mr. Norman Kerowitz of Neenah. Congratulations !" "Be that as it wasn't" (says our "good friend and coppersticker," Prof Schaller) "Miss Loretta Zorn ('26) of Cleveland, Ohio, was married to Mr. Herbert Rupprecht on April 14. I should like to offer my sincerest congratulations." â&#x20AC;˘.

"This is a spring for weddings and engagements, 'isn't it'?" (Undoubtedly, you recognize the pet expression of Prof. Stindt) "I hear that Wenonah Guenther (H. S. '31) is engaged."

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"Yes, yes, 'See America first. See America first!'" ('That, of course, could be no one but Prof. Klatt.) "That's what I always say, but Gerald Duin (,31) seems to prefer Europe. He is graduating from West Point Military Academy on June 12 and will spend the summer in Europe." " 'Take a notation to this effect'" (said Prof. Backer). "Among those present at the concert of the Concert Choir on April 26 were Alma Sievert (,29) of Wood Lake; Bertha Wilbrecht ('25) of Sanborn; Gertrude Vogel (,34) and Arthur Meier ('33) of Sleepy Eye; Arthur Glende ('34) of Corvuso; and Armin Schmidt ('30) of Gibbon." "Now, are there any more questions?" (Prof. Levorson would ask at the close of a period). "You should like to know whether I've heard anything about Arnold Lober ('33)? Well, yes. He and Mrs. Lober were made very happy by the arrival of Marion Jeanette on May 13. Congratulations !"

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A report in The Spectator favoring the teaching profession may be of interest to our graduating class, as well as to others ascending to that goal: "An argument presented in favor of teaching is the many careers open to one who has chosen this profession as an occupation. Besides the elementary grades, high school. and college teaching, there is the opportunity for librarian-ship, recreation, school administration, and research, and various branches of the foregoing. "Another reason for choosing this profession is the fact that the teacher has unlimited opportunities for leading a happy life. His associates in the profession have


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high standards of living and thinking; the community honors him, and in many cases he is called upon to lead move... ments for civic improvement. "Teaching also stimulates mental growth. The teacher has opportunity to travel and study during the summer months. Teachers serve to bring the knowledge of the world to the service of the people." An article in the Bethany Scroll bids us cease our anxieties of the distant future: "What a fruitful field for worry is the future! We spend fitful hours assuming that because this has happened, that will follow as a logical consequence, never realizing that life cannot be reduced to mathematical formulae, but is as variable as the course of the planets is invariable. "The interesting thing about life is not what has happened so much as what will happen. Each day brings with it new possibilities, new heights to scale, new people to meet; in brief, the future holds everything for us. How dull our existence would be if we knew what the future held for us! Stevenson in the essay 'EI Dorado' says, 'Desire and curiosity are the two eyes through which we see the world in the most enchanted colors.' The zest in living lies in the mystery of the future, and the way we look at it; gloomily and with foreboding; or with frank curiosity and interest, as the leaves of time are swiftly paged." From the literary' section of the Bethany Scroll comes a little poem entitled Clouds, which could have been written by Carl Sandburg. Snowdrifts Quietly soaring Through the sky, They hang a shadow Over the sun And then Pass on.

It is not only at our college that OpInIOnShave been raised in regard to the comparative advantages of a practical course against a general academic course. In the Bethany Scroll we read that "Competition in the commercial field is perhaps keener than anywhere else. A person has to be not only good, but better than the average, to get any


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place. But shall we sacrifice the attainment of culture to the earning of our daily bread? The responsibility lies with the individual. No amount of classical training can make an ignoramus cultured. Conversely, the lack of it will not make an innately intellectual man an ignoramus. "It is said that the educational standards in the United States are being lowered by the tendency to take a course in a mechanical skill subject instead of a classical course. The wisest solution, perhaps, would be to require a 3-year academic course in history, science, some language, preferably Latin, and English. Then let the student specialize as he desires. If he wishes to continue along academic lines, he has a solid foundation; if necessity compels him to earn his living, he is still not out a whit."

I sympathize with the poor Freshmen who must bear the brunt of the college and finally of the whole world. They have it again from The Black and Red: Freshman-I'm a little stiff from bowling. Coach-I don't care where you're from, Shorty; get busy. The girls are by no means slighted. "Gracious, it's been five years since I've seen you. You look lots older, too." "Really, my dear? I doubt if I would have recognized you but for your coat."


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On April 20 the college celebrated Arbor Day in order to give the campus a thorough cleaning. There were very few students who returned to classes the next day without blisters, back-aches, and sunburn. The sandwiches and pop were especially appreciated.

The Phi Gamma Rho Literary Society fulfilled the request of some of our professors and students by presenting a German program on April 23. Rudolph Weyland directed an interesting German ballad, Koenig Karl und Wittekind by Karl Loewe, which was very well presented. Margaret Koehler, Ruth Gehlar, Waldemar Nolte, and Albert Brockelman took part in the German comedy, Einer Musz Heiraten by Alexander Viktor Zechmeister, This performance showed that we still have capable German scholars in our student body.

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This year the Glee Club, College Band, and lVIarlut Singers gave a joint concert on May 3. The following program was presented: Glee Club Miss Ida Ingebritson, directress In Heaven Above Norwegian Folk Tune Morn of Beauty Jean Sibelius The Fairy Dell A. Bixby The Snow Storm Roberts Mighty Lak a Rose Ethelbert Nevin

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Band Norwald Behrens, director Semper Fidelis March J ohn Philip Sousa Country Gardens Percy Aldrich Grainger Hungarian Dances Nos. 7 and 8 Johannes Brahms Evening Shadows K. L. King The Poet, Peasant, and Light Cavalryman ..Henry Fillmore Marlut Singers Waldemar Nolte, director Indian Serenade LeRoy Wetzel Duna J. McGill Come to the Fair Easthope Martin The Wild Rose A. Dregert Abschied vom Walde Mendelssohn- Bartholdy â&#x20AC;˘ This arrangement has proved to be more satisfactory than the presentation of separate programs by these organizations.

The Dr. Martin Luther College Concert Choir, directed by - Emil D. Backer, gave its annual sacred concert on April 26. The program consisted of the following numbers: 1. My Soul, 0 Praise the Lord Thy God Bach 2. Christmas Lullabies: In Stable Bare : Durrant Child Most Holy Durrant 3. Lo, To Us Is Born an Infant Liebhold Organ: First Sonata, Finale Guilmant Waldemar Nolte 4. Choral-Motette: Jesus, meine Zuversicht.. ..Schumann 5. Ein geistliches Wiegenlied Backer 6. Sei still dem Herrn Hauptmann 7. Hosianna dem Sohne Davids Reuter Piano: Scherzo in b flat minor : Chopin Henry Engelhardt 8. Mary Magdalene Brahms 9. Motet: The Wall of Heaven. 0 Saviour Rend ..Brahms 10. The Benediction Backer

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All members of the Concert Choir are eagerly awaiting .the coming tour, which is scheduled as follows: . June I-North LaCrosse, Wisconsin June 2-Waterloo, Wisconsin . June 3-Columbus, Wisconsin June 4-Sparta, Wisconsin June 5-Zumbrota, Minnesota The program for the Commencement Concert to be held Thursday, June 11, 8 :15 P. M. is as follows: I. Concert Choir a. Chorale Motette : Jesus, meine Zuversicht : Schumann b. Sei Still dem Herrn Hauptmann c. Hosianna dem Sohne Davids F. Reuter d. 0 Child Most Holy F. Durrant e. Motet: The Wall of Heaven, 0 Saviour, Rend J. Brahms II. Organ-Piano: Rhapsody in A Demarest Organ-Waldemar Nolte Piano-i-Rudolph Weyland III. Chorus: Folk Songs a) Spanish: Tropic Gardens b) Mexican: Little Star IV. Piano: Scherzo in b flat minor Chopin Henry Engelhardt y. Chorus: Folk Songs: a) Sandmaennchen b) Des Morgens frueh c) Ein geistlich Abendlied d) Rosestock, holder blueht VI. Piano: Choral: Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring Bach-Hess Rigoletto Concert Paraphrase Verdi-Liszt Waldemar Nolte VII. Chorus: Folk Songs a) Creole Indian: Should Ever When Years b) Negro: Lindy Lou

Graduation exercises will be held June 12 at 10:00 A. M. Prof. E. E. Kowalke, president of Northwestern College,Watertown, Wisconsin,has been chosen as speaker.


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5

At six-thirty o'clock Wednesday morning, April 15, the old college bell rang and rang and rang until finally it had aroused the girls at Hillcrest Hall, who had returned after a well-spent Easter vacation. Everybody s.eemed to have had a good time, but still most of them were glad to return. Although we had twelve days of vacation, yet the vacation was too short for Vernice Seibel, for she went home again the following week-end. Wilma Schultz accompanied her on her week-end jaunt. All the girls welcomed Adele Nommensen back to their midst again after vacation, the reason for her absence being a mastoid operation. But it didn't take Dels long to recover from her illness, because soon she was her "jolly old self again." On April 20 the long awaited day arrived-Arbor Day. By 8 A. M. every girl was outside working as hard as she could. Whata day! Pop! Sandwiches! Ice cream! About 11 :45 A. M. Professor Schweppe informed us that our end of the work was finished, and did the girls rejoice! But after all, everybody seemed to have enjoyed the day in spite of stiff backs and blisters. The effects of Arbor Day must have been quite lasting according to some of the girls, because at 4 :30 on April 23, Ruby Holzhueter was found sleeping on the organ bench in Room 22. ' She must have been pretty tired out because she didn't mind sleeping on a hard bench at all. Just to break the monotony of dormitory life the III Floor gang decided to hold one of its famous parties again. This time the menu consisted of popcorn and nectar, with jam as dessert. Ern-Gret Birkholz provided the entertainment.


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Since Easter a member of the opposite sex has been living in Florence Raddatz's room! Scandal! Scandal! Sometimes he wears a green suit and sometimes he wears a brown suit, depending upon his environment. And he seems to enjoy the company of all the girls because he flounts around from one study table to the other during study hour. Of course, he has a name too-it's "Oscar." But have no fear, it's only a harmless little chameleon which Florence brought along from home as a pet! He lives on sugar and flies; so every time we see a fly around here, we save it for Oscar's lunch. The old "tradition" says that when pressing a 'dress you turn it inside out and lay it smoothly upon the ironing board. But the other day Olga Richter was in too great a hurry to follow this procedure, so she just lifted up her skirt without taking it off and had Eva Taras press it for her. Can you imagine anything like that? Just the other day the janitors erected a horsesho.e court for the girls and since then it has been kept quite busy. And you can count on a lot of. giggling when Omi Birkholz and Ruth Priesz get started playing a game. Can you imagine Ern-Gret Birkholz wearing highheeled shoes and having her hair set in a beautiful wave '? It really does sound quite impossible but it's almost true. One Saturday she came to supper with her hair all slicked up and set in beautiful waves. There's one distinction which has been acquired by the girls in Room 3-Elizabeth Berg, Erna Kuehl, and Marie Sweeney. They pride themselves in converting their abode into a one-room- apartment, equipped for cooking, sleeping, laundry, and the receiving of visitors. Agnes Timm decided to spend a few more hours in Arlington than the rest of the choir members on May 17, so she had her brother call for her earlier that afternoon. By the time the rest of us arrived there, she was in the midst of having a good time. There must be something up here that attracts Gertie Vogel; she has been coming to visit Adelaide Nolte quite often of late. Every time she comes Adelaide always has a good time. One Sunday they traveled as far as Waseca to visit some of Adelaide's relatives there. Does Florence Berg ever like her toast-and how! She brought her toaster along from home, and whenever she


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and Marion Lewerenz feel like eating toast, they have the necessary equipment for making it. These balmy spring days have proved quite favorable to Hazel Steinberg, for a daily sight around Hillcrest Hall is Hazel sitting under a shady tree deeply absorbed in a love story. For a little diversion she indulges in a game of kittenball with Ern-Gret Birkholz during her spare moments. Speaking about balmy spring days, one bright Sunday morning the Redeker "gang" aroused themselves early and tramped out to Camel's Back to have an egg fry. While they were looking for kindling wood with which to build a fire, a hen came loitering around, looking rather downcast. Possibly she was deploring the fact that her eggs were being devoured. "What are a few mosquitoes in our young lives!" might be the saying of the Redeker "gang." For the last couple of nights they've been sleeping outside. They say that it's awfully romantic watching the stars and the moon, but I bet their attitude changes when it begins to rain and they have to rush inside. Frances Meyer is really a lucky girl-she is the first one to receive a call among the III Normals, and has accepted the call to Bowdle, South Dakota, She intends to leave on June 1 already, to attend summer school at Madison, South Dakota.

LOCALS Arbor Day is past, perhaps forgotten by many, but it will yet be some time before the II-III Normal "tree-gang" forgets how firmly some trees are rooted. Were you around when the big tree finally came down on the road? A "grand flop"-that's what Wantoeh thought of Arbor Day; but he lays the blame to his enforced absence during the afternoon. Nevertheless it was, or should have been, one of his big moments as college "buck." Gurgel had considerable difficulty keeping Gerlach busy on Arbor Day. Observers would suggest to Gurgel that he set a better example for his "gang" next time.


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It is beyond the comprehension of most of us how Traetow, Fuerstenau, and Gerlach can ever finish a game of tennis-they argue three-fourths of the time about the decisions and the other fourth try to decide who is in the right. Schultz, our power-motor grass-cutter chief, is doing most of his experimenting on the baseball diamond this year. Gurgel and Schnitker have been unofficially appointed to rid the campus of bluejays-the poor birds! "Charlie" is becoming quite elated over his approaching auto trip to his home in Washington; in fact, he has already begun packing. Traetow is wearing a "patch" over one eye, the result of the impact of a baseball. Birkholz complains that his "buck" keeps such strict discipline in his room that nothing exciting ever could happen! The I and II Normal boys are getting considerable practice playing for Chapel. The annual "party-craze" has seized the III Normals. Pruess and Krueger have decided to give up their jobs as dishwashers-but is it really because they wish to study state exams? When Pretzer decides he needs batting practice, don't stand too near-and, by the way, maybe the windows should be furnished with grilles or shutters for economy's sake. Perhaps next year we may look forward to a girls' football team-they have taken up horseshoe already! Wilmar Bode, Kuesel, and Reinholdt Nolte have been going fishing lately, but they really should try to be more consistent in their reports of success. Several weeks ago Neumann and Moldenhauer opened the swimming season. Gurgel has several pet wood-ticks, a beetle, and numerous flies in a glass cage on hi" desk. Rather "buggee"! Bobby woodtick went for a walk a few days ago and has not been seen since. Did he "thumb" a ride with you? "Ray" and "Hank" are the proud owners of several goldfish-they maintain one is a blonde and one a brunette!


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During the evening of May 9, three ghosts were said to have been roaming through the Dorm. Roland Bode insists he saw them in his room. Since then he carefully locks his door every night! Gerlach admires Bethany's baseball pitcher. Here is one of his remarks, "That's the first rainbow I ever saw without colors." . The Marlut Singers enjoyed a very pleasant trip to Nicollet, May 8. Raymond Duehlmeier demonstrated how to drive a V eight safely without .brakes. -did

Coppens has devised a new manner of wearing a jacket you notice him at the II-III Normal picnic?

The boys of the new Dorm have a new, reliable alarm clock. A woodpecker seems to get his "daily dozen" on an eaves spout just outside. Kuesel is spending his spare moments snaring gophers on the baseball diamond. Arnold Lueker has a new pastime in German classcutting out paper dolls. Did you see the big sight in Chemistry class a few . weeks ago? Roland Bode was just too tired! Even H2S failed to wake him. Witte sets his alarm clock quite often, but usually on "silent." Wantoch says he comes from the farm. Probably on Arbor Day he expected the wagon with which he was running down the hill to stop when he said "whoa," but no such luck! The Redwood table became rather rough at supper May 19, and upset a full pitcher of water-on Otto. Arbor Day was more strenuous than you might have supposed. Even "Peewee" was "laved-out" when a basket of leaves was dropped upon his nose. Lux is as interested as ever in nature-he makes frequent expeditions into the wilds of the forests hereabout. Did you ever hear of anyone eating fourteen pieces of cake ? Well-and "out in company" too! Miss Luna, a moth of exceptional beauty, was captured by several of the enterprising members 'of the choir on their return from Arlington. She was at once turned over to Mr. Mittelsteadt.


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Several of the fellows, Weyland, Mittelsteadt, and H. Schnitker, were to St. Peter to hear the St. Olaf Choir, May 15. Meet our Dorm golf caddy-Traetow. Inky reports he will soon be writing a letter home. It seems he has not written since Easter recess. How is this for ambition? The 10th Grade recently held its religion class even in the absence of the Professor! The night that the choir sang in Arlington there were three and one-half gallons of ice cream "consumed" by those remaining in the Dorm. Just so he does not forget, "Peanuts" Greve has the name of the. college in heavy black print across the top of his desk! "Hardy" Wiechmann discovered several moths in his pajamas a few nights ago, It seems strange that Limpert and Heckmann should have been catching moths earlier the same evening. Spaude thinks locals have something to do with dentistry! The Messenger regrets it is unable to publish any poems by the 120etand poetess of the II Normal class. For the past few weeks the 9th and 10th grades have been enjoying the task of keeping the grass cut short. Dallman would like to give notice that he intends to give up his job as "creaser." He is interested in meeting his probable successor. Reinholdt Nolte is trying to locate the generator in "lightning bugs." A few weeks ago it was almost unsafe to lean out of a first floor window-some one always seemed to be at hand to pour a pail of water upon you from above. Spaude is now carrying on another famous experiment -trying to put wings on a sound wave! The way "Bob" Nolte is getting the "fuchses" to fix up the tennis courts is certainly some "racket." Hoefer is trying to earn a letter by sleeping the longest every morning. "Gopher" Schultz and "Trapper" Otto are rapidly exterminating the most dangerous of the four-legged beasts, the pocket gophers. Schultz will affirm that the female of the species is more deadly than the male.


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- --Ii ,]' I~ ... ..1.

When Coach Voecks issued the call for baseball players shortly after the Easter vacation, four lettermen of last year's championship team and many promising and experienced players were on hand. The boys early made up their minds to do everything possible to keep the championship won last year. The team has a difficult schedule of seven conference games to play but as far as the season has gone now, it looks as if D. M. L. C. again has a good chance of coming out on top. It is encouraging to see so many students and also faculty members present at our games. Keep up the good work and I am certain the players will do their part to furnish interesting games. But let's watch the boys and see how they go. PLAY BALL! D. M. L. C. Defeats Bethany in Opening Game On April 25, D. M. L. C. showed its batting power and all around baseball ability by trouncing Bethany 25-4. "Pop Eye" Foss on the mound for the Hilltoppers did not allow a


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hit as long as he worked. Sixteen hits coupled with almost as many Bethany misplays allowed D. M. L. C. to run up such a high score. D. M. L. C. AB H R Bethany AB H R Dallmann : 5 0 3 Peterson .. 5 0 0 Schweppe 7 4 5 Heitner .. 5 1 1 Mau 5 3 4 Odegard .. 400 Foss 6 1 2 Meyer .. 300 Lindemann 4 1 2 J. Peterson .. 401 Hoefer 4 2 2 Timmeraun .. 3 0 1 Austad 4 1 3' Madson . 300 Raabe 5 1 2 Thoen .. 300 Rolloff 6 3 2 Vangen .. 3 1 1 Jngebritson 0 0 0 Uecker 1 0 0 33 2 4 E:chultz 1 0 0

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Hilltoppers Defeat Concordia and Bethel On May 2, the Maroon and Gray baseball team returned from the Cities with two more victories to their credit. On the previous day, the Hilltoppers defeated Concordia 7-1. Foss again pitched a brilliant game, striking out thirteen men and allowing only five hits, one of them a homer by Kruger. D. M. L. C. scored in the first inning on Dallmann's walk, a sacrifice, and Schweppe's double out to left field. From then on the Hilltoppers never lost the lead. D. M. L. C. continued its winning streak the next day by trouncing the Bethel nine 23-6. Bethel made seven safeties off the offerings of Raabe and Mau, and D. M. L. C. hit safely eighteen times. Raabe with two doubles and a triple led the Hilltopper attack. D. M. L. C. AB H R Concordia AB H R Dallmann 3 1 1 Nachtsheim 3 0 0 Raabe 4 2 1 Buck 4 0 0 Mau .. 4 0 0 Hansen 3 1 0 Schweppe 4 2 2 Lieske 3 0 0 Lindemann 3 2 0 Kruger.................. 4 2 1 Hoefer 4 0 1 Petersen 4 0 0 Rolloff 4 0 0 Mack 3 1 0 Austad 4 1 1 Becker 4 0 0 . Foss 4 2 1 Schierenbeck 3 1 0 34 10

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D. M. L. C. Dallmann Raabe Mau Schweppe Lindemann Hoefer _... Rolloff Austad Foss

AB H R 5 3 2 6 3 3 6 2 3 7 2 3 4 2 4 7 1. 1 6 2 4 7 1 0 4 2 '3

52 18 23

Bethel AB H R Dickau ...................... 2 1 1 Randahl ................ 1 0 0 Lundeen ................ 1 0 0 Schumann ............ 3 1 1 Holberg ................ 6 1 0 Bolinder ................. 4 2 0 Richert ................... 1 0 1 Buren ..................... 2 0 0 Stroebel .... ............ 2 0 0 Nylander ............... 2 0 0 Westmann ............ 2 0 1 Kossacker ............ 2 0 0 Lundeen ................. 2 0 0 Sinkiewitz ............ 1 Q 1 Bradshaw ................ 2 1 1 Johnson ................ 2 0 0 Young ...................... 1 1 0 - - 36 7 6 -

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'

-

Waldorf Hands D. M. L. C. Its First Defeat On May 8, Waldorf traveled to New VIm and left with a 7-2 victory. D. M. L. C. played a fair game but not good enough to overcome the strong, well-balanced Waldorf team. Waldorf took the lead in the first inning and this was never threatened. In the eighth inning Raabe and Rolloff started what might have been a rally by hitting consecutive singles but Anderson then bore down and retired the next three batters. D. M. L. C. AB H Dallmann .............. 4 0 Raabe .................... 4 1 Rolloff .................. 4 1 Schweppe .............. 4 0 Lindemann ............. 4 0 Hoefer .................. 3 0 Foss ...................... 4 1 Ingebritson .......... 3 0 Pretzer ..................... 2 0

R 0 0

0 0 1 0 0 0 1

- - 32

3

2

Waldorf AB Kennedy .................. 3 Johnson ................. 4 Feeney .................. 4 Severeid ................. 4 Huso ........................ 5 Everts .................. 5 Willis ..................... 5 G. Anderson .......... 2 Romness ................ 1 Anderson ............... 4 37

H R 1 3 1 0 1 1 0 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0

-

-

8

7


49

'l'he D. M. L. C. Messenger

D. M. L. C. Again Defeats Bethany Bethany was a much improved team when D. M. L. C. met them again on May 13, but still the Hilltoppers emerged victorious 11-2. Bethany collected 9 hits but Foss pitched very well when hard pressed and thus held them to two runs. Our boys only had 8 hits, but this combined with 11 walks and 5 stolen bases enabled them to score in all innings but three. Bethany AB H R D. M. L. C. AB H R J. Peterson 5 2 0 Dallmann 3 1 2 Heitner 5 1 0 Raabe 4 0 0 1 Joe Peterson. 4 Rolloff 6 1 2 Meyer 4 2 0 Schweppe 4 0 1 J. Odegard 3 o 0 Lindemann 4 2 2 Madson ..!' 4 1 1 Hoefer 5 1 0 Bolstad 4 2 0 Foss v ••••••• 3 2 1 Ingebritson 2 0 0 Thoen 3 1 0 Vangen 3 o 0 Horn 3 1 3 Odegard 0 o 0 Hempel 0 0 0

o

34

8 11

35· 9

2

Mankato Teachers College Defeats D. M. L. C. The D. IVL L. C. nine traveled to Mankato and played the Teachers College there in a non-conference game but, sad to say, lost by the score of 8-2. The Hilltoppers were unable to successively meet the offerings of Lopata and Pinckney and only gathered 5 hits during the afternoon. M. T. C. on the other hand collected 10 hits off Raabe. The D. M. L. C. fielding also was below par, and this gave the Mankato team several unearned scores. D. M. L. C. AB H R Mankato AB H R Dallmann 2 0 0 Hoen 4 2 2 Raabe 4 0 0 Nesheim 5 1 1 Rolloff 2 1 2 McArth ur 4 0 0 Schweppe 3 0 0 Hoffmann 5 3 1 Lindemann 4 0 0 Norby 1 0 0 Hoefer 4 2 0 Osterberg 0 0 1 Foss 3 1 0 Wurscher 2 1 0 Horn 3 0 0 Brosman 2 1 1 Ingebritson 1 1 0 Kleinsmith 4 0 1 Hempel... 1 0 0 Fiebieger 4 2 1 - - Lopata 2 0 0 ' 27 5 2 Pinckney.............. 2 0 0 35 10 8


50

The D. M. L. C. Messenger

M. T. C. Again Defeats D. M. L. C. May 20 found the Mankato Pedagogues again defeating the New Ulmites, this time by the score of 7-6. D. M. L. C. profited to some extent on the eight walks issued by the Mankato pitchers, but the hitters could not deliver in the pinches, with the result that twelve men were left on the bases. However, D. M. L. C. never gave up the fight and Foss was on third base with the tying run as Hempel fanned to end the game. D. M. L. C. AB H R M.T. C. AB H R Dallmann 4 0 1 Hoerr 3 1 2 Ingebritson 5 路0 0 Nesheim 5 o .1 Raabe 1 1 2 McArthur 5 2 1 Schweppe 5 1 1 Hoffman 5 1 1 Lindemann ~. 5 1 2 Wurscher 2 1 0 Hoefer 3 0 0 Brosnan 1 o 0 Foss ? 0 0 Osterberg 4 3 0 Rolloff 3 0 0 Eberlein 3 o 0 Horn 1 0 0 Kleinsmith 1 o 0 Hempel 2 0 0 1 Hoover 0 Fiebiger 3 o 1 31 3 6 Lopata 0 o 0 Pinkney 2 1 0 34 9 7

o

D. M. L. C. Blanks Bethel In a drizzling rain on Friday, May 22, the D. M. L. C. baseball nine moved a step nearer the championship by shutting out Bethel 15-0. Bethel did not hit a ball out of the infield as "Pop Eye" Foss and his mates usually retired the side in row and order. At the same time the Hilltoppers were banging out nineteen hits for a total of fifteen runs. Foss led the D. M. L. C. attack with three singles and a double in five tries at the plate. D. M. L. C. AB H R Bethel AB H R Dallmann 5 1 1 Dickau.. 2 1 0 Ingebritson 6 2 0 Sinkiewitz 3 0 0 Raabe 5 1 0 Holmberg :. 3 0 0 Schweppe 6 3 3 Young 2 0 0 Lindemann 4 3 3 Schuman 4 0 0 Hoefer 3 2 5 Bolinder 4 0 0 Foss 5 4 1 Burch 3 0 0 Rolloff 5 2. 0 Richard................ 2 0 0 Horn 3 1 2 Johnson................ 2 0 0 - - Bradshaw 1 0 0 42 19 15 Tanquist 3 0 0 29 1 0


The D. 11-1. L. C. Messenger

51

"A little bird tells me this soup is delicious." "A little bird ?" "Yes, a little swallow." Mistress: I can see a spider web in the corner, Adelaide! To what do you attribute that? Adelaide: To a spider, ma'am. Old Lady: "Where did those large rocks come from ?" Tired Guide: "The glaciers brought them down." "But where are the glaciers?" "They've gone back after more rocks."-Ex. Mother: But, my son, don't you think that new topcoat is a little loud? Krenz: No, Mother, you see I always wear a muffler with it. Professor: Where is the capital of the United States? Student: All over the world.-Ex. While discussing great men one night marked, '!That reminds me of my uncle." "Why; did he do anything great?" "Not yet!"

Traetow

re-

Professor: Donnie, who was Anne Boleyn? Donnie: Anne Boleyn was a flatiron. Professor: What on earth do you mean? Donnie: Well, it says in the history book: Henry having disposed of Catherine pressed his suit with Anne Boleyn.


The D. M. L. C. Messenger

52

M-an's Ambition At At At At .At At At At At

four-to wear pants. eight-to miss school. twelve-to be president. fourteen-to be a gangster . eighteen-to take life easy. twenty-to take a girl out to dinner. twenty-five-to have the price of a dinner. thirty-five-to eat dinner. forty-five-to digest dinner.

Professor:

What did Caesar say when Brutus stabbed

him? Melville Schultz:

Ouch!

Barber (shaving a customer): Will you have anything on your face when I've finished, sir? Victim: Well, it doesn't seem likely.-Ex. Swantz (coming into Wichmann's room): I'm reading a good book! Ray (trying hard to get a translation): reading.

Oh, Ray, Keep

on

'Answer on Fern's geography test paper: "The essential thing about the earth from an agricultural standpoint is that it revolves on its axis, thereby providing for the rotation of crops." . A colored man said to his friend, "What is the matter, Mose ? You look so mad.": "Who wouldn't be?" his friend replied. "Dat doctah what operated on me sewed 짜Ie up with white thread." -Ex. A small boy who was staying at a farm rushed indoors one day and breathlessly exclaimed that a mouse had fallen into a churn of milk. "Did you take it out?" asked the farmer. "Of course not," answered the boy. "I put the cat in." -Ex.


STUDENTS! BEFORE BUYING CONSULT THE ADVERTISING SECTION

Patronize

Our Advertisers

Without Them

THE MESSENGER Cannot Exist

List of Advertisers.

.

I

Saff'ert'sProvision Market F. J. Backer & Co. Eugene Koehler Barber Shop Dr. G. J. Hiebert Mr. Albert Flor The Bee Hive J. C. Penney Co. Drs. Schleuder Somsen, Dempsey, Johnson & Somsen Fink's Store New DIm Grocery Simons Lumber Co. Farmers and Merchants State Bank ModelBarber Shop Wicherski Shoe Store Salet's Department Store Crone Bros. Company Erickson and Graff National Tea Store Drs. Hammermeister and Saffert


State Bank of New Ulm Muesing Drug Store Eichten Shoe Store Herzog Publishing Company Kemske Paper Co. Weilandt and Stegemann New VIm Greenhouse Rexall Drug Store Eagle Roller Mill Co. Eibner and Son Schlumpberger's Grocery Hummel Bros. Dr. A. L. Kusske Ulrich Electric Company Tauscheck and Green Buenger Furniture Company Citizens State Bank Dr. E. G. Lang Robert Fesenmaier, Inc. Silver Latch Inn Mr. T. O. Streissguth Retzlaff Motor Company Retzlaff Hardware Company New Ulm Dairy Henry Goede Studio Lang's Master Barber Shop Champion Shoe Shop New Ulm Steam Laundry Schroeder Bakery Dr. F. H. Dubbe Schuck's Tailor Shop Dr, Von Bank Gastler Studio Union Hospital E. C. Vogelpohl Aid Association for Lutherans A. C. Ochs Brick & Tile Yards August Schell Brewing Company The Hauenstein Company

':.


BREAD! Helps You Off to School With Needed Food Energy Your Baker Makes The Finest, Most Delicious, Wholesome Bread EIBNER'S BREAD IS GOOD Eat More Of It And Keep In Tip-Top Condition

EIBNER 8 SON BAKERY and ICE CREAM Established 1883

PHONE 128

ALBERT D. FLOR Attorney at Law New DIm, Minnesota

SALET'S DEPARTMENT STORE-NEW

ULM, MINN.

EVERYTHING TO WEAR FOR HIM OR HER WE,AR SALET'S FAMons $1.98 FOOTWEAR

Highest Quality and of Course "YOU ALWAYS SAVE AT SALET'S"

SILVER LATCH INN "The Pride of New DIm" Fountain Service-Lunches-Meals Dining Room Service


Geo. D. Erickson

John W. Graff

ERICKSON & GRAFF Attorneys

at Law

New UIm, Minnesota

EUGENE KOEHLER BARBER SHOP Hair Cuts 30c Efficient Service and Courteous

Treatment

20 N. Minn. St.

New VIm

AMERICA'S FINEST SUIT VALDES See the Beautiful Patterns on Display in our Window. Corne in and Feel the Luxurious "Meaty" fabrics $15.00 - $17.50 - $21.50 - $25.00 The Biggest Money's Worth You Ever Saw

HUMMEL BROTHERS 14 No. Minn. St.

New Ulrn, Minn.

BANK WITH

FARMERS ~ MERCHANTS STATE BANK New Ulm, Minnesota

c

FRIENDLY HELPFUL SERVICE AT YOUR COMMAND TAILORED

TO MEASURE

$22.50 No Deposits-No

SUITS

$25.00and up

C. O. D.'s

All kinds of Repairing

CLEANING AND PRESSING

SCHUCK

TAILOR S Phone 498

215 N. Minn St.

Residence Phone 150

Office Phone 260

DR. F. H. DUBBE PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON NEW ULM,

MINNESOTA


SPAULDING ATHLETIC GOODS ~at-

Robert Fesenmaier,

Inc.

Special discount given to students

CRONE BROS. CO. Always

Show The Latest Clothes

and

Reasonable

Our

Best

in Young_ Men's

Furnishings Prices

Attention

Everything of a banking nature entrusted to our care receives our best attention. We shall be glad to have a share of your business.

State Bank of New Ulm Member Federal

Deposit

Insurance

Fund

MUESING Drug

Store

"Expert Prescription

Service

ARTCRAFT PHOTO SERVICE We Have It! Will Get It! Or It Isn't Made!

Pholles 52-34I


WHEN IN NEED OF FOOTWEAR Be Sure and Call on Us We carry a complete line of men's, ladies' and children's shoes We appreciate your business. Our prices are always the lowest, Qualitconsidered

ATHLETIC SHOES OUR SPECIALTY TRY OUR REPAIR DEPARTMENT

FOR GOOD WORK

P. J. EICHTEN SHOE STORE New Ulm, Minnesota

THE NATIONAl ..TEA CO. FOOD STORES GROCERS AND BAKERS New VIm, Minnesota

G. J. HIEBERT,D~n.S. OfficeOver Rexall Drug Store Office Phone 247 Residence Phone 1547 New VIm, Minn.

Weilandt & Stegeman Contractors and Builders Correspondence Solicited Work Done in Any Section of the Community Plans and Specifications Furnished Estimates Cheerfully Given Office 1100 Center St. Phone 571 Auto Glass Replaced to Order

Champion Shoe Shop A Pleased Customer Is Our Best Advertisement We also have a good supply of new shoes. E. FREESE, Proprietor 24 So. Minn. St.

NEW ULM GREENHOUSES New DIm, Minn. - Phone 45


NEW ULM GROCERY CO. Wholesale Grocers Distributors STOKLEY'S CANNED VEGETABLES LIBBY'S CANNED FRUITS Service and Satisfaction at the

MODEL BARBER SHOP Alfred H. Kuester, Prop.

Footwear Athletic Footwear and Sox Ladies' Smart Styles Attractively Priced

EMIL WICHERSKI For Greater Values and Service See Us ,

, I ,~.

i

!'

COAL Lumber-Millwork Cement-Sewer Pipe and all other Builders Supplies

HENRY

SIMONS LUMBER CO. DEPENDABILITY

I


THE SCHROEDER BAKERY THE FLOWER OF NEW ULM JUST LIKE THE BREAD MOTHER MAKES

PHONE 232 AID ASSOCIATION FOR LUTHERANS APPLETON, WISCONSIN The largest legal reserve fraternal life insurance society for Lutherans in the United States and Canada, and operating strictly within the various Synods of the Synodical Conference. 34 YEARS' RECORD

1902 191'2. 1922 1932 1933 19-34 1935... April 1936.

No. Of Branches 33 $ 234 942 2,128 2,187 2,273 .... 2,330 2,350

Insurance In Force 760,000.00 7,404,600.00 26,258,018.00 125,864,13:3.00 131,328,065.00 144,%8,113.00 160,262,690.00 163,346,807.00

... $19,709,639.87 Total Admitted Assets Total Bene-fitsPaid to Cerfificate-holders and Beneficiaries Since Organization ....$15,471,204.75 ALEX O. BENZ, President Wrn. F. KeIrn, First Vice President Albert Voecks, Secretary Wrn. H. Zuehlke, Treasurer


SCHLUMPBERGER'S

GROCERY

Groceries-Frui ts- Vegetables-Smoked Meats Phone 182 New Ulm, Minn.

WILLIAM J. VON BANK, D.D.S. Dentist Residence Phone

OfficePhone

TRY THE

797

New Ulm, Minn.

237

BEE HIVE

FIRST

fAVORITES

I

J. A. OCHS & SON, Inc. New DIm. Minn. The Busiest Store in Town-There Must Be A Good Reason Why EVERYTHING FOR THE CO-ED . . AT RIGHT PRICES

F. J. BACKER & CO. HARNESS DEALER Kwik-Pak Parcel Post Laundry Cases Trunks. Traveling Bags. Suit Cases. Purses and Other Leather Specialties

DR.E. G.LANG DENTIST Office above State Bank of New Ulm Oflice Phone 472

Res. Phone 1172

THE GASTLER STUDIO For Quality Photographs Also Kodak Finishing'


A. C. OCHS BRICK & TILE COMPANY General Sales Office 906 Foshay Tower Minneapolis

Executive Office and Plant Springfield, Minn.

Manufacture

Artistic Face Brick Various Colors -

Also-

Load Bearing Tile and complete line of

Building Tile and Common Brick Our Material stands every Test, and was used in hundreds of Government, State, Public and Private jobs in every state of the great Northwest and Canada. Some of them being-The last twelve new buildings on the University of Minnesota Campus, numerous large business blocks and other buildings in the City of Minneapolis, such as the New Nicollet Hotel, Sheridan Apartments, Cleveland School, St. Mary's Hospital, Swedish Hospital, Calhoun Beach Club, etc., etc., two Lutheran churches of Springfield, Immanuel Lutheran Church of Mankato, Lutheran Churches in Brewster, Lake Benton, Blue Earth, Wanamingo, Westbrook, Wood Lake, Alden, St. Paul, Morgan, Odin, Ceylon, Clara City, Jackson, Delano; Devils Lake, Arnegard in No. Dakota; Dimock,Roscoe,Huron, etc., in So. Dakota, the Dr. Martin Luther College and the Union Hospital of New DIm, the Lutheran School at Sleepy Eye, together with others built prior and since the above mentioned. Veterans .buildings at St. Cloud, Minnesota and Rapid City, South Dakota, the new seven story First National Bank at Fargo, North Dakota, also large public and private buildings at Brookings, Watertown, Lennox, Lyons, Huron, South Dakota; Willmar, Hendricks, St. Paul, Marshall, Tracy, Rochester, Winona, Minnesota and many others all over the four States.

Our Products Are Sold in the New DIm Territory by New DIm Brick & Tile Yards


Buy to the Limit Save to the Limit If Savings Mean Anything at All to You, You'll Stock Up at Penney's

J.. C. PENNEY CO. Corner Minn. and 2nd North

St.

Give Your Eyes a Chance It isn't right to toil under the handicap of defective eyesight. Poor eyes make backward students. They not only affect your work, but your nerves and health as well. We fit your eyes right, grind lenses in our own shop and replace broken lenses on short notice.

DRS. SCHLEUDER ..

I

Optometriss and Eyesght Specialista

102 N. Minn. St.

Telephone 87

For Printing and Supplies

Phone

370

New Ulm

KEMSKE PAPER CO.

Towels and Toilet Paper

Mimeograph Stencils and Ink Filing Equipment and Office Supplies

NEW

ULM

DAIRY

THE HOME OF

Pure Dairy Products r ASTEUEIZED MILK, CREAM, BUTTER and

ICE

CREAM PHONE 104

Route and Gunter

Service

SOMSEN, DEMPSEY, JOHNSON and SOMSEN Henry N .. Somsen Russell

L. Johnson Attorneys

New VIm,

W. H. Dempsey Henry N. Somsen, Jr. At Law

Minnesota


DANIEL WEBSTER FLOUR Produces More and Better Bread

, 1_;;.:..1 .......

THE BIDST IS ALWAY路STHE CHEAPEST

EAGLE ROLLER MILL CO. NEW ULM, MINNESOTA

PINK'S STORE Where the Newest Styles Are Shown First The Smartest Wear for Young and Old At Prices You Expect to Pay

The Store Where You Feel At Home DEER

BRAND

BEER

AUGUST SCHELL BREWING COMPANY NEW ULM,

MINNESOTA

1


HA VENSTEIN BEER and PALE DRY CARBONATED BEVERAGE SERVED AT ALL PLACES Telephone No. 1 New VIm, Minnesota

Buy Rexall lVJerchandise

SUPERIOR QUALITY

i,,"

.

i

'l "

AT LOWER PRICES

I .

i I ,..,.

~.::..• ,I _~

i-I

J_.-

'.

: 'l

REXALL DRUG' STORE Walter Muesing-Walter

W. Hellmann

"SAVE WITH SAFETY" For Your Dry Cleaning, Laundry or Hat Work We assure you prompt and efficient service and invite you to visit our modern, up-to-date plant at 107-109 So. Minn. St.

NEW ULM STEAM LAUNDRY OTTO F. OSWALD & SONS

Expert Dry Cleaners and Hatters

Phone No.5


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Buy Where

r ou See

This Sign

YOU BUY BETTER BECAUSE WE BUY BETTER Our 500 Store Buying Power Makes Possible the Low Prices on Our Quality Merchandise

F. H. RETZLAFF HARDWARE COMPANY

D,rs. Hammermeister ~ Saffert Physicians and Surgeons

MINNESOTA

NEW ULM,

QUALITY CLOTHING At

$17.50 to $35.00

TAUSCHECK ~ GREEN

Drive With Dodge

SAFETY

Plymouth

RETZLAFF MOTOR COMPANY


We Turn a House Into a Home

BUENGER FURNITURE Stores:

CO.

New Ulm, Sleepy Eye and Gibbon

SUCCESSFUL PLANNING Everything in co-operation and accommodation consistent with courteous and sane banking principles is added to "YOUR AOOOUNT" at this community financial institution.

CITIZENS STATE BANK New UIm, Minnesota Under provisions of the Banking Act of 1933 Our Deposits Are Insured


UNIDN HOSPITAL NEW ULM, MINN. A modern, well-equipped, and fireproof hospital supervised by and staffed with registered nurses. PHONE No. 404

A. L. KUSSKE, M.D. Practice Limited to Eye, Ear. Nose and Throat a-id Fitting of Glasses In Weiser Block Over Silver Latch Cafe Nr w DIm Minnesota

SUBSCRIBERS, ATTENTION! When You Change Your Address Be sure to notify the Business Manager The Messenger Is Never Forwarded By Your Local Postmaster


COMPLIMENTS

OF

T. O. STREISSGUTH Reconstruction, Installation, Additions, Blowers, Chimes, Harps

Modernizing, Maintaining, Tuning, Repairs, Service, Sales

Wicks Pipe Organs ERNEST C. VOGELPOHL ORGAN ARCHITECTS AND BUILDERS New Uim, Minn.

405-'409 North Broadway

When in Need of Electrical Supplies and Radios or Service call on

Ulrich Ele~tric Company ELECTRIC SERVICE AT ITS BEST BUY WITH SERVICE

Phone 148

'I

r','

" ~~-; r- ;~ f-!_

!

--','~

~-~:-.:

HENRY GOEDE

y •. ;e.0"'k.c, ,

STUDIO

~~ , , J]~JIYL

; .:

1---<-

I

.

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.'

..... '

We Make Photos That Satisfy STUDIO

I'

170 North Broadway

TIes. Fhone 311

Phone 315

Waiting to Serve You A Iways a Good Barber

I

At

LANG'S MASTER BARBER SHOP No Mug Shower Baths

"Bel iw Silver Latch Inn" We Use Bar-Soap Lather Machine ABSOLUTIDLY SANI'rARY

No Brush Shoe Shines


1935-1936 DMLC Messenger Vol. 26  
1935-1936 DMLC Messenger Vol. 26