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THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

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VALEDICTORY Esteemed members of the faculty, schoolmates, and friends: The graduating class of 1934 welcomes you to its commencement exercises. We are happy to see so many of you here. Commencement is indeed a happy day. It means primarily the attainment of a goal, the reaching of a destination toward which we have been striving. We have finished the course prescribed for us and have attained that end upon which we set our eyes as freshmen in the high school. These diplomas which we hold are testimonies to the fact that we have carried out our studies to the satisfaction of our instructors and are now prepared to enter the field to take up the fight for the Lord. We nevertheless realize that, as the name of this day implies, this is only the' commencement of what is to come; this is only the prelude to a great field of endeavor that will cover a lifetime if properly carried out. This day is, however, a large milestone on the road of education, and we are very happy to reach it. This day also bears a special significance that make s it all the more a day of joy for us. This is an anniversary in the history of our school. The Lord has been pleased to bestow his blessings upon this institution and guide it for


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fifty years. It is indeed an important occasion and worthy of commemoration, and you have come from far and near to thank the Lord for His care and guidance. You have come from far and near to awaken fond memories of your school days, to renew friendshins that have long been parted, and to honor your Alma Mater on her semi-centennial birthday. Not only is this the Golden Jubilee of our school, but it is also the fiftieth anniversary of one of its professors. He was the first man called to this college and is to this day still actively engaged in his work here. We are happy to share the joy of this day with Prof. Burk and congratulate him; may the Lord grant him many years of blessed labor here as yet. On every hand there is joy over the anniversaries to be celebrated, and we above all are happy to have the honor of being the Golden Jubilee Class; it is an honor which we shall all remember and a name which will unite us in future years though many miles separate us. Would that we could keep this day in our memories as a happy day. Would that we could see only the joy of it all, but, alas, we must bear with us thoughts that add a bitter drop to our cup. We find at this moment of parting that these halls have grown more dear to us than we had ever realized. Every room, every building, all have contributed so much toward making this a real home for us during our studies here, and now we must leave them all. During the past years we have also formed many friendships; living together in our dormitories and in our school as we have for so long we have come to know each other as intimately as members of one family, and as hard as it is to leave home, so we also find it hard to leave our school with its familiar surroundings and friends. And now classmates: The time for parting is here. Let us look at the haDDY side of our days spent here and forget the nan=s of parting. Let us still rather cast our eyes into the future and see what lies before us. How shall we approach this great field of our endeavor? What are the commands of our Lord? We know that the words of Christ, "Feed my lambs," and "Go, ye, and teach all nations." are sooken as directly to us at this moment as they were to Peter and, the other apostles. Let us therefore like those disciples of Christ place ourselves wholly at His disposal and bend our every effort toward bringing in especially the lambs to the fold. Let us do this in a spirit of self-sacrificing love for our Savior and for those tender lives placed into our hands


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for moulding. In such a spirit we can easily fulfill our motto and say, "Thy will, not mine, 0 Lord." Let us enter the field with this resolution; then we need never be ashamed of our work and shall at the final judgment day be able to render a good account of the charge placed into our hands. At this time of commencement our hearts are also overflowing with gratitude. We thank the Lord for His care and guidance during our schooling. We pray that He may more than ever bless us as we now go out into the field to teach. We cannot hope ever to repay in the slightest measure all the sacrifices of our parents and others who rave supported us while we were here. To say, "Thank you," seems but a paltry conventionality. We hope therefore that by working faithfully in the field and by fulfilling their aim in sending us here that we can make them proud of us and in that way slightly repay the great debt we owe them. We also thank all the Christians throughout our Synod whose gifts have given us this institution and maintain it. We cannot also begin to estimate the debt we owe our faculty. It was their care and guidance that kept us on the path to the real truth. They have faithfully instilled in us true Christian principles and have advised and admonished us. When we erred they were patient with us and bore with us' in our weakness, and by their true Christian dealing with us they have won a place of honor and es ' eem in our hearts. We thank them for their untiring efforts on our behalf and hope that our labors in the field may be richly blessed and thus redound to their praise. We thank all you relatives, friends, and alumni for coming here and helping to make this a real day of joy for us. We express our gratitude to the II normal class for all the beautiful decorations and preparations they have made for tl-is day. One and all we thank you-God bless you.

R. C. J. '34.

AMERICA'S HEROES Other nations may have great warriors and benevolent rulers whom they class as their heroes, but America is too democratic to do such a thing. She originated peace pacts to do away with warriors, and she elects presidents to look after the government of the country. Her people seem to


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believe that this is the most practical way of settling that uninteresting matter; and if, according to their opinion, the president fails to establish and maintain the prosperity they desire, he is severely criticized and after the close of his term of office is ousted and remembered no more. In the eyes of many Americans he is then nothing more than a worn-out tool. Toiling for the general welfare of our homeland does not seem to be the worthy and sufficient aim of a hero. Most people want heroes of a different type. Let us therefore see who the heroes of America are. Although we have a large number of prominent characters worthy of our admiration, I feel that the majority of our American people did not choose wisely; for the heroes of our nation are none other than a host of professional athletes. How it -is possible for these persons to rise so high in the estimation of the people can only be explained if one realizes that the present age is chasing chiefly after pleasure and amusements, and work and art are only an undesirable necessity. The crowds shout for leaders who can steer them through their leisure hours, and those who respond to their desires become their idols. In my opinion Jack Dempsey, Gene Tunney, and Max Schmeling never had a right to be classed as heroes. I maintain that their prize fights were more barbaric than heroic. Babe Ruth and the many other ball players whose names are too numerous to mention awaken and stimulate ambitions in men and boys who might otherwise have had higher motives than perhaps seeking professions for selfglorification. Of what benefit was it to mankind that Gertrude Ederle swam across the English Channel? Without question, all the courageous feats of these people serve first and last the performers themselves. To me such achievement seems very trivial. I must yet learn to see something noble in a person who for no other reason than to gain riches exhibits his courage before a tumultuous crowd. Let us pause. Must we all choose our heroes from .the athletic round-up? How can we pay homage to people whom we now' do not acknowledge? Must we perhaps do without a hero? That is impossible, for I believe that only a real egoist can live without having some person or persons to admire. Where are America's truly great men? It is to be lamented that the doings of our professional ball players eclipse the efforts and accomplishments of our nation's statesmen, inventors, educators, and artists; yet many of us know that they are there. It is therefore only


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just that we give them some of the attention tion which they so richly deserve.

and admira-

Permit me to mention first of all our nation's president, Franklin D. Roosevelt. If he can not get at least our good will as a reward for his unceasing efforts to keep peace and order in our country, we are, indeed, the most ungrateful citizens and not worthy to have heroes. The daily newspapers are the messengers that bring to us the ideas and activities of our great men as well as the reports of our athletes. Although discussions of them are crowded into the obscure columns, one can find them if one cares. How I do search for statements concerning Senator Borah, and especially Senator La.Folletts from my home state. For me their aims and hobbies seem so much loftier than those of the Cubs or the Red Sox. Just think, they are striving to make our country the grandest place to live in .. In our homes, in our gardens, in our workshops we can pursue our work and fun unmolested, because these men and others like them keep busy solving the political and social problems for us. The sports fans need not think that we have a hard time killing our leisure - hours, for if our minds cannot invent pastimes, we have many men who plan for us. Sandburg, Robinson, and Masters wrote enough poems to chase away the .most sluggish hours. What can be more pleasant than reading "A Friend of Caesar," "A Friar of Wittenberg," or "Ben. Hur" in some shady nook in the garden? It certainly can not be a hot afternoon upon some bleachers, watching a baseball game. No matter how insignificant William Stearns Davis may be to some people, he is worthy to be one of my heroes. It may be impossible to say just who the great heroes of America are, because of the many different attitudes of the people. A hero that is perfect in the eyes of one may have dozens of faults in the eyes of another. We magnify the good qualities of those that we admire and overlook their shortcomings. Our heroes are made, not born. AItrough the majority of our people gather about the athlete, I belong to that small group who chooses its heroes from the assembly of scholars and statesmen.

v. L.

'35.


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THE

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MARK TWAIN THE CYNIC When we hear the name, Mark Twain, mentioned, we immediately think of him as the great humorist. It is true; his writings have become subjects for humor and fun. Yet we behold in Samuel Langhorne Clemens a certain dislike, when the literary world called him a humorist. Mark Twain wished to be taken seriously. His ideas he wished to express in ridicule. He made fun of the deeply religious-minded and of those to whom church-going was a mere pretense. He hated sham and affectation of every kind. Mark Twain was a pessimist. He was a hater of the human race. This fact we glean from his favorite expression: "the damned human race." These are ideas, not new. They were expressed already by the ancient Greek school of cynic philosophy. A cynic taught that virtue is. the only good, and that its essence is self-control and independence. He believed that human conduct was wholly to be self-interest and self-indulgence. Into this picture we fit Mark Twain. What made Mark Twain a cynic'! Perhaps it was the wider view on life which he gained on his travels. The first evidence of this fact we find in his book Innocents Abroad. Mark Twain was much impressed by the sights in the Old World, but as soon as some member of the sight-seeing party would express himself in hypocritical sentimentality, he would become violent and outrageous in his ridicule. When things in Europe did not please him, he openly said so. Whatever he disliked, he criticized. This he did through the medium of ridicule. Another example of Mark Twain's cynicism we find expressed in his book A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. In this volume he showed his disdain for the old-fashioned idea of chivalry. He ridiculed the church, which at that time was enmired in superstition and unbelief. He laughed at the fashions and dress of that period. These books and opinions which Mark Twain expressed in them belong to the middle period of Mark Twain's life. At this time of his life Mark Twain was. not yet so sharp in voicing his pessimistic views. Later in his life we find Mark Twain in the lowest stages of pessimism and misanthropy. His book What Is Man expressed a most contemptible satire on man. "Man," he says, "is a machine, an impersonal machine." He continues by saying that man is moved and governed by exterior influences. Men lacked originality. Man had no


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control over his brain. The only impulse that drove man to do a certain thing was motivated by self-interest. He even goes so far and says that mother love is selfish. Whatever a mother does for her child she does for the purpose of gaining self-approval, and self-approval is man's only impelling power. In the same book Mark Twain ridicules the moral sense of man. He claims that animals have greater sense of right and wrong than man. He illustrates this point by s.ating that a starving dog picked up from the street and fed will not bite you, whereas a man down and out to whom aid is given is apt to bite back at his benefactor. More pessimistic views are given in his history of the human race. He pictures life as a continual drudge and as weary toil. After all man is nothing. He struggles for bread. Each fights to get the most of the comforts of this life. Then come old age and sickness. which push down .the pride of man. Finally, death ends all and with it ambitions are killed and checked. This characteristic, the despairing of mankind, we find in the whole life of Mark Twain. Closely related to Mark Twain's cynicism are his views concerning God. As a deist he belonged to the school of Paine and Ingersoll. Not only did Mark Twain adhere to the beliefs of these men, bu t he enlarged upon them. He added science and a form of Calvinism to this deistic religion. In this religion he put a God, whom he blamed for all the faults and misfortunes on this earth. For this being he had no reverence. Since God cared nothing for man, as he thought, Mark Twain believed himself free to say and do as he pleased. In conclusion we may summarize that Mark Twain was an unenlighten€d misanthrope. He showed extreme contempt for the human race. He was blasphemous and criticized God. There was a time when he at first made fun of Christian Science, bu ; it seems that toward the end of his life he even was tempted to believe in this-the unreality of the universe. R. R. '35.

MY IMPRESSION OF THE SPORTS PAGE "Lasky will humble Baer." A phrase of minor importance like the one stated is what catches the public's eye. During the present era a newspaper cannot be popular in


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America without a conspicuous and magnificent sports page. Any paper that publishes only news, politics and conservative reading material soon loses its subscribers or else does not obtain any in the first place. The wise editor can soon solve such a problem very easily. A sure cure is the institution of a few pages of jumbled thoughts concerning sports. Every time I see the large number of sports pages in a daily paper, I am convinced that America's honorable citizens care more about who pitched for Detroit or who scored the winning touchdown than what the political and national affairs of our country are. Surely if some of our early statesmen would come back to earth, they would be horror-stricken to see the craze of the present Americans for those minor activities recorded on the sports page. I am certain they would regret the fact that they were given the opportunity to witness such insanity. Of all the long-winded. stale, tiresome writers, I believe those that scribble those dozens of columns of hash about nothing are the biggest bores. They must fill space; therefore they begin with a nice long preparation for the empty story which they are about to write. After they rave written for some time, it dawns upon them that more words are necessary; consequently they begin all over again by repeating everything that already has been stated; only they tax their brains for a different type of flowery language, which every successful sports writer possesses. Thus we now already have two copies of that magnificent story which they want to ring out to the world, but by the time the paper is ready for publication, the mighty deeds of America's athletic heroes are duplicated many times. To emphasize some heroic deed or startling play, the sports editor must use an especially fancy phrase or group of sentences, or else the public will stamp him as one who has no emotions and is able to record only cold facts. Again the poor writer must plague his brains to the utmost in order to satisfy the crazed public. The result is that he brings forth from the deepest recess of his tr.inking machine a group of adjectives that would startle even a statue of stone. Yes, every insignificant fact concernin-r athletes must

r-p recorded, but just because Dick Hamilton was tired, lazy, stubborn, disappointed or sick shortly before the exhibition game at Melbourne is no sign that his beautiful name must be smeared over the entire daily paper in large blazing letters. There are other people of yet greater im-

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portance who also are plagued with such frailties yet they receive no mention. Newspapers do not record every ingrown toe nail, sore ankle, or headache that the chief executive suffers, but if America's athletic idols suffer one of these minor ailments the entire world must know it. Yes, the citizens sympathize with sorrowing heart, especially after they have read the sentimental story of the sports writer. . .

-

One never reads in the papers concerning the minor occurrences of our president's youth. Such things are left in darkness even during the presidential campaign, but similar incidents concerning our idols are treated with all the care and exaggeration possible in order that everyone may know that Lynwood Rowe still loves his childhood sweetheart, Edna Skinner, that Red Grange tipped over in a baby carriage when he was four years, three months and two days old, that Nagurski suffered a stomachache from eating too much sauerkraut on August 5, 1910, and many other facts of major importance. Some facts, however, are not so virtuous, but they do not serve to discredit the athletes. First of all the sports writers give the heroes six coats of whitewash and then the public puts the best construction on their deeds so that finally the vices of the athletes turn out to be virtues. Every day some athlete's comely picture must edify the sports page. If it so路-happens that no one performed a great act; then by means of psychology, physiology, sociology, or necromancy the sports writers explain why a certain favorite son of America has not been performing as he should. Usually a high-sounding alibi glossed with gross exaggeration whitewashes that particular athlete to such an extent that the public feels sorry for his inferiority or superioriiy complex, his extreme case of neurasthenia, or whatever ailment is ascribed to him, but little are the readers aware of the fact that this particular person has been disqualified or suspended for slugging an official or has been benched for plain laziness. Yes, newspapers are forced to edit elaborate sports pages, but although they contain high-sounding phrases, in my opinion every column of sports adds a large gloomy letter to the word trivial. H. O. F. '35.

I I


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The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published quarterly during the. school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is seventy-fivecents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communicationsshould be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates win be furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends. Entered as second class matter at Post.Officeof New DIm, Minnesota

Volume XXV

No.1

September 1934

-: The Messenger Staff :Raymond

Duehlmeier

Waldemar

Nolte

Edi tor- in -Chief Business Manager

Julius Wantoch

Assistant

Business Manager

Winfried

Assistant

Business

Stoekli...

Doris Sauer Vera Lawrenz Ruth

Uhlig

Herman

Fehlauer

Beata Moldenhauer

Manager

Alumni Notes 路

Exchange CoUege Notes Locals Co-ed Notes

Raymond

Riess

Athletics

Clarence

Radl.

Jokes


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r.==================-=-=--=--== -----II

EDITORIAL

• = HOSPITALITY Hospitality, that practice of receiving friends and strangers with kindness and liberality, has always been very common in the Orient and in regions where persecutions were frequent. In our country, however, hospitality seems to have gradually fallen into neglect during the progress of time. Today we find that it has practically become a thing of the past. Surely, this is a deplorable condition. It is, therefore, our duty as future leaders in the Church to do our part in again making hospitality common. We can already begin at school, and there are various ways in which we may show our hospitality. Several weeks ago students again entered the portals of ·our school. The greater majority of them were to live in the school-day homes, the dormitories. For us, the older s: udents, returning to old friends and familiar surroundings was a pleasure. We, however, were not the only ones who had come to make these dormitories our temporary homes; many new students had come to share them with us. For them the first days of school were undoubtedly not so pleasant, for their happy greetings did not resound on the campus, nor did they wear smiles 'on their faces. Here we had and still have ample opportunity .of showing our hospitality. A pleasant greeting or an invitation to our' rooms means much to our new students. Why not do


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everything in our power to make them feel at home in our midst? This is one way in which we can all practice hospitality and prevent it from dying out at least in our school. During the course of the year we shall also have many other opportunities of showing our hospitality. Frequently visitors come to our institution in order to become better acquainted with it. These we can invite to the classrooms and other activities and show them our various buildings and equipment. Although these things may seem trivial to us, yet they are not considered as such by him who receives them. Since we have these opportunities, let us make the most of them, and thereby develop a habit which will be of value in later life. It is no difficult task to show hospitality; in fact, it is a pleasant one. Try it. R. D. '35.

TEMPLES Since the world began man has built temples. The .world over we find many different types and constructions which range from the Buddhist Temples in Japan to the Cathedral of Rheims in France. In history we are told of those wonderful. buildings which represented man's tribute to some higher being. Probably the most famous temple is Solomon's. If we could see its spacious dimensions and rich interior laden with the best the world could offer, we would doubtlessly say, "This is the greatest temple ever .built." The dictionary tells us that a temple is an edifice dedicated to the worship of a deity. The greatest. temple of all time can be found right today. Where? It is found near home; in fact, you see it every day. It is your body, for have you not dedicated your body to the Lord? Man-made temples can not begin to compare with the delicate and incomprehensible construction of ours which was made by God. In the eyes of the world Solomon's man-made temple was a magnificent structure, but how much more magnificent must be the temple which the Lord himself built. With these things in mind, I believe that today God gives us the same task which he gave to Solomon, that is to build a worthy dwelling place for our Lord. A.C.-'37


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ALUMNI NOTES In spite of discouraging signs when calls were given out this spring, we find that all but a few of the graduating class of 1'934 received assignments. The teachers have been placed as follows: William Arras, Sebewaing, Michigan; Louise Baumann, Bowdle, South Dakota; Elmer Behrens, Weyauwega, Wisconsin; Norbert Berndt, Kenosha, Wisconsin; Esther Bode, Coleman (Eldorado), Wisconsin; Floyd Beroken, New Prague, Minnesota; Arthur Glende, Cedar Mills, Minnesota (P. O. Corvuso); Esther Heimann, Jefferson, Wisconsin; Roland -Jacobs, Oshkosh, Wisconsin; Eldor Kopitzke; Ruth Lorenz, Hortonville, Wisconsin; Clara Oswald, Thiensville, Wisconsin; Elizabeth Robisch, Menomonie, Wisconsin ; Waldemar Roekle; Rudolph Schulz; Christina Stellick, Tomah, Wisconsin; Gertrude Vogel, Goodhue, Minnesota. . Upon the resignation of Mrs. Henry Goeglein, Miss Ada Sievert, who has been teaching at Watertown, Wisconsin, accepted the position as matron of our girls' dormitory.


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Martin Albrecht '29, who has been teaching at the Winnebago Lutheran Academy, has entered the Seminary at Thiensville. The wanderlust seized several of our alumni, and a vague desire for new scenes filled their hearts. The result was several changes of positions, among which are the following: . Clara Mehlberg, desiring to be nearer to her Alma Mater, left Bowdle, South Dakota, for Gaylord, Minnesota. Yearning for Minnesota air, Viola Louis left Colome, South Dakota, for Gibbon, Minnesota. Raymond Brei succeeded her at Colome. Viola Oetjen deserted Thiensville for Manitowoc, Wisconsin, to take the place of Melinda Bartsch. Hilda Zahn of Jefferson, Wisconsin, took Ada Sievert's place at Watertown, Wisconsin. Erwin Bartsch accepted an assignment to Mt. Lebanon, Milwaukee. Sanborn, NewUlm.

Minnesota,

welcomes Bertha

Wilbrecht

of

Louis Harms has been called to Baraboo, Wisconsin. To fill a vacancy caused by the resignation of G. Groth, S. J. Bergmann accepted the call to St. Mark's in Watertown, Wisconsin. We are happy to state that several members of the class of '33 have received calls; namely, William Bartels to Watertown, Wisconsin; Edna Steinberg to the East Fork Mission in Arizona; Fred Beck to Hinckley, Minnesota; and Edwin Sorgatz to Glencoe, Minnesota. We wish them God's blessing on this new year of school work! Resigna tions : William Schriefer has resigned at Buillion, and Fred Lippnow, formerly of Williamsburg, Iowa, has been assigned to take his place. H. A. Braun of Reedsville resigned from his position. Waldemar Pape of Lewiston, Minnesota, is to fill the vacancy. Lacorda Schimmelpfennig has resigned from her position at Hortonville, Wisconsin.


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Cupid, alias Eros Dillinger, was not idle during the spring and summer months, but succeeded in bringing down several victims with his little wooden gun, as we see from the following: . John Bremer '33 and Odelia Burk, married August 4. Walter Luedtke and Melita Voigh, married August 17. Arnold Meyer and Mildred Albrecht, both of the class of '30, married August 20. Erwin Bartsch '27 and lola Winter of Graceville, Minnesota, married August 10. Adolph Janke and Melinda Bartsch '28, married August 25. Elmer Kiecker of Fairfax and Gertrude Seehusen '28, married September 8. . A daughter, Eunice, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Waldemar Pape. Mrs. Pape was the former Elizabeth Binger. Here we have news concerning one who has but recently entered the ranks of the alumnae. Louise Baumann suffered herself to be relieved of her appendix in late August. Consequently she was unable to attend the opening of her school at Bowdle, South Dakota, but she hopes to return to her post as soon as possible. Good luck! Feeling an urge to be taught instead of to teach, the following attended summer school at Concordia College, River Forest, Illinois: Olivia Tjernagel, Theodore Lau '26, Fritz Bartels '28, Bernhard Boese '29, and Arthur Meier '33.


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EXCHANG E NOTES The Vacation Number of the Concordia Courier has the following headline on its front page: "Dr. O. Hattstaedt Ends Half Century of Noble Service." For many years we have used in our German literature classes a "Handbuch der deutschen Nationalliteratur" edited by Dr. Hattstaedt. This fact brings him near to us although we may not know him personally. Through the medium of his book he has been .also our educator, and therefore we wish to join his many friends in wishing him the Lord's blessing for many more years. It is interesting to know that Dr. Hattstaedt first came to Concordia (Milwaukee) in 1884, directly from the seminary at St. Louis. During the past half century he has instructed many hundred youths as professor of history and of German language and literature. Some years ago he was instructor of Concordians in choral and secular singing. Until recently he was secretary of the faculty. He still holds the position of faculty librarian. His activities have, however, not been limited to the classroom and campus. At various times he was assistant pastor of Immanuel, Cross, Zion, and St. Stephen's Lutheran churches.


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Dr. Hattstaedt has been active in the. literary field. He has written a "Handbuch der deutschen Nationalliteratur" and a- "Deutsche Grarnmatik" and was editor of a collection of German spiritual and folk songs. Frequently articles from his pen have appeared in synodical publications, especially in the "Lutheraner." In 1930 the faculty of Concordia Seminary of St. Louis, Missouri, created him Doctor of Divinity.

u

To fill a gapInsert the thing that Block it up With other and 'twill The more; You cannot solder an With air.

caused it. . yawn abyss

The philosophy expressed by Emily Dickinson in the above lines is very true. The lines seem to have been created for an Exchange Column writer. Especially do they seem appropriate when that writer is asked to do her duty in the second week of September when schools have scarcely opened their doors, and no one has heard from anyone, and finally, only one vacation number is found on the Exchange shelf. "Short and snappy" can be the only verdict, and a humble assurance that every effort will be made to offer a longer and more interesting column in the next issue. This promise can, however, be only fulfilled if the fellow-students in the schools about us do not neglect us, or are not too modest to send us their periodicals. Stop, Look, Listen! not disappoint us.

We want your school paper-do


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COLLEGE

NOTES

The school year has begun again. We welcome to our midst the new faces. The enrollment this year has increased to about 130, and several students are still expected to come. Excepting the graduates, not many of the old students are missing. There is one face, however, which we all miss, and that is the face of Professor Bliefernicht. He was confined to his bed most of the summer, and he will be unable to do any teaching this winter. May God grant him sure and complete recovery. Mr. John Dahlke has been called as tutor to help carry the extra work which has been shifted to the rest of the faculty because of Professor Bliefernicht's illness. We wish him success. As usual, the faculty was widely scattered during the summer vacation. Professor Albrecht went to Wisconsin. Professor Backer and family visited the Century of Progress Exposition. Professor and Mrs. Burk made several trips to Duluth. On August 22, while returning from Fort Ridgely, they had the misfortune to be in an auto accident. Luckily no one was seriously injured. Professor Janke attended summer school at Madison, Wisconsin. Professor waukee.

and Mrs. Klatt

and family went to Mil-


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

21

Professor Leverson and Professor Palmbach visited their homes in Lake Mills, Iowa, and Appleton, Wisconsin. Professor Sauer attended the conference in Milwaukee. Professor Schaller spent a few days at Lake Washing-

-ton, and also made a trip to the Twin Cities.

Professor Schweppe. and family visited 'in South Dakota and Wisconsin. Professor and Mrs. Stindt and family went to Bay City, Michigan. Professor and Mrs. Voecks visited Appleton and Cudahy, Wisconsin.

their

homes in

The new boys had an opportunity to join the band at its first meeting on September 10. This year the band will be under the leadership of Martin Rauschke.

Although the Fiftieth Anniversary celebration of our . college occurred several months ago, I feel sure that the memory of the occasion lingers in the minds of all those who participated. Taken all in all, the entire festival, because of its significance, impressed itself on our hearts; but I feel that there is another specific reason, and that is the presence of old friends and acquaintances. It was this spirit of love and tribute on the part of old students and alumni that made the Jubilee Celebration the happy occasion that it was. The Golden Jubilee was a time of meetings and reunions, a time of old acquaintances renewed and strengthened, a time for the exchanging of reminiscences and fond memories. But it was more than that. For us and for all the friends and visitors who participated, it was an occasion on which we could give all honor and praise to the Father, who has guided the work of our school for the pas t fifty years. We thank all those who joined us in our festival of thanksgiving, many by being present, and many by the sending of their felicitations. Our sincere hope and desire is that we may meet again in the next happy anniversary celebration of our college.


22

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

CO-ED NOTES September 5 again found numerous strange faces on the top of the hill. We say "Howdy" to them all. The newcomers are: Dorothy Trommer, Saginaw, Michigan; Ruth Gehlhar, Elgin, Minnesota; Agnes Timm, Milwaukee. Wisconsin; Frances Senf, St. James, Minnesota; Margaret Koehler, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Erna Kuehl, .Mound City, South Dakota; Alma Sick, Elgin, North Dakota; Vernice Seibel, Courtland, Minnesota; Marion Temple, Erna Gieseke, Melba Gieseke, Genevieve Hartmann, Helen Hempel, Erna Hinnenthal, La Vierne Kraus, Lillian Schroeder, Anita Schwartz, New Ulm, Minnesota. . It seems as though many of our girls can't decide what they want. Each year there has been some shifting about. Ora Wallenburg has moved to Redeker Hall and Veleda Kelm has come back to the dorm again: I guess she has decided that the "windige Ecke" is the place for her. After two years' absence, Erma Engel has returned to D. M. L. C. Esther Paape, who left to teach for a semester, has also returned. Please stay a while this time. We hardly recognized the inside of our "home," as we returned from our vacation. The rooms were all nicely painted. All our cherished and well-known spots had been covered. The floors were covered with a highly polished coat of floor wax-c-much to Helen Weyland's sorrow. Florence Raddatz announces, this 路seventeenth day of September, 1934, to all those who are lovesick or homesick, that there are 77 days till Thanksgiving, 97 till Christmas vacation, and 275 till June fourteenth. "Quiet" was a shy person dwelling in Hillcrest Hall for three or four days. He reigned supreme. One night, under pledge of secrecy, a monster, by the name of

to


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

23

"Windige Ecke," called together his cohorts and decided to execute this ruler. Without a suspicious thought in mind, he came to the appointed rendezvous. That was the end of "Quiet." The head executioner was "Room 9." At ten-thirty every night, his ghost wanders through the halls. Gradually, he again regains a little power, but only till the woodpecker knocks his morning signal. Our musical ears decided that E flat on our piano was slightly oft' pitch. On September 14 Mr. Sperling tuned our piano. Now we are all happy again, because Ruth and Omi can now give their nine o'clock concerts again. The girls all welcome their new matron, Miss Ada Sievert, to the dormitory. We all hope she'll like her work and we do assure her the heartiest co-operation. One of the matron's rooms has been changed to a "sick room," in which we are all to cure our little ills. In order to be the first to congratulate Helen on her birthday, Elsie set her alarm for twelve o'clock and then went into Helen's room and woke her. She scrambled into bed with Helen, and then-far, far into the night. On September tenth, the girls met in the auditorium and appointed Ruth Riess, Dorothy Trommer, and Frances Senf to fill the vacant places on the athletic board. Dorothy was appointed basketball manager and Frances as kittenball manager. Ruth Riess was elected president and Ida Clements secretary. Ruth Uhlig, Adelaide Nolte, Doris Sauer, and Hilma Albrecht were appointed as captains for the kittenball teams. Because we have more time to earn points this year, the total amount of points necessary to earn an L was raised to 2,500.

.

Everyone is soon due for a real treat. The girls are going to learn how to playa real game-namely, horseshoe. If some of our enthusiasts won't be able to write their exercises on the board, you'll know the reason.'


24

THE

D. M. L: C. MESSENGER

STUDENTENWISSENSCHAFT Why Teachers Get Gray A triangle is a circle with three corners to it. A miracle is something some one does that can't be done. .Climate is caused by hot and cold weather. Latitude and longitude are imaginary lines running around the earth to show where you are and which way you are going. Wool is material that silk stockings are not made of. A circle is a closed straight line that has been bent. Bi-monthly means the installment plan. The Poor Things The "fteshies" maintain that our school is out of date, merely because no one is here to give initiations. Wi'"h Apologies to Shakespeare We'll call our school a stage, and all the lads and maidens merely actors. They have their exits and their entrances and each one in his time plays many parts, his acts being seven stages: At first the Freshman, innocent and pliable in his fellow-classmates' hands. And then the arrogant Sophomore, lord over freshmen, forgetting his own not far-gone experiences. And then the Junior, wiser, with some forethought and prudence, taking better heed of his seniors.' commandments. And then the Senior, full of great pride and successful endeavor, leaving behind him days of pranks and pink neckties. And the First Normal, in new-found dignity soon cast off for the role of his former school days, full of quick wit and advice at all times in readiness. And so he plays his part. The sixth a-re shifts into Second Normal dignity, too new to be carrt-d with ease and self-confidence, and punctual with outbursts of pranks and high school behavior. Last scene of all that ends this great, eventful history is that of Third Normal dignity and new-found duties, sans timidity, sans arrogance, sans pranks, sans everything foolish. D. J. S. '35.

,.


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

o

25

@

LOCALS Once more D. M. L. C. has gathered its students into its fold for another year of work. Most of the old students and a number of newcomers have answered the summons of our school. We extend to all the new students the glad hand of welcome and wish them much success during their stay here. Let us get acquainted and live as one big happy family. Surely the co-operation and good will of all will make this school year a happy and successful one. 'The Boys' Dormitory boasts of the following new inmates: Edmund Schierenbeck, Sanborn, Minnesota; Brainard Otto, Redwood Falls, Minnesota; Charles Fritz, Gary, South Dakota; Henry Engelhardt, Elgin, North Dakota; Carlheinz Neumann, St. Paul, Minnesota; Fred Schoenherr, Custer, Michigan; Erhardt Wiechmann, Rochester, Minnesota; Albert Habben, Raymond, South Dakota; Dennis Krenz, Sleepy Eye, Minnesota; Charles Winter, Hoskins, Nebraska; Arthur Bade, Balaton, Minnesota; Reuben Bode, Nicollet, Minnesota; Gerhard Rolloff, Calvary, Wisconsin. After a year of absence Milton Bradtke and Arnold Coppens have again joined our ranks.


26

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Melville Schulz became so interested in the exhibits of a fair that he forgot all about such a place as D. M. L. C. The intense interest, however, must have gradually decreased, for Schulz has arrived-just a little late. To see groups of students gathered in the halls was a common scenEL_during the first_few_da~s of school, for-----everyone wanted to compare the calouses on his hands and tell his unusual experiences during the vacation. Henry Hasse has been officially appointed college mail "shagger." Well, Hank, just prepare to hear that trite expression, "Did I get a letter?" and to see strange faces when you inform them that he or she has not written. Our temporary home has been improved considerably during our few weeks of absence. The halls of the Boys' Dormitory received a coat of paint; the sidewalks were repaired, and the music hall floor was waxed. The Marlut Singers have begun another year of work. Coppens, H. Krenz, and Milton Bradtke replaced the veterans that graduated last spring. Although some "freshies" offered their services, they did not receive a berth of honor. The band has again begun rehearsing, and a successful year is expected under the leadership of our able director. At last another class has attained the goal it was striving for with all its honor, glory, trouble, and headaches-namely, to be III Normals. Clarence Radl is the lucky one to be first to receive the title "Teacher." Co-eds, get on the good side of Jerry Gilbert, for he is our new Music Hall inspector. This position gives Jerry a fine opportunity to witness the weaknesses of human nature. Arthur KeB, Harold Dushlmeier, Arthur Glende, Gilbert Timm, and Arthur Meier visited their alma mater in the beginning of September. What a disappointment "Fuches" Neumann and Bade must have experienced when they discovered that striped ink and tie stretchers were not available in the dormitory. Henry Krenz is gradually supplying himself with household goods for his future home. He already possesses a clock, and it is not one of those with a pesky alarm either!

~ ---'


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

27

Football casualties came early this fall. During one of the first practices, Edgar Wehausen broke his leg. Ivan Raddatz assures himself of a soft resting-place, since he uses two mattresses. On the night of September 8, a group of the band members had the good fortune of wishing Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Kiecker, nee Gertrude Seehusen, a happy married life by treating them and their friends to a number of band selections. The boys were well repaid for their efforts and everyone enjoyed himself. Again the rooms of the dormitory are being filled with pot flowers with the hope that the tender plants will be able to survive in our environments . . Yes, Prof. Klatt is the proud owner of a new automobile. He feels quite certain that he now can climb the college hill on high. The boys .of the dormitory know a good man when they see him. That is why they unanimously elected Waldemar Nolte as Reading Room manager. The college truck no longer sees any joy in visiting the City Beautiful every day; consequently Uncle Sam has taken upon himself the duty of herding the students' parcels containing "eats" spiced with a little laundry up the hill. Since the mighty Minnesota river no longer could supply the thirsty students with water, the city built a well below the college hill. Meet the most responsible man on the campus-Fireman Arnold Coppens. He has the huge task and responsibili.y of keeping our dear co-eds warm. Is football a rough game? Bade gave his answer not in words but by deeds. One day he stationed himself near the boiler-house and witnessed football practice through a pair of binoculars. Students on second floor miss Charley's voice路and fatherly advice.

melodious

Our school does not boast of any outstanding architecture; nevertheless one of the "freshies" stood before the Music Hall a long time in death-like silence caused by the interest, awe, and admiration of the majestic edifice.


28

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

FOOTBALL King Football has arrived and is here to stay till Thanksgiving Day is ushered in. D. M. L. C. also has hailed the arrival of this great sport. A few days following the opening of school, Coach Voecks ordered out all old and new football aspirants. His call was not unanswered .. A favorable showing of thirty-five candidates turned out for the initial scrimmage of the year. During the first week of practice these boys have not failed to show an undaunted spirit in the sport. Candidates that have reported are Herman Raabe, Hempel, Schultz, Fuerstenau, Wagner, Schlenner, Sauer, Duin, Schwantz. Horn, Gilbert, Schweppe, Goeglein, Wantoch, Schnitker, Fischer, Dierson, Rauschke, Rolloff, Schoenherr, Coppens, Bradtke, Behrens, Pretzer, Stoekli, Wiechmann, Habben, Gurgel, Hertler, and W. Nolte.


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

29

Another call is issued to the student body. Come out, attend the games, and support your team. If you have not the opportunity of playing,路 the least you can do is to assist from the sidelines. "Well, there she blows." "Who blows " "Why, the whistle; the game is on."

I'

JOKES

"What will you have, sir?" "A toasted cheese sandwich." "On toast, sir?" "No, bring it on horseback."-Ex.


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

30

College Questionnaire

Q. Have you done any philanthropic work? A. Yes, I had four blind dates. Q. What is your favorite course? A. Q.

Roast beef. Are you married? No. Children? Aren't we all? Have you done any work during summer vaca-

A. Q. A. Q. tion? A. Yes. Q. What line? \ A. The same one about loving her more than anyone else in the world. Q. Do you intend to continue studying next year? A. Rah, rah, rah !-Ex.

You Said It! Hugo: I'm anxious to meet that brunette you kept company with last night. Sharlie: Yeah, so am 1. She took my watch. Co-ed's cry on the Nile:

"'Egypt

me."-Ex.

In the Fall In the fall. a young man's fancy lightly turns to football, hiking, wiener roasts-s-and he wonders who the new girl is that came to college this year. On the Air We have certain boys doing the aerial work on the football team-they blow up the footballs. First Student: Why are you wearing that old sweater to class? Haven't you any shirt? Second Student: Sure, I've got lots of shirts, but they're both in the wash.


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Bean (calling--?): 0-0-0-0, zero, zero-oh, wrong one.

31

Hellow operator-number nothing! I guess I got the

Sick Pupil: My throat hurts. Teacher (looking at throat): Why you have two large eggs in your throat. What happened? Pupil: I ate two spring chickens for supper and I guess they laid heavily on my stomach.-Ex. Youth's springtime spent in study will keep warm the winter of old age.-Ex. Stude.nts, Write a Headline for ThisA woman with a thousand hats to tryon mirror.-Ex.

â&#x20AC;˘ and no

â&#x20AC;˘ Old Fashioned Primer with Modern Answers Oh, see the dog! I'll say I do. Can the dog run? He isn't paralyzed, is he? Is this a horse? What's the big idea? You aren't blind, are you?

There are' no coarse jokes in the movies because they are all screened.

Her Disappointment Dumb Dora (crying on his shoulder): If you love me, then why don't you make your chest go up and down like the hero in the picture?

Irate Garage Keeper: Hey-can't you see the sign Smokin'?" Man (puffing big stogie): VeIl, it 'don't say "Positively."

-"No


32

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Greenhouse Special "We give the earth with every plant." On the Menu "This silverware is not like doctors' medicine-s-to be taken after meals."-Ex. Theme song for one who is knocked senseless: Saw Stars,-I Heard the Birdies Sing.

I

Wiechmann: I'm a little stiff from bowling. Coach: I don't care where you're from; you'll have to move faster if you want to make the team.

Patronize Messenger Advertisers! SUBSCRIBERS, ATTENTION! ~

Be sure to notify the Business Manager of this Publication When You Change Your Address The Messenger Is Never Forwarded By Your Local Postmaster


STUDENTS! BEFORE BUYING CONSULT ADVERTISING

THE

SECTION

Patronize Our Advertisers Without Them

THE MESSENGER Cannot Exist

List of Advertisers. Red Front Grocery Grand Hotel Barber Shop Eugene Koehler Barber Shop Dr. G. J. Hiebert . Mr. Albert Flor The Bee Hive J. C. Penney Co. Schleuder Somsen and Dempsey Pink's Store New Ulm Grocery Simons Lumber Co. Farmers and Merchants State Bank . Model Barber Shop Wicherski Shoe Store Salet's Department Store Crone Bros. Company Erickson and Graff National Tea Store Drs. Hammermeister and Saffert


State Bank of New Ulm Muesing Drug Store Eichten Shoe Store Herzog Publishing Company Kemski Printing Co. Weilandt and Stegemann New Ulm Greenhouse Rexall Drug Store Eagle Roller Mill Co. Eibner and Son Schlumpberger's Grocery Hummel Bros. Dr. A. L. Kusske Ulrich Electric Company Tauscheck and Green Buenger Furniture Company Citizens State Bank Dr. E. G. Lang Robert Fesenmaier, Inc. Silver Latch Inn Fred Meine Clothing Store George's Tavern Retzlaff Motor Company Retzlaff Hardware Company New Ulm Dairy Henry Goede Studio Meyer's Studio Champion Shoe Shop New Ulm Steam Laundry Schroeder Bakery Dr. F. H. Dubbe Schuck's Tailor Shop City Meat Market Dr. Von Bank Prey's Grocery Gastler Studio Union Hospital E. C. Vogelpohl Aid Association for Lutherans A. C. Ochs Brick & Tile Yards August Schell Brewing Company The Hauenstein Company

J


---

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THE SCHROEDER BAKERY

THE FLOWER OF NEW ULM JUST LIKE THE BREAD MOTHER MAKES

PHONE 232

---


WHEN IN NEED OF FOOTWEAR Be Sure and Call on Us We carry a complete line of men's, ladies' and children's shoes We appreciate your business. Our prices are always the lowest, Qualit; considered .

ATHLETIC SHOES OUR SPECIALTY TRY OUR REPAIR

DEPARTMENT

FOR GOOD WORK

P. J. EICHTEN SHOE STORE New Vim, Minnesota

THE NATIONAl ..TEA CO. FOOD STORES GROCERS AND BAKERS New DIm, Minnesota

G. J. HIEBERT, D~D.S. OfficeOver Rexall Drug Store Office Phone 247 Residence Phone 1547

Weilandt & Stegeman

New DIm, Minn.

SAy

Contractors and Builders Correspondence Solicited Work Done in Any Section of the Community Plans and Specifications Furnished Estimates Cheerfully Given Office 1100 Center St. Phone

571

Auto Glass Replaced to Order

Champion Shoe Shop A Pleased Customer Is Our Best Advertisement

We also have a good supply of new shoes. E FREESE, Proprietor 24 So. Minn. St.

WITH

r:lOWERS cAlways in good t ast eÂť

c4lways tlppreciated NEW ULM GREENHOUSES New DIm, Minn. - Phone .45


Save to the Limit Buy to the Limit If Savings Mean Anything at All to You,

You'll Stock Up at Penney's

~~ ~. WEDO

~~

J.. C. PENNEY CO.

OUAPAAT

~. WE DOOUAP41tT

Corner Minn. and 2nd North St.

Give Your Eyes a Chance It isn't right to toil under the handicap of defective eyesight. Poor eyes make backward students. They not only affect your work, but your nerves and health as well. We fit your eyes right, grind lenses in our own shop and replace broken lenses on short notice.

DRS. SCHLEUDER Optometrists and Eyesight Specialists 102 N. Minn. St.

Telephone

New Ulm

87

R. R. KEMSKI PRINTING CO. 370

Towels and â&#x20AC;˘ Toilet Paper

For Printing and Supplies

Phone

KEMSKE PAPER CO. A. B. Dick Mimeograph Stencils and Ink

Mimeograph and School Papers

NEW

ULM

DAIRY

THE HOME

OF

Pure Dairy Products PASTEURIZED MILK CREAM, BUTTER and ICE CREAM PHONE

104

Route and Counter Service

SOMSEN & DEMPSEY Henry N. Somsen ATTORNEYS New Vim,

W. H. Dempsey AT LAW Minnesota


BREY'S GROCERY Good Service, Good Treatment and Right Prices at 201 North Minnesota Street Modernizing, Maintaining, Tuning, Repairs, Service, Sales

Reconstruction, Installation, Additions, Blowers, Chimes, Harps

PIPE ORGANS

E. C. VOGELPOHL ORGAN CO. ORGAN ARCHITECTS AND BUILDERS New Ulm, Minn.

405-409 North Broadway

When in Need of Electrical

Supplies and Radios

or Service =--

j.

call on

'

. ,-

Ulrich Electric Company ELECTRIC SERVICE AT ITS BEST. BUY WITH SERVICE

Phone 148 r

QUALITY CLOTHING At

$17.50 to $35.00

TAUSCHECK ~ GREEN

RED FRONT GROCERY FANCY AND STAPLE GLASSWARE-NOVEL

GROCERIES

TIES-DINNERWARE

Phone 43 and 44

.


. Buy

Rexall Merchandise SUPERIOR QUALITY AT LOWER PRICES

REIALL DRUG STORE Walter Muesing-Walter

W. Hellmann

"SAVE WITH SAFETY"

GEORGE'S TAVERN ,

Dine and Dance

I.

Bowling Bar and Booth Service "The Center of Activity" Phone No.5 For Your Dry Cleaning, Laundry or Hat Work We assure you prompt and efficient service and invite you to visit our modern, up-to-date plant at 107-109 So. Minn. St.

NEW ULM STEAM LAUNDRY Expert Dry Cleaners and Hatters


SILVER LATCH INN . "The Pride of New DIm" Fountain Service-Lunches-Meals Dining Room Service

EUGENE KOEHLER BARBER SHOP Hair Cuts 30c Efficient Service and Courteous Treatment

New Ulm

20 N. Minn. St.

GREATER VALUES Our New Fall Stock Supplies the Greatest Values of the Time

$15.00

$17.50

$2~.50

Suit and Overcoat

$25.00

The Mirror Proves the Style and Fit

HUMMEL BROTHERS 14 No. Minn. St.

New Ulm, Minn.

Patronize Messenger Advertisers


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SCHLUMPBERGER'S Groceries-F'ruits-

GROCERY

Vegetables-Smoked

Phone 182

Meats

New Ulm, Minn.

WILLIAM J. VON BANK, D.D.S. Dentist Residence Phone

OfficePhone

237

New Ulm, Minn.

797

"THE BUSIEST STORE IN TOWN" "There Must Be a Good Reason Why"

. THE BEE HIVE . J.

A. OCHS & SON

Ladies' Ready-to-Wear and Dry Goods EVER YTHING FOR THE CO, ED

A. L. KUSSKE,'M.D. Practice Limited to Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat and Fitting of Glasses In Weisel' Block Over Silver Latch Cafe New Ulm Minnesota

DR.E. G.LANG DENTIST Fritsche Clinic Building Res. Phone 352 Office Phone 472

THE GASTLER STUDIO For Quality Photographs Also Kodak Finishing


BREAD! Your Outstanding Energy Food Use Bread freely for your essential energy needs. Easy digestibility is one of the foremost values of Bread

EIBNER 8 SON .BAKERY and ICE CREAM Established 1883

路PHONE 128

SPAULDING ATHLETIC GOODS -at-

Robert Fesenmaier, Inc. Special discount given to students

ALBERT D. FLOR Attorney at Law New DIm, Minnesota

SALET'S DEPARTMENT STORE-NEW

ULM, MINN.

EVERYTHING TO WEAR FOR HIM OR HER WEAR SALET'S F AMons$1.98 FOOTWEAR

Highest Quality and of Course

"YOU ALWAYS SAVE AT SALET'S"


CRONE BROS. CO. The Store for Young Men

Our

Best

Attention

Everything of a banking nature entrusted to our care receives our best attention. We shall be glad to have a share of your business.

State Bank of New Ulm

MEYER'S STUDIO A Studio That Is A Studio New DIm, Minn. Phone 268

MUESING Drug Expert

Store Prescription Service

ARTCRAFT PHOTO SERVICE We Have It!

I

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Will Get It!

Or It Isn't Made!

Phones 52-34I


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For Superior Baking Results Use

DANIEL WEBSTER FLOUR Perfected

EAGLE ROLLER MILL CO. NEW ULM, MINNESOTA . John W. Graff

Geo. D. Erickson

ERICJ{SON & GRAFF Attorneys at Law New Ulm, Minnesota

HENRY

GOEDE STUDIO

"Nothing Pleases Us More Than A Satisfied Customer"

Studio -- 107 North Broadway

HAUENSTEIN SPECIAL and PALE DRY CARBONATED BEVERAGE SERVED AT ALL PLACES New Ulm, Minnesota Telephone No. 1


NEW ULM GROCERY CO. Wholesale Grocers Distributors

STOKLEY'S FINEST VEGETABLES Ask for this brand and be satisfied Service and Satisfaction at the

MODEL BARBER SHOP Alfred JI. Kuester, Prop. Footwear Athletic Footwear and Sox Ladies' Smart Styles Attractively Priced

EMIL WICHERSKI THE PROGRESSIVE WAY

To serve as much as possible To live up to promises

.,

To know the business To increase the volume, of business yearly and cut down overhead.

HENRY

SIMONS LUMBER CO. DEPENDABILITY


----------------------------------=~~-------

Buy Where rou See This Sign YOU BUY BETTER BECAUSE WE BUY BETTER Our 500 Store Buying Power Makes Possible the Low Pr.ces on Our Quality Merchandise

F. H. RETZLAFF HARDWARE COMPANY

D,rs. Hammermeister

~ Saffert

Physicians and Surgeons

NEW ULM,

MINNESOTA

The Grand Hotel Barber Shop Arndt and Strate, Props. "It Pays To Look Well"

Dodge

Plymouth


A. C. OCHS BRICK & TILE COMPANY General Sales Office

Executive Office and Plant Springfield, Minn.

818 National Bldg. Minneapolis Manufacture

Artistic Face Brick Various Colors -

Also-

Load. Bearing Tile and complete line of

Building Tile and Common Brick Our Material stands every Test, and was used in hundreds of Government, State, Public and Private jobs. in every state of the great . Northwest and Canada. Some of them 'being-The last twelve new buildings on the University of Minnesota Campus, numerous large bus.iness blocks and other buildings in the City of Minneapolis, such as the New Nicollet Hotel, Sheridan Apartments, Cleveland School, St. Mary's Hospital, Swedish Hospital, Calhoun Beach Club, etc., etc., two Lutheran churches of Springfield, Immanuel Lutheran Church of Mankato, Lutheran Churches in Brewster, Lake Benton, Blue Earth, Wanamingo, Westbrook, Wood Lake, Alden, Odin, Ceylon, Clara City, Jackson, Delano; Devils Lake, Arnegard in North Dakota; Dimock, Roscoe, etc., in South Dakota, the Dr Martin Luther College and the Union Hospital of New UIm, the Lutheran School at Sleepy Eye, together with others built prior and since the above mentioned. Veterans buildings at St. Cloud, Minnesota and Rapid City, South Dakota, the new seven story First National Bank at Fargo, North Dakota, also large public and private buildings at Brookings, Watertown, Lennox, Lyons, Huron, South Dakota; Willmar, Hendricks, St. Paul, Marshall, Tracy, Rochester, Winona, Minnesota and many others all over the 'four States.

Our Products Are Sold in the New DIm Territory by New DIm Brick & Tile Yards


\""

~~~~~==========~~ BANK WITH

FARMERS ~ MERCHANTS STATE BANK New Ulm, Minnesota FRIENDLY HELPFUL SERVICE AT YOUR COMMAND

TAILORED TO MEASURE SUITS

$22.75 No Deposits-No

$25.00 C. O. D.'s

AND UP

All kinds of Repairing

CLEANING AND PRESSING

SCHUCK'S TAILOR SHOP 215 N. MINN. ST. Office Phone 60

Residence Phone 150

DR. F. H. DUBBE PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON NE\V ULM,

MINNESOTA

UNION HOSPITAL NEW ULM, MINN. A fireproof hospital supervised by graduate best service.

PHONE No. 404

nurses giving the


PINK'S STORE Where Quality Comes First Smartest Wear at Prices You Expect to Pay Ladies' Ready to Wear, Silk Underwear, Hose, Shoes, Dry Goods, Groceries The Store Where You Feel at Home

SCHELL'S

SELECT

AUGUST SCHELL BREWING COMPANY NEW ULM,

MINNESOTA

AID ASSOCIATION FOR LUTHERANS APPLETON, WISCONSIN Legal Reserve Fraternal

Insurance

for Men, Women and Children

30 YEARS' RECORD

1902 1912.0. 19220 1932. 1933 July 1, 1934.

No. of Branches 33. 234 .. 942 .... 2,128 .. ... 2,187 ... 0 2,246 ...

July 1, 1934 Admitted Assets $16,201,803.80 Certificate Re serves, Surprus and other Liabilities 15,935,852.28 Emergency Reserve Funds 265,951.52

$

Insuran2e in Force 760,000.00 7,404,500.00 26,258,018.00 125,864,133.00 131,328,055.00 134,840,817.00

Payments Since Organization To Living Certificateholders $ 8,382,594.36 To Beneficiaries 3,873,053.72 Total Payments 00. 12,255,648.08

ALEX O. BENZ, President Wm: F. KeIrn, First Vice President Albert Voecks, Secretary Wm. H. Zuehlke, Treasurer


I~======================================~l~

We Turn a House Into a Home

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CO.

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"


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-:-

CONTENTS

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LITERARY A)

The Village Slept.................................................... 3

B)

Across the Miles...................................................... 4

C)

Kismet

D)

Why Not Face the Inevitable?

11

E)

Dan's Christmas Eve

13

9

EDITORIAL A)

The Beginnings of Our Messenger

16

B)

Hands

18

LIBRARY NOTES

21

ALUMNI NOTES

23

EIN LIEDLEIN

26

EXCHANGE

28

COLLEGE NOTES

3]

CO-ED NOTES

33

STUDENTENWISSENSCHAFT

40

LOCALS

41

ATHLETICS JOKES

:

45


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

THE VILLAGE SLEPT The little village slept beneath the shadows deep. Alone the watch-fires flicked their waning gleam Where sheltered lay the flocks of tired sheep, And lonely shepherds stood to watch and dream. The tiny village slept and still did not awake When stars were dimmed by glory from above; When from amid the throng an angel spoke And gave the message of the birth of Love. The weary village slept e'en mid the burst of song Which made the silent hills of Juda ring. All Juda slept and did not know the throng Proclaimed the birth of Israel's Lord and King. The village slept.-Oh, little village, wake! Behold The hope of kings and prophets nestling there: . 'Tis Christ, thy Savior, He the long-foretold! Awake now! Wake! For Him thy heart prepare. D. J. S. '35.

3


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THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER.:...,_

4

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_

ACROSS THE MILES "I tell you, Lane, it's no go. The public don't fall for that sorta stuff. Ya gota think of the people listenin' in. They're expectin' Sandra Michaels. and they'll get what they . want. Whoever heard of Sandra croonin' a Christmas caroL Piffle !" "Now wait a minute, wait a minute. Cool off and calm down. Trouble with you is you don't know your public. They'll fall for this. Here's the lay-out; Christmas-wreaths, candles, Christmas trees. Everybody feelin' soft and sentimentaL Then comes Sandra Michaels, Queen of the Blues Singers. The people ain't in the mood for the hot stuff. It's something soft and soulful-like they want. So what? Sandra sings 'em a Christmas carol. Get the idea? Boy, it's a cinch. I'll get 'em." "But, they--" "Listen, Crafton, I know you're Michaels' manager, but you don't know everything about what's what. They'll fall for it, I tell you. They'll gobble it up." Harvey Crafton stared with unseeing eyes out of the window at the snow-covered roofs. Puffing at '~is cigarette, "Red" Lane, the master of ceremonies at the Craigwell Cafe,' eyed him apprehensively. Nothing could be heard but the soft sound of snow striking against the windows.. Suddenly Crafton sighed and straightened up. He shook his head. "Nope, I'm not goingto risk it.

'Stakes are too high--"

Lane was on his feet with a crash. Every red hair on his head abristle with wrath, he leaned across the table. "You mumskull !" His voice shook with indignation. "You're throwing away the chance of a lifetime. I tell you there ain't .gonna be no risk. Can'tcha just take my word for it?" ..He ran his fingers through his blazing hair.' "Listen, old man," his voice held a pleading note, "I'll take it on me to put it over. If it's no go, I'll foot everything. Only let me try it." Crafton hesitated. will.

"Oh--all right. Go ahead. I'll let her do it__:_ifshe You don't know that dame when she's got an off idea."

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THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

I'>

Lane reached across the table and grabbed Crafton's hand. "Great stuff, Harvey, I knew you'd come across" he burbled joyously, pumping Crafton's hand as though Itwere a worn-out handle. one of them babies You won't be sorry, Lane was across the

"She'll come across. Why- I can get to do anything I want. Well, I'm off. old man. Toodle-loo." With a bound. room and out into the street. .

*

* ~: * *

The cafe of the Craizwell Hotel was always the 'c-enter of gayety. On this particular occasion, especially, the assembled elite were more than usually merry. Laughter, gay voices, and the clink of glasses mingled with the music of the orchestra. Good cheer and excitement were at a height. They had been at a height for some time, aided by the ever courteous waitress who hurried frorri table to table with trays of good cheer. But the gay crowd was waiting for something, and when the orchestra number came to a sighing close, all eyes were turned expectantly toward the smiling master-of -ceremonies. "Ladies and gentlemen, we are indeed happy to se~ you all this evening, and we extend our headiest greetings. This evening we have a surprise for you.' . Allow me to present none other than Sandra Michaels, Queen of the Blues Singers." Staccato clapping and shrill whistles filled the air as Sandra stepped out before the audience. She smiled slightly as she acknowledged the homage paid her. The orchestra, began to play. No wailing of saxophones, no twanging of guitars. Softly, like the echo of a half-forgotten melody, the strains of an old familiar song were wafted over the room, A silence fell on the assembled throng; laughter and voices were stilled as though a great hand had suddenly been laid upon them. Then, lifting her lovely golden head, Sandra began to sing. No one stirred.

"It came upon a midnight clear that glorious song of old-" The cafe was filled with the sound of the old carol. Sheepishly the revelers glanced at one another. Wonder and amazement were stamped on all the faces. The waiters


6

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

stood silently and set their well-filled trays on the tables. Noone spoke.

* * * * * Far away in a small hospital a nurse was vainly trying to quiet a young man as he tossed feverishly on his bed. "Can't you hear them?" he babbled. "They're torturing me. I tell you I didn't do it. Can't you do something to make them stop yelling at me?" His restless fingers pulled at the covers as his voice sank to feverish mutterings. The door opened quietly, and the nurse looked up with a sigh of relief. "He's always talking about some one yelling at him, Doctor, and he wants us to do something. Wait, I have an idea. Do you think it would disturb the others if we turned on the radio? A little music might help. He hasn't much of a chance." "It can't do much harm," the doctor answered in a tired voice. There was a snap as the radio was turned on. Suddenly the room was filled with a beautiful golden voice. "Peace on the earth, good-will to men-s-" The sick man lay still. der crossed his face.

A look of contentment and won-

"Peace," he whispered. "'Peace on the earth.' Ihad forgotten-there was-peace. Christmas-Child Jesus -give me-Thy peace." He turned his head and closed his eyes. The nurse looked inquiringly at the doctor. The doctor nodded. "He has received. peace."

* * * * * The woman frowned as she listened. "No, send him away. that comes to my door."

I can't be helping every beggar

The old butler bowed and silently left the room. Julia Faringham sat back in her chair and frowned. The glow of the fire from the wide open hearth somewhat softened the sharp, angular contours of her face. but it failed somehow to


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

7

add any sweetness. She sat with her long, white hands folded and gazed into the fire. Why need everyone come to her house and beg? It was that way every year: one beggar and tramp after the other. Give something to one and the others will flock to be fed. What was it Dobson had said? Christmas? Well, what if it was; she couldn't play benefactor to everyone. She had done her share with contributions to the various institutions of charity. More it was not her duty to do. Julia Faringham did her duty. The door opened softly and Dobson entered. Miss Julia did not turn her head until the silence was punctuated by a sharp click. "Dobson, I won't want that radio on now. I don't like the thing, and I don't see how I ever persuaded John to install one." The old butler hesitated. "Please; ma'am. Mr. John will be here any moment now, and you know how disappointed he'll be if you act as 'though you dislike his gift." The woman's face softened. "You adore that goodfor-nothing nephew of mine, don't you, Dobson? Very well; leave it on for all of me; but turn it down that I'm not disturbed." Dobson complied to her wishes and left the room. Miss Julia leaned back and closed her eyes. The thought of her beloved nephew John rose in her mind. He was a good boy, doing wonderfully well in his business. In her lonely heart Julia Faringham idolized her dead sister's son. No one but John could have influenced her to have a radio installed. Tonight was one of the rare times when it was playing. The soft tones of the orchestra wove themselves into her thoughts. A feeling of peace stole over her. The door opened. "Come in, John," she called, opening her eyes. "Please, ma'am." It was Dobson standing hesitatingly at the door. "The man is back again. He says his wife is sick and he is wondering whether vou-s-" "Dobson," interposed Miss Julia, impatiently. "I thought I told you not to ask me again. Tell him I can do nothing for him." She turned her head and looked into the fire. The old butler stood and looked sorrowfully at his mistress. No sound could be heard but the strains of the


s

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER:..,_

_

orchestra. What was that they were playing? Miss Julia turned her head in amazement. The room was filled with the strains of the old, old carol. Then a lovely young voice began to sing. The tender old melody fell like a benediction on the fire-lit room. "Good will to men from heaven's all-gracious King-" Julia Faringham drew a sharp breath. Why, it was Christmas! Everyone should be happy today, not hungry and sad. What if it was her John begging out in the cold for help! What was she singing? "Good-will to men," she whispered, softly, her eyes bright with unshed-tears. The music came to a soft close. With swift steps the woman crossed the room. "Dobson, bring him in to see me. good-will."

I want to bring

* * * * * The song was ended. 'Saildra Michaels, smiling a wistful smile, bowed gracefully to her wondering audience and left the stage. An embarrassed silence layover the room. Then some one giggled nervously. Instantly the strained tension was broken. A babble of voices arose; waiters rushed about filling eager demands; the orchestra crashed into a wild tango. In her dressing room, Sandra Michaels knelt by her window and wept.-D. J. S. '35.


THE

D

M. L. C. MESSENGEH

9

KISMET

.~

The sun is slowly hiding its fiery rays behind a distant sand dune while the lone Bedouin with his ungainly dromedary is wending his way eastward. Suddenly, as the last rays have transpired into a mere crimson after-glow, a bell is heard ringing in a distance where the white minarets betray the presence of a village. The hour of prayer has come, and the Bedouin bids his camel to go down on its knees in order that he might get off. As soon as he has dismounted, the sheik kneels down and performs the characteristic eastern bow with his face toward Mecca, be it one mile away or ten thousand. The time ascribed to this little scene' is extremely immaterial-all devout Mohammedans have bowed before Allah in the same way daily and have dressed and traveled and even thought the same way since the memorable Hegira in 622 A. D. The place for this scene also has a wide range. It may have taken place in the Great Arabian Desert, in the Great Salt Desert of Persia, or on the way from Mecca to Medina in the province of Hejaz. From time immemorial the desert wanderer has been impregnable to the influence of the modern Western civilization. Only on one point has Western civilization scored, and that is when the sheiks of the desert substituted modern rifles for their traditional spears and sabres. Western civilization, on the other hand, has not been so stubbornly opposed to the influx of Eastern ideas. The Mormons offer a striking example of the case under discussion. Their religion allows the practice of polygamy to any man who can support more than one wife. The only difference is that the Mormon lives in the desert lands of Utah, whereas the Mohammedan has his harem on the outskirts of Ispahan. Any officer (or private, for that matter) of the French Foreign Legion will tell you that the Turk is the most fearless and the most cruel foe of any. This fearlessness and utter abandonment in danger has a direct bearing upon Islam religion. From childhood the Mohammedan is imbued with the idea that to die in a battle against the "Infidel" will bring him the choicest morsel of the here-after. Another reason why the Saracens are such zealous warriors is the fact that Mohammed taught that Allah had set every man's life span; no man can even kill himself before his predestinated end has come. From this belief the Mohammedan religion obtained the name Islam, meaning resignation. "No man can kill me until the moment comes .which


1:0

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Allah has set-kismet." How important a part this little word kismet has played in world's history will never be fully realized. No armyhas yet waged successful warfare against the Mohammedans sirice that religion gained its firm hold on the nomadic tribes of the Near East and the greatest part of Africa. It took Spain almost a century to rid itself of even such an isolated group of Mohammedans as the Moors. Not the blame for so little success in conquering the Saracen can be laid at the doors of such natural reasons as the incoherence of the many tribes or the difficulties of a desert campaign. Armies sent against the American Indians were handicapped in the same way, and it took comparatively few years to subdue them. The ferocious Indian will show the white feather, but the Turk will never. Mohammedan armies have stood up against European armies, and if a massacre of the Europeans did not terminate the battle, the Mohamme. dans executed an orderly retreat by the orders of a general trained in modern warfare. .

all

A Mohammedan would rather be hacked to ribbons than to be captured. He glories and rejoices at the idea that Allah has at last seen fit to allow him to die. His implicit faith in Allah has given him strength to allow kismet, or fa=e, to rule him. Kismet-per se-is Allah's most "powerful weapon for the completion of the circle indicated by the Crescent. It is also Allah's greatest diplomat in his bid for world supremacy. Already occupying fourth place in the list of leading religions of the world, Mohammedanism has at present over two hundred million staunch followers. It is a threat which we as Christians must fight. Even we, who consider ourselves civilized and highly cultured and above all, a Christian people, follow the dictates of kismet. The only difference is that we call it fa~e or just luck. How often don't we say, "Aw, that's just plain luck l", when we should realize that the opposing team had a better aerial attack and better blocking. How well we know the addict of the horse-races or the roulette who plays to the limit because he feels Old Dame Luck smiling at him! Even now as I write, a phrase which I had read in the evening paper comes to mind. Relative to the Michigan-Minnesota football game last Saturday the paper remarks that Kipke made "no effort to alibi the setback on the fickleness of fate." He, at least, blamed the superior playing calibre of the Gophers and not fate for the defeat.


THE: D. M. L. C. MESSENGEH

11

On many Americans kismet exerts an almost mesmeric power. The Mohammedan goes into battle for Allah; the American goes into high stakes for the benign countenance of Lady Luck !-M. O. R. '35.

WHY NOT FACE THE INEVITABLE'?

The error of co-education, which was thrust upon the present generation by two generations of scholars. has given rise to many heated arguments and a veritable hail of literature comdemning or defending it. When our forefathers instituted this bane for femininity, they did it with the idea that woman, being also human, was also entitled to an education. "Equality" was the cry and Democracy the end. How democracy flourished and grew to its present perfection! ' Women were at first reluctant to take any definite step toward higher education. Most of them had at one time learned their reading and writing and were. upon their graduation from the elementary school. more interested in housework and a family than in the insanity of Hamlet. With the turn of the century however, America found itself suddenly against a wall. This wall proved to be the Pacific Ocean, and the movement westward ended. The last frontier had been conquered, and the pioneer disappeared. No more log cabins to live in, no more spinning and weaving to do, the American woman found herself at leisure. Curiosity didn't kill Cock Robin, and neither will leisure kill time; so women, to kill time with a show of industry, blessed the institutions of learning with their receptive minds. Ah, how the first women were cherished, and, oh, how they were condemned. They were cherished by the instructors and condemned by the male populace. These were indeed courageous creatures to ignore the spite of the male students. They were cherished by the instructors because of their brilliance and industry. This, it is quite natural, would at least be one-half of the reason for the condemnation by the men. The other half of the reason is-well, you know in those days "good-lookingdames didn't stay in circulation" long enough to desire higher education! Because of the immense strides of business, WOmen

_-


12

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

soon were called into the business world as stenographers and private secretaries. For this they needed some training; where could they get this? At some business college, of course. It is still for the same reason that women go to school-to kill time or to get a business training. Culture does not playa part in women's education. Far be it from me to condemn the education of women. On the contrary, I maintain that women also are entitled to an education .. This education, however, should be a combination of a cultural and a housekeeping training to be received in a school for girls only. Male students have often been accused of going to college merely to learn to build bridges. In most cases this is true. What these too zealous advocates of co-education forget is the fact that a learned man cannot make a living without "cashing in" on his education. Culture is a good thing if a person can do something for which some one will hand him a payroll check. There are too many men in the United States at present who have only culture to show for their schooling; these men we commonly call "educated bums." When a man attends a college, he does so in order to prepare himself for a profession for life; a woman prepares herself'.for a profession in life, as a famous psychologist onc_eremarked. The previously mentioned over-zealous advocates of coeducation further state (and would also gladly offer examples) tha' co-eds do more studying and more thinking than the male students. This is quite natural. The co-eds realize-and hope r-that. they have to get all their education out of books and from the teacher because they won't be in their profession long enough to learn from experience as the men will be able to do. No sane man would begrudge the women a little education; but what he doesn't like is when they invade the stamping grounds of the college man. To the average serious-minded male student the co-eds are an incessant irritation with their petty babble and shallow conversa tion. Like our late friend Prohibi 'ion, co-education is a "noble experiment." It is an attempt to put on an intellectual par with one another two creatures with a vas' ly different aim and view of life. Woman, although her exterior has changed, is still a woman, and therefore she cannot but serve the purpose for which she was created. Man, in spite of the thousands of wives in the business world, is still looked upon as the head of the family. In this capacity he must


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

13

work to supply 路his family with all the necessities of life. This bread winning has been made more difficult with the advance of the centuries because of the training that is required. A very fine argument was offered by the opponents of co-education in Normandy, France, where co-education was very recently voted out by an almost unanimous vote. These people stated that "male school teachers cannot teach girls their future roles of wife and mother."

DAN'S CHRISTMAS

EVE

"One week from tonight is Christmas eve," whispered Dan to himself, as he stopped to gaze at the toys in a toyshop window. Dan was a lad of fifteen years. and an orphan. His mother had died when he was but eleven years old; a few months after the death of his mother, his father had left in his despair, and Dan was sent to an orphan home, where he had now been a little more than three years. As he was now gazing with wonderment at all of the pretty toys and things in the window, he thought of the last happy Christmas he had, when his mother was still living and his father was at home. Suddenly three of his companions came up and roused him from his thoughts, and soon all of the boys were shouting and pointing at all the things that they would like to ha_ve. They were enjoying themselves to such an extent that they did not notice the approach of a much dreaded figure, and were unaware of its presence until one of the boys, and then all of them, received a cuff on the ear. The creator of the disturbance was none other than Mrs. McLeere, the matron of the orphan home. "Get ye yerselfs home, and practice them Carols. How do ye expect. to make any money fer me if ye can't sing?" Mrs. McLeere was a rough Irish woman who believed in strict and harsh discipline, and had a weakness for money, provided she did not have to work for it herself. For three years now the boys had sung Carols on Christmas eve. The gifts of money which they received were forfeited to Mrs. McLeere, but the remaining gifts they were permitted to keep. Several days had now passed, and it was the night before Christmas eve; all the boys of the orphan home were called together and were told in what groups they were to


14

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

go. Dan was put together with Ed, Sam, and George, with whom he had been the past three years. Christmas eve had come. After a short program in the. home the boys were sent out.路 Dan, Sam, Ed, and George had not gone far when Sam said, "Let's go down to McGoff's bakery; they surely will give us some cakes again." "No, let's go to the man who owns the laundry; he'll give us each at least a half dollar as he did last year," George answered. Each boy voiced his own favorite places, until it was agreed upon to go to all of their favorite places sarting with the bakery. At this place they received a cake and pie, each. After singing another song of thanks and wishing the baker and his wife a "Merry Christmas." they passed on to the next place, where they received some money and some toys. After visiting many places and receiving many gifts, the boys started back for the orphan home. On their way home they passed a church, and since a Christmas program was in progress, they stopped outside to listen. As the choir began singing, "Behold, I bring you glad tidings of great joy," tears came to the eyes of Dan, for the Carol had been his Mother's favorite Christmas song. H was now that they first noticed two men standing in the shadows of the church, with bowed heads. The door of the church opened momentarily and cast a beam of bright light on the men and boys. Dan stared with surprise at the smaller of the two men. Where had he seen that man before-then it suddenly came to him. and with a cry of glee, he ran to the man and cried, "Daddy, daddy where have you been?" The man stared at the boy and readily recognized him as his own son, whom he had not seen for almost four years. "My son, Danny," he whispered, with tears in his eyes. The man and boy entered the church and joined the congregation in singing, "Let us all with gladsome voice, praise the God of earth and Heaven." Although the mother was missing, Dan and his father spent the happiest Christmas in their lifetime, and thanked God ever after.-G. G. '35.


THE: D. M . .1,.. C. MESSEN'GElt .'_

.. ~, e

15

~.

......

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The "D. M. L, C. Messenger" is published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription pr-iceis seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not accepted. We'; request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressed to Business 'Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributions to our .Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends. Entered as second class matter at Pest. Office-ofNew Ulm, Minnesota

Volume XXV

No.2

December 1934 ....

'

.

.: The Messenger St.a{f':-.-:'"-Raymond Duehltrteier ;; : :.:;;.; Editor-irt:Cltief Waldemar Noite ..; , ,,;:, Business: Manager Julius Wantoch ' : Assist.an_tBusiness Manager Winfried Stoekli. ; ;Assist.ah_tBusiness. Manager Doris Sauer ; : ., ;".)...•. J •. ,;;Alunrni. Notes Vera Lawrenz ; ~ ; ;1;;..···,:;··:".,..:: ;; ••i.{;,i.:"IEx:ch.ange Ruth Uhlig : ; :.;; :'..:; ·CQIJeg~~ NQtes Herman Fehlauer :· ;..;:..:.;.~, .r,••.,;.•:,.,./..,.'·,.~·.,.,i.. Locals Beata Moldenhauer CQ;-:ed,N()tes ~:r~:c~d

:!~r. ..~ .:.. .:~ ... ...:..;::~::: ;::;.:::~:~:.::.~:.:~::~; ;1.,',I~:) :.

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-."

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-_ - ~.

.' With this issue Of the MeSseD;geI:si~>}Jtewl?ers of .the staff, again bid their readers .farewell-, -;All;-,l"a.msure,' have enjoyed the -work they' h.ave done.. .,Our hearty thanks to all who have helped us -in numerous ways, ~andwe hope that our successors will enjoy the support we have rec~iveq.·· Although we have tried to fulfill our duties, -we do not know how well we have succeeded. We. shall. therefore .let our readers judge us and answer the question..


16

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

EDITORIAL

â&#x20AC;˘ THE BEGINNINGS OF OUR MESSENGER Twenty-six years ago a group of serious-minded students of our school expressed the wish to have a college paper. Dr. Martin Luther College was progressing rapidly at this time, and these students undoubtedly felt that every up-to-date school must have some means of keeping in touch wi h its alumni and friends. The other members of the student body supported the idea, but this alone, although very necessary, would not publish a school paper. Many other serious obstacles presented themselves, and these had to be overcome in some manner before any definite progress could be made. The end of the school year came, but no college paper had been printed. A beginning, however, had been made. The following September the enthusiasts again raised their voices. By this time they had discovered ways of overcoming the difficulties that had seemed 8'0 great the year before. Immediately a committee of students was selected to prepare plans for publishing a paper. These plans were soon presented to the student body and were approved of. The faculty sanctioned the plans and appointed a staff of ten members to take care of the work. The first staff members were W. Wojahn, H. Steinbring, H. G. Meyer, A. Fuerstenau, H. Nitz, O. Boerneke, E. Jacob, G. Zarwell, C. Hohenstein, and C. Pape. Most of these men were among those who had started the idea, and we can conclude that they were ready and willing to do-hard work.


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18

THE

D. M. L. C. MESS ENGEn'.:..

_

The first number of the new college paper, known as the Dr. Martin Luther College Messenger, appeared in December, 1910. It contained twenty-six pages and appeared in booklet form. Three pictures of our buildings were also included. At this time all material was divided among eight departments. One fact cannot be overlooked; many German articles and even jokes were printed. Surely it is a deplorable fact that German contributions are seldom found in our "paper today. All in all a very good beginning had been made and it is worthy of praise. The staff members of 'the past twenty-five years realized this and consequently made few changes. Now the Messenger is in its twenty-fifth year of existence, and we hope that it has served our school and friends during the entire time. Just as at the beginning, support : and co-operation from all sides are still necessary at the present time. Without the assistance of its readers the Messenger would soon be a forgotten paper. The present staff realizes this and therefore is willing and pleased to accept and consider any criticisms or suggestions. Let us therefore all join in making the Messenger a continued suecess.-R. D. '35.

HANDS We sometimes are apt to forget what our hands really mean to us, and how much of our character they symbolize. Hands have real beauty, character, and personality, which is often more than we have in all the rest of our body. Today much emphasis is placed-especially where women's hands are concerned-on 'tapering fingers with brightly colored nails that harmonize with all of the newest shades in dresses. .These fingers are sometimes very beautiful, and then again, when looking at them, one can hear tom-toms beating and can see brightly colored savages whirling to the drums of their life, and one wonders how long it will be until our civilization will be doing the same thing. There is an old adage about hands, however, which if taken properly -to heart, will push all of the -barbaric trends in hands into the background. This old adage says that "beautiful hands are those that do, beautiful things the


20

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER 1;.;

.-}'-

whole day through." .~·Thismight sound like so much senti.mentality-to som.~i:9utafter one has given it a little thought" it;x:~allY,';&,(t". qulti);$eIiJ;sible,and "beautiful things",.ily:this . s~nse, I am~ e,~'~~~il tasks well done. ~:i'~' .','......

any . :;'~~bfis~ig..er some

,.~::".First1et famous women's ha~d~~.:~b~:. 'cau_s,_e"it) .that through all the changing habits fj];:I,hl.ll1are!:Lg .ations,.hands remain a symbol'Qf,;,t.he.¢.ter,rta1 'teminirie ... When they are beautifully cared for;" and' whent . .th~,yi:fulfil1'itheir respective missions in life to""the'be~t of then:, ability, hands are as much a "hallmark" ..as- the term used in its bes t sense. When they are ypimg they gxhibi't the lithe suppleness of a slender sapling: grow'ri:;old, though gnarled and withered, they often posse'ss ..the' strength and ancient beauty of an old 014· ' <

':raa:y"

Two pairs of women's hands that a:i:.e well-known are Amelia Earhart's and Anne Morrow Lindbergh's. Both must have hands that are strong and sure, so that when one is piloting her own airplane across an Atlantic, or one is copilot with. her famous husband on one of his many air expeditions, those hands will be steady and true .in handling the joy stick or in sending the important radio message. There are the hands of Helen Keller, the 'woman who has neither the gift of eyesight nor of hearing, and whose hands therefore are her eyes and ears. Through her hands she sees and hears what we are privileged to enjoy openly. Her hands must be super-sensitive and very alive because they really are her life. Then we come to the women' whose hands are not famous but they .are beautiful in every sense of the word. Farmwomerr, .scrubwomen, and-other hard working women -rwho do notl<~ow o~,c:arewhether it is proper to use "ruby" nail 'polish,when ·W~il'r:iiig:~a. brown dress, and whose hands .are rough and :dry~blit"~h6<'go to bed at night having done 'a-day's work well and. wh('i:thelZef:qrecan lay" claim to beau:ttf:ul handsf," ' I. :~<" >,: Of men's hands there.aret\io~kinds; 'namely, the rough, . browned hand of .theirugged type of man)"and the lighter, softer-looking hand of the. 'Scholar or musician. There are the famous handso:i\he Drs. Mayo at Roches. tel'. Steady, strong, and-precise hands they must be when ,Q.'p'~Jatingin an attempt to save a life. i:,,~),'1be);;I;.,.are. the ~ands of .Leop;ld Stokowski, director of ,,9i~"PH14aaeJ.p}ua-PhIlharmoillc"Orchestra;whose hands sure-

L;i;r:

:1..

J


TH'~J D. M, L: C, MESSENGEH

21

ly are supple and artistic as they veritably draw the music fromhis world renowned orchestra. -In .fact, there are many famous men's hands in the world. The hands of Fritz Kreisler and Jascha Heifetzthe violinists, the hands of Paderewski, the pianist, the hands of Lorado Taft, the sculptor, and last but not least as far as most baseball fans are concerned, the hands of Dizzy Dean, the ace. pitcher for the Cardinals. These hands are all doing their particular missions in life according to their various talents and ambitions. Weak hands, strong hands, long hands, short hands, moist hands, dry hands, soft hands, and hard hands--they are-all represented in this world, and 'each tells the story of a different character. It is indeed a creditable ideal to want to do our task well so that our hands also might be beautiful andtell the right kind of astory==H. M. '36.

Library Notes 'The editorial staff was kind enough to give us some space -in the Messenger for brief discussions which, directly or indirectly, have some bearing on the library or the book store which is closely allied with it. We believe that we can find something of interest to the readers of the Messenger for every' issue. There are new books which should be briefly brought to the students' attention, and it may also be of benefit to point out occasionally some of the policies of our library. It mustbe the aim of instructors and students to make our library a worthwhile place of study and reading. In order that this may be so, two things are necessary. First, we should be acquainted with the material the library offers and how we may find this material. We 'have been planning for a long time to put into effect some form of library instruction such as many schools have introduced for their students. Soon after the Christmas recess, if time permits, we hope to institute a series of lectures, which will explain the inside workings of the library.


22

THE D. M. L. Co.MESSENGER

A proper understanding of the library and its contents will help us to find for ourselves the books and the material we need for our studies. But on the other hand, it is also necessary, that students using the library may do so without any disturbing and distracting influences from others. If everyone makes an effort to bring about such a condition in the library by refraining from all unnecessary noises, we shall all enjoy to the fullest extent the wonderful opportunities our library has to offer. Let us remember that the worst offenders are whispering lips and clicking heels. The library has lately acquired a book which will be of interest to both the students and the teachers.' The author is the popular writer Paul De Kruif and the title of his latest book is Men Against Deat.h. In this book he pictures very graphically how the. science of medicine has discovered cures or antidotes for some of our most serious diseases such as Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Pernicious Anemia, Diabetes. De Kruif has a way of presenting his facts that makes his books as exciting as a mystery story. The great pity of it is that he fails to see the merciful nand of our God in all these discoveries. To him, our world seems to be merely some machine set agoing by an unknown power and everything that happens in the world is brought about by chance. If a Christian reader will supply in his mind the correct background for the discoveries Mr. De Kruif relates, the book should prove of great constructive value. No doubt our students are all acquainted with the college stationery sold at the book store. They also no doubt have recognized the emblem on the stationery as Luther's coat-of-arms. Perhaps it would be of interest to know Just how this emblem was obtained. The answer may be found on page 447 of Graebner's Dr. Martin Luther, or rather you will not find it there. You will see that a small square corner of the page is missing. This contained the coat-ofarms as adopted by Luther himself, and as found on a valuable seal-ring presented to the Reformer by the Lutheran prince. Luther gives us the following definition for this coat-of-arms: "First there shall be a black cross on a heart of a natural color, to remind me that .faith in the Crucified doth save us. For if one believes with all his heart, he is justified. Now this heart shall be placed upon a white rose, to show that our heart's faith creates a pure joy, comfort and peace. The rose, again, is set upon a skyblue field to signify that our joy in faith is but a beginning of that . heavenly joy awaiting us above the skies. And this skyblue field, finally, shall be encircled by a golden ring, to point out


路THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

28

that our heavenly joy shall last forever and have no end and shall be rich and costly far above all joy and riches, even as gold is the finest and costliest.metal."-A. S.

\

.?

..

We extend our heartiest congratulations To Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Krueger of Whiteriver, Arizona, parents of a son, Richard Earl, born November 20. To Mr. and Mrs. Carl Finup, who announce the birth of a son, Donald Carl, October 16. . To Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Brekka (nee Jeanette Jordahl '29), proud parents of a daughter, Catherine Louise. . To Mr. and Mrs. Armin Rauschke of Stanton, Nebraska, parents of a. daughter, born November 28. Here's a bit of news from Stoddard, Wisconsin. Ervin Humann plays bus-man every day and uses his own car to bring ten of his pupils to school. Edmund Hellmann has accepted the position vacated by Erwin Wilde at Cudahy, Wisconsin. Victoria Schuetze has been called to teach the lower grades.


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGBR

Wedding bells rang August 15 for William Schriefer '28 and Margret Carstens. Congratulations! .. ' News from the West: Armin Rauschke of Stanton, Nebraska, has been chosen as visitor for the Nebraska District's schools by the School Committee of the Nebraska District. Mrs. Neitzl (nee Irene Kramer '28) was forced to undergo an operation in September at the Union Hospital. We are happy to hear that she has recovered from her illness. Clara Mehlberg paid two very short visits to her friends at D. M. L. C. . \

We were also delighted by a visit from two well-known friends and Alumnae, Gertrude John and Gertha Paap. The celebration 'of Prof. Burk's fiftieth anniversary as professor at our institution was one enjoyed by all. The mere fact that classes were to be suspended during the afternoon brought happy faces. The festival was begun with a fitting ceremony of thanks and praise to God, who had kept our dear teacher and friend to this day. After the services, everyone assembled in the gymnasium, and the evening was passed in speech and song, interrupted for a time by the serving of a lunch. The speakers of the evening w.ere friends and former students of Prof. Burk. One of the speakers, Rev. Schultze of Hutchinson, Minnesota, delighted the students with condensed versions of a number of well-known German poems. I have been fortunate to obtain a copy of these poems, and I present them as an aid to future German classes. Des Sangers Fluch Der Konig und sein Weib sitzen oben, Da kommt ein Sanger mit seinem Buben. Und weil gar so hubsch singt der Kleine, Gibt sie ihm eine Rose, 'ne schone. Deshalb kommt der Konig.In Wut, Er klitscht ihm ene 'nein, dasz ihm die Nase blut, Der Alte schnell den Ausgang sucht und flucht. Erlkonig Durch Nacht und Wind reitet Vater und Kind. Erlkonigs 'I'ochter, ziehen's in's Gelachter ; Und wie der Vater kommt heeme mit ihm, Da hat sich das Kind zu Tude geschrie'n.


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

25

Der Taucher Ein blechernes Dings, Ins Wasser 'nein schwingt's, Der Konig: "Wer bringt's?" Fragt er recht und links. Und einer, 'nein lief er Und taucht immer tiefer. Bracht's voll Ungeziefer. "Hier ist es !" so rief er, Und del' Konig, so lacht er, Und hohnisch dann sagt er : "Wenn's noch einmal macht er, Kriegt er auch meine Tochter." Und del' Jungling, hoch-naszlich, Hupft nein-e-unvergeszlich. Und ertrank=-es ist graszlichl-> Die war ihm -nalt-=zu haszlich. . Many Alumni were present that evening to assist in the celebration. Our only wish was that more could have been with us. The occasion will long beremembered by all of us. May God bless and keep our teacher for many years to come! On November 18, Herman Gurgel of the Class of '09 celebrated his twenty-fifth year in the teaching. profession. Pres. Nommenson of the West "Wisconsin District gave a short talk. The Northwestern Octette directed, by: 'Karl Gurgel, oldest son of Teacher Gurgel, and a Teache:rs'.'Cl').oir directed by Teacher Ebert, sang several selectioris.. '-To' be present at the celebration, Karl arid Ror~rid ·"Gurgel came home from Northwestern College, Watertown, arid Herman Gurgel and Winfried Stoekli f~om' D}VI. L; C:, NewUlm .. Before I' leave my post as editor ~f AI_umniNotes, I wish to thank all the kind friends who have solicited.contributions to my column. Your news flashes were"welcomed with open arms. I thank.all the readers for" bearingwith me in my humble efforts to fill this position. Arid in' .conelusion I bestow my heartfelt sympathy-on my. 1?lft.cces~or. May he be more fortunate in obtaining adequafe,;ljl}:i'terial than I was! ..' . .~: J

i _.':.-'

._. ~.~. _-'~, __

':"

:.=,._J~.:.


26

THE D. M. L. C. MESSI!JNGER

Prof. G. Burk Ein kleines Liedelein zusammengestellt seinem treuen Freunde Prof. Gottfried Burk, zu seinem golden en Amtsjubilaeum gewidmet von F. Greve. Fuenfzig Jahre, lange Zeit! Wenn wir auf die Zukunft sehen, Scheint's 'ne halbe Ewigkeit. Drin noch vieles mag geschehen; Doch fuer die Vergangenheit Scheint's zu sein 'ne Kleinigkeit, Die zurueckgelegt wir haben In verschiedenen Lebenslagen. Wege fuehren bergauf, bergab; Manch Juengling geht mit forschen Schritten Des Weges,-ein anderer in vollem trab, Als ob sie schon von Ferne wittern Das Ziel, das sein Beruf ihm gab. Ob's schwer, ob's leicht es zu erreichen, Bedenken manche sich nicht recht. Was Wunder ist's, wenn man verfehlet Des Weges, ob der Will nicht schlecht; J edoch auf unseren Lebenswegen


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Wir duerfen dies vergessen nicht, Dasz durch des treuen Gottes Segen Erfuellen wir nur unsere Pflicht. Er ist's, der unsere Schritte lenket, Ob auch seine Wege rauh und steil; Wer dieses darum recht bedenket, Den wird er fuehr'n zu seinem Heil. So war es heut vor fuenfzig Jahren, Als Gott sich unseren J ubilar Aus sechs Studenten sich erkoren, Den Gottfried Burk zum Professor. Der Herr in seiner Lieb und Treue Ihm Kraft gegeben immerdar, Zu lehren im New Ulmer Seminar Die Knaben und auch Maedchen gar Vor allem die edle Musika, Sei's auf Orgel oder im Chorgesang, Den Herrn zu preisen ihr lebenlang. Dasz ihm nun dies Werk gelungen, Erweist sich heutesonnenklar! Drum haben wir des Lob gesungen, Des treuen Gottes heut fuerwahr. Als der Beruf an ihn ergangen, Da war es ihm sehr zweifelhaft, . Ob er der Mann, dies anzufangen, Und fortzufuehren ihm die Kraft Nicht fehle zu der Meisterschaft. Doch der ihm den Beruf gegeben, Ruft ihm zu: Mein lieber Gottfried, weiszt du nicht, Dasz ich der Herr dir Kraft kann geben, Die Kraft, an der es selbsten dir gebricht? Bedenk du nur, ich bin dein Herr, Des Kraft und Macht zu jeder Frist In dem, der schwach, recht maeszig ist. St. Paulus hat's vor vielen Jahren, Auch du, mein Gottfried, sollst's erfahren. Drum zage nicht, sei gutes Muts, Dein Gott und Heiland tut dir Guts! Und unser Gottfried liesz sich raten, Schied bald aus unserem Siminar, Ging nach New.Ulm als Professor. Doch ueberzeugt vom Wort des Herrn, Dasz nicht gut ihm sei, allein zu sein, Schaut sich um nach seinem Herzliebchen fein Und fuehrt sie bald als bessere Haelfte heim. Auch dieses hat ihn nicht gereuet;

27


28

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Stand treu zur Seite ihm und hat erfreuet Ihm im Hause Familie und Amt, Dasz man musz sagen, es sei nicht umsonst, Zu haben ein solch feines Ehegesponst. 1st grosze Gnade vom Herrn gegeben Der Jubilariri und dem Jubilar. Drum preisen wir maenniglich fuerwahr Den Herrn unsern Gott im Jubeljahr; Doch wenn es ist in Schwachheit verklungen SolI's besser erklingen im ewigen Jubeljahr I

c~ ÂŁXCH/jNCe ,_-___

EXCHANGE Just recently I was told that the "Messengers" of former times were much more interesting than the ones published now. The after effects of this remark were somewhat bitter. Obviously, the staff strived in vain to make our college paper better from year to year .. If I had not finally come to the conclusion that all things belonging to the "good old times" have special value and charm, I might not have mus.ered enough courage to write my last Exchange Notes. Undoubtedly, the largenumber of'periodicals sent to us by the various schools during the last few weeks should, however, urge me to write in spite of all rebukes. Most of them are brimful with good and interesting information. The headlines on their front pages give us a fair insight concerning the activities of the students in their particular schools.


THE"D.

M. L. C. MESSENGEH

29

We received the following papers during the last few' weeks, and by naming them here we wish to show aur appreciation: The Spectator, The Black and Red, Concordia Courier, Alma Mater, The Concordia Comet, The Booster, Academy Echo, Bethany Scroll, The Augsburg Echo, The Luther Arrow, The Bethel Clarion, The Comenian. Let us note what some of them have to say: In an editorial of the Bethany Scroll we read opinions concerning "initiative." "It has been said that a head full of knowledge is like a barrel: not of much use until it dispenses its contents; and likewise, anyone with plans and ideas is of little value until he develops initiative and makes practical use of his plans and ideas. . Dare to do! Remember that everything done in this world was done through the efforts of some daring individual who did not wait .o be shown but showed the world instead. " Th"eConcordia Courier speaks of "The value of Time"~ "So long as we are awake our mind is occupied with a continuous stream of thoughts. The all-important question is the nature of our thoughts. We should never waste our time in useless thinking. Time is life's capital even in the mental world and ought never be wasted. Diversity of thoughts is recreation. Alternately we can give our attention to our studies. athletics, music, letter writing, art, reading, or to some special hobby. In sensible conversation education is received and given. If we can find nothing else to do, we can ask questions of general interest. Through questioning we can build up a storehouse of knowledge. " A fine development of the thoughts just expressed is found in an article entitled "Conversation" and found in the Alma Mater. We read "There is potential benefit in conversation, especially with people who know more than we do. If our preparation, reading, and general background are sufficient, the difference will not be obvious. The better educated a person is, the more apt he is to recognize the value of fresh views from other minds, and the more willing to exchange views. Many hidden possibilities lie in the exchange of ideas in conversations which are based on intelligent thought. Everyone ought to get a little more thinking behind his conversation. It is an art which should be cultivated."


30

THE D. M.路L: C. MESSENGJU{

In another article, the Concordia Courier tells us what not to do in our conversations-namely, "Never try to have the last word in an argument or raise your voice in trying to convince your opponent. Neither toss your head in silent contempt of his opinion, with pursed lips and scornful eye. Never, under any circumstances, allow yourself to get heated in an argument, for this is the surest way to lose your case. State your opinion, argue' your point, and then let the matter rest. In general conversation, never try to dominate. Let everybody have a chance, and try to draw into the conversation the silent ones. Often what they say is worth twenty minutes of volubility from the chatterer." The Luther Arrow gives us some rare lines concerning the chatterer. "What a dead world this would be without language. and especially talk, but: It seems to me that talk should be, Like water sprinkled sparingly; Then ground that late lay dull and dried Smiles up at you revivified, . And flowers-of speech-touched by the dew Put forth fresh root and bud anew. But I'm not sure that any flower Would thrive beneath Niagara's shower: So when a friend turns full on me His verbal hose, may I not flee? I know that I am arid ground, But I'm not watered-Gad! I'm drowned." Let us note what the Spectator has to say in regard to better reading. "Far be it from us to expect Lutheran college students to spend their time reading Homer, Milton, or Dante. Nevertheless, there is worthwhile reading-material in the world, plenty of it, besides the classics. We suggest to students who indulge in cheap magazines, that they cut their eye-teeth on Winston Churchill, Ralph Connor, James Oliver Curwood, Norman Ducan, Edward Eggleston, Hamlin Garland, Wilfred Grenfell, Jack London, Howard Pyle, Ernst Thompson-Seton, or Stewart Edward White." . _ Did you ever think it was possible for a man to earn a million dollars in an honest way and receive it as a just


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

31'

reward? An editorial in the Black and Red tells us in a general way how it may be possible. An excerpt from it shall follow.

..

"We all agree that a man can possibly earn with honesty and merit $2,000 a year. We also agree that he can earn even more than this. But can a man honestly earn $100,000 a year? This is a large amount; but, if a man renders to society a service equal to that amount of money, I believe he can truly earn this. And I believe he can earn a million,yes, even a number of millions of dollars, if he has done a service for society worthy of this large amount." "If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; there is where they should be. Now put founda. tions under them."-Thoreau .. "Accept the connection of events." " . make the best of your talents and opportunities. Extract from the accumulate knowledge of the centuries as much as you can for personal enjoyment and use." -The

Concordia Comet. My swan song: May my successor accomplish what I have failed to do-namely, help to create "Messengers" having the fine qualities of those of the long, long ago.

On September 29, a meeting of the Phi Gamma Rho and Phi Delta Sigma literary societies was called for the purpose of accepting new members. The Sigma started the year with a picnic chaperoned by Prof. Klatt, and the Rho had a "

I' l


32

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

party chaperoned by Mr. Dahlke. The first program of the year was a declamatory contest between the two societies. Professors Schweppe and Levorson and Mr. John Dahlke were the judges. The Phi Gamma Rho carried off the honors by winning in the oratorical and humorous fields, while the Sigma won in dramatics. This year the Marlut Singers have been organized under the direction of Waldemar Nolte. They have sung only twice, and at informal gatherings, but they give every indication of being able to uphold the reputation they have made for themselves. A Girls' Glee Club has been organized under the direction of Miss Sievert. This new rival of the Marlut Singers has the advantage of having a permanent director. Following the example they set last year, the faculty again gave a Hallowe'en Darty for the student body. Games were played on the athletic field until rain chased us into the auditorium. where we were entertained by the heretofore unknown talent of different members of the student body. "Eats" were served in the kitchen, and all were happy because they could have more than they wanted. A choir of thirtv-six members went to Delano to be nresent at the celebration of the 400th anniversary of Luther's translation of the Bible. The choir sang- three numbers in a double service in the afternoon. Prof. C. L. Schweppe nreached the English sermon, and Rev. A. Haase of St. Paul the German sermon. This trip was a real treat to the students. On October 9, the f'acultv.. student body, former students. and friends united to heln Prof. Burk celebrate his fiftieth anniversary as a teacher at D. M. L. C. In the services in the afternoon Prof. Schweppe gave an address, and the college choir sang two numbers. A lunch was served in the gymnasium, and this was followed by a' program of speeches and singing. Prof. Burk was presented with gifts from his former students and from the student body. Prof. Burk's golden jubilee was an opportunity for us to thank God for the blessings He has bestowed on our teacher and to ask His guidance in the future. Prof. Burk is continuing his work at the college, and we wish him every blessing.


THE

33

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

The customary Christmas collection for missions is ing gathered. This year the money will be sent to our dian missions. Let us not forget that "Inasmuch as have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, have done it unto me."

beInye ye

This year Christmas vacation begins on December 18 and ends all too soon on January 3. On the evening of December 18 the students will present the traditional Christmas program consisting of songs by the choir, organ numbers, and an address by a faculty member.

5

CO-ED NOTES It is just nineteen years ago that the co-eds were given the first opportunity to enter their column into the Messenger. Our school paper is interesting to us in every detail, but this column containing items supplied by all the girls, adds something that both the alumnae and we look forward to with interest. In these first co-ed notes only six girls are mentioned. This enrollment has greatly increased and with it these notes. There was only one co-ed, Miss Hedwig Naumann, on the staff at that time. During the last years the number has been changed, and we now have four co-eds on the staff. Nineteen Years Ago As the "Messenger" has progressed slowly but surely, we, the girls, have been watching it very closely. We felt happy at every new step it has taken toward bettering itself. If it had been within our power to assist the editors,


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENG1iJR

we would have done so willingly, but we had very little to say. For this fact we cannot blame the former editors, because our assistance was not required. Today though, I am happy to say, we are represented and in such a manner as to draw the interest of all the girls' of our institution. May we all give our undivided attention to the college paper whenever and wherever it is needed. Fifteen Years Ago The morning after the thirty-first of October found the dominion of the co-eds in a rather turbulent state. The room was hardly to be recognized when the girls came up from classes. After running around with brooms and dust cloths and making all the noise possible for a short time, the girls again restored the room to its former order. We do not doubt that the boys meant well in decorating our room; nevertheless, we still believe that girls possess more artistic taste than boys. We, however, do not object to little tricks now and then. The girls of the double quartette which accompanied Professor Reuter to Renville, Minnesota, report a pleasant trip. Five Years Ago Quiet reigned in the city girls' room, quiet until"Who's got my books ')" in a high pitched, excited voice. Of course, no one had taken Frances Redeker's' books, but they were not to be found .. A thorough, minute search of the room followed, every table, shelf. and locker being ransacked. Finally some one passed the waste basket, and there they were! Moral:. Keep. your shelves in perfect order, The books. may revolt, take legs, and find the waste paper basket. (The moral still holds good. Editor.) Did You Know That girls are no longer afraid of mice? The II Normal throw them at each other in class. Yes, there's a catch to it. Margaret Wegner makes them out of handkerchiefs . . That Elsie Prosek and Adele Nommensen have to sit a whole evening pondering over PATTER from the THE READER'S DIGEST before they realize that it is funny? That the Redeker Gang knows any German? They sang a German hymn for devotion one evening and except for a few mispronunciations, it was quite successful. That the strange creaks, thumps, groans, and what not that issued from Room 10, were results of strenuous exer_

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,


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

35

cises performed by girls who believe they have an excess of what we commonly call avoirdupois? That the reason the girls are in at dinner so long is not because they eat so much, but because the girl at the head of the table acts as hostess and serves the meal? It takes a bit longer, but everyone is pleased with the fact that the manners that so long have been hidden, are suddenly brought to the foreground. That there are numerous talented German speakers among the girls? For proof I offer the following examples that occurred at the supper table: -Say, weiszt du ob wir dies stuff in Deutsch Kniep callen? Two girls had a debate as to whether cream was called Rahm or Sahne. Another girl called for everything in plural so that she would at least get the correct article if nothing else. Chatter Screens were hauled out! Rags were seen in all hands! Dust and dirt were being routed in a big way. It wouldn't take any observer long to see that Hillcrest Hall was going through the annual housecleaning. The girls even managed to move the piano without aid from the dormitory across the way. Not a Man in the House and all went well.

I

_It>

The Wandering of a Laundry Bag was a topic of a speech in a class not so long ago. If we would let Omi Birkholz's talk, it would have a tale worth telling. From the mail man's car it entered the dorm. Quite secretly it was taken from there and placed on a table in Physics lab. It rested peacefully till another secretive group came up and took it to Professor Backer's room and set it on the piano. Finally the frantic owner found it and rescued it. Ask Elsie and Lindy if raspberry jam is good. They ate fifteen minutes longer than the rest just to get full enjoyment out of some they had-received from home. Hallowe'en never passed by so quietly as it did this year. There was perhaps one short-sheeted bed or so, and a few alarm clocks were set off for twlve o'clock. Otherwise we were almost too good to be true. We are still wondering what we can do to make our teachers believe that we have sprained fingers when we say we have. In spite of the fact that our finger is twice its normal size and all colors of the rainbow, they won't believe that it is possible that it might ache. Maybe some one will help us think of a suitable method.


36

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER.::......

_

It's more fun than a picnic] It's funnier than a radio路 skit! It's more entertaining than a circus! What? T mean listening to Helen and Elsie argue about something as insignificant as whether it is better to get a heavy letter with a one and five cent stamp or with two three cent stamps. The arguments they manage to find and offer truly would put any of our noted lawyers to shame. One evening we were agreeably surprised to see candy and apples on the supper table. It was all due to Professor Burke's generosity, and we heartily thank him for the delicious treat. The "oh's and ah's" would have told anyone how good it tasted. Blisters and sore backs were the results of the work we did on our tennis court this fall. Those were about the only results too. We never did get any clay to put on it so that we might finish our job. Now we just have pleasant thoughts concerning the work we'll have on it in spring to put it in playing shape. Cecilia was telling everyone about the beautiful antithesis that she had composed, so she was asked to play it. A dead quiet pervaded the room as she sat down to play. She struck the first chord, and as the sound filled the room, the basket of flowers on the piano started to tremble from the vibrations and fell off, barely missing "C. C.'s" head. She ran for a cloth and we ran for fear that we might have to listen to some more. "Haste makes waste" is the Redeker slogan. In trying to be at breakfast on time, some one is always tearing a shoe string. We wonder whether that is just a good excuse. We certainly all know how it feels to get locked out. It has occurred several times already, and one time it actually looked serious. The fire escape didn't do us a particle of good, because we really didn't want to break the screens. Miss Sievert finally managed to get her door opened and let her shivering picnickers into the building. Frances Senf didn't stay with us very long. One morning she just packed her "duds" and left. We were really sorry to see her go, for everyone had a warm spot in his heart for her. We wish her luck in her new school work Social Activities Miss Frances Meyer's room was the center for several parties in the past month. Miss Meyer entertained. at asix


THE

D. M. L. C. lIIESSENGJ..:G

37

o'clock dinner for Miss Ora Wollenberg, in honor of her birthday. On November nineteenth Miss Elizabeth Berg entertained for Miss Meyer at a luncheon. Guests at the luncheon were Miss Wollenberg, Miss Erna Kuehl, and Miss Margaret Wegner. Miss Oliva Stindt and Miss Ruth Uhlig spent a most enjoyable week-end at the latter's home if we can judge bythe number of days Miss Stindt was absent from classes. Our last edition was already sent to press when Miss Adele Nommen sen from Columbus, Wisconsin, returned to D. M. L. C. to resume her studies here. We were all glad to have her hearty laugh backin our midst. Miss Ada ;:ievert left her charges for a few days to atend a conference at Winona. Minnesota. During her absence Miss Esther Schnitker saw to it that law and order were maintained. MiSS Gertrude Vogel '34 left her schoolroom long enough to visit all her friends at the dormitory. She was guest of honor at a party given by the third floor girls. The menu consisted of apples. candy, and cake. The room was attractively lighted with flashlights. Miss Agnes Timm has been receiving quite a number of callers lately. One afternoon the Misses Adela, Clara, and Lydia Rudolph from Watertown, Minnesota, stopped for a few mnutes. After the Winona conference her parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. Timm from Milwaukee and Mr. Gilbert Timm from Arlington, Minnesota. visited with her. Miss Dorothy Larson, a former member-of the Redeker Gang visited here over the week-end of November the ninth. A happy reunion was enjoyed on Thursday evening when the Misses Ruth and Marie Hinnenthal, Alma Oswald, Florencs Raddatz and Florence Witte spent the evening at Redeker Hall. The evening came to an end with a "sumptuous repast." Miss Marguerite Harnisch '32 of Boyd, Minnesota, visited with friends at D. M. L. C. Instead of being a guest of honor as would have been the proper way to treat such a distinguished visitor, she entertained for the girls who were in the dormitory when she resided there. The Misses Veleda Kelm and Margaret Koehler went to New Prague to attend the twenty-fifth wedding anniversary celebration given in honor of the former's parents. On


38

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

their return Miss Kelm served a chicken supper for her roommates. Miss Elisabeth Robisch of Menomonie, Wisconsin, spent Thanksgiving with her sister at Hillcrest Hall. Her visit was much enjoyed by everyone. To prove that we were glad that she was here, a banquet, as only third-floor girls can serve, was given for her. Fourteen girls attended, and everyone went home tired, but not hungry. Professor Levorson gave the Redeker Gang the PrIVIlege of accompanying him to Hanska. Minnesota. where the girls spent a happy afternoon with Miss Dorothy Larson. Mr. Athniel Birkholz acted as chaperon on this excursion .. 'Hunter's Rest was the scene of a jolly nicnic when the Misses Sievert and Schnitker and the girls from the dormitory had a supper there. It turned quite chilly in the evening, so it was a chilly noisy group that came back to the dormitory to find themselves locked out. Frances Meyer and Evelyn Hunt both were lucky enough to have their parents come to visit them in the past month. Many of the girls looked enviously on when they chatted with brothers and sisters, and thought how nice it would be if they could be talking to a brother, sister, or even a friend from home. Mrs. Redeker served the Hallowe'en dinner to the Gang. Decorations were carried out in the color of the day. For them October thirtieth was a day to write about in their diary. Club Calendar C. A. M. Club is in full swing this year. The first meeting was of utmost value to all those interested in the cause to which the club pledged itself. Miss Naomi Birkholz was chosen as the only officer. All the members solemnly prom. ised to aid her in every way, so that the evil they had discussed in the evening would be thoroughly rooted out. The session ended with three cheers for the president and the Catch All Mice Club. The brave officer's work has been highly successful. When she sees a mouse, she screams so loud that all the members come on the run, armed -with brooms, and rid the world of another of these pesky creatures. The Girls' Sewing Club has met twice at the present writing. The various talents that the girls possess are gradually coming to light. Entertainment is furnished by the person that feels the most talkative. .The evening

-'


TilE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

39

usually comes to an end with a lunch of apples or a dish of popcorn. The last batch we had was seasoned with three cups of salt. 'That was one time we almost wore the water faucets out. The Nut Club has survived one year of trial and care. It is now a flourishing and prosperous organization. From the worried frown on the treasurer's brow, we judge that she must have many a heavy responsibility. They have meetings as often as they are all in one place at the same time. To onlookers, and especially to the librarian, they are a very interesting group. A Girls' Glee Club has been organized and is under the able direction of Miss Sievert. They made their first public appearance on November the ninth at the informal gathering in honor of Professor Burke's fiftieth anniversary. We hope that this organization will continue and not break up at the end of the year as has always been the case thus far. Wanted Column Wanted-A larger doormat for the dormitory for Omi and Ruth, so they can at least both get on at the same time. Wanted-An alarm clock on which the alarm refuses to ring for Veleda Kelm. She uses the alarm quite frequently and just as frequently stays in bed after it has rung for abou ; ten minutes. Wanted-New chairs for the reception room of the dormitory. The present equipment is so worn that every move a person makes in them results in horribly squeaky noises. They have already caused such untold embarrassment that some one should take pity on the poor unfortunate victims. Wanted-A gong that would not only wake the sleepy heads, but also make them less sleepy. Lost and Found Lost-A melodious, sweet voice somewhere between Practice School and Hillcrest Hall. Finder please return to Elsie Prosek. Lost-Some golden blonde curls of very fine texture somewhere between Ulrichs and the dormitory. Reward. Florence Raddatz. Found-Some very fine stitches in a pair of pajamas. Owner please call on Dorothy Simonton. Found-A certain Mr. 45 by a certain dark eyed brunetteon November 26.. She is eager to have the owner call. Merry Christmas to you all !


~o_

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGEH

Studentenwissenschaft! What Goes On In The Huddles? Many of our students, especially the co-eds, may wonder what really goes on when our football team goes into a huddle. Well, here's what we've overheard. The game is. on. The boys are in the midst of a battle. Wally: "Well, fellas, give me a little more help and I'll be able to put that ball over for a touchdown. Say, I really have to make a touchdown for my girl friend. Boy. she's sweet. And how!" Dierson: "A w, dry up! They're all the berries." Raabe: "I'm surprised to hear such things from you. Dierson. Why, my little girl's a charrnin' woman." Duin: "What's that got to do with the price of hogs in Iowa. Them wimmen's all the same to me." Pee Wee: "Me too. I'm over-weight." (Here we pause for 3 minutes during which time the "ref" penalizes D. M. L. C. 5 yards for offside.) Coppens: "Boys, we've got to fight for old Alma. Never mind the women." Bradtke: "Let's get going! That tough guy playin' against me socked me on the nose. I'll square up with him the next play." Hempel: "Shucks, I'm stuck here! Somebody threw a wad Of gum on the field. Sure enuf, it's Bubble Gum." Schoenherr: "You're always stuck on something. Get goin'; we need another touchdown. Don't call signals yet, my shoestring's untied." (Another fifteen yard penalty for D. M. L. C. as a result of Habben trying to mop the field with one of his opponents.) Wiechmann: "Hot, cha, cha! How'm I doin ! Wanna buy a duck!" -- "Aufderheide (kicking Wiechmann on leg): "I'll buy the duck if you take out the men you're supposed to." (The duck is bought, the path is cleared, and Aufderheide runs 50 yards for a touchdown. The whistle ends the game.) Team: Rah, rah, rah! Three cheers for good old D. M. L. C.-C. R. '35.


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

41

What Is Your Opinion? Diersen maintains that studying a dead language is bad enough, but he feels that studying a live language from a dead teacher must be worse. Example of a Freshman's Humor Schierenbeck: "What is a joke?" C. Fritz: "A short funny tale. Why do you ask such a silly question ?" Schierenbeck: "Well, I just saw a rabbit with two ears and a joke." Please Explain Why are so many of our co-eds wearing taped rings? Prof. Schweppe: "While in the woods, I amuse myself by watching the woodchuck's antics. " What Olga wrote: While in the woods, I amuse myself by watching the woodchucks and ticks.

A LOCALS A At last the hidden composer of D. M. L. C. has come to the foreground through the creation of a song which he dedicates to our fair lady, whoever she is. The song, indeed, merits comment, especially after one hears the budding crooner of D. M. L. C. render it. One would hardly expect anyone to rejoice over the great fire at St. James, Minnesota, but Athniel Birkholz does nourish a secret joy over this catastrophe, for he now can attend the fire sale. The football season of 1934, has passed into history. That sport is now being replaced by a game that eventually will become football's biggest rival-namely, table tennis. A special room on second floor has been set aside and an appropriate table has been constructed for the purpose of playing that big game. Thus far no coach has been appointed to guide the boys and teach them the tricks of the game.


-

42

.

--

---------------------

THE D. M. L. C. MESSE.NG:i!m::_

_

There will be music in the air constantly in the future, for Reuben Bode has invested in a new clarinet. Here is hoping that his roommates appreciate good music. Fishing is good in the Boys' dormitory. .All you have to do is drop your line into some aquarium, sit in an easy chair, and watch the poor little fools seal their doom. I, however, warn you not to try this sport, for the owners of the fish are very much attached to their pets, judging by the good care they receive. November 22 was a memorable date for Martin Rauschke. It was on that day that he passed through a : transition-namely, from adolescence to manhood. To impress the importance of this day upon his mind, he invited the boys of his class to his home, where the birthday was celebrated in the appropriate manner. Hank Hasse, however, must have suffered evil results, for he spent the next day in bed. The professors are aware that the students do not only Jove to study, but that they also enjoy parties. They showed this by giving the students a Hallowe'en party on October 23. Herman Gurgel has been given the worthy task of keeping the door closed during chorus rehearsal in order to reduce the number of lost chords. Basketball season arrived once more and with it came the foxes' favorite pastime-carrying and erecting the bleachers. Hans Wagner is also susceptible to surprise. A group of his classmates proved this on the night of his birthday, November 8. Now that winter is about to make its entrance, the snow shovels in the basement look at the foxes with pleading eyes, as if to say, "Oh, please give us some exercise." Meet tered the ment and facturers business.

our young chemist. Robert Nolte. He has masdifferent methods of breaking laboratory equipstarting fires quite thoroughly. Even the manuof laboratory equipment report an increase in

Did you ever hear about anyone playing a french horn with head voice? Well, Hertler maintains Harold Hempel can do it.


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

43

Winfried Stoekli, Walter Goeglein, and Milton Bradtke had a party all by themselves on November 9. Goegleiri was the host. Our tennis manager has also joined the A. A, A. He dug up only half the tennis court. Duehlmeier has discovered a new method of practicing his chapel hymns. He now has Schierenbeck sing while he plays. A fine opportunity to visit relatives presented itself to Clarence Radl on November 2, 3. He accompanied Teacher Nolte and the Austin to Winona. If you happen to stroll into the City Boys' room, your attention will naturally be drawn to Herman Raabe's and Hans Wagner's bookshelves. They have them arranged or deranged in a peculiar manner. On October 23, Hank Hasse had the good fortune to attend his brother's wedding at Nicollet, Minnesota. Dallmann is determined to become a proficient teacher of pictures. He has gathered a fine collection-beautiful pictures too! . Alarm clocks are unnecessary in the boys' dormitory since some chickens are grazing on our campus. Julius Wantoch has proved to be a very successful football manager, for he has been re-elected. . During the last two months Armin Schmidt, Edgar Wiechmann, and Arthur Meyer have visited their alma mater. Why have the boys from Minnesota been wearing such a proud smile of late? It is because the Minnesota football team swamped both the Michigan and Wisconsin elevens by a big score. That is something to be proud of. Mr. John Dahlke felt that an atmospheric change was indispensable; consequently he deserted his books and journeyed to Home Sweet Home on November 9. "Shoes shined for a penny. Satisfaction guaranteed or one-half the penny back." Thus reads Edmund Schierenbeck's advertisement. . Through the aid of some of the students the Reading Room is gradually being converted into the college archives. According to the number of letters Charley Brockel"mann gets, the people out West must get a bigger thrill out of writing letters than they do in this section of the country.


44

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

On October 6, Riess and Hasse journeyed to Morgan. They had the thrill of driving without lights for a number of miles on their way back to college. Mr. Dahlke convinced and muscle-bound as they first few days of tumbling muscles, butthat is now a

the boys that they are not so stiff thought they were. During the everyone complained about sore thing of the past.

The declamatory contest proved that we have some modern Daniel Websters in our midst. Boys, if you want a certain measure passed, just call on Habben and Rolloff to speak for you. Engelhardt attempted to remove the dandruff from his head; . The white flakes remained, but the skin from his face departed. It was Home Sweet 'Home for Herman Gurgel and Winfried Stoekli during November 17, 18. The reason for this was the twenty-fifth anniversary celebration of Teacher Gurgel's teaching career. The boys returned by automobile. . One evening this fall one of our necessities of life refused to serve us any longer-namely, the lights. All the students offered their assistance and knowledge, but the trouble could not be found; therefore an electrician had to be called to the scene.

Since this is the twenty-fifth anniversary issue of the Messenger, let us turn to the past and see what was news one-fourth of a century ago. Mr. Ben Luehmann of Lewiston, Richard Janke on October 22.

Minnesota,

visited

Walter Engel visited at the home of his parents near Fairfax, Minnesota . . The Rev. J. Baur of Morgan, Minnesota, called on his son, Alfred, October 21. Leo Luedtke attended on October 24.

the funeral of his grandfather


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

45

SPORTS

Twenty-five years ago the first Messenger appeared. At that time already a Sports editor was on the staff. Let us go back to that distant era and see what that editor had to say on sports. The following excerpt is taken from VolumeI of the Messenger and reads"Pity the poor editor that should write on a topic that is so remote from nearly every student's mind during winter at D. M. L. C. as the humming of bees in January. With a good gymnasium and all necessary apparatus, winter would not hinder us in our necessary physical exercises; basketball and turning wouldbe indulged in, but being at present without any accommodations,we must look for something else. At present skating is in vogue. New VIm has two rivers, and the ice on them is nearly always good for skating. A few hours after. studies, in the exhilarating air, when you


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSEr-;G;')R

-are carried over the smooth surface of the ice and in congenial company, will be found very refreshing and rejuvenating and our boys are making good use of the opportunity offered. Bright eyes, red faces and ears, fingers and feet nipped by the frost, are daily sights. Keep at it, boys, and enjoy yourselves, no harm will come from such enjoyments. Last but not least, we have our snow shoveling festivals. Here in Minnesota, the state where blizzards are wont to come occasionally, when the sky turns dark with snow which is not permitted to fall peacefully like a blessed mantle as it usually does in other states, but is blown and rent and tossed like the canvas of a ship in a gale. Volunteers are sometimes called to help the janitor clear away the beautiful white mantle and open a passage for the teachers, city scholars, and above all for the letter carrier who brings to the students the news from home and mother. On such a day many boys turn out with shovels in hand and shout as if the severe labor were a holiday frolic, the courage and the hilarity rising with the difficulties encountered. There is as much excitement and healthy stirring of the blood in this as in baseball and football." .i We have what these boys were wishing for. Baseball, football, and basketball have become the major sports at our institution. This year we have had some fine results in football. Although we won only two out of five games, we may judge the success of our team by comparing this year's scores to those of other years. Coach Voecks has done well this year, when we consider the opposition that we encountered this year. The morale of the team was high. Every member of the squad showed that he was a cog in the great football machine.

Football

s.. Paul

Luther Defeats D. M. L. C.

Saturday, October 6, the D. M. L. C. football squad traveled to St. Paul where they were defeated 19-0 in their first game of the season. The game was hard-fought throughout. In the first period of the game no score was made by either side. In the beginning of the second quarter the Saxons on sheer force carried the ball over for the initial score. The extra point was good. Their second touchdown resulted when they blocked a Luther punt and


THE

47

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

fell on it behind the goal line. The extra point failed. The final touchdown was made by the Saxons on power plays that brought the score to 19-0. D. M. L. C. lost their chance to score in the second period when on beautifully executed passes they put on a goal line march from the Saxons' 40 to the one yard line. At this point the Teachers were unable to penetrate the heavy line of the Saxons and lost the ball on downs. Lineup: St. Paul Luther Hovland Seehuetter Domcke Ackermann Ostendorf Ot:o Nickel Oberleiter Hultgren Gorney Lau

D.M.L.C. :

L.E................................. Coppens L.T Fuerstenau L.G Schlenner C Bradtke R.G Wantoch R.T Habben R.E Schweppe Q.B Hempel L.H Duin R.HJ......................... Aufderheide F.B Goeglein

Score by periods: St. Paul Luther

O

D. M. L. C

O

7

o

6

o

6-19

0- 0

D. M. L. C. Blanks Pillsbury October 13, 1934, D. M. L. C. was host to the Pillsbury football squad and defeated them by the score of 26-0. The Teachers had possession of the ball most of the time and almost scored at will. Only one first down was made by the Cadets late in the fourth quarter when they completed an S-yard pass and bucked the line for three more. Luther scored early in the game after Aufderheide carried the ball from Pillsbury's 45-yard line to their 5-yard line from which Goeglein scored the first touchdown. Hem.pel kicked the extra point. The second touchdown resulted when Aufderheide broke loose on Pillsbury's 32-yard line and scampered for a score. The kick after goal failed. In the third period Goeglein scored another touchdown after the ball had been advanced by Aufderheide to the 15-yard line. Hempel converted. The final goal was made in the last quarter when Aufderheide on an end run scored from the 20-yard line.


-

-- -

- --------------------------------------------------

48

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGJjJR

Lineup: Pillsbury Bulowa Thorpe Constance Van Duzer Sutton Swanton Billing Dolder Clarke Massey Hamilton Score by periods: Pillsbury D. M. L. C

'"

D. M.L.C. Coppens Fuerstenau Schlenner Bradtke Wantoch Habben Schweppe Hempel Duin Aufderheide Goeglein

L.E.... L.T L.G iC : R.G R.T R.E Q.B L.H..... R.II F.B 0 7路

0 6

o

0路-- 0

7

6-26

St. Mary's Trounced by Lu' her October 17, 1934, Luther unlashed all its fury to bury St. Mary's of Sleepy Eye on the local gridiron by the' topheavy score of 58-0.Touchdown after touchdown was made by the Teachers who found it an easy task to plow through for long gains. Aufderheide and Goeglein alternated in the scoring drive of Luther. Lineup: St. Mary's Schren Rasmussen Rectner . Maurer Leitschuh Clark Longworth Fowler 'Bertram Farrell Forster Score by periods: St. Mary's D. M. L. C

D. M. L. G.

L.E...................................Hertler' L.T Fuerstenau L.G Schlenner : C Bradtke R.G Schwantz R.T Habben R.E Schweppe Q.B Hempel L.H...... Duin R.H Aufderheide F.B Goeglein 0 13

o

0

0- 0

7

12

26-58


THE

49

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

St. Peter Downs Teachers On October 27, 1934, Luther played St. Peter at New Ulm where they lost by the score of 6-19. The game was played in a strong wind which fact was unfortunate for both teams. Aufderheide made the only Luther score on a sharp thrust tackle from St. Peter's 3-yard line. Further scoring was made impossible as the St. Peter line got stronger. St. Peter scored in the second period and counted twice in the third. Lineup: S路. Peter D. M. L. C. Davis L.E.................................Coppens Krohn L.T Fuerstenau . Anderson L.G...............................Schwantz Freeman C ; Bradtke Olson R.G Wantoch Warning ; R:T Habben Severson R.E...................................Hertler Peterson Q.B Hempel MacDonald LJI.............................. Duin Maxine L.H : Aufderheide Malmberg F.B............ Goeglein Score by periods: 0-19 6 13 St. Peter 0 o 0 0- 6 D. M. L. C 6 Shattuck Noses Out D. M. L. C. On November 2, 1934, the Luther squad traveled to Faribault where they were defeated by Shattuck 12-7. The Teachers began the scoring by registering seven counters in the second period. From this point it seemed that Luther might have the best of a closely-fought game. Shattuck, however, came back in the final period to score twelve points. Lineup: Shattuck Gluek 路 .Nelson Neer Norden Qualls

D.M.L.C. L.E................................. Coppens L.T Fuerstenau L.G : Schwantz C Bradtke R.G , Wantoch


THE

50

Nohl Hicks Bowler Macomber .: Smith Rogstad

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

R.T R.E Q.B L.H R.H F.B

,

Habben Schweppe Hempel Aufderheide Duin Goeglein

Score by periods: Shattuck

_

D. M. L. C

0

O

o 7

o o

12-12

0- 7

Basketball Fo~ several weeks already basketball practice was held. The team has been developed from almost all new 路material. Yet, many of this year's squad have shown uncanny ability on the floor. The team looks promising and we wish that coach and team have a successful season. Basketball Schedule 1934-1935 November 26-Mankato Teachers Freshmen, here . . December I-Alumni (tentative), here. December 5-Shattuck, here. December 14-Bethany, there. January ll-St. Paul Luther, here. January 26~Concordia, there. February 5-Bethany, here. February ll-St. Paul Luther, there. February 12-Bethel, there. February 19-Rochester, there, February 23-Concordia, here. February 27-Shattuck, there. March 2-Bethel, here. Girls' Sports The end of the kittenball season showed some real material among the girls. Even our coach couldn't help marveling at a game between Nolte and Uhlig. It could have been called a pitcher's duel. An error gave Uhlig's team a real break, but the score was close until the last inning. A little more practice for all of us, and we'll show the world that we can: play. The following shows how the teams stood at the end of the season:


.

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENG1JJR

52

Won

Lost

Pct.

Uhlig

6

o

Nolte Sauer Albrecht

4 1 1

2 5

1.000 .667 .167 .167

5 Because Frances Senf, the newly路 elected kitten ball manager, left school, Adele Nommensen was appointed to take her place on the board. Basketball games have started, and the teams thus far seem quite evenly matched. Ruth Riess, Naomi Birkholz, Margaret Koehler, Myrtle Pagenkopf, Cecilia Priesz, and Adele Nommensen are the captains who are fighting for supremacy.

Laughs of Long Ago

A: What is the hottest place in the U. S. ? B : A hornet's nest. During rollcall in chapel two boys answered one name. Prof: Sind zwei da ? Spookum:--路Ja~--z\vminge.


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

53

Prof (in arithmetic period): Is the name of this number 'cows, horses, dogs or cats? Slapp Jude: Stinkcats !-By C.' Pape, class of '12. Ted (laughing at a mouse which had just passed his bench) . Prof: War das einer -von- deinem Geistesverwandten ?--:-1.920,Vol. X, No.3. An excuse from a mother: Fritz kann nich komm, Hos ist en 2.-1917, Vol. VIII, No.3. Dated or Undated! "What kind of coffee do you serve in your home?" "Cuckoo Coffee." .. "Why do you call it Cuckoo Coffee ?" "Oh, kinda weak in the bean."-Sinc. M. P. From Bad to Woise And then there was the absent-minded professor who poured maple syrup down his back and scratched his pancakes.-Ex. Rolloff (trying to pull a wise one): "Say, the Greeks must have had wide paper-six feet to a line." Bob N.: "Oh! yes, yes! You see they rolled it on sticks." Save the Pieces And now, after months of research work, we finally discovered that jig-saw puzzles are the result of trying to put together a tattooed sailor after a train hit him:

He Got It Miss Hatchetfoot: "0 Joe, I brought you a present for your birthday." Joe: "What is it?" M. H.: "I wanted to bring you all myoId phonograph records, but they were too heavy to carry so I just brought the needles." Joe: "I get the point."-Ex.


54

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Z-z-z!

Andy: "I heard they had to throw cold water over Amos at his wife's funeral." Kingfish: "Sure must of been terrible. Did he faint ?" Andy: "No, just naturally a' sound sIeeper."-Ex. I wonder whether Mr. Dionne could believe hiscensus when he was told he was the father of quintuplets.

Time Out Drunkard (seeing expressman carry grandfather's clock into the house): "Mishter, could I ash you a quest'n ?" . Expressman: "Well, what is it?" Imbiber: "Why dontcha get a wris'-watch ?"-Ex. Matz R's Lament When ice cream grows on lemon trees, When Sahara's sands are muddy, When cats and dogs wear overshoesThat's when I like to study. Most girls divide life's story into "Chap one," "Chap two," etc. Koehler: "Oh...h-h ! There's two boys coming behind us. Let's run." KeIrn: "Which way?"

Mama: "My, but your hands are clean." Mary: "Yes, but you should have seen them before I helped Kelly make the biscuits."-Ex.

Squire: "Did you send for me, my lord?" Sir Launcelot: "Yes, make haste with my can opener; I've a flea in my knight clothes."


TI-I~~D M, L, C, MESSENGEll

55

Love Personified raper Bag: "Love me, dear?" Suzar ~ "I'm all wrapped up in you." Faper Bag: "Oh, you swe-eet thing."

Christmas Shorts Real Christmas spirit contains no bitters. 2. Trese are ~he days you must hand it to the kids. 3. Mistletoe 'is all right but holly has its points. 4. We used to believe in Santa Claus; now we do our Christmas shopping- early. 1.

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Reconstruction, Installation, Additions, Blowers, Chimes, Harps

PIPE ORGANS

E. C. VOGELPOHL

ORGAN CO.

ORGAN ARCHITECTS'AND BUILDERS New Ulm, Minn.

405-409 North Broadway

When in Need of Electrical

Supplies and Radios

or Service call on

Ulrich Electric Company ELECTRIC SERVICE AT ITS BEST BUY WITH SERVICE

Phone 148

QUALITY CLOTHING At

$17.50 to $35.00

TAUSCHECK

~ GREEN

RED FRONT GROCERY FANCY AND STAPLE

GROCERIES

GLASSW ARE-NOVELTIES-DINNERW Phone 43 and 44

ARE


THE SCHROEDER BAKERY

THE FLOWER OF NEW ULM JUST LIKE THE BREAD MOTHER MAKES

PHONE 232


We Turn a House Into a Home

BUENGER FURNITURE

CO.

Stores: New Ulm, Sleepy Eye and Gibbon

SUCCESSFUL PLANNING Everything in co-operation and accommodation consistent with courteous and sane banking principles is added to "YOUR AOOOUNT" at this community financial institution.

CITIZENS STATE BANK New Ulm, Minnesota Under provisions of the Banking FR 8D A. MEINE -of-

FRED MEINE CLOTHING CO.

See Us for Snappy Clothes

Act of 1933 Our Deposits Are Insured


·SILVER LATCH INN "The Pride of New DIm" Fountain Servlce-c-Lunches-c-Meals Dining Room Service

EUGENE KOEHLER-BARBER SHOP Hair Cuts 30c Efficient Service and Courteous Treatment

New DIm

20 N. Minn. St ..

GREATER VALUES Our New Fall Stock Supplies the Greatest' Suit and Overcoat Values of the Time

$15.00

$17.50

$21.50'

$25.00

:'The Mirror' iPrOVeSthe Style and Fit

HO~MMELBROTHERS 1.4 No. Mimi..St.

New Ulm, Minn.

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Buy Rexall Merchandise SUPERIOR

QUALITY

AT LOWER PRICES

Rexall Drug Store Walter Muesing-Walter W. Hellmann "SAVE WITH SAFETYu

GEORGE'S TAVERN Dine and Dance Bowling Bar and Booth Service "The Center of Activity" Phone No.5 For Your Dry Cleaning, Laundry or Hat Work We assure you prompt and efficientservice and invite you to visit our modern, up-to-date plant at 107-109So. Minn. St.

NEW ULM STEAM LAUNDRY Expert Dry Cleaners and Hatters


WHEN IN NEED OF FOOTWEAR Be Sure and Call on Us We carry a complete line of men's, .ladies' and children's shoes We appreciate your business. Our prices are always the lowest, Qualitconsidered

ATHLETIC SHOES OUR SPECIALTY TRY OUR REPAIR DEPARTMENT

FOR GOOD WORK

P. J. EICHTEN SHOE STORE New Ulm, Minnesota

THE NATIONAl ..TEA CO. FOOD STORE~ GROCERS AND BAKERS New UIm, Minnesota

G. J. HIEBERT, D.D.S. OfficeOver Rexall Drug Store Office Phone 247 Residence Phone 1547

Weilandt & Stegeman

New Ulm, Minn.

SAY

Contractors and Builders Correspondence Solicited ~!Ol·k Done in Any Section of the

Community Plans and Specifications Furnished Estimates Cheerfully Given Office 1100 Center St. . Phone '57 I Auto Glass Replaced to Order

Champion Shoe Shop A Pleased Customer Is Our Best Advertisement

We also have a good supply of new shoes. E. FREESE, Proprietor 24 So. Minn. St.

;-LOWERS cA!ways in (food tast e»

e,

" 11ways

»rp re

e/fl ted

NEW ULM GREENHOUSES . New DIm, Minn. - Phone 45


A. C. OCHS BRICK & TILE COMPANY General Sales Office

Executive Office and Plant Springfield, Minn.

818 National Bldg. Minneapolis Manufacture

Artistic Face Brick Various Colors -

Also-

Load Bearing Tile and complete line of

Building Tile and Common Brick Our Material stands every Test, and was used in hundreds of Government, State, Public and Private jobs in every state of the great Northwest and Canada. Some of them being-The last twelve new buildings on the University of Minnesota Campus, numerous large business blocks and other buildings in the City of Minneapolis, such as the New Nicollet Hotel, Sheridan Apartments, Cleveland School, St. Mary's Hospital, Swedish Hospital, Calhoun Beach Club, etc., etc., two Lutheran churches of Springfield, Imma:nuel Lutheran Church of Mankato, Lutheran Churches in Brewster, Lake Benton, Blue Earth, Wanamingo, Westbrook, Wood Lake, Alden, Odin, Ceylon, Clara City, Jackson, Delano; Devils Lake, Arnegard in North Dakota; Dimock, Roscoe, etc., in South Dakota, the Dr. Martin Luther College and the Union Hospital of New Ulrn, the Lutheran School at Sleepy Eye, together with others built prior and since the above mentioned. Veterans buildings at St. Cloud, Minnesota and Rapid City, South Dakota, the new seven story First National Bank at Fargo, North Dakota, also large public and private buildings at Brookings, Watertown, Lennox, Lyons, Huron, South Dakota; Willmar, Hendricks, St. Paul, Marshall, Tracy, Rochester, Winona, Minnesota and many others all over the four States.

Our Products Are Sold in the New DIm Territory by New DIm Brick & Tile Yards


PINK'S STORE Where Quality Comes First Smartest Wear at Prices You Expect to Pay Ladies' Ready to Wear, Silk Underwear, Hose, Shoes, Dry Goods, Groceries The Store Where You Feel at Home DEER

BRAND

BEER

AUGUST SCHELL BREWING COMPANY NEW ULM

. MINNESOTA

AID ASSOCIATION FOR LUTHER.ANS APPLETON, WISCONSIN Legal Reserve Fraternal

Insurance for Men, Women and Children

30 YEARS' RECORD

190,2 1912 1922 1932 1933 July 1, 1934

No. of Branches 33 234 942 2,128 ....... 2,187 2,246

July 1, 1934 Admitted Assets $16,201,803.80 Certificate Re serves, Surplus and .other Liabilities 15,935,852.28 Emergency Reserve Funds 265,951.52

.$

Insuran~e in Force' 760,000.00 7,404,500.00 26;258,018.00 125,864,133.00 131,328,055.00 134,840,817.00

Payments Since Organization To Living Certificateholders $ 8,382,594.36 To Beneficiaries 3,873,053.72 'lotal Payments 12,255,648.08

ALEX O. BENZ, President Wm. F. Keirn, First Vice President Albert Voecks, Secretary Wm. H. Zuehlke, Treasurer


BREAD! Your Outstanding Energy Food . Use Bread freely for your essential energy needs. Easy digestibility is one of the foremost values of Bread

EI3NER ~ SON BAKERY and ICE CREAM PHONE

Established 1883

128

SPAULDING ATHLETIC GOODS -at-

Robert Fesenmaier, Inc. Special discount given to students

ALBERT D. FLOR Attorney at Law New DIm, Minnesota

SALET'S DEPARTMENT STORE-NEW

ULM, MINN.

EVERYTHING TO WEAR FOR HIM OR HER WEAR SALET'S FAMOUS $1.98 FOOTWEAR

Highest QualEy ami of Course

"YOU ALWAYS SAVE AT SALET'S"


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Save to the Limit Buy to the Limit - -If Savings Mean Anything at All to You, You'll Stock Up at Penney's

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J~C. PENNEY CO.

WE DO OUR PART

mDOOURPART

Corner Minn. and 2nd North St.

Give Your Eyes a Chance It isn't right to toil under the handicap of defective eyesight. Poor eyes make backward students. They not only affect your work, but your nerves and health as well. We fit your eyes right, grind lenses in our own shop and replace broken lenses on short notice.

DRS. SCHLEUDER Opnmetrtas and Eyes'ght 102 N. Minn. St.

t'pecialists Telephone 87

New Ulm

R. R. KEMSKI PRINTING CO. For Printing and Supplies

Phone

370

KEMSKE PAPER CO.

Towels and Toilet Paper

A. B. Dick Mimeograph Stencils and Ink Mimeograph and School Papers

NEW

ULMDAIRY THE HOME OF

Pure Dairy Products PASTEURIZED

MILK

CREAM, BUTTER and ICE CREAM PHONE 104 Route and Cc.unter Service

SOMSEN & DEMPSEY Henry NrSomsen

W. H. Dempsey

ATTORNEYS AT LAW New Ulm,

Minnesota


NEW ULM GROCERY CO. Wholesale Grocers Distributors STOKLEY'S FINEST VEGETABLES Ask for this brand and be satisfied Service and Satisfaction at 'the

MODEL BARBER SHOP Alfred H. Kuester, Prop. Footwear Athletic Footwear and Sox Ladies' Smart Styles Attractively Priced

EMIL WICHERSKI For Greater Values and Service See Us

COAL Lumber-Millwork Cement-Sewer

Pipe

and all other Builders Supplies

HENRY SIMONS LUMBER CO. DEPENDABILITY


For Superior Baking Results Use

DANIEL WEBSTER FLOUR Perfected

EAGLE ROLLER MILL CO. NEW ULM, MINNESOTA

John W. Graff

Geo. D. Erickson

ERICJ{SON & GRAFF Attorneys at Law New DIm, Minnesota

HENRY

GOEDE STUDIO

"Nothing Pleases Us More Than A Satisfied Customer"

Studio --1 07 North Broadway

HAUENSTEIN SPECIAL and PALE DRY CARBONATED ~EVERAGE SERV~D AT ALL PLACES New Ulm, Minnesota Telephone No. 1


CRONE BROS. CO. The Store forYoung Men

Best

OUt

Attention "

'

Everything of a banking nature entrusted to our care receives our best attention. We shall be glad to have a share of your business.

State Bank of New Ulm

~IEYER'SSTUDIO A Studio That Is A Studio Phone 268

New UIm, Minn.

M,UESING i

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E;xpert Prescription

Service .

ARTCRAFT PHOTO SER路VICE We Have It!

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Will Get It!

Or It Isn't Made!


Buy Where

r ou See

This Sign

YOU BUY BETTER BECAUSE WE BUY BETTER Our 500 Store Buying Power Makes Possible the Low Pr.ces on Our Quality Merchandise

r. LI.

RETZLAFF HARDWARE COMPANY

D,rs. Hammermeister

~ Saffert

Physicians and Surgeons

MINNESOTA

NEW ULM,

The Grand Hotel Barber Shop Arndt and Strate, Props. "It Pays To Look Well"

Dodge

Plymouth


SCHLUMPBERGER'S Groceries-Fruits-

GROCERY

Vegetables-Smoked

Phone 182

Meats

New VIm, Minn.

WILLIAM J. VON BANK, D.D.S. Dentist OfficePhone 237

Residence Phone New Ulm, Minn.

797

"THE BUSIEST STORE IN TOWN" "There Must Be a Good Reason Why"

THE BEE HIVE J.

A. OCHS & SON

Ladies' Ready-to-Wear and Dry Goods EVERYTHING FOR THE CO,ED

A. L. KUSSKE, M.D. Practice Limited to Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat and Fitting of Glasses In Weiser Block Over Silver Latch Cafe New VIm Minnesota

DR.E. G.LANG DENTIST Fritsche Clinic Building Res. Phone 352 Office Phone 472

THE GASTLER STUDIO ,

.

For QuaJity Photographs Also Kodak Finishing


Saffert's Provision Market

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Athniel Helmuth Birkholz 1918-1935 Deep sorrow filled the hearts of students and professors of Dr. Martin Luther College when they heard of the death of Athniel Birkholz. This sad and unexpected message reached us on February 1. AI~hough his health was not of the best, he returned to our institution after the Christmas holidays. During the remaining weeks of January he failed to improve, His illness was thought to be a mild case of influenza. On January 25, he was taken horne, where he hoped to rest and regain his strength. However, his illness increased to the extent that he was removed to the Lutheran hospital at Mankato. Here he submitted to an operation on Wednesday, January 30. Early the following Friday morning he calmly and peacefully met his death. Athniel Helmuth Birkholz, the son of Ernst and Anna Birkholz, was born January 4, 1918, at Olivia, Minnesota. After his confirmation in 1931. he enrolled at Dr. Martin Luther College. At the time of his death he was a member of the Twelfth Grade. Next fall he had hoped to continue his preparation for the Holy Ministry at Northwestern College. Funeral services were conducted at St. James, Minnesota, on February 4. The Reverend R. P. Korn officiated at the horne, while the Reverend A. Ackermann preached the German sermon and Professor C. L. Schweppe, the English. Interment was at the Lutheran James, Minnesota.

cemetery

at St.

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CONTENTS

LITERARY: a)

Behold the Man 1...................................................... 4

b)

Be Thou My Guide

c)

Walls

d)

Education and the Kitchen Sink.

13

e)

Afro-American People

15

f)

Regan and Goneril as Superlatives

17

g)

How I Feel About Moby Dick.

20

h)

A Human Being

22

:

5 ,

;

12

EDI'TORIAL: Recruits in the Messenger Staff

25

LIBRARY

26

ALUMNI

28

EXCHANGE

32

COLLEGE NOTES

36

CO-ED NOTES

38

LOCALS

.

.

43

ATHLETICS

45

JOKES

55


4

THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

BEHOLD THE MAN!

I. "Behold the Man!" The shadows of Gethsemane Hide from our eyes the anguish of His prayers. "Remove this cup-Thy will, not mine be done." It is the sin of all the world He bears. II. "Behold the Man!" Led to the Judgment Hall ".~ He stands before the earthly rulers there. Despised and mocked, sharp thorns upon His head, ' He suffers all the pain that we should bear. III..

i

"Behold the Man!" Three crosses high on Calvary-eHere hangs the King that Israel decried. Deep darkness covers all the saddened world: It fir the Son of God who suffered here and died. ,

IV. "Behold the Man!" World, hear the angel's word: "The Lord is risen; seek not in the grave." Behold the Victor, Son of God and Man! He lives triumphantly His own to save. D. J. S. '35.


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGMR

5

nE THOU MY GUIDE A tear of pure joy escaped from beneath poor Mrs. Gannon's eyelid. To-day her dearest wish was being fulfilled. It was Don's Confirmation Day-Don, her only son. How she had fought, hoped, and prayed for this moment! Her life had not been an easy one. Mr. Gannon, now dead, had been a bitter scoffer at everything his wife held sacred. He had refused to let Don attend services with his mother. Then came the greatest sorrow for the family. Mr. Gannon failed in business, and in order to avoid his creditors, he plunged from a' sixth-story window to the pavement below. .Mrs. Gannon slaved day in and day out that she and her son, who was eight years old at that time, might settle the debts satisfactorily. Her. husband's sad end made her ever more determined to rear her son in the fear of the Lord. She took him to church and taught him prayers and hymns. To-day, on his fourteenth birthday, he was promising his Saviour to be faithful unto the end. What happiness she experienced! She listened with renewed thanks when Don and his classmates sang, "Take Thou my hands and lead me." Three happy years rolled by. Mrs. Gannon and her son were constant in their attendance at church. Don had completed his high school training in the little Carrollton High School. Now he was ready for college. Mrs. Gannon dreaded the thought of seeing her son leave. "Please Don," she pleaded, "promise me you'll always go to church and continue to be the good boy you've always been." "Of course, Mom," was the curt reply, "you know I've always gone with you, and as for being a good boy-I'll try." Mrs. Gannon shed many a tear in her room during the days preceding Don's departure for college. She knew that he was not very strong in faith; that he needed a guiding hand. She prayed, "Lord, on his Confirmation Day he asked of You 'Be Thou My Guide,' please be his Guide now while he is away from home." In spite of the fact that she felt sad, Mrs. Gannon tried her best to appear happy in Don's presence. On the day of his departure, she smiled and joked as she helped him put his last things into the trunk.-After they had eaten a little lunch in the tiny kitchen alcove, she called the taxi. On the way to the station they talked of many things to keep their minds off the final "good-bye."


6

THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

"Say, Mom, just look at that old man over there. He looks as though his eyes measured three glasses while his stomach cared for only two." "Yes, Don, I hope you'll always remember not to indulge in anything like chat. Remember you promised me you'd b-" "Oh, Mom dearest, you do get the funniest ideas sometimes. I'll be careful how I behave myself-remember I'm not an infant anymore." They drove on in silence for a few minutes. Mrs. Gannon's heart was too heavy to say much. Don changed the subject and prattled on about one thing and then another. 'They arrived at the station just as the train came in. Don rushed into the station for his ticket. Together they boarded the train and found a comfortable place. Don talked nervously and quickly. Mrs. Gannon responded with weary nods. At last the conductor called the signals. Mrs. Gannon kissed her son and clung to him in a last embrace. She reminded him of many things and above all not to forget his prayers. Before Don could answer, the conductor pulled Mrs. Gannon away and told her she must get off immediately. A final wave of the hand and she was alone on the little Carrollton station platform. Had he promised her to remember his prayers? Don easily became a member of the "set" at college. He was a handsome, likeable chap with enough wit to satisfy any group of youngsters ready for fun. He sometimes became very lonesome for his Mother. That feeling, however, seemed easy to conquer, for he had a happy-golucky room-mate who always took him in hand at such moments. "I used to get that way too," he confided, "but that only makes a fellow mopy. Let's get out and have a little fun." The "little fun" usually led them to a small uptown tavern, where, as a rule, they would find other members of the "set." At first Don reluctantly followed his friend's suggestion. Then he discovered that this group really could make him forget his cares-at least temporarily. I ut that little tavern soon found Don there almost daily even when he was not molested by home-sickness. Deep in his heart he felt a pang of shame, for he knew his Mother would never approve of this. However, he could not bear the jeering of Ken, his roommate, and the rest of the gang. Usually he trooped along with them. He also fell away from church.


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

7

The short vacations which he spent with his Mother, did little to revive his interest in church. In fact, he impatiently awaited the days when he could go back to Ken and the gang. Mrs. Gannon wore an anxious look every time she parted from her son. She still clung to the hope that Don would turn out all right. At every parting, she received a careless promise to be good. Thus four years went by. The only time Don attended church was at home. Ken and he had become inseparable friends, but it was Ken who always did the planning for their good times. They danced. drank, gambled, smoked, and swore. Don tried to comfort himself in the thought that the rest of 'the world was doing the same, and why shouldn't he? Graduation time came. It meant that his Mother would come and that he must entertain her while the rest were having a good time. On the day before graduation, Don met his Mother at the station. She gulped hard to stifle the lump that formedIn her throat when she saw her son. It had been almost a year since she had. seen him last, for he had gone home with Ken at Christmas time. Don's face was sallow; his eyes were sunken and moody. In spite of his appearance, she managed a cheerful, "Gracious, Don, you have become such a handsome young man!" Then she hastily turned her head to wipe the tears from her eyes. This was not what she had prayed for. This was not what she had sent her son to college for. At the boarding house they met Ken. "Hi there, Don! Meet you at the Uptown later. you're busy now."

See

"But, Ken," stammered Don, "I'll not be able to come to-night. You see my Mother is here." "Oh, there are other mothers around here with whom your Mother can visit. There's my sister, remember. You see it's our last night: You've got to come or you'll throw ice on the entire affair." Ken eyed the pair as he waited for an answer. "You won't mind if I run over a while, will you, Mother? Of course you won't! It's only this one time yet." He shot a nod at Ken and then hurried his Mother up the steps to the waiting room. Don introduced his Mother to Ken's sister. Then he was' gone. All the joy she had


8

THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

anticipated left the poor mother. She answered all the kindly attentions of Ken's sister with a mechanical nod. At ten o'clock Ken and Don appeared. Both of them balanced on rather unsteady feet, but they managed to get their relatives to a hotel near by. With a hurried goodnight kiss, Don left his Mother and joined Ken who was already waiting in the hall. Two years later Don was seated behind a large oak table in the office of the Burnham Publishing Company. He was now a promising young newspaper man. The fact that he was separated from his gang did not check his mad career of unwholesomefrolic. Mr. Burnham, the owner of the firm, was a tall, lean, middle-aged man of very stern character. On this particular January afternoon, he seemed to be in a desperate mood. He marched up and down the aisles and barked at everyone that talked to him. Don was. too sleepy to pay much attention to the unusual behavior of his employer. In fact, he was just dozing off to sleep when he felt a heavy hand on his shoulder and heard a thunderous voice pour out its volume on his head. "Mr. Gannon, I have a very important business matter to clear up. I can't leave the office myself, but I'll trust that I can safely give the matter over to you. You will leave for Chicago in the morning." "Yes, sir," was the startled reply. The next morning found Don on his way. He was glad to escape the tension of officeroutine for a few days. , With a feeling of joy he stepped on the gas lever. The speedometer shot up to fifty, fifty-five, sixty, and sixty-five. There it swayed back and forth ever so slightly. The little green roadster dashed along merrily. All at once Don began to feel dizzy. A mysterious darkness covered his eyes; his hands grew limp on the wheel. A few seconds and a horrible crash was heard. The little car rolled over and over down a high grade into the creek below. A farmer who had seen the car plunge through the railing ran to the rescue. He pulled the unconscious young man out of the wreckage and put him on the frozen ground beside the brook. Several other cars stopped, one of them a grocery truck. The driver offered to take the victim to a hospital. A bed was made of blankets which the curious motorists offered. Don was rushed to a hospital in a town near by. The doctors found that his back was badly injured. A card in his purse revealed his name and address. Don's employer was notified and through him the doctors learned Mrs. Gannon's address. Mrs. Gannon herself was very ill and could not come to the bedside of her son.


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGBR

9

Miss Renning, the nurse, did everything in her power to make her patient comfortable. At first Don was too weak to say much. As the days passed, he prattled more and more about his friends and his work. However, he never mentioned any affiliations with any church. Miss Renning, who was a devout church member, was surprised at this. One day she ventured to ask him whether he never attended church. With a faint smile Don answered, "Oh, I used to, but I'm rather out of the habit now. The sermons are too tiresome for a fellow like me." . The nurse was quiet a few minutes. She looked at her patient's worn features and sighed. But wouldn't you like to have a minister visit you while you're. ill?" she ventured.

come and

"A minister to see me? Why should I be interested in a minister?" Miss Renning was deeply wounded. She never mentioned religion in his presence again while he was at the hospital. After five weeks of suffering, Don was able to be removed to a lodging house. His nurse accompanied him here. Three more weeks passed before he could stand alone or walk. One Sunday morning Miss Renning asked him to go to church with her. .. "I suppose it won't do me any harm. This Sunday is just as good as any other," was the careless reply. The nurse called a taxi and helped her patient with his coat. Soon they were off to church. An amused smile escaped Don as he, supported by his nurse, entered the church. He was counting the number of years he had not attended church. It was just three years. After arranging the pillows she had brought, she tenderly settled Don among them. Then she bowed her head in prayer. Don watched her curiously with a mingled feeling of pity and remorse. Don turned his head. Is she praying for me? Don almost felt that she was. After a while she sat erect. "Are you comfortable, Mr. Gannon?" "Yes, Miss Renning," was the reply. Miss Renning noticed a note in his voice which she had never before heard. She opened her hymnal with a joy and satisfaction. The bells in the tower began to chime. In a few minutes the organ began a festive march. The


10

THE D. M. L.-C. MESSENGER

Rev. Mr. Douglas entered with his confirmation class. It was Palm Sunday! Don watched the children take their places and moved uneasily among his pillows. He sat as one in a daze; he heard the hymns, altar services, and sermon, yet he sat as one unconscious of it all. All at once his head jerked and he listened. The children were singing "Take Thou my hands and lead me." He moved about and thumped his knee with his fingers. He heard "alone my footsteps falter-Lord, who my life canst alter, be Thou my Guide." A heavy sigh escaped his breast, he closed his eyes and folded his hands. The children sang on: "Take Thou my heart and hide it in folds of grace~ Draw, Lord, of Thy good pleasure, Thy child to TheeStill to my goal Thou guidest me through dark night." A smile crossed his pale lips and seemed to carry with it the dark mask that had rested there before. Miss Renning whispered a few words of thanks as she saw the effect of the song upon her patient. When the congregation sang the closing hymn, "Let Me Be Thine Forever," Don sang as fervently as his weak condition would permit. Once outside the church, Miss Renning hailed a taxi. They drove home in silence. When they were inside their own rooms, Don turned and threw his arms about his nurse. The pillows glided to the floor and were forgotten. "Lulu, 路Lulu," came the happy cry, "thank you ever so much for taking me to church. Oh, I see it all now. He has guided me! That accident had to be in order that I might find somebody to lead me back to Him. Can't you see? He's guided me through my dark night. What a fool I've been all these years!" Miss Renning gently pushed her patient to the great armchair and made him sit down. She was so happy that she had not even noticed Don call her Lulu. "Now, Mr. Gannon," she replied quietly, "you must rest and I'll bring in your dinner." The nurse hurried from the room. Don sat in his chair in quiet reverie. Then he arose alone-the first time since his accident-and reached for Miss Renning's Bible. He turned the Bible a few times and then opened it to John 8 :31-32 and read. "If ye continue in my word, then are ye my disciples indeed; and ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free." This had been his own confirmationtext. He saw himself in the little church at home; he heard the minister preach on the text; and he


i路

THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

II

heard the class sing, "Take Thou my hands-" Miss Renning entered with the tray. She stopped short and listened. / Don did not notice her. He was softly singing his confirmation song. A few more weeks passed by. Don continued to improve, and by early May he was able to travel. Miss Renning packed a little traveling bag for him. Her heart was sad. To-morrow meant that she must part from her patient, for whom she had a deep affection. Don watched her at her work. "Well, Lulu, to-morrow we'll be headed for Carrollton and Mother." "We?" she gasped. "Yes, we. Why not?" demanded Don. "All right, if you think you shall still need me, I'll be willing to go along," she answered. "I'll always need you, Lulu. You brought me back to my Saviour. You must keep me there," was his humble reply. The next morning the train left the little town behind and bore Don and Lulu westward. When they arrived at Carrollton, Don forgot his back and fairly leaped off the train. Lulu followed him, rejoicing in his happiness. In a few minutes, Don was kneeling beside his Mother's chair. Mrs. Gannon was just recuperating from her illness. Now Lulu had two patients to care for, but she was happy. A month later Lulu and Don stood at the altar of the little stone church-the church of his confirmation. The choir sang a song which Don himself requested. It was Be Thou Our Guide.

"He was my Guide, now He shall be ours," he blissfully told his wife.-R. L. S.


12

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENG2.R

WALLS

The stone, brick, or concrete base may be the foundation of the house, but the things which can be considered the main features of a structure are the walls. There are houses without a definite base, but houses they are nevertheless. The chimney may be absent, the roof flat or gabled; convention and experience, however, decree vertical walls. Not only in houses do walls figure as a predominating feature; taken in a wider sense, "walls" are all about us and in us. According to Webster's definition a wall is "a structure of stone, brick or other material inclosing a space, forming a division; an obstruction-." In this dissertation "wider sense" and "and other materials" will be the two co-operative spirits with which I shall attempt to raise the various forms of walls from their recondite condition. Walls have always been considered means of protection. Walls several feet in breadth were the primary reason for people's moving into an inclosure of such walls. A romantic name was concocted, and castles were the result. Behind the walls of these castles the defenders sought protection. The walls were their perfect "alibis" which did not break down until the enemy had battered them too much with the "third degree." Going on another tack, we can easily see what a wall means to an attackingparty. An immense six-foot wall of stone is not the easiest obstacle to overcome. With the goal in mind of conquering the world, the aggressive party finds many such stumbling-blocks in its path. To circumvent the obstacle is far beneath the dignity of a true aggressor who has a definite goal in mind. To overcome has been the underlying principle of every civilization for nearly six thousand years. In actual warfare catapults and cannon have been the chief instruments to overcome the "walls" of convention and racial tradition. All through the ages there have been notably impregnable "walls," walls which were obstacles in the path of the current civilizations or of some notable person. The Turk was a challenging obstacle to the Crusaders, and he proved his impregnability by again coming forth in the twentieth century as a wall of obstruction to the allies during the World War. The Atlantic Ocean was the western wall of the little world up to the year 1492. The most substantial walls of all times, however, are the Laws of Nature. These


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walls are so high that a two-hundred-inch lens must be made in order that scientists may see the uppermost extremity and at the same time they are so small that with the aid of powerful microscopes scientists are at times unable to pick them out from the midst of other microbes. These "walls" of nature have been for protection to humanity, and in-rare cases they are obstacles. Man puts his entire confidencein these "walls." He plants his corn in spring with the absolute confidencethat spring will be followedby summer and never by winter. A sailor goes to sea resting assured that the water will bear his ship if it has no serious evidences of human frailty. The child throws a rubber ball up into the air, not with the intention of throwing it into space to stay there; the child knows that the ball will come back. Professor Piccard found in nature an obstacle,-his stratosphere flight ended at a certain height and he could get no farther. The designers of the airplane and submarine had serious obstacles to overcome. They did not, however, break down these "walls"; they went around them. In man himself there are "walls" to be overcome, or for protection. In man there is a "major engagement" every day. "You must conquer yourself if you would conquer the world" is indeed a fine definition for Success.

EDUCATION AND THE KITCHEN SINK I feel sorry for the men; they are S'O woman-haunted. Whether it's conceit or fantasy, I can't say, but they have the notion that women are pursuing them. The fact worries them. It's the cause of prematurely gray heads and young-old furrowed brows. As soon as they see a' fair damsel drawing near with a friendly smile, they are ready to pick up their belongings and decamp. They are haunted. This erroneous idea about women is so cemented in their brain centers that they have cast suspicion even on the co-ed. "What do you want here?" they ask with a haunted look. "You can't be here for an education." And they peer about fearfully, ready to run for cover at the slightest sign of danger.


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But the harassed men need have no fear. No co-ed with an iota 'Oforiginal imagination comes to college with a bridal veil in view. College years in themselves contain enough interest and enjoyment without wasting them in a mad scramble for a life-partner. Believe it or not, girls. come to school for an education. At least this fact can be attributed to ninety-five out of a hundred girls. They set out for, and acquire, their education, and the other fivewell, they are like the Canadian "Mounties" in that they invariably get what they set out for. But these are exceptions to the rule in regard to college-girls. It may seem fantastic and incomprehensible that any of the fair ones with their shallow minds could actually concentrate long enough to learn anything. But then, women have always: been an unsolvable conundrum to the men. Florence Seabury said, "Understanding woman has long been the greatest masculine sport." As far as I know, none of the masculine gender, as yet, possesses a winner's cup in this great game. Perhaps by and by they'll give it up as a bad job. But to return to the subject, co-eds are educationminded. "Now why," query puzzled males, "does a girl desire learning, when nine times 'Out-of ten she'll surrender her position for the kitchen sink in a short time?" Although it doesn't seem that way to the men, nevertheless "there's method in our madness." The main reason for the apparently useless strain on the purse-strings and on feminine gray matter is to make ourselves sufficiently acquainted with subjects of culture that we need not be embarrassed in any society center. Our other reason is that we desire to satisfy that inborn instinct of curiosity (which word, by the way, Leacock says is no poor synonym for intelligence) . Of course, an over-abundance of intelligence is not required in order to turn an egg-beater or to guide a sweeper across the living-room rug. In fact, anyone can master the ordinary rudiments of house-keeping without any knowledge whatsoever of the "three R's." But there is satisfaction in knowing that because of your education you are a member of an important woman's club. Furthermore, if the head of the family should lose the job he' managed to snatch from the fingers of feminine jobhunters, the educated wife has a greater certainty of being able to earn enough money to keep the family from starvation. The men's idea, of course, is that "a woman's place is in the home." But that doesn't mean she must live in cloistered seclusion. If women aren't to succumb to the


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monotony of every day routine, they must have a means of mental recreation. This means of invigorating the mind is made available by a collegeeducation. Just because girls come to a co-educational school isn't saying they are husband-hunting. Most of them would gladly attend a girls' school if it were in any way possible. The majority of the co-eds realizes the disadvantage of coeducational schools where "they are distracted and dominated by men, and miss the separate college's stimulus to leadership and a vigorous intellectual life." (Time, October 1, 1934) Take courage, therefore, apprehensive males, and don't be alarmed. Co-eds are not in college to capture you with their wiles. They have far too much else to do. -D. J. S.

AFRO-AMERICAN

PEOPLE

Wasn't it in Los Angeles where a man who pestered young and old with his famous window-peekingscheme was sought not so many years ago? Some say that he had much the appearance of an ape and was found even to be perched in trees across from some one's window. When we hear or think of barbarians, we have a very definite picture in' mind; namely, of an African native whose mouth is extremely long and wide, who has puffedup lips, and of one who has one tuft of hair perched exactly on top of his bald head. He poses for pictures with an immense spear in his left hand. So far he has been gracious enough to spare the life of the photographer. With all this in mind, we proceed to scrutinize the civilized American who claims for himself only virtuous features and qualities. First, however, we shall go back to foreign lands-to the days of Goetz of Berlichingen, when men were men and fought for their rights and privileges. If they were assaulted or insulted, they "fought it out" and were justified, for ours was not yet their type of civilization. To us these men are almost barbarians, but on second thought, were they not better than Henry VIII, Voltaire, Dillinger, Loeb, and Leopold?


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What are we reminded of when we hear the nameHenry VfIl ? Not only was he immoral, but in all his dealings he plainly showed that he was totally unacquainted with rules of courtesy, consideration, civil life, and social distinction. When he saw that the church he at first revered would not "give in" to his selfish plans, he dropped it and tried by the most unchristian means to gain his ends. Surely a La Follette might have taught him rules of diplomacy. The name Voltaire reminds us of vile indecency and fearful shame. Louis XIV was guilty of equal crime and shameful deeds. Couldn't we. therefore, class these men in a state of human society intermediate between savagery and civilization? Truly, we may. But wait!Have we a right to. do so? "Sweep before your own door first." So we shall. And don't forget, times have changed, and laws of social life require that we do nothing-to inoite our neighbor's ire. We are expected to live calmly, sleep nights, shovel snow, eat carefully, and use discretion right and left. Did our last year's barbarian observe this simple and deligh tful maxim ? Johnny Dillinger did not choose to perch in trees nor was he known to be a window-peeker, He merely broke into bank buildings, extracted thousands of dollars, and made a very gentle escape by killing only a few persons whenever he saw fit. He showed unusuaJ bravery by allowing a woman to harbor him in her own home. My! What wonders our hero did! He succeeded in so far that he made for himself a lasting name in crime. Then we have other Afro-American heroes at whom we must express our wonder. "AI" Capone, I understand, walked the streets nonchalantly, perhaps drank milk, wore a poker-face expression, slept nights, never chewed tobacco, and maybe even wore leggings until he was twenty-one years old. And yet he was guilty of the worst of crimes. To-day he graces the island that harbors such "bad boys" that are truly a menace to human society. Capone was an infidel of the worst type; so also were Loeb and Leopold who took the life of an innocent child. Wha t was their motive? Did they have any ? We have heard the world's verdict concerning Hauptmann; yet it is to a great extent 'Only a jury proclamation. Are we as Christians, in agreement with it? Is Hauptmann 'the Afro-American that many think him to be? .


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Insull chose a neat piece of work in the form of embezzlements, but the Americans pardoned him. We wonder.How often are we reminded that men like Mozart and Beethoven, who did wonders, really led a mean life! Dare we then say that Henry Ford, Benjamin Franklin; or Sinclair Lewis were or are flawless people? Indeed not! Yet we choose to hide facts until perhaps 1999. And did it ever occur to us that others may think us an uncultivated society of people? And aren't we? We disobey laws right and left; that has nearly become the secondnature of many among us. Someof us may delight in seeing rich Mr. Jameson wearily trudging through the thick snow banks on the, walk before our house. Finally we feel obliged to, or are maybe even asked to, shovel off our walks. After some grumbling we go about our task, but beware! Go not one inch beyond our lot! . "Let neighbor Smith shovel his own walk. That's his duty." Off we slouch with a feeling of wicked satisfaction that the Smiths still have a job before them. Why not stay right within our very own circles? Courtesy asks us not to do so, but necessity permits it. Frederick received an "A" on a final. That may be an unusual occurrence, and so we all "pile unto" him and accuse him of-oh, perhaps cheating or studying till all hours of the morning. Frankly speaking-we are jealous and become rude little barbarians. Did we take justice into consideration? Hm! I wonder-what are we? I shall leave that to your very kind judgment. But I fear-I fear-that we shall not be so readily pardoned.-H. M. W. '35..

I~ REGAN AND GONERIL AS SUPERLATIVES The woman characters of Shakespeare's plays are of a'Sgreat a variety as the brands of cigarettes one is able to purchase to-day; they range from the very, very good to the very, very bad. In the MERCHANT OF VENICE Shakespeare introduces us to one of his "good" characters in the person of


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Portia. In fact, her goodness is almost as incredible as is Regan's and Goneril's wickedness. She is an amiable, intelligent, accomplished, and beautiful woman, who can be serious, who can be amusing, who can be strong, who can be weak, and who-can be a real woman. Rosalind of AS YOU LIKE IT is a rather different character in that she is just wicked and playful enough to be human and provokingly likable. She is a humorous, cheerful, and witty person. No unhappiness thrives in her presence; even her chiding seems to cheer us up; because as soon as she has lashed you with her tongue, her eyes ha ve healed the wound. In THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH and THE TRAGEDY OF KING LEAR, however, Shakespeare strikes an entirely different note. One can say, almost without scruples, that the women have as many masculine traits as feminine traits. Lady Macbeth has a firm, sharp, wiry. matter-of-fact intellect, doubly charged with a strong will and with the ability of holding herself in check. She is able to see things, not distorted by conscience, but as they are. Nothing but facts can move her, and she has a strong mental facility whereby she can ward off all temptations to imagine things. She is a plotter and a schemer. She shares with her husband the desire for power, and it makes no difference to her how he gets that power. When King Duncan is at the palace of Macbeth and so shows his trust in them and his good will to them, she uses it as an argument for killing him. She is very shrewd and bold. Because she knows that her husband will not kill the king if he has time to think about it, she bullies him into it by holding up to him his seeming weakness. When this fails, she turns the whole matter into a personal feud-a domestic controversy. Now, of course, husbandly affections are put up against a manly conscience. It hurts Macbeth to be scorned by the woman he loves, and so he does as she pleases. His wife is the very opposite of Macbeth, and yet she seems to be different in a way that supplements him. When he is weak, she is strong; when he is most disturbed, she is calm. Lady Macbeth is a wicked woman we admit, but upon closer scrutiny we find a few womanly traits in her .. Sometimes we are almost positive that her vulgarity was really only pretended, that it was merely the result of trying to acquire a lacking firmness and fierceness; for after she-


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heard that Macbeth had also killed Duncan's two grooms, she fainted. She was so taken by surprise by this act that her assumed courage was gone. She had not bargained for wholesale murder. Another incident which brings out this point is the scene in which she. in her sleep, cries out, "Here's the smell of blood still" and in which she sees spots on her hands. While she is sleeping, she is her real self, freed from pretended wickedness. We even begin to feel sorry for her in the end although we feel that she has received her deserts, Goneril and Regan, however, do in no way awaken our pity. They are not even deserving of the name woman; rather should we call them she-devils, hell-cats, and fiends. There was not a trace of humanity to be found in them except that they fell in love-and then look with whom they fell in love. Of course, we can defend Edmund to some extent, and say that he was goaded into being wicked and cruel, but Goneril and Regan surely had no such excuse. They were simply naturally malicious. Although some people hold that Regan was not so malicious as Goneril, I feel that the difference is not worth the mention. The elder daughters of Lear were untruthful and deceit.ful. At the division of the kingdom they never meant a word they said about their love for their father. The only reason for the flowery praise was to enrich themselves. When a third or more of a kingdom was at stake, what was a little lie to them? It was their habit anyway to do things only for their personal benefit. They were unaffectionate, disrespectful, deceitful, and terribly cruel. Of affection we cannot begin to speak, for from the very first we find that an uncanny desire for power and riches had squelched all other human virtues within these wretches. Their disrespect they showed in the treatment of their aged father. Any person with the least bit of decency in him respects old age and its wishes. Regan and Goneril, however, had no scruples about treating their father like the dirt beneath their feet. They ordered him around like a child, and that, on the pretext of looking after his welfare. Heartless they were! Humane people usually see to it that their household, including people and animals are sheltered during a storm. If a stranger should happen along, he, too, is given shelter; but Regan and Goneril could leave their distracted father out in a raging storm while they sat in a luxurious castle as though it were an everyday happening. Were they cruel? . I don't think a torturer in the Spanish Inquisition was very


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cruel in comparison. How any woman could cold-bloodedly and unflinchingly watch, even suggest, the stepping out of a man's eyes is more than I can understand. It seems to me that there are no words in the English language that can describe these two eldest daughters of Lear. Of all characters that have ever lived or been imagined by Shakespeare or anyone else, Regan and Goneril are superlatives in wickedness.- V. K. '37.

HOW I FEEL ABOUT MOBY DICK Queer thoughts surged through my mind when T heard that we had no choice when it came to reading our famous American novel, Moby Dick. Several years ago I heard that it was a good book and among the best novels that America had produced. I had enjoyed all other books that had been recommended by the librarian; so why shouldn't this one be as good as the next? As it happened, it was a new librarian who advised me. She took me at face value, or should I have said "size" value, and never once thought about mental ability. I took the book home and was sorry for many a day afterward. I read, scanned, skipped, slept, and finally read again when I came to the last few chapters. The poor people that had to go through the tortures of the inquisition didn't have a thing over me. Right then and there I vowed that I never even wanted to see the book again; and when it did happen to be in the vicinity, I looked the other way. Then, to start the school year right, we're informed that Moby Dick must be read by anyone who even pretends to know anything about literature. To say the least, I didn't like the idea at all. I took the book out of the library, and made an honest attempt at reading it. Two weeks passed, and I hadn't progressed very far. With a fervent wish that some one else would get more enjoyment out of it, I returned it to the library. Ominous rumbling reminded me that tests were not far off; there was an immense amount of work for all classes; and I still had not finished Moby Dick. Then, out of a clear sky, I had a life saver flung at me. Take the


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story and analyze certain characters! The first time I just read it to get an interesting story, and was very much disappointed in it. This analyzing appealed to me, and also turned out to be my solution. As far as I'm concerned, I think that is about the only way in which Moby D'ck can be read. Studying it as a whaling treatise may be fine for some grizzly fisherman, but that is about as interesting to me as a Hebrew grammar. It might be read as an allegory, but it seems as though that takes away all that the story was meant to mean. Moby Dick is a whale, and Ahab is a man, and they absolutely represent nothing but themselves in my mind. As a romance of the South Seas it is a "flop." That doesn't even seem plausible. Because I could feel no different about the book, I stuck to my first resolution. Queequeg was the first person in the book that I noticed. The minute Ishmael awoke and found this man worshipping his idol, I knew that he would be interesting. My faith in him did not go unrewarded. His implicit faith .in his idol, his love and "dogged" devotion for Ishmael, his bravery in rescuing Dagoo, his eager helpfulness, and his sudden resolution to get "well when he thought of something left undone, made me wish that Herman Melville had omitted about a dozen chapters on whales' ears, eyes, teeth, or lack of them, and written more concerning our brown Queequeg. Of course, the most fascinating and also the most hateful person was the ship's master, Ahab. With the exception of Quee queg, he is the only character that held my interest throughout the entire story. He was so mysterious at. first, for one heard nothing but rumors of him; The crew didn't even know what he looked like until they were out at sea. I couldn't read fast enough to get my first glimpse of this monomaniac, the captain of the Pequod, Finally I did learn to know him, and that mainly through his monologues and fanatical actions. Most of the time he seems to be raving mad in his fiendish desire to capture the famed white whale. His wooden leg kept reminding him of the fact that he must get that whale. I hated him forwhat he was, and at the same time I couldn't quit reading' until I'd seen him a victor or a dead man. For a few seconds I felt pity for him when he thought of his home, wife, and son. That was but a flash! In a minute I looked at him again with that queer feeling of revulsion mixed with a curious interest. Who could have


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pursued such a fiendish desire for so long a time? No one but Ahab! What diabolical mind could have refused the request of the Rachel? None but Ahab's! What fiend wouldn't have listened to the pleas and warnings of his men and returned home? None but Ahab! Who could have resisted the thought of loved ones suffering if the venture failed? No 'Onebut Ahab! What suffering he had to bear, his failure in his venture, and ultimately his death were well deserved. In spite of all, I was satisfied as I put my book aside. I can feel no different about Moby Dick. Even as I sit here now, I can remember very few striking points about most of the other characters. One can't help noticing something about them, but these two opposite men stood out like two bright moons in a starry sky. If I ever pick up the book again, I am sure that I'd have to use the same method again. And I wonder whether Ahab wouldn't be one of the characters that I'd choose!-B. N. M. '36.

A HUMAN BEING

According to Webster, a human being is one who possesses all the natural characteristics and frailties of mankind. In my essay, I wish to speak of a human being. Cannibals are mortals; they have all the necessary characteristics to classify them as human beings, but would you say they were human beings? No, I venture to place them with the animal kingdom, for they have no feelings of sympathy for their fellow men. Even the more tenderhearted cannibal would be ready and eager to boil you or me for his next meal if he had the chance. Times have changed. We are today living in the twentieth century. Let. us see what the human being of today is like. This type of person is not a "mamma's" boy. Far be it from him to be ridiculed for his effeminate tendencies. The type of person I have in mind must be able to defend his rights in a sound and sane manner if he wishes to be a human being. He must respect all people whether they are his superiors or juniors, men or women.


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One day as I was strolling leisurely along the sidewalk, I heard a terrible racket. It sounded like tin cans clanging along the highway and immediately came the thought "It must be a wedding." To my dismay, the source of the noise caught up with me. Here was a poor, little dog with two tin cans tied to his tail. Now was that the humane thing to do? Undoubtedly those who had committed this vile deed patted each other on the back and said, "What proud boys we'can be to have been able to accomplish such an heroic piece of work!" These boys were not human beings. They were just a group of rowdies not' able to make use of the little bit of sense they still had in that block they carried about on their shoulders. A human J:H~ing will, do anything within his power to save a little helpless dog from any, possible harm or injury, He will make it his aim to have clean run not at" the expense of some'poor helpless creature. ~A--huma:iibcing wile not poke fun whenever he has a chance. Instead, what he has to say, he says to a person's face .and does not use essays or speeches for that purpose. A human being will employ his knowledge of courtesy wherever he sees fit and does.not wait until some one sees him and then commends him on it.-E. M. P. '35.


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. The. "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has expired; unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be' furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends.

E.IlÂŁtElred as .secondclass matter at Post Officeof New Ulm, Minnesota';

Volume XXV

March 1935

No.3

-: The Messenger Staff :Waldemar Nolte Winfried Stoekli Arnold Coppens Gerhard Rolloff Veleda Kelm Gertrude Limpert Ruth Uhlig Julius Wanioch Beata Moldenhauer Milton Bradtke Adele Nommenson

Editor-in-Chief Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Assistant Business Manager Alumni Notes Exchange Coliege Notes Locals Co-ed Notes Athletics Jokes


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EDITORIAL

THE RECRUITS IN THE MESSENGER STAFF This issue introduces a new staff to the readers. Terminating their duties with the last issue, the six staff members of the class of '35 maintained that they had enjoyed their work. I am sure that all the readers also enjoyed the results of their efforts. The veterans are Raymond Duehlmeier, Doris Sauer, Vera Lawrenz, Herman Fehlauer, Raymond Riess, and Clarence Radl. In place of these, Arnold Coppens, Gerhard Rolloff, Veleda KeIrn, Gertrude Limpert, Milton Bradtke, and Adele Nommenson have been appointed. As though to prove that the weaker sex are fully as strong as the men on laughs, one of our ladies has been appointed Jokes editor. Thus we have five young women on the staff instead of the usual four. I am sure, however, that the positions these newly appointed hold will be immaterial as far. as work is concerned. I have sincere confidence that the new staff will approach their duties gladly and cheerfully, and will work wholeheartedly for the perfection of our little school magazine, the D. M. L. C. Messenger. WN:AC 3/4/35


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lIBRARY NOTES At the time of this writing, the first Library Course given at our institution is coming to a close. 'When completed, the course will have brought five lessons. The subject matter covered is as follows: 1) Library Classification; 2) The Book; 3) The Card Catalog; 4) Reference Books; 5) Taking Lecture Notes; Bibliographies. The attendance was quite satisfactory in spite of the fact that the lectures had to be given at seven o'clock in the evening, during a part of the study period. We sincerely hope that the course has met with approval among our students and that, it has provided them with new and worth-while information on libraries. It is no longer an unusual occurrence to meet at conferences with teachers who have attended some advanced course in a normal school, college, or university. For teachers who wish to take such a course it will prove a great help to have more than a passing knowledge of library economy. Since this was the first time such a course was offered, the members of the three classes in the normal department were given the opportunity to attend the lectures. Next fall we intend to begin quite early with the lectures. All members of the high school senior year and the college freshmen, as well as any new students entering the normal department. will be eligible to attend. In fact, the course may be made obligatory for this group. With the coming of the spring months, many of us will azain take great interest in the coming of our migratory birds and the study of bird life. In spite of all efforts of scientific investigators, bird migration is still a marvelous mystery. No one has satisfactorily answered these questions: Why do birds micrate ? How do birds wintering in the southland know when to begin their journey to the northern nesting grounds? How do birds find the old haunts in which they nested in former years? Every year hundreds of birds are caught; a tiny metal band with a number is fastened to the leg, and they are released again. In this manner it has been fully proved that the same birds return to the old bird boxes and trees


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in which they nested the year before. But how they do it is beyond human understanding. One can hear vast numbers of birds passing overhead in the dead of night at this time of the year. Usually they travel during a storm and in torrents of rain or even in a blinding snow storm, and it is obvious that even their sharp eyes cannot see any landmarks as they fly across the country. Yet individual birds will at intervals, separate from the travelling flocks, come down to village and farm below them, and unerringly return to their old nesting sites. When we step out of our doors on a morning after such a migration, we find that our friends, the robins and the bluebirds and the meadowlarks and many others, are with us again to thrill us with their songs and their beautiful plumage. Thus the Creator has endowed these little feathered friends with some faculty that guides them safely over oceans, prairies, and cities to their summer homes; and that will remain a riddle to the wisest mind for all time. We hope that many of our students will acquire a lasting interest in our beautiful birds. We have in our library one of the most excellent works. on birds ever written. It is called "BIRDS OF MINNESOTA," and was written by Thomas S. Roberts of the University of Minnesota. Two large books comprise this set. It contains excellent plates picturing all the birds ever seen in this state, together with a detailed description of the life of each one of these birds. For this time of the year we suggest that students study the nature calendar on pages 78-83 in volume one. There they will find the average time of arrival of the different birds in the locality of Minneapolis and St. Paul. The books are brimful of most interesting facts concerning our bird life. Did you know, for instance, that the Great Horned Owl is the first bird to nest in our state and that this takes place about the time of Washington's birthday? Did you know that the Horned Larks are the first migrants to arrive in this vicinity and that you may see them on wind-swept knolls as early as February? By the time this number of the Messenger appears, the March migrants, .ineluding robins, bluebirds, meadowlarks, killdeers, blackbirds, and phoebes, will already be with us. Make it a point to see, hear, and observe our birds and to pass on your acquired knowledge and interest to the children who later on will be entrusted to your instruction and guidance. Nature study should form an integral part of every school curriculum in our schools.-A. Schaller.


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SO THE BIRDIES TELL ME With Spring just around the corner the birds have been coming back to New VIm-early birds, you know, who want to catch the worm, I suppose. Well, I'm afraid that they're slightly disappointed about the worms, because it's too cold in our part of the country for those frail little creatures to be flying about; but the birdies' disappointment is somewhat lessened by the generosity of certain of our students who feed them bread crumbs. You'd be surprised if you knew what chatty little fellows they are. And oh my) do they tell tales! One day last week a little love bird stopped on my doorstep, one that has "been around" quite a bit, it seems. He says it is really surprising to see how the depression has knocked the bottom out of things. "People used to tell me," he said, "that in spring a young man's fancybut now they don't wait that long for their fancy to turn. It turns right in the middle of winter." (Perhaps they like firelight better than moonlight.)


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Anyway-Sylvan Broker '31 and Margaret Triloff of Lake Mills were engaged at Christmas. Miss Triloff had been assisting Mr. Broker in his school. Well, we won't go into that. Congratulations! William Bartels '33 of Watertown, Wisconsin, and Kathryn Kent ex~'36 of Wausau. Wisconsin, also tightened the slip-knot at Christmas. This engagement just "shows to go you" how some college romances end. You have all your friends' best wishes, I'm sure. Engaged also is Louise Kelm ex-'32 to Randall Renrreke of Sleepy Eye, Minnesota. Congratulations! Esther Behrens, '29 H. S. and Waldemar Lemke, student at Concordia Seminary, St. Louis, Missouri, also decided to put their friendship on a more permanent basis and were engaged at Christmas time. Congratulations! Mr. Martin Roehler '30 of Milwaukee and Rev. Hilton Oswald of Mobridge, South Dakota, went even a step farther than did the others .. On July 30, 1934, "Tubby" was married to Miss Helen Timm of Milwaukee. Bernhardt Boese '29; New London; Meilahn Zahn '32, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin; and Gilbert Timm '32 saw Mr. Roehler off at the docks when he embarked on his voyage. 'On December 27, 1934, Rev. H. Oswald and Gertrude John '27 were married at Mankato in the presence of many friends and former schoolmates. Among the guests were Clara Oswald '34, Martin Albrecht '29, of Thiensville, Wisconsin; Adelheid Mueller '29, of Milwaukee; Gertha Paap '27, Good Thunder, Minnesota; and Rev. Wm. Schweppe, St. Croix Falls, Minnesota. For those who should like to know what the bride wore, the paper said, "She wore a beautiful gown of eggshell satin fashioned with a Queen . Victoria collar, long, full sleeves. and a train. Her short veil was worn cap effect with a lace crown." A very charming little bride she must have been. Mr. Stork tells me that he's been doing his share of traveling hither and thither and yon! It was when he came to New Ulm on November 28. 1934, and visited the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Nolte (nee Emma Loeslin) both '30, and brought Laurence Alvin that I had a little talk with him. On December 24, 1934 he left a daughter with Mr. and Mrs. Philip Jauss (Martha Sievert '27) of Winthrop, Minn.


30

THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

On December' 23, 1934 he installed as a permanent resident, Donald Frederick, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Kutz of Claremont, Minnesota. Mr. Kutz is of the class of '31. On February 16, 1935, his route led through New Ulm again and he stopped at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Schoenemann (nee Ella Kamrath '26 H. S.) The Schoenemanns took so great a liking to the little stranger, Thomas Henry, who accompanied Mr. Stork, that they decided to keep him with them. Last summer during the month of August, he was in the vicinity of Denmark, Wisconsin, and visited the home of Rev. and Mrs. W. Schlavensky (nee Irma Wilbrecht '22) in whose care he left a little Richard Arnold.. He reports a hearty welcome. A pretty bluebird that returned from the south via Milwaukeesays he saw Thelma Boerneke and Eldred Luehmann there) Yes, they are working there-learning what the upper four hundred eats, wears, does, and thinks. They're probably learning, even though they are not going to school. There is much in observing, you know. . At Thiensville, Wisconsin, he says he was pleasantly surprised. He thought that the monster ingratitude had the American people under its thumb, but here Mr. Bluebird found a group who had escaped its clutches. The various musical organizations of the Seminary, which are under the direction of Martin Albrecht '29 presented 'him with a car radio at Christmas time. A brown thrush who was.in the Jefferson community bore a bit of sad news. Elisabeth Robisch '34 was forced to leave her school at Menomoniebecause of illness. Her cousin, Leonarda Vogel '29, is substituting for her. We hope that you'll be able to resume your work soon and here's to a speedy recovery, Bettyl From northern Michigan came a meadowlark with a different story. Waldemar Roekle '34, "Shorty" to most of us, has received a call to Millington, Michigan. May success be yours, Shorty! From away down in Arizona came a woodpecker, who was so eager to tell me about the Guenthers that he woke me from my much needed sleep. Wenonah '31 H. S. is keeping house. (She studied at the University of Arizona. Attention, gentlemen: Edgar '33 H. S. is attending a


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

31

school of mines at Phoenix, and our pal, Rolly, '34 H. S. is at present criticizing his mother's cooking. (However, if I were his mother, I wouldn't let it bother me. I'd consider the source. No harm meant, Rolly.) A robin picked up this bit of news in Cannon Falls, Minnesota. Oliver Althoff, '34 H. S. is there when he isn't in Minneapolis, which is about five days out of seven. While he is there, he attempts to learn the hardware trade. Several people didn't trust the tales the birdies told, so they came to see for themselves. Ed Sorgatz '33 stopped in on February 15 to see whether the college was still here. And having received sufficient proof of the fact, he proceeded to an unmentioned destination. On February 5, Martin Birkholz '34 H. S. visited a group of old friends. Although the occasion of his visit was very sad, we were all glad to see Marty. He is attending Northwestern College at Watertown this year. The game between Concordia of St. Paul and our team attracted quite a few alumni among whom were Armin Schmidt '30 of Gibbon, Minnesota the Rudolph sisters, Adele '30, Lydia ex-'33, and Clara ex-'36; Clara Mehlberg '32 of Gaylord, Minnesota; Viola Louis '30 of Gibbon, Minnesota; E-sther Gehlhar, '28 H. S. of Elgin, Minnesota, and Gilbert Timm '32 of Arlington, Minnesota. I couldn't say whether they carne to see us win or lose; nevertheless, we showed them a good fight and a fiery school spirit. In conclusion,I wish to ask all alumni to send in news. The new staff has been instructed to make this paper interesting and enjoyable. My column depends entirely upon you. Whether you send me news or not, I shall do my very bes t. . Won't you help me, please? Mr. and Mrs. Gust. Hillmann of West Bend, Wisconsin, announce the engagement of their daughter, Elfrieda, to Henry Gruenhagen, formerly of St. Paul, Minnesota. Mr. Gruenhagen graduated from our institution in 1932. He is now a teacher in St. John's Lutheran School at West Bend, Wis.


'rHE: D. M. Ii... C. MESSENGER

If you are one of those droopy daydreamers, and your路 daydreams happen to be of the right kind, an editorial in the Bethany Scroll has a bit of encouragement for you. Even your trivial dreams and ideas may prove valuable and some day procure for you a name as great as that of Benjamin Franklin, whose idea led him to prove by means of a key, kite and thunder storm that lightning and electricity are the same thing. Then there are others, such as Joseph H. Dodson, who attracted more birds to his bird houses by attaching bright metal to them and today has. these houses in use all over the country. "These men were just like you. They did many of the same things you are doing. They had their regular work, but they did not let their work take all of their time. They allowed themselves ideas and dreams; they made careful observations round about them; they let their inner selves have full play. And so, you also should escape from the regular trend of things-your books, your work, your food, and sleep, and observe what's going on about you. You should think a. little about a hobby, give vent to your inner thoughts and ideas, forget the commonplace things and use your imagination. Pull yourself out of the rut of what has :0 be done and give some thought to what might be done. Let your ideas consume some of your time." Remember, do not let them consume all, for we are not all destined to be Banjamin Franklin's or Joseph Dodson's regardless of the time we may spend on our dreams and fancies.


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENG1:R

33

Although our first semester examinations are behind us and our second semester ones comfortably far ahead, I must acquaint you with a few observations which other schools have made on this popular topic. From the Luther Arrow we learn that some students are born with brains, others study, and still others just pass. I wonder which class was represented by the boy who, after writing a very poor examination, scrawled the following plea at the bottom of the last page: "The quality of mercy is not strained. It droppeth." He passed. The Bethany Scroll offers consolation to the flunker by stating that "the wisest men are not always the most booklearned. They are men who are vitally interested in life." But I doubt whether such consolation will assist the flunker when parents view the report card. So perhaps ,it is best to put some effort behind our studying. No one can take true pride in flunking, although two can bear it better than one, as this joke taken from the Academy Echo shows: "Did you pass your exam ?" "Well, it was like this-you "Shake!

see-"

Neither did I!"

I believe that in the years to come we shall still look upon examination week as the most outstanding week of the entire school year. In fact, it is so individual in character that we can hardly find words that will explain it. In the St. Louis Alma Mater some one has said that "the only thing that can be compared with it is being cast on a desert island, one hundred feet in circumference, with sixty other men, without food or drink for seven days and without a tree for shelter from the路 blistering tropical sun." And isn't it true that a person does feel abandoned and lost during examination week? But our standings soon bring us back to reality. Although we are continually being told that we are not rated only by the examinations we write, isn't it natural for us to dread examination week? It really would be enjoyable to write an examination if we proposed only to find out how many questions the professor has asked concerning things of which we know too little, and how far our wrong answers are from being right.

* * * * * The Augsburg College Choir returned February 4 from a successful three-day tour, in which it visited Willmar, Lamberton, Madelia and Winthrop. The choir is also plan-


34

TH];; D. M. L. C. MESSENGilih

ning for its annual spring tour which will cover a period of two weeks and will take them to cities in Wisconsin, Illinois, and Michigan in addition to a number in their own state. Prof. H. P. Opseth is the director of the choir. The Concordians of River Forest are being shown a series of educational talkies illustrating problems and discoveries of the natural sciences. . A survey course in classical mythology and two Hygiene courses have been added to the curriculum of the St. Paul Luther Collegefor the second semester. Mr. Otto Beyers has replaced Prof. Theo. Kuehnert as instructor of the History of Education at Concordia Teachers College, River Forest, IllinoIs. Mr. Beyers, who is a graduate of Concordia, received his bachelor's degree from the Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri.

* * * * * Are you one of those persons who consider life so boring and monotonous that they find enjoyment and pleasure in but few things? If so, perhaps the following bit of advice from the Academy Echo given to those persons dependent upon others for their entertainment, will make you see your mistake. Such persons "never having learned to use their minds, blame their surroundings for their wearisome lives. Often the surroundings are drab, but an original person will do what he can to enliven conditions. In trying to make things more entertaining for others, he finds gayety for himself. It is, often, not the outside world which is wearying, but our own minds which are monotonous." How very often we find ourselves discontented and disgusted with everything about us, and never realize that we are dragging others into the same rut with us. Perhaps you yourself have found from experience that such an attitude is contagious. But the reverse is just as contagious. If we make an effort to be a little more cheerful, it won't be long until everyone "catches" that cheerful atmosphere. If each person in turn makes an equal effort to spread that cheery feeling, the day will be a great deal brighter for everyone.


THE

D. M. L, C; MESSENGER

35

Perhaps by this time my readers have stamped me as a person who falls for everything he reads-hook, line, and sinker; and perhaps I am such a one. But in rambling through various school papers, I came upon the following rime written by a St. Paul Luther student: Boys have many faults But girls have only twoEverything they say And everything they do.

I hope that I am right in thinking that it was meant as a joke, but some two-faulted co-ed should collect her poetic wits and return with a rime as true to the opposite sex.


36

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Parties The time from Christmas to Easter has, this year as always, been the season for class parties. Because the choice of chaperons is usually so widely varied, it is a real surprise to find that Mr. Dahlke has had the honor of chaperoning every party this year. Literary Programs The program which was broadcast over station RHO on January 25 was true to form, even down to the children's letters and bedtime story. It was an interesting and amusing program. Professor Schweppeacted as critic. The Phi Delta Sigma society presented a very original program on February 28. The program was a review of the historical events of the entire month of February. Mr. Dahlke was the critic. Concert Choir Program Professor Backer has again chosen a concert choir of fifty students. Although the choir will not go on a tour this year, it will visit individual congregations near New Ulm. This year for the first time, Professor Backer will present a twelve-voicenumber. He will present the choir in the followingprogram on March 31: I. 1. Lo! To Us A Child Is Born 2. 0 Child Most Holy :'; 3. I Stand Beside the Manger Stall 4. All Breathing Life

Liebhold Durrant Bach Bach


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGu:n

37

II. Ich hebe meine Augen auf Reuter Christ ist erstanden Reuter Das alte Evangelium Backer Wie solI ich dich empfangen Schreck III. 9. Deck Thyself, My Soul, With Gladness Christiansen 10. Make Me, 0 Lord God Brahms 11. Benediction Backer On April 11, Professor Backer will present a number of students in a piano and organ recital. Lectures Rev. Kretzmann of Chicago was here for two days to lecture to the student body on Young People, and Young People's Societies. Judging from the number of questions the students had to ask, they must know all there is to know on that topic. Professor Schaller is giving a series of lectures on library work for the benefit of the three normal classes. It is surprisingly simple to find a book after one once knows how. If the high school classes also attended lectures on how to locate books, I think the librarian would find herself with time on her hands. MarIut Singers Concert The Marlut Singers, under the direction of Waldemar Nolte, will give a concert on May 10. They will be assisted by the Girls' Glee Club, directed by Miss Sievert. The following is the program: PART I 1. Indian Serenade LeRoy Wetzel 2. Sylvia Oley Speaks 3. Wanderschaft K. Zoellner 4. Das Voeglein im Walde J. Duerrner PART II 5. Mache dich auf, werde Licht F. Reuter 6. Wenn's will Abend werden F. Reuter 7. Blessing and Glory J. S. Bach 8. Praise to the Lord W. Nolte PART III 9. Autumn A. Gretchaninov 10. Negro Spiritual. ~ . 11. Laughing Song F. Abt 12. Song of the Northmen W. Freudenberg 5. 6. 7. 8.


38

THE

D. M. L. C. MES'SENGEh

Writing co-ed news is like writing letters. You are forever thinking of things to write, but when you sit down and start writing it seems as though every idea you ever possessed, has vanished. So I decided to raid my diary. Here come the highlights of news that concern the co-eds and what they have been doing since the return after Christmas vacation. January 8Everybody is back again after the Christmas vacation which our faculty so generously lengthened. All seem to be well and healthy; and if added weight indicates health. they're healthier. No one left any of his usual "pep" at home, because nothing could quiet this dorm after we had all moved in and unpacked and showed all the things Santa gave us. Margaret Koehler and Adelaide were enjoying such a delicious hamburger in Mankato that they forgot all about a certain North Western train at the station; so the train just went without them. They did manage to get to New DIm several hours later. I suppose they thought that after so many hours of riding, they'd rid themselves of some of their stiffness by walking the last thirty miles. I almost wish that I could have missed my train, so that I might have been able to see the looks on their faces when they saw empty space where a train had once stood. January 9Everything is back in the normal order again, for we are all busy complaining about all the work being assigned so soon after we get back.


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGEH

39

January 10Paula Engelhardt visited with her brother and her cousin, Gertie. I hope that she enjoyed herself, but I just have a feeling that she doesn't like our "college hill" when it is covered with a sheet of ice. January 16The co-eds were very much flattered by being mentioned in the Brown County Journal. It raised quite a commotion, because we couldn't imagine why in the world anyone should pick on us for not cheering for our basketball team. If my ears didn't deceive me, I think that the co-eds did most of the cheering. Of course, we didn't have organized cheers, but that doesn't say that we aren't backing our team. January 20It wasn't only cold today. It was colder. No one was ambitious enough to study, and no one was enthusiastic about the idea of spending much 路time outside, so the girls invaded Mrs. Wagner's domain and made several batches of candy. Every bit of it turned out O. K. Now just let people "spott" all they want to about our cooking, we can at least make candy. January 23I only hone that no one thouvht that Hillcrest Hall was on fire this afternoon. If we caused any anxiety, we beg pardon for doing so. We were only nracticing some cheers for the Luther game tonight. Since the co-eds were the ones who were supposed to be so lax in their cheering, we just naturally got together and cheered. It pad the desired effect. The boys figured that their booming voices were necessary to make it effective, so they appointed some cheer leaders. January 30-February

I-

I know I'll flop! We haven't had a single test all semester and now we are supposed to cram all that material into our heads for one test! I know that I'll have gray hair by Friday! I'll bet the dorm walls were glad when we were finished singing that mournful song. It doesn't take much to guess that that sounded like semester exams. We all wrote them and came out of each class with, "Wasn't that the worst test you ever wrote?" Guess I'll sit down and wait for the same refrain next June.


40

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

February 2-4Just a nice little vacation! Many of the girls went home or visiting. Those that stayed, spent their time trying to think of something to do. The whole gang went tobogganing one evening. Margaret Koehler put her knee in the wrong place when they upset. and wrenched it. As a result. the smell of liniment has invaded the dorm, and Margaret has to start for wherever she is going about ten minutes before the rest of us. February 7Today was a day of great importance for the members of the illustrious Nut Club. At exactly seven minutes after ten o'clock, it was a year old. It was all they could do to restrain their emotions at the time, for they were in class. They were pretty close to getting up and standing at attention with their faces turned toward the girls' room. That night they celebrated royally. The main course consisted of a cake trimmed with nuts and one candle. The evening was spent in playing Old Maid, and Agnes Strege walked off with the prize. The humor, during the games, was supplied by Florence Witte; the giggling, by Oliva Stindt and Ruth Seehusen, and the music necessary was furnished by Ruth Uhlig. February 8It doesn't quite suit "old man illness" to have a whole school year go by without some sort of operations. Florence Witte decided to fulfill his lustful desire; so she had her tonsils removed this afternoon. February 9Third floor decided that it was time for a feed; so they hauled out all their pennies and proceeded to town with the market basket. As a result, the poor unfortunates upstairs, suffered with pangs of hunger. A tantalizing aroma of onions and hamburger crept through every crack and crevice. We forgot about bringing cups; so we quickly got hold of some small fruit jars, and found that college coffee had never tasted so good before. We must have collected too many pennies, because some of us could have felt better. February 10Adelaide Nolte condescendedto come back to our midst today. She went home over semester week-end and didn't


THE

D. M. D. C. MESSENGER

41

come back until today. She says that she had to help her mother, hut we wonder?? Nevertheless, the fried chicken smelled very good to those that didn't get any. February11I heard this morning that Alma Sick was called home because of the illness of her mother. We hope that her mother recovers quickly, and that Alma will soon be back in our midst. February 14If one judges by the 'girls' dorm, the mail man was busier today than he was at Christmas time. It took four girls to carryall the mail to the dorm this morning. Happy, disappointed, and puzzled looks flashed over the various faces as the girls came to look at the mail. What a bustle there was as all eagerly rushed around with various missives. The most puzzled look' was on Frances Meyer's face. During the past year she has received several cards from a certain Charles and now she had another one.. The poor girl is in a quandary, because she knows no Charles-and the cards are really pretty. A mischievousface was .seen too. Because Margaret Wegner was up to some of her tricks' 'again, and the box that she had received went on a mighty curious journey. r-

::?: :' ...

,

February15- ' .. 'kDeils were asked, I don't believe that she could give a plausible reason for grabbing hold of some red hot irons. Perhaps she was sick of tying shoe strings, cutting meat, and doing all those little jobs that come with life. At least, that was our job after she burnt three of her fingers. February 21Ruth Gehlhar answered the door bell because there was no one else around to answer it. When she opened the door, she saw her sister standing there who had come to surprise her. To say that she was surprised would be putting it mildly. February 23Miss Adelheid Mueller came for the Concordia game tonight and spent the next few days with Veleda. We enjoyed her company, and only hope that she enjoyed dorm life.


42

THJ:: D, M. L. C. MESSENGER

February 24--.Margaret Wegner returned from supper tonight to find her room in what one plainly calls a "mess." It isn't a regular occurrence to see her bed upside down .and bed clothes,lying all over the fioor. She was game though, 'and enjoyed the joke. I just know that she is busy formulating some trick to repay the culprits. February 25Tena Clements was the first to get what Professor Schweppe calls a baby sickness-namely, measles. Weall hope that she didn't start something. March 2_:_ Dorothy Simonton was very much tickled today, because her aunt came to visit her. She has a mighty generous aunt, because Dorothy always suffers from loss of appetite after she is gone. March3-

Evelyn Hunt was greatly pleased this morning. Just as she was going over to breakfast, a car stopped at the dorm. It was her brother and other friends from South Dakota who had come to visit her. And so, co-ed diary, it is time to leave you again, for you must be published for those who might enjoy hearing of what we do as we pass away our school days in Hillcrest


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

43

We didn't resume our studies until January 8. The faculty saw that the students were much in need of rest; therefore they gladly prolonged our Christmas vacation from January 3 to January 8. Although the vacation was lengthened, there were some students who still loathed to come back. It seems that Brockleman, Adair Moldenhauer, Margaret Koehler, and Adelaide Nolte intentionally missed the train in Mankato. As a result they enjoyed a pleasant walking tour. The flu and the measles again made their visit among our students. A number of them report having had an enjoyable time in the sick room. Erhard Wiechman had the chicken-pox and spent several weeks in the sick room. Class parties have been numerous. We conclude that Mr. Dahlke must be an efficient chaperon, for he has been chosen as "party leader" six successive times. The Seniors were the first to choose him. The Juniors, Sophomores, I Normals, III Normals, and even the "Freshies" followedsuit. The semester holiday was spent in various ways. Sleighing, skating, and carrom playing were the chief pas-


44

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

times. A number of boys also had the opportunity to go through the Eagle Roller Mill. "Bob" Nolte and Uecker say that in order to get enough exercise on Sunday afternoons, they have to shoot basketball until they are "blue in the face." Bradtke seems to take great pride in his room decorations and hasn't as yet removed them. But who can blame him; he captured the prize awarded for the best decorated room in the dormitory. With the rapid approach of spring, some "foxes" are afraid they won't be kept busy because they no longer will have snow to shovel. The stamp-collecting craze has a firm grip on some of the boys. Charles Winter, "Charley" Brockelman, A. Wantoch, and Hans Wagner have resolved to establish a postoffice department of their own. It seems as though Rueben Bode has conquered that dreadful disease, homesickness. H e spends some of his week-ends at the dormitory. Alas! We even have an astronomer in our midst. It is none else than Arthur Bade. With the help of his powerful binoculars he has discovered that the moon actually is round. Professor Schaller's conception of tumbling is that of a game in which a player who breaks his neck twice, is "out." "Hansie" Wagner makes it a special effort to ask for the day's assignments at breakfast table. "Have we anything special today?" The S. O. F. F. has discontinued its meetings, because the business is no longer "booming." When one is not able to sleep soundly, one should try laughing or talking. Neuman, it seems, has been using these with good results. On February 24, the quartet motored to Nicollet where they sang several numbers as entertainment between acts of a play given by the Walther League. The boys enjoyed both the play and the "eats" served after the play. Was "Wally" Goeglein on the Cottonwood bridge Sunday, March 3, at 3 :00 P. M.? If not, where was he? Is it possible that he has returned to that long forgotten age. the "Cave Dwellers"?


io (Y) (j)

~ (Y) ,(j)

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o

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«

m I-

w

~ (f)

« m

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46

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

BASKETBALL Not a single letterman of last year's basketball team returning, the team for this season had to be built from almost all new material. Although they came through with but four victories and eight defeats, they provided much excitement. Five games with one-point margins wouldmake any completed schedule an interesting one. The second team had a more successful season. They came through with five victories and two defeats. Coach Voecks can look forward next year to some good material from this source.


THE

47

D; M. L. C. MESSENGBIl

Luther Drops Initial Contest The opening game of the season was played at home on November 16, 1934, against the Mankato Teachers. Although the Maroon and Gray lost to a far superior team, it was noticeable that at no time did they lack a fighting spirit, and 'there were signs of a smooth working team. D. M. L. C. fg ft pf Mankato T. C. fg ft pf Schoenherr 2 1 0 Hanzel 2 0 '0 Hempel 2 0 1 Austad 0 1 0 Becker 0 3 3 Frentz 5 0 0 Bradtke 0 0 0 Soenke.............. 4' 2 0 Aufderheide . 2 2 3 Loomis. 3 1 2 Schweppe 0 0 0 MeArthur 3 0 1 Wiechmann' 0 0 0 Bekke 0 0 0 Horn : 0 0 0 Pennington 1 0 0 Habben 0 0 1 Lucas 0 0 1 Rauschke 1 0 0 Gladhill 0 2 2 Hanson 0 0 0 768 18

6

6

Shattuck Defeats Luther

On December 5, Shattuck came to New VIm and were victorious by a score of 29-21. The smooth working Shattuck quint proved a little stronger than our team, which, however, was swiftly being whipped into shape. Nelson of Shattuck and Schoenherr, with 14 and 10 points respectively, were high scorers for the day. .Shattuck fg It pf D. M. L. C. fg ft pf Hicks Betcher Nohl .. Nelson Bowls Macomber

2 0 2 6 1 ,0

0 0 0 2 5 0

3 0 0 1 0 1

11

7

5

Schoenherr.. Hempel Becker......... Aufderheide Habben Raabe Schweppe Rauschke Bradtke

5 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0

0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0

3 3 2 4 0 1 0 0

0

,0

9

3 13


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

48

Luther Noses Out Bethany December 14 found Luther on the Bethany floor marking up their first victory. In spite of the size of the floor the game was slow. The score of 17-16 does not at all show the comparative strength of the two teams. The low score was due to Bethany's set defense. fg ft pf D. M. L. C. fg ft pf Bethany Schoenherr .. Hempel... Becker Aufderheide Habben Schweppe Bradtke

2 0 3 0 1 1 0

1 1 1 0 0 0 0

0 2 2 0 2 0 0

Meyer Luehmann Ellefson............ Thoen Wetzel Ylvisaker

4 0 1 1 0 0

3

3

o o

1 2 0

o

1

o

2

0

648

736

Our Second One-Point Victory On January 11, the home fans were given a treat when D. M. L. C. was host to the Luther cagers of St. Paul. This was the first home game in which the Maroon and Gray showed its superior strength. Our boys played good ball, especially during the first half. The score at the half was 16-9 in our favor. The Saxons then rallied. Nickels was shifted to the pivot position and began to get the feel of the bucket. Schoenherr, however, retaliated by making three successive field goals. The final sound of the gun found the Saxons trailing 23-24. D. M. L. C.

fg

Schweppe ........... Hempel ............... Becker ................ Aufderheide .... Rauschke ........... Habben .............. Schoenherr

0 2 2 1 0 1 3

9

ft

pf

2 0

1 1 3 2 0 2 2

6

11

0

0 1 3

0

8t. Paul Luther fg Luetkens ............ Rundle ............... Aalbue ............... Lau ................ ....... Nickel ................ Otto .................. Anderson .......... '

1 2 3 0 3

ft pf 1 4 1 0 1 0

2 2

0 0

0

1

10

3

14

0

0 4 2


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

49

A Third One-Point Victory On January 26, D. M. L. C. traveled to St. Paul to play their best game of the .year. During the first half the boys were "on." Superb shooting, passing, and floor work were the reasons for a fifteen point lead, 30-15,at the half. During the second half Ooncordia opened up and at the same time held our boys to 10 points. Their rally was within one point of tying the 39-40 score when the gun sounded. Schweppe with 12 points carried away scoring honors for the evening. D. M. L. C. fg ft pf Concordia fg ft pf Schoenherr ...... 3 1 1 Possehl .............. 2 1 3 Schweppe .......... 5 2 3 Peterson ............ 4 0 3 Becker .............. 5 0 2 Fenske .............. 1 2 1 Lange ................ 4 3 2 Aufderheide .... 4 1 4 Habben ............ 0 2 2 Schmidtke ........ 3 1 2 Hempel .............. 0 0 0 Beltz .................. 0 1 0 Horn .................. 0 0 1 Buck .................. 0 0 0 Raedke .............. 0 0 1 Bradtke ............ 0 0 0 Bester ................ 1 0 1 17 6 13 15 8 13

Bethany Loses to D. M. L. C. On February 5, Bethany traveled to New VIm to be defeated by D. M. L. C. 39-18. At half time the score was 3-29. Bethany fared a little better in the second half. Becker collected 13 points during the course of play. This was our fourth consecutive and last victory. D. M. L. C. fg ft pf Bethany fg ft pf Schoenherr .. 3 0 2 Meyer 3 3 1 Schweppe 2 1 1 Luehmann 0 0 2 Becker 6 1 1 Ellefson 0 1 2 Aufderheide 3 0 3 Thoen ,...........0 0 2 Habben 1 0 1 Wetzel. 2 4 1 Raabe 0 0 0 Milne....... 0 0 2 Hempel . 2 0 2 Odegard 0 0 0 Wiechmann 0 1 2 Horn ,. 0 0 3 5 8 10 Bradtke 1 0 0 18 3 15


THe:

50

D. M. L. C. MESSENGEi'(

D. M. L. C. Bows to Luther and Bethel On February 11, the Maroon and Gray lost a "heartbreaker" to St. Paul Luther by a score of 32-33. Half time found our boys trailing 15-20. They overcame this lead and at gun time the score was tied 32-32, but Luetkens ended the game by virtue of a free throw. The next night found our boys on the Bethel court coming out on the short end of a 23-26 score. Although the score at the half was 8-13 in Bethel's favor, D. M. L. C. threatened often in the second half. Becker with 10 points and Peterson with 9 were high scorers. D. M. L. C.

fg

ft

Schoenherr . Schweppe Becker Aufderheide Habben Hempel Horn Bradtke

1 0 3 1 0 3 2 0

1 3 4 2 0 0 2 0

1 4 3 4 4 1 2 1

10

12

20

<

D. M. L. C. Schoenherr Schweppe Becker Aufderheide Habben Raabe Hempel Horn

pf

fg 2 2 3 0 0 0 0 1

ft 0 0 4 2 0 1 0 0

pf 2 1 3 3 0 1 3 2

8

7

15

St. Paul Luther fg

ft

pf

2 4 3

0 6 3

2 2 3

0 1

1 1

4 0

1 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 1

11

11

12

fg

ft

pf

4

1

1

3 0 0

1 0 3

1 4 4

1

1

0 0 0

2 0 2

3 0

Aalbue Luetkens Nickels Lau Anderson Rendel Hultguren Otto Domke

Bethel Peterson Lundholm Backlin . Wessman Young Richard Sorely Olson

0 1

8 10 14

Rochester Juniors Trounce D. M. L. C. On February 19, D. M. L. C. traveled to Rochester. The Maroon and Gray were in poor form, and Rochester easily overcame them with a score of 36-20. Rochester's guards, Gibbons with 11 points and Schima with 13 points, scarred for the evening.


THE

D. M. L. C. Schoenherr ...... Schweppe .......... Becker .............. Aufderheide .... Habben ............... Raabe ................ Wiechmann ...... Hempel .............. Horn ..................

fg

D. M. L. C. MESSENGL:R

ft

pf

0

0

0

0

0 2

1 0 0 0 4 0

0 0 2

0 0 0 0 0

2

0 0 1 0

9

2

6

4

1

51

J. C.

fg

ft

pf

Woodbury ........ Herron .............. Hosfield ............ Gibbons ............ Shima .............. Stussy .............. West .................. Blaisdel ............ Lagerval .......... Paul ..................

2

0 0 0 1

1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

16

4

2

Rochester

0 2

6 5 0

Championship Hopes Shattered On February 23, a large crowd of local supporters saw Ooncordia shatter our hopes for conference championship by taking the Maroon and Gray into camp with a score of 30-27. D. M. L. C. outclassed their opponents in the second half, but a 21-11 lead at the half way mark was too much to overcome. Becker and Peterson shared scoring honors, each gathering 12 points. D. M. L. C.

fg

ft

pf

Schweppe .......... Hempel .............. Becker .............. Horn .................. Habben .............. Schoenherr ...... Raabe ................ Aufderheide ....

0 0 4 0 0 4 0

1 1 4 0 1

O¡

0 2

1 0 3 0 1 2 0 2

8

11

9

2

Concordia Possehl .............. Peterson ........... Fenske .............. Buck .................. Schmidtke

.

fg

ft

pf

3 6 2 1

2

3 3 3 3 2

1

14

0 2 0 0

4 14

Shattuck Noses Out D. M. L. Câ&#x20AC;˘ . On Wednesday, February 27, Shattuck on their own floor nosed out D. M. L. C. 25-24, Schoenherr and Becker again taking scoring honors for New VIm. The constant scoring of Bowls and Nelson proved fateful. The game was hard fought throughout, both teams having a swift passing attack.


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

52

fg D. M. L. C. Schoenherr ...... 5 Hempel .............. 0 3 Becker Aufderheide .... 1 Habben ............ 0 Schweppe .......... 1 Horn ................... 2

ft 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

pf 0

12

1

5

...............

1 2 2 0 0 0

Shattuck Hicks ................ Bowls ................ Nelson .............. Macomber ........ Vieregg ............

fg 1 5 3 I 1

ft 0 2 1 0 0

pf 1 1 0 2 1

11

3

5

Luther Drops Final Game The Maroon and Gray were host to the Bethel quint on March 2. The Luther cagers were in poor form, and at no time during the game did they threaten Bethel's comfortable margin. The final score was 28-17. D. M. L. C. Schoenherr Hempel Becker Aufderheide Habben Schweppe Wiechmann Horn Raabe

fg

ft

pf

1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

0 1 4 1 2 0 0 1 0

2 3 1 4 2 0 0 1 1

4

9

14

Bethel Peterson Backlin.............. Lundholm .. Wessmann Young Sorely Richert Olson

fg

ft

pf

1 I 4 2

1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0

3 3 2 2 2 I 2 0

i

1 2 0

12

4 15

* * * * * The Inter-Class

Tournament

The Twelfth Grade with no defeats walked away with the inter-class championship. They had an abundant supply of material while many of the other classes had to "borrow" players to make a team. As this goes to press another inter-class tournament is pending in which the players 'Ofthe college team may participate.


THE D. M. L. C.' MESSENGER

53

BASEBALL I.

.'

.~,.!.

"':BASEBALLSCHEDULE

April 27-St. Paul-Luther here, May I-Bethany,there. May 4-Concordia here. May ,9 (ten'tative')_:.:.:Waidorf there. May i7-St. Paul Luther there. May I8-Bethel.there., " May 23-B~ethany here, May SO-Bethel here. ... June 5-Goncordia there. June I3-Alumni here.

* * * * * TUMBLING

A large crowd was pleasantly surprised at the Concordia basketball game when a small group of our students' under the able coaching of Mr. John Dahlke put on ari ex-hibition of tumbling. . Their appearance marks the beginning of a new-form of gymnastic entertainment at our college. ' .Although .tumbling is one of the oldest sports known, we find it to be one of the most healthful and most artful sports. Since .its- first appearance our tumbling team has grown considerably. In a short time Mr. Dahlke has certainly developeda group of boys into a fine team, and we can all give him our support by turning out for practice in the future.-W. A. G. '37.


54

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

co路ED

ATHLETICS

Basketball had a great turn out this year. Many of our newer players told us a thing or two about the game, and the season turned out to be one of the most enjoyable that we ever had. The teams stood as follows: Won Lost Riess 12 Birkholz 10 Koehler : : 7 Pagenkopf 6 Nommensen 5 C. Priesz.................................... 2

2. 4 67 9 12.

Erna Kuehl, of Riess's team, and Hilma Albrecht, of Birkholz's team, ranked first in shooting, for each had 78 points to her credit. Next in line came Riess with 73, and Koehler with 72. The girls were not, ready to start playing volleyball when the first series of games were finished, so they arranged a class basketball tournament. Only six classes competed; because the Juniors didn't have enough players" for a team, they played along with the Freshman class. In the first round, the Seniors defeated the Sophomores, and the II Normals won from the Freshmen. In the second round the 1 Normals defeated the III Normals. A real upset occurred when the II Normal squad surprised themselves and everyone else by defeating the strong Senior team in an overtime game with a score of 6 to 4. The championship game was played by the I and II Normal teams. In a close fight, the II Normal team forged ahead, and left the floor with a five to three victory. The tournament has not been finished, so we cannot give the outcome of the race for second place.


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGl:rl

55

Pat is (and has been for some time) eating alphabet soup. Mike, thinking it's high time he quits shoveling , it in, says: When are you going to quit eating? To which Pat replies: When I come to a period. Professor (to Schoenherr. who is coming back to class after fire drill): Why are you so late? Schoenherr: I was looking for the fire. Professor: Did you find it? Schoenherr: I thought so, there was smoke coming from the faculty room. Mother: Dickie Brown always counts ten before he fights. Sonnie: Ya, and he doesn't count for anything after it. Purchaser: What is the charge for this battery? Garageman: One and a half volts. Purchaser: Well, how much is that in American money?-Ex.


56

T1;lE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Berg: What is the plurisignificance of chords? Meyer: 28 points. At Christmas time Bade discovered that time tables: have no legs. There is the Scotchman who on finding a coin he had picked up to be only a penny, got so angry he cried out: For two cents I'd throw you away. "The Film of the Age" is given much publicity in toothpaste ads.-Ex. Imagine "Turkey" getting Schierenbeck to keep his things Lin order Dallmann taking those pictures off the wall . _ Our mail-carrier forgetting "Porky" Weyland's let-" ter


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

57

There's the professor who said, "I think I've lost another pupil," as his glass eye fell down the drain. Mrs. Greene (at ball game, as pitcher and catcher have a conference): What are they 'talking about? Husband: About what to throw to the next batter. Mrs. Greene: But they aren't allowed to throw anything except the ball, are they?-Ex. Fern: What does the abbreviation "q. v." mean? Hazel: Q~o Vadis. Teacher: Give the principal parts of the verb "swim." Fred: Swim, swam, swum. Teacher: Good! Now give me the principal parts of the verb "dim." Fred: I'd rather not.-Ex. Teacher: What is your name, my boy? New boy: Jule Johnson, sir. Teacher: Julius, my boy, not Jule! You shouldn't spoil such a noble name as Julius! And what is your name, my boy? Next boy (confused): Billious Swith, sir.-Ex. Mother (from upstairs): Please. Tommy, turn off the radio. That lady announcer with rasping voice ought to be kept off the air! Tommy: But, Mother, it's Mrs. Jones to see you. Professor Schweppe, after reading a description on drying hay: Can't you just smell the hay, Behrens? Behrens (sniffing the air eagerly): No, I have a cold. The following was overheard in a geography class: Russia has a population of 29,589,000square miles. .


STUDENTS! BEFORE BUYING CONSULT THE ADVERTISING SECTION

Patronize

Our Advertisers

Without Them

THE MESSENGER Cannot Exist

List of Advertisers. Red Front Grocery Grand Hotel Barber Shop Eugene Koehler Barber Shop Dr. G. J. Hiebert Mr. Albert Flor The Bee Hive J. C. Penney Co. Schlender Somsen and Dempsey Pink's Store New Ulm Grocery Simons Lumber Co. Farmers and Merchants State Bank Model Barber Shop Wicherski Shoe Store Salet's Department Store Crone Bros. Company Erickson and Graff National Tea Store Drs. Hammermeister and Saffert


State Bank of New Ulm Muesing Drug Store Eichten Shoe Store Herzog Publishing Company Kemski Printing Co. Weilandt and Stegemann New Ulm Greenhouse Rexall Drug Store Eagle Roller Mill Co.

Eibner and Son Schlumpberger's Grocery Hummel Bros. Dr. A. L. Kusske Ulrich Electric Company Tauscheck and Green Buenger Furniture Company Citizens State Bank Dr. E. G. Lang Robert Fesenmaier, Inc. Silver Latch Inn Fred Meine Clothing Store Retzlaff Motor Company Retzlaff Hardware Company New Ulm Dairy Henry Goede Studio Meyer's Studio Champion Shoe Shop New Ulm Steam Laundry Schroeder Bakery Dr. F. H. Dubbe Schuck's Tailor Shop City Meat Market Dr. Von Bank Brey's Grocery Gastler Studio Union Hospital E. C. Vogelpohl Aid Association for Lutherans A. C. Ochs Brick & Tile Yards August Schell Brewing Company The Hauenstein Company


SUBSCRIBERS, ATTENTION! When You Change Your Address Be sure to notify the Business Manager The Messenger Is Never Forwarded By Your Local Postmaster Buy Rexall Merchandise SUPERIOR QUALITY AT LOWER PRICES

Rexall Drug Store Walter Muesing-Walter

W. Hellmann

"SAVE WITH SAFETY" Phone No.5 For Your Dry Cleaning, Laundry or Hat Work We assure you prompt and efficient service and invite you to visit our modern, up-to-date plant at 107-109So. Minn. St.

NEW ULM STEAM LAUNDRY Expert Dry Cleaners and Hatters


Buy to the Limit Save to the Limit If Savings Mean Anything at All to You,

~~

You'll Stock Up at Penney's

~.

J" C. PENNEY CO.

WE DO OUR PART

~~ ~. WE DO OURPART

Corner Minn. and 2nd North St.

Give Your Eyes a Chance It isn't right to toil under the handicap of defective eyesight. Poor eyes make backward students. They not only affect your work, but your nerves and health as well. We fit your eyes right, grind lenses in our own shop and replace broken lenses on short notice.

DRS. SCHLEUDER Opometris.s and Eyesight Epecialists Telephone 87 New Vlm 102 N. Minn. St.

R. R. KEMSKI PRINTING CO.

370

Towels and Toilet Paper

For Printing and Supplies

Phone

KEMSKE PAPER CO.

A. B. Dick Mimeograph Stencils and Ink Mimeograph and School Papers

NEW

ULM

DAIRY

THE HOME OF

Pure Dairy Products PASTEURIZED

MILK

CREAM, BUTTER and ICE CREAM PHONE 104 Route and Cc.unter Service

SOMSEN & DEMPSEY Henry N. Somsen

W. H. Dempsey

ATTORNEYS AT LAW New Vlm,

Minnesota


A. C. OCHS BRICK & TILE COMPANY General Sales Office 818 National Bldg. Minneapolis

Executive Office and Plant Springfield, Minn. Manufacture

Artistic Face Brick Various Colors -

Also-

Load Bearing Tile and complete line of

Building Tile and Common Brick Our Material stands every Test, and was used in hundreds of Government, State, Public and Private jobs in every state of the great Northwest and Canada. Some of them being-The last twelve new buildings on the University of Minnesota Campus, numerous large business blocks and other buildings in the City of Minneapolis, such as the New Nicollet Hotel, Sheridan Apartments, Cleveland School, St. Mary's Hospital, Swedish Hospital, Calhoun Beach Club, etc., etc., two Lutheran churches of Springfield, Immanuel Lutheran Church of Mankato, Lutheran Churches in Brewster, Lake Benton, Blue Earth, Wanamingo, Westbrook, Wood Lake, Alden, Odin, Ceylon, Clara City, Jackson, Delano; Devils Lake, Arnegard in North Dakota; Dimock, Roscoe, etc., in South Dakota, the Dr Martin Luther College and the Union Hospital of New Ulm, the Lutheran Schoolat Sleepy Eye, together with others built prior and since the above mentioned. Veterans buildings at St. Cloud,Minnesota and Rapid City, South Dakota, .the new seven story First National Bank at Fargo, North Dakota, also large public and private buildings at Brookings, Watertown, Lennox, Lyons, Huron, South Dakota; Willmar, Hendricks, St. Paul, Marshall, Tracy, Rochester, Winona, Minnesota and many others all over the four States.

Our Products Are Sold in the New DIm Territory by New DIm Brick & Tile Yards


BREY'S GROCERY Good Service, Good Treatment and Right Prices at 201 North Minnesota Street Reconstruction, Installation, Additions, Blowers, Chimes, Harps

Modernizing, Maintaining, Tuning, Repairs, Service, Sales

PIPE ORGANS

E. C. VOGELPOHL

ORGAN CO.

ORGAN ARCHITECTS AND BUILDERS 405-409North Broadway New UIm, Minn.

When in Need of Electrical Supplies and Radios or Service call on

Ulrich Electric Company ELECTRIC SERVICE AT ITS BEST BUY WITH SERVICE

Phone 148

QUALITY CLOTHING At

$17.50 to $35.00

TAUSCHECK

~ GREEN

RED FRONT GROCERY FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES GLASSWARE-NOVELTIES-DINNERW Phone 43 and 44

ARE


PINK'S STORE Where Quality Comes First Smartest Wear at Prices You Expect to Pay -Ladies' Ready to Wear, Silk Underwear, Hose, Shoes, Dry Goods, Groceries The Store Where Yon Fe;elat Home

DEER

BRAND

BEER

....... -

-AUGUST SCHELL BREWING COMPANY MINNESOTA

NEW ULM,

AID ASSOCIATION FOR LUTHERANS APPLETON, WISCONSIN Legal Reserve Fraternal Insurance for Men, Women and Children 30 YEARS' RECORD

1902 1912 1922 1932 1933 July 1, 1934

No. of Branches 33 234 . 94,2 2,128 ... 2,187 . .......... 2,246

$

Insurance in Force 760,000.00 7,404,500.00 26,258,018.00 125,864,133.00 131,328,055.00 134,840,817.00

Payments Since Organization July 1, 1934 Admitted Assets $16,201,803.80 To Living Certificateholders $ 8,382,594.36 Certificate Re serves, Surplus and other LiaTo Beneficiaries 3,873,053.72 . bilities . .. 15,935,852.28 Total Payments 12,255,648.08 Emergency Reserve Funds 265,951.52 ALEX O. BENZ, President Wm. F. KeIrn, First Vice President Albert Voecks, Secretary Wm. H. Zuehlke, Treasurer


SCHLUMPBERGER'S Groceries-FruitsPhone 182

GROCERY

Vegetables-Smoked Meats New VIm, Minn.

WILLIAM J. VON BANK, D.D.S. Dentist office Pho~ne 237

. Residence Phone 797

New VIm, Minn.

"THE BUSIEST STORE IN TOWN" "There-Must Be a Good Reason Why"

THE BEE HIVE J. A.

OCHS

s:

SON

Ladies' Ready-to-Wear- and Dry Goods EVERYTHING FOR THE CO,ED

A. L. KUSSKE, M.D. , Practice Limited to Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat and Fitting of Glasses In Weiser Block-Over-Silver Latch Cafe New VIm Minnesota

DR.E. G.LANG DENTIST Fritsche Clinic Building Res. Phone 352

Office Phone 472

THE GASTLER STUDIO For Quality Photographs Also Kodak Finishing


NEW ULM GROCERY CO. Wholesale Grocers Distrihutors

STOKLEY'S FINEST VEGETABLES Ask for this brand and be satisfied Service and Satisfaction at the

MODEL BARBER SHOP Alfred H. Kuester .Prop,

Footwear Athletic Footwear and Sox Ladies' Smart Styles Attractively Priced

EMIL WICHERSKI For Greater Values and Service See Us

COAL Lumber-Millwork Cement-Sewer Pipe and all other Builders Supplies

HENRY

SIMONS LUMBER CO. DEPENDABILITY


-

-

- -

-- - -

---------------------

--

i.

BREAD! Your Outstanding Energy Food Dse Bread freely for your essential energy needs. Easy digestibility is one of the foremost values of Bread

EIBNER ~ SON BAKERY and ICE CREAM PHONE 128

Established 1883

SPAULDING ATHLETIC GOODS -at-

Robert Fesenmaier, Inc. Special discount given to students

ALBERT D. FLOR Attorney at Law New DIm, Minnesota

SALET'S DEPARTMENT STORE-NEW

ULM, MINN.

EVERYTHING TO WEAR FOR HIM OR HER WEAR SALET'S FAMOUS $1.98 FOOTWEAR

Highest Quality and of Course "YOU ALWAYS SAVE :AT SALET'S"

---


CRONE BROS. CO. The Store for Young Men

Our

Best

Attention

Everything of a banking nature entrusted to our care receives our best attention. We shall be glad to have a share of your business.

State Bank of New Ulm

MEYER'S STUDIO Phone 268

A Studio That Is A Studio New DIm, Minn.

MUESING. Drug Store Expert

Prescription

Service

ARTCRAFT PHOTO SERVICE We Have It!

Will Get It!

Or It Isn't Made!

Phones 52-34I


For Superior Baking Results Use

DANIEL WEBSTER FLOUR Perfected

EAGLE ROLLER MILL CO. NEW ULM, MINNESOTA John W. Graff

Geo. D. Erickson

ERICKSON & GRAFF Attorneys at Law New VIm, Minnesota

HENRY

GOEDE STUDIO

"Nothing Pleases Us More Than A Satisfied Customer"

Studio -- 107 North Broadway

HAUENSTEIN SPECIAL and PALE DRY CARBONATED BEVERAGE SERVED AT ALL PLACES New Ulm, Minnesota Telephone No. 1


WHEN IN NEED OF FOOTWEAR Be Sure and Call on Us We carry a complete line of men's, ladies' and children's shoes We appreciate your business. Our prices are always the lowest, Qualit considered

ATHLETIC SHOES OUR SPECIALTY TRY OUR REPAIR DEPARTMENT

FOR GOOD WORK

P. J. EICHTEN SHOE STORE New Ulm, Minnesota

THE NAT!ONAL TEA CO. FOOD STORES GROCERS AND BAKERS New Ulm, Minnesota ,.-

\

G. J. HIEBERT, D"D.S. OfficeOver Rexall Drug Store

Office Phone 247 Residence Phone 1547 New Ulm, Minn.

Weilandt & Stegeman

SAY

Contractors and Builders Correspondence Solicited

W ork

Done in Any Section of the Community

Plans and' Specifications Furnished Estimates Cheerfully Given Office 1100 Center St. Phone 571 Auto Glass Replaced to Order

Champion Shoe 'Shop A Pleased Customer Is Our Best Advertisement We also have a good supply of new shoes. E. FREESE, Proprietor 24 So, Minn. St.

\VITH

;-lOWERS ~lways in good tasteÂť cAlways appreciated NEW ULM 'GREENHOUSES New DIm, Minn. - Phone 45


Buy Where

r ou See

This Sign

YOU BUY BETTER BECAUSE WE BUY BETTER Our

5eo

8:ore Buying Power Makes Possible the Low Pr.ces on Our Quality Merchandise

F. !-LRETZLAFF HARDWARE COMPANY

Drs. Hammermeister ~ Saffert Physicians and Surgeons NEW ULM,

MINNESOTA

The Grand Hotel-Barber Shop Arndt and Strate. PrOl;S. ;"1t Pays To Look Well"

Dodge

Plymouth


SILVER LATCH INN "The Pride of New DIm" Fountain Service-Lunches-Meals Dining Room Service

EUGENE KOEHLER BARBER SHOP Ha~rCuts 30c Efficient Service and Courteous Treatment New Ulm 20 N. Minn. St.

GREATER VALUES Our New Fall Stock Supplies the Greatest Suit and, Overcoat Values of the Time

$15.00

$17.50

$21.50

$25.00

The Mirror Proves the Style and Fit

HUMMEL BROTHERS 14 No. Minn. St.

Patronize

New Ulm, Minn.

Messenger Advertisers


We Turn a House Into a Home

BUENGER FURNITURE

CO.

Stores: New Vim, Sleepy Eye and Gibbon

SUCCESSFUL PLANNJNG Everything in co-operation and accommodation consistent with courteous and sane banking principles is added to "YOUR AOOOUNT" at this community financial institution.

CITIZENS STATE BANK New UIm, Minnesota Under provisions of the Banking l<'REDA. MEINE -of-

FRE:D MEINE CLOTHING CO.

See Us for Snappy Clothes

Act of 1933 Our Deposits Are Insured'


THE SCHROEDER BAKERY

... . THE FLOWER OF NEW ULM JUST LIKE'THE BREAD MOTHER MAKES

PHONE 232


BANK WITH

FARMERS ~ MERCHANTS STATE BANK New Vim, Minnesota FI~IENDLY HELPFUL SERVICE AT 'YOUR COMMAND

TAILORED TO MEAE:URE SUITS

$22.75

$25.00

No Deposics=-No C. O. D.'s

AND UP

All kinds of Repairing

CLEANING AND PRESSING

SCHUCK'S TAILOR SHOP 215 N. MINN. ST. Residence Phone 150

Office Phone 60

DR. F. H. DUBBE PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON NEW ULM,

MINNESOTA

UNION HOSPITAL NEW ULM, MINN. A fireproof hospital supervised by graduate nurses giving the best service. PHONE No. 404


-


tfrhe

]l .•.

lt-. e.

COMMENCEMENT

NUMBER

'-(~I_(

VOLUME XXV NUMBER 4 JUNE(1935


Saffert's Provision Market

~~ ~. WEDOOURMIT

J

Where Y ou Buy Quality!


- :-

CONTENTS

CLASS OF 1935

-:-

,..................................................2

TERTIA CLASS WILL

11

CHARACTERISTIC TABLE LITERARY

12

a)

Robert Frost

13

b)

Carl Sandburg

15

EDITORIALS a)

Retrospection

18

Where Are the Harvesters ?

19

c)

Student Contributions

19

d)

The Alumni Situation

20

- b)

LIBRARY NOTES

21

ALUMNI

23

EXCHANGE

25

COLLEGE NOTES

28

CO-ED NOTES

32

LOCALS

35

JOKES

;

41

L.


CLASS OFFICERS Raymond Duehlmeier

President

-

Vice President

Harry Diersen Ida

Secretary -Treas urer

Clements CLASS MOTTO

"Fight The Good Fight Of Faith"

CLASS COLORS Red and White

CLASS FLOWER Talisman Rose

SOLDIERS

OF FAITH

Eph, 6 :10-17 I. Prepared we stand, Soldiers of Faith, clothed in the armor of our God. .Our loins with truth are girt, With Gospel Peace our ready feet are shod. The Spirit's sword shall be our stay in strife To guard against the Foe and waiting death. We stand upon the battle-field of life: Lord, give us strength to fight the fight of faith. II. Prepared we stand, Soldiers of Faith, strong in the power of His might. Nor do we fear the Foe: We have the shield of faith to guard us right. Yet should we falter ere the battle's end When all seems dark despair and certain death, Oh, hear our plea, Thy guardian angels send, And help us, Lord, to fight the fight of faith. Doris Sauer '35.


IDA CLEMENTS Clements, Minnesota

m« Delta Sigma 4; Concert ClIoi1' 2; Gi~'IB'Athletic Board; Gi1'ls' Glee Cl7£b 1.

HARRY DIERSEN New Albin, Iowa Phi Gamma Rho 4; Concert Choir 2; Marlut Singers 2; Band 4; Football u..

.

...


RA YMOND DUEHLMEIER Corvuso, Minnesot~ Phi Gamma Rho 4; President 1; Concert Choir 1; Ma1'lut Sin_qe1's 2' P1'esident 1; jJle.YHen{lerBtaff 2; Edi.tor-in-Chief 1; Band 4; Class Pj'esident; Valedictor路ian,

HERMAN Vergas,

FEHLAUER Minnesota

Phi 'Gamma Rho 4; Concert Choir 3; Student Body President; Mm'lut Singers 3; Band 4; President 1.


GERHARD

GILBERT

Milwaukee, Wisconsin PM Delta Sigma 3; Band 3; Athletic Board 2; President. 1; Football 2L; Basebull J'Jlcmager 2; J'J11tsicn.ai Ins-pector 1.

HENRY HASSE Morgan, Minnesota Phi Gamma Hho 4; Baseball 2L; Basketbctll Mctnager 1; Athletic Board 1; Mail Carrier.


VERA LAWRENZ Lomira, Wisconsin Me.~8enger Staff 2; Phi Delta Sigma .{

ADA Renville,

NANTKE Minnesota

Phi Gamma Rho 4; G'i1'ls'Athletic Board.


ELSIE PROSEK Hurley, Wisconsin

.:

Phi Delta Sigma 4; Concert. Choir oue, Girls' Athletic Board 2.

4; ai'rl.,' Glee

CLARENCE RADL

..

New VIm, Minnesota Phi Gamma Rho 4; Concert Choi1' 3; Band 2.


MARTIN RAUSCHKE New Ulm, Minnesota Phi Delta Sigma. 3; President 1; Band 7; Director 1'; Concert. 01l0i1'3; Basketball 1L,

RAYMOND RIESS New Ulm, Minnesota Phi Gamma Rho 3; Concert Choir 1; lJ'lessenger Staff 2; Baseball 3L; A thletic Board 2,


DORIS SAUER New (JIm, Minnesota Phi Delta Sigma 4; Concert Choir 4; Girls' Glee Club 1; Messenger Staff 1.

RUTH SCHNITKER New UIm, Minnesota Phi Delta Sigma 3,' Concert Choir 2; Girls' Glee Club 1; Kittenball 2.


LINDA TESKE Tomah, Wisconsin Phi Delta Sigma 4; Concert Choir 3; Gi1路1.~'Glee CI1(,b1.

HELEN

WEYLAND

Larsen, Wisconsin Phi Delta Sigma 4.


TH ,.; D. M. L. C. !l1E~SEN(lEH

11

TERTIA CLASS WILL

'.

We, the Tertia of 1935, having orthodox judiciousness and unimpaired memory, well aware of the evanescence of our temporal existence, and desiring to dispose of the exuberance and copiousness of our personal effects, do hereby design, ordain, promulgate, and reveal this to be our Last Will and Testament. I, Harold A. Hempel, bestow upon Arthur Bade my success on the gridiron and to E. Wiechman my abundance of curly locks. I, Alfred Hertler, hereby hand down my ability to play end to Shierenbeck, my love for German to "Omi" Birkholz, and to "Wally" Goeglein a picture-frame. May he ever be inspired by the picture it contains. I, Henry L. Raabe, hereby bequeath my ability to be a nuisance to Ora Wollenburg and my sweat shirt to Ruth Riess! I, Herman Martin Raabe, Jr., do most solemnly will my ability to get my "comps" in on time to Helen Hempel, and my quietness and attentiveness in chorus to Hans Wagner. May they profit by their inheritances. I, Norman E. Sauer, do with much gusto will my posi-. tion as bottom man on the tumbling team to Edmund Schierenbeck. May he uphold the boys as I did. My skill at "bumming" cigarettes I will to Edgar Duin. I hope he has better luck than I had. I, Orville Schlenner, do hereby will my talent in Latin unto Albrecht Habben and my ability of geUng freeperiods to Denis Krenz. May they have as easy a time as I did. I, Homer Schweppe, do hereby most solemnly bestow my competence in manipulating the vernacularism of New Ulm to Fred Schoenherr. Ich hoff, dasz er mit es suc-' ceedin' tut. I, Arthur W. A. Wantoch, do place upon Lloyd Uecker my job as mail "shagger." To Charles Winter and Gilbert Fisher I bestow my ability as a stamp collector. IN TESTIMONY HEREOF, we have hereunto subscribed our name and affixed our seal, this fourteenth day of June in the year, One thousand nine hundred and thirtyfive. TERTIA CLASS OF 1935 WITNESSES: Schlenner's Pipe . 'Herm. Raabe's Rheumatism


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THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

13

ROBERT FROST Robert Frost, the poet of today's New England, was born in San Francisco in 1875. When Robert was ten years old, the family went East to his father's boyhood home in New Hampshire, and this became the real home of Robert Frost. He worked in the mills in Lawrence Massachusetts, and at the same time he wrote and published some poetry. He was married in 1895 and two years later he entered Harvard. After two years here, he worked as shoemaker, reporter, teacher, and farmer in New Hampshire. His poetry was not very popular and he had difficulty in getting a publisher; so in 1912 he sold his farm and went to England to get a publisher. In England he was welcomed as a "truly American" poet, because his poetry was entirely different from any of England's. In 1913 he published in England A Boy's Will and in 1914, North of Boston. England's praise gained him recognition in America, and the next year he returned to the United States. He bought and settled on a farm in New Hampshire, and wrote poetry about it. Most of Robert Frost's verse is either narrative or descriptive, and realistic. He keeps close to the soil, and finds his poetry in fields and men. He describes the beauties of nature, and his description is accurate, although he can see beauty where many others can not. He invents and adds nothing in his descriptions, but presents the scene so you can see it as he does. And his pictures are beautiful.


i4

THE

n:

M. L. C. MESSENGER

"Among tar-banded ancient cherry trees, Set well back from the road in rank lodged grass, The little cottage we were speaking of, A front with just a door between two windows, Fresh-painted by the shower a velvet black." He tells of his own experiences in the country and draws character sketches of his neighbors. His style is casual and conversational, but simple. It is the terse sneech of the outdoor Yankee who never wastes words. His verse is often written in conversational form. and the characters unconsciously express the decay of New England. His characters represent a culture-the culture of old New England to which they stubbornly cling, never admitting that it is a thing of the past. They are at times q-rimly melancholy, and nearly always pathetic. North of Boston, his best volume of verse, shows the futility of life for a man tied to the nearness of New England soil and a tradition of the past. It is really pathetic to see a man mending a wall to keep out-what? "He only says, 'Good fences make good neighbors.' " "Why do they make good neighbors? Isn't it Where there are cows? But here there are no cows. Before I built a wall I'd ask to know What I was walling in or walling out, And to whom I was like to give offence." He is mending wall to keep things out when there is nothing to keep out; mending wall perhaps to keen up an outward form of courage and to hide a heart which clings hopelessly to the past. Other volumes of Robert Frost's poetry are Mountain Interval, New Hampshire, and West-Running Brook, his most recent work. Robert Frost makes no suggestions for reform; he simply accepts and loves New England as it is. And New England as he presents it is beautiful. But at the same time Silas, The Hired Man, and his entire life are symbolic of decaying New England; and in the end it all sums up to .the same thing. "It hit the moon. And then there were three there, making a dim row, The moon, the little silver cloud, and she. Warren returned-too soon it seemed' to her,


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

15

Slipped to her side, caught up her hand and waited. 'Warren,' she questioned. 'Dead,' was all he answered." Ruth Uhlig '36.

CARL eANDBURG Carl Sandburg is the Chicago poet. In his early days he saw the filthy conditions of the f'oreivn laborers' homes. He saw the young shop-girl go !0 work in a musty shop early and work sixteen hours every day. The gangsters. the bullying foremen, the hoodlums, the ordinary prairie folk from the surrounding country are the first who make impressions on Carl. Beyond this, Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin farmers tend their corn. The feelings of these are Sandburg's feelings. His old jobs, such as bootblack in a barber shop, scene-shifter in a theater, hotel dishwasher, and organizer of the Socialist party, gave him insight into the life of the very things he would later use for writing. Walt Whitman's view of nature is seen again in Carl Sandburg. The Walker by Arturo Giovannetti is a picture of the criminal in his cell and the outlaw's indignation against society, which imprisons him. It is the voice of a class whose feelings are its laws. Sandburg wrote a few such poems also. Many observers of today realize Chicago is building up a civilization of its own. It is the most brutal of our larger cities. His poem Chicago starts, "Ho.'S butcher of the world!" Labor troubles, unmastered political quarrels, glorification of wealth, and its "gun-play" are expressed in this poem. He is therefore called laureate of industrial America. With the words, "Player with Railroads and Nation's Freight Handler," he wishes to say glorification of muscular power and beauty of elemental things are too vivid in Chicago's mind. Sandburg resents this "Stormy, husky, brawling cii y of the Big Shoulders." The poet was buffeted about in this industrial system and assumed the tone of the raw, realistic speech of the streets. Even though Sandburg criticizes these things, his poems show that he has a warm spot for them in his heart and pities them. He sees beauty in childhood, no matter how simple. In order to grip the fast-running, industrial minds, he picks up their own language and writes it as it comes to him.


16

THE

D. M. L .. C. MESSENGER

His poetry as such is unique. Harriet Monroe once said, "Rules are made by works of art, not for works of art." Sandburg's poetry follows no rules. He disregards regularity of stress, but he labors over his lines to give them the exact sound he wants for that particular content. To him there is no poetic language, and he doesn't borrow words or phrases from older poets. He is unconventional, but his lines say forcefully and accurately what he wants to say. No one used his style to such an extent as he did. He widened the rhythmic patterns of verse greatly. To me Sandburg might as well be known as a prose writer, but I like his writings anyway. One authority on literature says, "Sandburg wishes to swear at you, glories in the tang of reality. Chicago wishes to get you dirty, kick you, and strip you of your civilization and culture-so does Sandburg." Thus he is typically characteristic of Chicago. His poems reach such topics as the slums, the "niggers," Greeks, dance halls, harlots, and prize-fighters. r These are his first poems, especially those published in his volume known as Chicago Poems. What is Sandburg? His naturalism bites more than Whitman's. His poetry brings out the spirit and barbaric range of the Middle West. Maybe barbaric naturalism would fit his brutal poems with tenderness underneath. Even though he hates the industrialism of Chicago, he is not so radical as to reject the machine age. He says it is all right except when it misuses man. The effect of Sandburg is quite evident. Since he dared to put rude actuality into verse, many have followed his example .. At first America was shocked. They were used to the highly refined romanticism of Longfellow. But Sandburg brought about a liberal freedom in verse. His stanzas sound like prose, for there is no rime. Cornhuskers, Smoke and Steel, Slabs of the Sunburnt West deepen the impression he wants to make. These are volumes of poems similar to Chicago. Sandburg hated the rich and loved the poor and oppressed. Ke wrote a masterly biography of Abraham Lincoln: The Prairie Years. Critics say this will live longer than any other of his writings. Sandburg didn't waste words. Fog proves this: The fog comes on little cat feet. It sits looking over harbor and city on silent haunches, and then moves on.

Florence Witte '36


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

17

The "D. M. L. C. Messenger" is published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressed to Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends.

Entered as second class matter at Pest Office of New Ulm, Minnesota

No.4

June 1935

Volume XXV

-: The Messenger Staff :Waldemar

Nolte

Editor-in-Chief

Winfried Stoekli

Business Manager

Arnold Coppens Gerhard Rolloff

_ Assistant _

Assistant Business Manager

Veleda Kelm

â&#x20AC;˘

Gertrude Julius

Alumni Notes

Limpert.

Ruth Uhlig

Exchange ¡

College Notes

Wantoch

Locals

Beata Moldenhauer

Co-ed Notes

Milton Bradtke Adele Nommenson

Business' Manager

Athletics ,

Jokes


IS

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

EDITORIAL

RETROSPECTION As we close another many examinations, the and the frantic efforts moment. Let us look have you done here?

school year amid the confusion of mild excitement of many concerts, at packing, let us pause but one back upon the past year. What

What have you done here? It is not a question to any one in particular ; it is a challenge for all; it faces the author of it just as much as anyone else. What have you done here? "Why challenge, why ask it?" "Don't bother any more!" "We have vacation now." ,Yes, we have vacation now, but after it, comes yet another year, if God be willing. Therefore, let us look back and see just what we have done here. We came to school last fall, filled with the energy imparted by a fine vacation. Perhaps 'many a one felt this store of energy suddenly burst as a bubble. Life here became drab and depressing! Nevertheless, I am sure, if everyone grappled his problems with a will, God gave him the fruit of his labor. Perhaps one or the other actually did suffer disappointment. By all means let him take an unbiased view of the matter 'and if in any way he can improve, let him resolve with the help of God to do so.


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

19

Such a retrospection is more than a mere glance over the shoulder. The past year becomes a mirror which points out to us our defects, thus showing where we must place the strongest redoubt, prayer. It is a lesson, teaching us why we must entrench ourselves more firmly and deeply in the principle, "Take my life and let it be, consecrated, Lord, to Thee." W. Nolte

WHERE

ARE THE HARVESTERS?

During these last years when financial difficulties were keeping many students from school. we too noticed an abrupt drop in enrollment. This decline was greatest among the male students. The majority of our classes right now have more girls than boys. When these classes graduate, the teachers that will be ready to go out into the field will be girls. We don't say that they aren't efficient teachers. There's no doubt that they are. But at this rate the girls will walk away with the positions that should and can be filled by men. This may be advantageous from the girls' point of view, but is it good for the school? We all feel that it is a man's position to be at the head of the school. So why doesn't he keep it instead of just letting the girls step up and take that place? His position in regard to woman is the same; so he should be over her in the school. The older boys, and girls too, are more ready to look up to the man as their leader in school. The boys especially need the guidance of a man during these years. And they won't have this if our normal schools can't send out more male teachers. Fathers and mothers remember that your children need the guidance of these teachers! Why aren't there more boys going to our Christian training schools? We need them! Beata Moldenhauer '36.

STUDENT

CONTRIBUTION

Why don't more of the students take an interest in the Messenger? It is our paper. Not only those students who are on the staff, but the entire student body should feel that way about it! The students are willing enough to read it and complain when something doesn't appeal to them, but they don't care enough about it to do a little


--------------------------------

20

- ---- ----------------

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGlCn

extra work themselves to help 'the good cause along. When the time for the next issue of the Messenger draws near and we look for essays, stories, and poems, there just aren't any around. We know that there are many students who could write well, if they would only try. Why must we take compositions? Why don't some students write something just for the Messenger? Of course, there are some faithful students who do write. Look over your old copies of the Messenger路 and see who wrote the articles. Weren't they always written by the same group? Weren't most of them written by the girls? Why don't the boys write more? Is it because they can't or won't? In most cases it seems to be won't. What about the Studentwissenschaft box? That was put there so that those who had not contributed with articles, poems, or stories could at least do something. But it is a sad fact that even that box has been neglected lately. In the future let's all try to work for our Messenger by writing something. Then we will make it what it really should be-a paper of and by the entire student body. Adela Nornrnenson '36

THE ALUMNI SITUATION I wonder whether one does actually forget his old friends and classmates so soon, or it is just a case of pure negligence on the part of former graduates that they never commune with those whom they have left behind. Why don't you "drop a line" once in a while? You may have no interest in us any more, but we're still interested in youor at least your career. We and the other alumni, sure, should like to know how you are getting along in the world. '

I'm

Now in case you have forgotten it or overlooked itwe have reserved a few pages for Alumni Notes. Unfortunately these are seldom filled. I wonder why? Well; no one, or very few people ever tell us anything that belongs there. What there is, we get through much laborious questioning, and then we don't always get it right. I ask you all to please give a little information now and then, so that the reserved spaces for Alumni Notes will be well taken care of. Veleda KeIrn '37


THE

D. 111.L. C. MESSENGER

21

LIBRARY NOTES ?

The close of the school year quite naturally suggests to us that we take inventory of gains and losses. Even in a library there can be such gains and losses. The factors that chiefly go toward making a library a successful institution are the material it is able to supply to its readers and the extent to which it is used by the people within its reading radius. It is quite easy to clutter up a library with a mass of literature which may afford temporary interest and enjoyment and yet fails to improve the intellectual and emotional capacity of the reader. So much of the fiction that is published week in and week out is of this type. Much of it is actually harmful, especially for immature readers. About many of the modern stories there is a brazenness which cannot help but leave a decidedly unwholesome imprint in the hearts of America's youth. The fathers of a generation ago were greatly disturbed by the advent of the dime novel and strove to keep this type of literature away from their boys and girls. But the dime novel is as harmless as Mother Goose rhymes compared with the type of novel which has sprung up within the last two decades. We cannot hope to improve our library by stocking it with books of this type. But even books of biography and science as well as those which bear upon the social and cultural aspects of life demand careful scrutiny before they are adopted as material for a library, especially for a college library. They offer strange philosophies and may easily tend to warp and distort our Christian viewpoint of life. Perhaps they can be read to some advantage by a man who is well founded in the philosophy of Scripture. But they can hardly be recommended to people whose views of life are just being moulded. Our library has added 268 books to its stacks, making a total of 7570 volumes. Of these new books, 51 are fiction. The librarian must confess that a number of these stories are cowboy and adventure stories. We don't for a moment expect these to be character building, but we feel convinced that they are quite harmless in comparison with the type of novel that is so prevalent today.


22

THE D. M. L. C. MESS'ENGER,

Among the' new books, there are 14 biographies. Some of these are a most valuable asset to our library. We mention only Belloc's biographies of Wolsey and Milton, a biography of The Cid Campeador, of Mary, Queen of Scots, and of Daniel Boone. Other interesting and instructive volumes are: Mamro, Of Things Which Soon Must Come To Pass, a commentary on the Book of Revelations; a complete set of Luther's works in German; a valuable set of six volumes entitled: Life and Work of the People of England from the 11th to the 18th century by Dorothy Hartley. For students who are looking for guidance regarding the unscientific teachings of modern science, concerning evolution, we have entered several copies of Nelson's "After Its Kind." Worthy of mention also is a book by Gilbert, Crucifying Christ in Our Colleges. This book does not make pleasant reading. But it opens our eyes to the dangers which confront Christian boys and girls when they attend higher institutions of learning in our country. Finally, we wish to mention here a beautiful gift received by the library consisting of exquisitely bound and richly illustrated sets of Goethe and Schiller.

,.-

The work of re-cataloging the books in the library 'has gone forward steadily. We hope that in another year or two the entire library will be in such a shape that its card catalog will offer all the aid which may rightly be expected of it. At this point we wish to comment on the good behavior and library etiquette shown by our students during the past year. It has helped to make our library a pleasant and competent workshop. The new college catalog carries two items concerning the Book Store which we wish to bring to the attention of the students here. "A deposit of $5.00 will be required of all students as part payment of the book bills. When students who have attended the institution before desire to register for the new school year in fall, all old accounts (book bills included) must have been paid in full." A. Schaller, Librarian.

.'


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

23

!

Children's Choirs Sing Over Radio Don't tell us that we don't learn any music at D. M. L. C. or that our parochial schools are not abreast of the times. The children of the parochial school at Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin,under the direction of Miss Vera Hafenstein '33 sang over Station WLB at Stevens Point, Wisconsin, and Harold Klatt '31 of Columbus,Wisconsin, has presented his Children's Choir over a station at Madison several times. Good work! Keep it up! Another Score for College Romances It seems to me that there is an old saying to the effect that college romances do not last. Well, here is a hard knock for the old saying. I hope he can take it! Miss Verona Nerese Ex-'32 of Rochester, Minnesota, and Rev. Adelbert Hellman '26 H. S. of Colorado have announced their engagement. Congratulations to "Fluffy" and "Addie." Former Alumnus Pays Visit Arthur Meier '32 of Sleepy Eye attended the Marlut Singers' Concert on May 10. The singers were glad that he sang with this organization when he went to school; otherwise he might have criticized them. This way he couldn't tell.


24

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Things Are Looking Upfor Art Glende '34 of Corvuso. Imagine our surprise when we saw him drive up the other day in a new Plymouth. Now, Art, I suppose you'll have to "watch the Fords go by," or no? Visitors from Thiensville A powerful wave of homesickness carried John Raabe and "Putzy" Scheele '30 H. S. from the Seminary at Thiensville to New Ulm on March 22. With them came their fellow-students Herb Nommensen and Eldon Bode H. S. '31. Miss Edith Bode '32 of Baraboo accompanied the boys, and also visited with us for a few minutes. Stork Has Busy Season Mr. and Mrs. McArthur (nee Mathilda Fahje '30) of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, were made happy by the arrival of Baby Joyce on April 1. Mr. and Mrs. Howard Glaesemann (nee Laura Uhlig '26 H. S.) are the proud parents of Marion Ruth born on May 3. Mr. and Mrs. Kramer (nee Zylpha Busse Ex-'32) have an addition to the family in the person of a baby boy. whose name I am unable to tell you. Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Kupe (nee Edna Raeth Ex-'34) of Arlington, Minnesota, are also the proud possessors of a baby boy.


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSEl'<GZH

25

Have you ever considered how much like a barrel our "thinking caps" are, and what varying amounts our various barrels contain? In The Black and Red, under the title Barrels some one has written: "How like formal education. Day by day, week by week, facts, truths, formulas, opinions, data, beliefs, personal prejudices, what have you, are poured into it. Twice a year the measuring stick is let down to see how full it is. Sometimes barrels have leaks. The process continues. When the barrel is supposedly full the bung is driven home, seal put on, and out she comes. After rolling about a bit the bung works loose and out pour the same facts, truths, formulas, opinions, data, beliefs, personal prejudices, and what have you. Nothing new. Nothing fresh. Same old stuff. And we'll peddle it to our children. Thus the torch of learning is carried on." All of us have time and again made use of such expressions as "A perfect gentleman!" or "Can't you act like a gentleman ?", but I doubt whether we could all successfully define this oft-times-conferred title. Some one in The Black and Red made a valiant effort at a dafinition when he sta.ed that "there can be no one perfect gentleman; no set rule of conduct that will produce sure-fire results. Different times and occasions require different behavior.-If one is a true gentleman in the cow-stable, one will also with a little training be one in a drawing-roomand vice-versa. For it is a moral quality, only reflected in the exterior actions and manners of a man. To be a true gentleman is a rare gift, born in some, acquired by a few, but sadly lacking in many."-Now what is a gentleman?

The various colleges have either in the form of a program or by articles in their school papers paid tribute to Johann Sebastian Bach, in commemoration of the 250th


26

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

anniversary of his birthday being celebrated this year. In the Alma Mater two of his letters are printed, enabling one to find in them the man as he really was, rather than as the master musician whom we know in only that light. In one of these letters he is a man bringing his troubles to a friend, and in the other he shows his particular devotion to his children. , But according to The Spectator we are to approach Bach from the standpoint of his cantatas and chorals to truly appreciate this great artist. Through a study of his ability in tone painting, and his unexcelled four-part harmonizations we are brought closer to this great Lutheran composer. The Bethany College students observed this composer's birthday by a joint party with the Lutheran Choral Society. The program consisted of Bach selections, a talk on the music of Bach and Beethoven, and a short skit based on "The Coffee Cantata" which had been set to music by Bach.

A survey to determine the favorite books of Augsburg students was carried on, and out of the one hundred listed it is rather surprising that Romona by H. H. Jackson received the most votes. I wonder what book we would decide upon as a favorite. This year's senior class at Bethany College has "taken the initial step in a campus project." It sponsored the play "She Stoops to Conquer" and with the proceeds has undertaken the task of converting an unsightly section of the campus into a level lawn. Isn't such an improvement quite a memorial for a class to leave to its Alma Mater? Future seniors, I'm sure that our campus wouldn't object to an occasional act of kindness on your part. Can you "take it?" According to the Bethany Scroll, "it would seem that the status of the modern college youth is determined by the degree to which he can 'take it.' Take what? Take the knocks as well as the pats, the jeers as well as the applause! The ability to 'take it' involves being as good a loser as a winner, and as good a winner as a loser. It involves remaining modest when praised, openminded when criticized, willing to make amends when reproved. It includes following as well as leading." Have we reached the status, or not?


THE

p.

D, M. L. C. MESSENGER

27

An article in the Concordia Comet reveals that one of the most numerous causes of failure in a college student is a lack of self-reliance. "Distrust in himself can be the most destructive force in a student's life. Instead of being spurned on by his first success, he loses confidence in himself upon encountering a seemingly insurrnoun ' able obstacle, which looms up like a threatening and overwhelming huge giant in the path of future successes." There are the students who allow one little accomplishment to satisfy them, and shrink away from another such an opportunity. Then there are the students who make a very feeble effort to conquer a subject in which they are failing, but whose self-distrust is so great that their attempts are soon stamped as fruitless. Perhaps such students who are ready to give up in despair have not pondered long enough upon a possible means of escape from this slavery to one's own self. "Everyone with an average amount of intelligence can overcome this bane, the lack of self-reliance by 'putting his shoulders to the wheel.' If one is afflicted with this ailment, he should persevere, surge forward with added determination and with insistent effort solve every problem that may arise. Thus he can overcome all obstacles and thereby place a certain amount of self-confidence in himself and trust in his ability to overcome future obstacles. Diffidence will have vanished, and. he will become a success in his particular field of endeavor."

What an ideal place! Utopia College! No, college wouldn't be "half bad" if it would abide by the rules given in the Concordia Courier. In the first place, those too eager for breakfast get only bread and water, while latecomers are treated to whatever they may desire. And there's no need to rush frantically from class to class-a candy bar is the reward for the one having the most tardy marks at the end of the month. At Utopia College it is nonsensical to spend a study hour at your studies, and if there is a party, the dean will be only too glad to have you go. And so college life would be just one continual vacation and we wouldn't mind in the least if graduation day would never come to end it. Of COUl'S!' it's fun to build air castles about such a Utopia College, even though we are quite certain that we won't live to see those castles settle on "terra firma."


28

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

0LLEQE

Spring at D. M. L. C. always means two things: a rush of social events, and a rush of complaints of overwork. For three Mondays the concert choir slept its way through classes; the cause was a series of Sunday evening concerts. On April 28, the choir sang in Gaylord, on May 5, in Corvuso, and on May 11, in Redwood Falls. All three concerts were followed by receptions, and no one would want to venture an opinion as to where the best time was had. Mr. Jansen, the "birdman," brought us release from classes and an interesting lecture on birds on April 30. It is due to the "birdman's" lectures that so many students are interested in birds-Oh, yes indeed, it is. The Phi Delta Sigma Society presented its play, Plain People, on May 2. The play was coached by Mr. Dahlke, and had the following cast: Jerry Thompson Mrs. Gaffey Helen Thompson George Thompson Jane Thompson Jennie Brown Jimmy Brown Tom Prince Joan Thompson Count Coletti..

Orville Schlenner Agnes Strege Margaret Wegner Julius Wantoch Ruth Uhlig Else Prosek Edmund Schierenbeck Norman Sauer .Ida Clements Henry Engelhardt


29

THE"D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

We have been hearing so much about the band being weak this year that the concert on May ·15 was a real surprise. The following is the program:

t

1. Tenth Regiment-March 2. Concentration-Overture 3. Teddy Trombone-Novelty 4. Silver Sails-Novelty 5. Parade of the Wooden SoldiersCharacteristic 6. Black Mask-March

R. B. Hall Edw. Hazel H. Fillmore Clay Smith Leon Jessel Al. Hayes

INTERMISSION Roses De Sandman

Ad. Wallnoefer ······· ..D. Protheroe

Girls' Glee Club Miss Ada Sievert, Director Young Werner's Parting Song Trombone Solo-W. Stoekli Perfect Day

· Vocal Solo-C. Radl

V. Nessler

········· ..C. J. Bond

7. 8. 9.

Under Arms-March Al. Hayes The Admiral-Overture Edw. Russell Courtship of Juanita-Novelty Paul Yoder (Showing how "Juanita" is played in Spain, Germany, Russia, Scotland, and America) 10. Eooso-Medley-March B. G. McFall 11. Belle Isle-Waltz K. L. King 12. Under the Double Eagle-March ..Arr. by Ellis Brooks Finally the Girls' Glee Club found something to do besides assisting on other programs. On May 21 the girls went to St. James to give a concert that was all their own. The picnic season is back again. It would be too much to enumerate all of the class picnics. The two most important, the band picnic and the II-III Normal picnic, on May 22 and May 24 respectively.


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

30

The final concert of the year will be given on June 13 by the chorus and the concert choir under the direction of" Prof. Backer. The program will be the following: 8 :15 P. M., Thursday, June 13, 1935 I.

Concert Choir: All Breathing Life Make Me, 0 Lord God, Pure in Heart Brahms Introduction Andante Expressivo Andante Allegro Christ ist erstanden Rueter Advent-Motette Schreck Wie soll ich dich empfangen Wie du einst empfangen wuerdest (12 parts) Wie ich dich empfangen will

II.

Organ:

III.

Chorus:

IV.

Organ-Piano:

V.

VI.

VII.

4th Sonata (Finale) Waldemar Nolte

Bach

Guilmant

Volkslieder An den Sonnenschein Wie schoen bist du, freundliche Stille Draus' ist alles so praechtig Muss ich denn zum Staedtle 'naus Prelude to "The Mastersingers of Nueremberg Wagner Organ-Doris Sauer Piano-Henry Engelhardt

Girls' Glee Club:

Wiegenlied Amaryllis Miss Ada Sievert, Directress

Piano:

Chorus:

Sonata Op. 27, No. I Andante . Martha Robisch Beauty in a Rose Garden From Dwarf Land Henry Engelhardt Folksongs English: The Cobbler's Jig Scotch: Rantin' Rovin' Robin Spanish: Joy and Song

Brahms Parlow Beethoven McDowell McDowell


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

81

The school year will close with the commencement exercises on June 14. PROGRAM Assembly: "Now Do We Pray God, the Holy Ghost" Organ-Herman Fehlauer Prayer and Scripture Reading Organ Solo: "Second Movementfrom the Third Sonata" Elsie Prosek Address:

Guilmant

Rev. John Plocher of St. Paul

Assembly: "Fight the Good Fight of Faith" Organ-Martin Rauschke Presentation of Diplomas: Prof. Carl L. Schweppe Choir:

"0 Let Me Feel That Thou Art Near Me"....Reuter

Valedictory: Raymond Duehlmeier Assembly: "0 For a Faith That Will Not Shrink" Organ-Harry Diersen Lord's Prayer and Benediction

.. J


32

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Such a chatter in the study hall! What in the wide world is all the noise for? And with all this going on I'm supposed to write out co-ed notes. What was that I heard? I think I'll listen in and get some news that way .. "Say, did you notice the happy grin on Meyer's face? Why, it practically reaches from ear to ear. She just received word that she has a baby brother. "Yeh, that's great! But did you notice all the curls: blossoming forth lately. Those kids must have been eating crusts of bread. Dorothy, Evelyn, Helen, Elsie, Lindy, Tena, Ada, and Raddatz all look like Topsies. And does. Wegner ever look nice with hers cut!" "Mentioning Wegner reminds me of Sunday night. Did we ever have a great time at Redwood Falls! And to think it's the last time we have a Sunday night "tour." Wouldn't we. have fun on a tour through Wisconsin-but then we'd have to press our smocks every day. Maybe it's our luck that we don't have a tour. By the way, what do you think of the Glee Club?" "Yes, considering who's in it, Miss Sievert certainly did a pretty good job. They sang in St. James on the twenty-first." "It really was a successful year for them. They sang at every choir concert and assisted the band and Marlut Singers too. The boys like the song, The Night Wind, the best." "Didn't you get a kick out of hearing Dells say that she lost her Romeo? It certainly was lucky that Agnes had him, or her loss would have been announced. I can see her blush already." "That's no gooffier than seeing Hazel up in the sick room with the measles. It seems practically impossible that she should be ilL"


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

33

For a minute there seemed to be a lull in the storm. I was just ready to leave, when I heard someone say, "What did you pull out of your envelope this morning? The old maid? Well, that's too bad. It certainly is fun sleeping on wedding cake. But I wish they wouldn't put in an old maid slip." "You bet! Because spring is a mean time路 to have to be thinking about an old maid. Spring is having some effect on the girls! They won't even come out for kittenball and volleyball. There was so little done in those sports that there won't even be a column about it in the Messenger. Before they were always grumbling that we didn't have a chance to partake in sports and now they don't show up." "Did you hear all that noise from upstairs? That poor mouse couldn't help running the way it does with all those screams. That reminds me of the night of Ruth Gehlhar's surprise party. She is the only one in that room that will chase after a mouse; so we called her and said that there was a mouse in the room. She came armed with a broom and a firm desire to get that mouse. And was she surprised to see a whole gang of girls instead! Did we ever have a real feed! In the course of the evening Elsie managed to tip the table with the dishes on at least twice. It sounded like the California earthquake, but not a single dish was even cracked." "Kids, just imagine, the Nut Club has been so busy that they collected enough money to have a real celebration one night not so long ago. They seem to be a regular institution already. First thing we know they'll have their picture in the Messenger. What would a free period be, without hearing them in the library." "It seemed like the good old days to see the Junior triplets, the two Naomi's and Ruth Priesz, go out on a picnic. They called it a bean fry, which sounds very much like their line. I'll bet they giggled every minute of the time they were gone." "Say, did you notice that Witte got back in time for classes this last time she was home? I wonder what the reason was, but I guess that troublesome hat must have gotten on straight after the first try for a change." "Some of you should have been around it ever quiet down here! Most of the girls the concert, so the few that remained made You should have seen third floor after those

tonight. Was were down at the best of it. little mischief-


34

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

makers finished with it. Pictures were turned around and all sorts of draperies hung from them. Beds were dumped. Drawers were pulled out and their contents spilled. In one room belts were pinned together and strung up like Christmas decorations. With a little more help, they would have made this place unrecognizable, but the others came home too soon. This is the third time it has happened to some of the rooms. And then the victims have to dig around in the dark trying to find their way into bed. I think I'll play safe and stay home unless everyone else goes too." "I noticed that our little garden of rhubarbs is growing nicely. I saw Dorothy eating some this afternoon." "The Redeker gang likes rhubarb too, because one of them said they have a sweet time in the patch every day." "Have you seen how nicely Pa Redeker has improved the place this spring? In addition to the flowers and shrubbery that have been planted to cover up the destruction caused by widening the road, he has also made a suite of rustic furniture." "Honig went along home with Witte last week. It was so quiet down at Redekers that even Mr. Redeker thought that one of his flock was missing." "Girls, it's almost time for the lights to go out and here we sit-still talking. For some of us this most probably will be our last chance to hash over all these events, so I almost 'hate to go to bed." With cheery goodnights the girls rushed off to bed. I couldn't help thinking of the III Normal girls, who so hated breaking up the pleasant, if gossipy, evening. It is hard for them, as well as for us, to say goodbye. As some of them have been together for seven years, why shouldn't they sigh a little when, with everything they do, is connected the thought "the last time"? But we can at least wish them, and all those whom we won't see again, a happy and blessed future.

-.-~.-,-,


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

35

LOCALS Since the Concert Choir no longer goes on singing trips Sunday evenings. some of the boys do not know what to do. Especially Duehlmeier finds it difficult to enjoy himself to the degree that he did while driving the "election bus" on these trips. . On April 9, we had Arbor Day. Although some of the boys really worked, many only helped to consume the pop and ice cream. Bode had planned to go home on Arbor Day, but upon hearing that ice cream would be served for supper, homesickness vanished and he stayed here. Neumann likes Mexican beetles as bed partners until they begin to bite. . . During Easter vacation Hans Wagner submitted to an appendicitis operation in a Lincoln, Nebraska, hospital. On May 7-9, Professors Sauer and Schaller attended a conference at East Farmington, Wis. During their absence, Mr. Dahlke assumed the duties of dormitory inspector. The Marlut Singers and the band presented their annual concerts on May 10 and 15 respectively. Missing! Prof. Sauer's baby Lincoln. He now is the proud owner of a Pontiac. Everybody out! This is the sad news the boys of first and second floors new dorm received some time ago. With reluctance the boys left their rooms to find new homes for the rest of the year. In spite of the lump that this news might have brought to their throat, we know they will cheer up when they see that their "old homes" are going to be nicely painted for next year. Cheer up, boys; it's for the best! Hurrah! What's all the shouting for? Here's the answer. The tennis court is now ready for play. After many hours of labor under the supervision of Bob Nolte, the boys succeeded in giving one of our two tennis courts a new surface. We appreciate this more when we remember the depressions and puddles which marred the old courts. The court has been made a little higher and "Old man Rain" can stay away from our court with his mud puddles.-Now for the tennis tournament!


36

THE D. M. L. C. MESSl<]NGL:H

Bob Meyer and Hans Wagner spend their afternoons in combing the hillsides for mushrooms. They think that searching for these precious nuggets is a profitable business. During Easter vacation Stoekli's Dodge successfully made the round trip to his home as well as to--; well, you can guess. Art Meier, Armin Schmidt, among recent visitors here.

and Art

Glende were .

Norwald Behrens has been elected as our new band director. Success to you! The chain letter craze hit the country with a crash. Some students even tried their fortune at that easy money making scheme. It seems though that Dallman has his own chain of letter writers. At least he receives on an average of three to six letters a day. Schierenbeck maintains that the best time to do his German assignment is at noon while the rest are eating dinner. Although we have had plenty of rain this spring, it hasn't kept the dormitory aquariums filled with water so that the fish could live. Brockelman still is trying to find some one to help him defend the West. Recently Schoenherr has always kept his hair neatly combed. I wonder why? Some of the high school students are really beginning to study. Is there any special reason to do so? Oh, only the approaching state examinations. It has been decided to give the boys a recreation room. We don't know much more about it, but we surely are looking forward to next year when the room will be ready. NOTICE! If you have any automobile or engine repair work to be done, come to Melville Schulz. He is busy learning the trade by experimenting with the power mower. "Charlie"" Brockelman has been causing a great deal of disturbance in history class. In order to remedy this, Prof. Klatt has suggested several things: namely, cold showers, girls, and a justice of peace. We always wondered from whom "Peewee" got all the notes. Upon investigation our detective found the author of them.


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

37

Can you figure it out? Why does a certain quartet of boys often go to play around the water tank after supper? It cannot be that the lawn is better there, for we are blessed with just as fine a lawn in front of the boys' dormitory. If anyone can figure it out, I am sure we should be glad to know. Picnics are again in vogue. On Wednesday, May 22, the band held their annual picnic and on the following Friday the II Normals entertained the Normal graduates in the Junior Pioneer Park, commonly known as Hunters' Rest.

BASEBALL Because of weather conditions and a late Easter vacation, training for the great American sport was hindered until shortly before the first game. At the time of this writing, the season is well under way, and the team is none the worse off for the late start. Coach Voecks has a strong pitching staff of W. Mather, F. Schoenherr, Henry Raabe, and A. Wantoch; two stalwart catchers in J. Dallman and A. Habben; an alert infield consisting, of H. Schweppe, H. Hempel, G. Rolloff, and Herman Raabe; and dependable outfielders in R. Riess, J. Aufderheide, and H. Hasse. The team has had the support of all the students and many local fans; together with this, the fine brand of ball it has been playing should make the season a successful one.-BATTER DP! The Season's Opener On April 27, the St. Paul Luther nine came to New DIm to defeat D. M. L. C. by a score of 11-8. During the


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

38

course of the game a large crowd of local fans were treated to many thrills. The game was not won until the last batter had been put out. Mather started on the mound for D. M. L. C. He was relieved in the sixth inning by Henry Raabe, who was relieved by F. Schoenherr in the eighth. Our chances for victory were good until the ninth inning, when St. Paul Luther took advantage of a lucky, but perfect, set-up for a double play, Luetkens to Otto. D. M. L. C. Hempel Herman Raabe.. Schweppe Schoenherr Henry Raabe.... Rauschke Riess Dallman Mather Habben Rolloff

AB 4 4 5 5 5 3 4 2 1 1 2 36

H 3 0 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 1

R 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 1

10

8

St. Paul Luther AB Luetkens 5 Lau '.' 4 Kuester 3 Aalbue 4 Reiff.... 5 Knitt 5 Otto. 5 Hultgren 5 Rundle 4 40

H 1 1 0 2 1 2 0 1 2

R 2 2 1 1 1 0 2 1 1

10

11

D. M. L. C. Noses Out Concordia May 4 found Mather on the mound again facing the hard-hitting Concordia team. He turned in a well pitched game, and, although he left the game in the sixth frame with bases loaded and no outs, the Maroon and Gray were leading 3-1. Schoenherr, replacing Mather, pitched himself out of the hole nicely and finished the game, allowing two hits and one run. AB D. M. L. C. Hempel ............ 4 Herman Raabe .. 3 Schweppe .......... 4 Schoenherr ...... 4 Aufderheide .... 3 Riess .................. 3 Hasse ................ 3 Dallman ............ 2 Mather .............. 2 Rolloff ................ 0 28

H R 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

3

Concordia AB Paul .................. 5 Hansen .............. 5 Petersen ............ 5 Fenske .............. 5 Mack ................ 4 Kaphingot ........ 1 Beltz .................. 4 Schmidtke ........ 2 Ritz .................... 1 Janke .. 3 36

H R 0 1 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

2


THE

39

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Waldorf Is Victorious On May 9, D. M. L. C. traveled to Forest City, Iowa, to play the "crack" Waldorf team. The first part of the game was close, but soon the Waldorf team piled up runs. They gathered seventeen hits for fifteen runs off the delivery of Mather and Schoenherr. AB H R Waldorf D. M. L. C. AB H R 2 3 Bjortont 3 Hempel 2 1 2 o 3 Wiegert 5 Herman Raabe.. 4 0 0 o o Feeney 5 Schweppe 4 2 0 3 2 Anderson 5 Schoenherr 3 1 .0 4 2 Johnson 3 . Aufderheide 4 0 0 2 1 Severeid 5 Riess 4 0 0 2 1 Saweley 4 Hasse 4 2 0 o 1 Horey 0 Mather 1 0 0 1 1 Carpenter 3 Dallman 2 0 0 1 1 Olson 3 Habben 0 0 0 Olson 1 1 1 Rolloff 3 1 1 o Riden 1 o Henry Raabe.... 1 0 0 32

7

3

38

17 15

D. M. L. C. Trounces St. Paul Luther and Bethel On May 18, the Voeksonians returned from a very successful road trip to St. Paul, where they met St. Paul Luther College and Bethel College. Schoenherr pitched an excellent game on May 17, holding the fighting Saxons to four scattered hits and no runs. The home boys had a good day at the bat and crossed the plate for eleven tallies, six of them coming in the first inning. The following day brought the Maroon and Gray another smashing victory, featuring good mound work by Mather and another "swat fest" with the hickory stick by our own team. AB H R St. Paul Luther AB H R D. M.L.C. 2 Henry Raabe .... 6 2 Luetkins 4 0 0 1 2 Herman Raabe .. 3 Lau 4 0 0 Schweppe .......... 4 2 2 Kuester 4 2 0 Schoenherr ...... 5 1 Ostendorf 4 0 0 3 .... 5 2 1 Reiff 3 0 0 Aufderheide 0 0 Otto 4 0 0 Hasse ................ 5 Hultgren 4 1 0 Riess .................. 4 2 2 Rundle 3 1 0 Rolloff ................ 5 0 0 Dallmann .......... 5 1 1 Aalbue 3 0 0 42

13 11

33

4

0


40

'l'HE

D. M. L. C. MESSH:NG1~Jl

AB H R Bethel 2 1 Dichau ............... 5 1 1 Rendahl ............ 5 0 1 Bolinder ............ 3 2 0 Young ................ 4 1 0 Wessman .......... 4 0 0 Sinkiewitz . ........ 3 0 0 Carlson .............. 2 0 0 Olson ................ 2 0 0 Retzlaff ............ 2 .3 1 1 Schuman .. 0 0 Anderson .......... 1 0 0 Johnson ............ 1 35 7 4 D. M. L. C. Wallops Bethany On May 23, D. M. L. C. took Bethany into camp by a score of 25-1. Twenty-one hits, ten stolen bases and three beautifully executed squeeze plays accounted for the twenty-five tallies. Bethany's lone run came in the sixth, when Heitner hit a double, stole third, and came home on a wild pitch by Mather. All four of the D. M. L. C. pitchers allowed only three hits. Bethany AB H R D. M. L. C. AB H R Heitner 4 2 1 Henry Raabe .... 4 1 1 Peterson ;. 4 0 0 Herman Raabe.. 6 3 3 Odegard 4 0 0 Schweppe 6 1 3 Meyer 3 0 0 . f'cpoenherr 5 3 3 Wetzel 2 0 0 Aufderheide 6 2 2 Luehman 4 1 0 Riess 1 1 1 Strom 4 0 0 Hasse 5 4 4 Thoen 1 0 0 Rolloff 5 2 4 Ellefson 1 0 0 Dallman 4 3 2 Olson 2 0 0 Mal-her 1 0 0 Vangen 2 0 0 Hempel 4 1 1 Habben 0 0 0 31 3 1 Wantoch 1 0 1 48 21 25 Tennis and Horseshoe The tennis manager was a long time in getting the courts in shape, but the weather is prepared to take the blame again. Nevertheless, a tennis tournament is at present the center of much interest and enthusiasm. Of the twenty-eight participants 'it is very difficult to make any predictions as to the champion. Not to be outdone by the swinging rackets, horseshoes seeking that iron stake are flying through the air. Twenty-six are participating in a new kind of horseshoe tournament. H R 0 1 2 2 2 3 2 3 1 2 2 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 3 47 15 15

AB D. M.L.C. Henry Raabe .... 6 Herman Raabe .. 5 Schweppe .......... 5 Schoenherr ...... 6 Riess .................. 6 Hasse ................ 5 Dallman ............ 5 Mather .............. 3 Rolloff ................ 0 3 Aufderheide


THFJ D. M. L. C: MESSENGER

41

The new office boy had been instructed how to answer callers. Just before noon a man asked, "Is the boss in?" "Are you a salesman, a bill collector, or a friend of his ?" "All three." "Well, he's in a conference. He's out of town. Step in and see him."-Ex. The human person contains enough phosphorous make many matches, but generally makes only one.

to

Ora (parsing a noun): It is the singular case. Prof: What's that? Charlie: When it isn't mutual. Spring finds many men so tender hearted they refuse to beat the rug. "Is your wife changeable, old man?" "I've never tried, but I shouldn't think so !"-Ex. "To what do you attribute your remarkable health and age?," "Well, I reckon I got a good start on most people by bein' born before germs were discovered, thereby havin' less to worry about."


42

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER .

LOST A silk handkerchief with a lavender edge by Ruth Gehlhar. Jerry's supreme salesmanship (Wanna buy a band ticket?) . From the Floruna farm-a baby pig. A reward of one ear of corn will be given to the finder. The resistance to anything magnetic by Ralph. "You must think that I am a perfect idiot," "Well, maybe you aren't as perfect as I thought you were." . Teacher: Who was Homer? Pupil: The guy Babe Ruth made famous. WANTED The secret of the private conferences of Berg and Meyer at the dinner table. Just two dozen measles to be delivered before an organ lesson-Schoenherr. Some of the energy that makes Tena get up at 6 o'clock every morning. A method of eating supper and reading that letter at the same time. Prof: What was the cause of the disbelief that the disciples had in Christ concerning the feeding of the four thousand? Ralph (day-dreaming): Five loaves. Teacher: What ispoise ? _ Pupil: It's the way a Dutchman says boys.-Ex. "Money, money-it's always money! I'm the goose that lays the golden eggs?" "No, dear, not that one."-Ex. Backer's definition of a silicate-A town.

Do you think

dame from down


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

43

"Now, boys," said the teacher, "tell me the signs of the Zodiac. . You first, Thomas." "Taurus, the bull." "Right, now you, Harold, another one." "Cancer, the crab." "Right again, and now it's your turn, Albert." The boy hesitated a moment, and blurted out, "Mickey, the Mouse." Rauschke: All you girls are here for is to make this place a match making factory. Doris (sweetly): Yes, I know, it's the heads coming to look for their sticks. Beggar: My wife is starving. Smith: Here is a quarter. Where is she? Beggar: I don't know. She eloped with a poet last week.

"I was shadowing my wife and she threw me off the trail." "What are you so sore about?" "It was a mountain trail." He: You should see the altar in our church. She: Lead me to it.

Prof: Who is the author of that speech. Homer: It's anonymous. Hen: What's his first name?

FOUND By Ada a tulip bed to keep her supplied with flowers. By Ruth Winter-a Ford car in front of the service building. By Matz and Adelaide-a new bench at Denkmal. By Raymond Wiechmann-a horsehair on his coat. By Wally-a method of a stampless correspondence.


44

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGffiR

Father: Bobby, if you had a little more spunk in you, I think you would stand better in your class. Now do you know what spunk is? '. . Bobby: Yes, father, it's the past participle of spank.

Stage Manager: What is all that noise coming from the girls' dressing room? Assistant: They are all talcing at once.

He (after being turned down): I'm not worrying. There are still a lot more fish in the sea. She: Yes, and if nobody has a better line than you, they will all have to stay there.


STUDENTS! BEFORE BUYING CONSULT THE ADVERTISING SECTION

Patronize

Our Advertisers

Without Them

THE MESSENGER Cannot Exist '

List of Advertisers. Red Front Grocery Grand Hotel Barber Shop Eugene Koehler Barber Shop Dr. G. J. Hiebert Mr. Albert Flor The Bee Hive J. C. Penney Co. Schleuder Somsen and Dempsey Pink's Store New DIm Grocery Simons Lumber Co. Farmers and Merchants State Bank Model Barber Shop Wicherski Shoe Store Salet's Department Store Crone Bros. Company Erickson and Graff National Tea Store Drs. Hammermeister and Saffert


State Bank of New Ulm Muesing Drug Store Eichten Shoe Store Herzog Publishing Company Kemski Printing Co. Weilandt and Stegemann New Ulm Greenhouse Rexall Drug Store Eagle Roller Mill Co. Eibner and Son Schlumpberger's Grocery Hummel Bros. Dr. A. L. Kusske Ulrich Electric Company Tauscheck and Green Buenger Furniture Company Citizens State Bank Dr. E. G. Lang Robert Fesenmaier, Inc. Silver Latch Inn Fred Meine Clothing Store Retzlaff Motor Company. Retzlaff Hardware Company New Ulm Dairy Henry Goede Studio Meyer's Studio Champion Shoe Shop New Ulm Steam Laundry Schroeder Bakery Dr. F. H. Dubbe Schuck's Tailor Shop City Meat Market Dr. Von Bank Brey's Grocery Gastler Studio Union Hospital E. C. Vogelpohl Aid Association for Lutherans A. C. Ochs Brick & Tile Yards August Schell Brewing Company The Hauenstein Company


CRONE BROS. CO. The Store for Young Men

Our

Best

Attention

Everything of a banking nature entrusted to our care receives our best attention. We shall be glad to have a share of your business.

State Bank of New Ulm

MEYER'S STUDIO A Studio That Is A Studio New DIm, Minn. Phone 268

MUESING Drug Store Expert

Prescription

Service

ARTCRAFT PHOTO SERVICE We Have It!

Will Get It!

Or It Isn't Made!

Phones 52-341


WHEN IN NEED OF FOOTWEAR Be Sure and Call on Us We carry a complete line of men's, ladies' and children's shoes We appreciate your business. Our prices are always the lowest, Qualitconsidered

ATHLETIC SHOES OUR SPECIALTY TRY OUR REPAIR DEPARTMENT FOR GOOD WORK

P. J. EICHTEN SHOE STORE New Ulm, Minnesota

THE NATIONAl. TEA CO. FOOD STORES GROCERS AND BAKERS New DIm, Minnesota

G. J. HIEBERT, D~D.S. OfficeOver Rexall Drug Store Office Phone 247 Residence Phone 1547 New Ulm, Minn.

Weilandt & Stegeman

SAY

Contractors and Builders Correspondence

Solicited

":/ork Done in Any Section of the Commurrty

Plans and Specifications Furnished Estimates Cheerfully Given Office 1100 Center St. Phone 571 Auto Glass Replaced to Order

Champion Shoe Shop A Pleased Customer 1s Our Best Advertisement

We also have a good supply of new shoes. E. FREESE, Proprietor 24 So. Minn. St.

FLOWERS tAlways in good tasteÂť

tAlways appreciated NEW ULM GREENHOUSES New DIm. Minn. - Phone 45


BREAD! Your Outstanding Energy Food D se Bread freely for your essential energy needs. Easy digestibility is one of the foremost values of Bread

EIBNER ~ SON BAKERY and ICE CREAM Established 1883

PHONE 128

SPAULDING ATHLETIC GOODS -at-

Robert Fesenmaier, Inc. Special discount given to students

ALBERT D. FLOR Attorney at Law New DIm, Minnesota

SALET'S DEPARTMENT STORE-NEW

ULM, MINN.

EVERYTHING TO WEAR FOR HIM OR HER WE,AR SALET'S FAMons $1.98 FOOTWEAR

Highest Quality and of Course "YOU ALWAYS SAVE AT SALET'S"


SUBSCRIBERS, ATTENTION! When You Change Your Address Be sure to notify the Business Manager The Messenger Is Never Forwarded By Your Local Postmaster Buy Rexall Merchandise SUPERIOR QUALITY AT LOWER PRICES

,c

路REXALL DRUG STORE Walter Muesing-Walter W. Hellmann "SAVE WITH SAFETY" Phone No.5 For Your Dry Cleaning, Laundry or Hat Work We assure you prompt and efficient service and invite you to visit our modern, up-to-date plant at 107-109 So. Minn. St.

NEW ULM STEAM LAUNDRY Expert Dry Cleaners and Hatters


NEW ULM GROCERY CO. Wholesale Grocers Distributors

STO~LEY'S FINEST VEGETABLES Ask for this brand and be satisfied Service and Satisfaction at the

MODEL BARBER SHOP Alfred H. Kuester, Prop. Footwear Athletic Footwear and Sox Ladies' Smart Styles Attractively Priced

EMIL WICHERSKI For Greater Values and Service See Us

COAL Lumber-Millwork Cement-Sewer Pipe and all other Builders Supplies

HENRY SIMONS LUMBER CO. DEPENDABILITY


SCHLUMPBERGER'S Groceries-Frui

GROCERY

ts- Vegetables-Smoked

Phone 182

Meats

New Ulm, Minn.

WILLIAM J. VON BANK, D.D.S. Dentist OfficePhone 237

Residence Phone 797

New Ulm, Minn.

"THE BUSIEST STORE IN TOWN" "There Must Be a Good Reason Why"

THE BEE路 HIVE . J.

A. OCHS & SON

Ladies' Ready-to-Wear and Dry Goods EVER YTHING FOR THE CO, ED

A. L. KUSSKE, M.D. Practice Limited to Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat and Fitting of Glasses In Weiser Block Over Silver Latch Cafe New Ulm Minnesota

DR.E. G.LANG DENTIST Office above State Bank of New Ulm

Res. Phone 352

Office Phone 472

THE GASTLER STUDIO For Quality Photographs Also Kodak Finishing


-C:~

Buy to the Limit . Save to the Limit If Savings Mean Anything at All to You,'

-C:~

You'll Stock Up at Penney's

~.

J" C. PENNEY CO.

~

WI 00 OUR PART

wr 00 OUAMIT

Corner Minn. and 2nd North St.

Give Your Eyes a Chance It isn't right to toil under the handicap of defective eyesight. Poor eyes make backward students. They not' only affect your work, but your nerves and health as well. We fit your eyes right, grind lenses in our own shop and replace broken lenses on short notice,

DRS. SCHLEUDER Op''ometris 's and Eyesight Specialists 102 N. Minn. St. New VIm Telephone 87

R. R. KEMSKI PRINTING CO. For Printing and Supplies

Phone

370

KEMSKE PAPER CO.

Towels and Toilet Paper

A. B. Dick Mimeograph Stencils and Ink Mimeograph and School Papers

NEW

ULM

DAIRY

THE HOME OF

Pure Dairy Products PASTEURIZED

MILK

I

I':

CREAM, BUTTER and ICE CREAM PHONE 104 Route and

a unter

Service

SOMSEN & DEMPSEY Henry N. Somsen

W. H. Dempsey

ATTORNEYS AT LAW New VIm,

Minnesota


A. C. OCHS BRICK & TILE COMPANY Executive Office and Plant

General Sales Office

Springfield, Minn.

818 National Bldg. Minneapolis Manufacture

Artistic Face Brick Various Colors -

Also-

Load Bearing Tile and complete line of

Building Tile and Common Brick Our Material stands every Test, and was used in hundreds of Government, State, Fubli : and Private Jobs in every state of the great Northwest and Canada. Some of them being-The last twelve new buildings on the University or Minnesota Campus, numerous large business blocks and other buildings in the City of Minneapolis, such as the New Nicollet Hotel, Sheridan Apartments, Cleveland School, St. Mary's Hospital, Swedish Hospita:l, Calr oun Beach Club, ete., etc., two Lutheran churches of Springfield, Immanuel Lutheran Church of Mankato, Lutheran Chur..hes in Brewstsr, Lake Benton, Blue Earth, Wanamingo, Westbrook, Wood Lake, Alden, Odin, Ceylon, Clara City, Jackson, Delano; Devils Lake, Arnegard in North Dakota'; Dimock, Roscoe, etc., in South Dakota, tl:.e Dr Martin Luther College and the Union Hospital of New Ulm, the Lutheran School at Sleepy Eye, together with others built prior and since the above mentioned. Veterans buildings at St. Cloud,Minnesota and Rapid City, South Dakota, the new seven story First National Bank at Fargo, North Dakota, also large public and private buildings at Brookings, Watertown, Lennox, Lyons, Huron, South Dakota; Willmar, Hendricks, St. Faul, Marshall, Tracy, Rochester, Winona, Minnesota and many others all over the four States.

Our Products Are Sold in the New Ulm Territory by New DIm Brick & Tile Yards


~IOUROWNHARDWAREI~ ~-----~----

---

Buy Where

r ou See

-

This Sign

YOU BUY BETTER BECAUSE WE BUY BETTER Our 500 Store Buying Power Makes Possible the Low Prices on Our Quality Merchandise

F. H. RETZLAFF HARDWARE COMPANY

Des. Hammermeister

~ Saffert

Physicians and Surgeons

NEW ULM.

MINNESOTA

The Grand Hotel Barber Shop Arndt and Strate. Props. "It Pays To Look Wen"

Dodge

RETZLAFF

Plymouth

MOTOR COMPANY


BREY'S GROCERY Good Service, Good Treatment and Right Prices at 201 North Minnesota Street Reconstruction, Installation, Additions, .Blowers, Chimes, Harps

Modernizing, Maintaining, Tuning, Repairs, Service, Sales

PIPE ORGANS

E. C. VOGELPOHL ORGAN CO. ORGAN ARCHITECTS AND BUILDERS 405-409 North Broadway

New UIm, Minn.

When in Need of Electrical Supplies and Radios .or Service call on

. Ulrich Electric Company ELECTRIC SERVICE AT ITS BEST BUY WITH SERVICE

Phone 148

QUALITY CLOTHING "

':

At

$17.50 to $35.00

TAUSCHECK ~ GREEN

RED FRONT GROCERY

,. I,

.FANCY AND. STAPLE GROCERIES , .. "

"_,,_

GLASSWARE_:_NOVELTIES-DINNERW t,

"':< ---"7". L'.

""

_~_ :

~.....,' ,_/

'..

, Phone 43 and 44

ARE


For Superior Baking Results Use

DANIEL WEBSTER FLOUR Perfected

EAGLE ROLLER MILL 'CO. NEW ULM, MINNESOTA

John W. Graff

Geo. D. Erickson

ERICliSON & GRAFF Attorneys at Law New VIm, Minnesota

HENRY

GOEDE STUDIO

"Nothing Pleases Us More Than A Satisfied Customer"

Studio -- 107 North Broadway

HAVENSTEIN SPECIAL and PALE DRY CARBONATED BEVERAGE SERVED AT ALL PLACES New VIm, Minnesota Telephone No. 1


PINK'S STORE Where Quality Comes First Smartest Wear at Prices You Expect to Pay Ladies' Ready to Wear, Silk Underwear, Hose, Shoes, Dry Goods, Groceries The Store Where You Feel at Home DEER BRAND BEER .'_"_~'_"-·'-·-'-'-"_'_'I•

AUGUST SCHELL BREWING COMPANY NEW ULM,

MINNESOTA

AID ASSOCIATION FOR LUTr[ERANS APPLETON, WISCONSIN Legal Reserve Fraternal Insurance for Men, Women and Children 30 YEARS' RECCRD

Insuran-e in Force

No, of

Branches 1902 1912 1922 1932 1933 July 1, 1934 "

33, 234 942 " 2,128 ",2,187

$

" 2,246

. , '

July: 1, 1934 Admitted Assets $16,201,803.80 Certificate Re serves, Surplus and other Liabilities _ 15,935,852.28 Emergency Reserve .B unds 265,951.52

760,000.00 7,404,500.00 26,258,018.00 125,864,133.00 131,;}28,055.00 134,840,817.00

Payments Since Organization To Living Certificateholders $ 8,382,594.36 To Beneficiaries 3,873,053.72 ~otal Payments 12,255,648.08

ALEX O. BENZ, President Wm. F. KeIrn, First Vice President A:bert Voecks, Secretary Wm. H. Zuehlke, Treasurer


We Turn a House Into a Home

BUENGER FURNITURE Stores:

CO.

New Ulm, Sleepy Eye and Gibbon

SUCCESSFUL PLANNING Everything in co-operation and accommodation consistent with courteous and sane banking principles is added to "YOUR AOOOUNT" at this community financial institution.'

CITIZENS .STATE BANK New UIm, Minnesota Under provisions of the Banking FRBD A. MEINE -of-

FRED MEINE CLOTHING CO.

See Us for Snappy

Clothes

Act of 1933 Our Deposits Are Insured


SILVER LATCH INN "The Pride of New DIM" Fountain路 Service=-Lunchcs-c-Meals Dining Room Service

EUGENE KOEHLER BARBER SHOP . Ha;r Cuts 30e Efficient Service and Courteous Treatment New DIm

20 N. Minn. St.

GREATER VALUES Our New Fall Stock Supplies the Greatest Suit and Overcoat Values of the Time

$15.00

$17.50

$21.50

$25.00

The Mirror Proves the Style and Fit

HUMMEL BROTHERS 14 No. Minn. St.

Patronize

New Ulm, Minn.

Messenger Advertisers


BANK WITH

FARMERS ~ MERCHANTS STATE BANK New Ulm, Minnesota

FRIENDLY HELPFUL SERVICE AT YOUR COMMAND

TAILORED TO MEASURE SUITS

$22.75 No Deposits-No

$25.00 C. O. D.'s

AND UP

All kinds of Repairing

CLEANING AND PRESSING

SCHUCK'S TAILOR SHOP 215 N. MINN. ST. Residence Phone 150

Office Phone 60

DR. F. H. DUBBE PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON NE\V ULM,

MINNESOTA

UNION HOSPITAL NEW ULM, MINN. A fireproof hospital supervised by graduate nurses giving the best service. PHONE No. 404


THE SCHROEDER BAKERY

THE FLOWER OF NEW ULM JUST LIKE THE BREAD MOTHER MAKES

PHONE 232


i

\

"

.. '

.4.._

1934-1935 DMLC Messenger Vol. 25  
1934-1935 DMLC Messenger Vol. 25