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CONTENTS . September 1925

l.ITERARY .a) VclediclofY _"

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b) Commencement Address _.. C)

Herbstgedanhen

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d) New Vim-Our

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Christian Institution ..

EDITORIALS a) New Editors

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VALEnWTORY Honorable Professors, dear Fellow Students, and Friends: Since the beginnings of our beloved Dr. Martin Luther College forty years ago, there have been many commencement days, but among all these this day has special significance became it marks a period in the growth of our institution where it is no longer possible to have the clos-ingexercises in the Music Hall, for the student body has grown to such pro-portions that .it might itself fill that building. We are therefore today gathered in a different place. We did not expect this two years ago and might feel a little estranged at the sudden ehange but for the fact that we have been here so often, that you, our teachers, our fellow students, and our friends, are gathered here with us, and that the First Normal Cl-ass has made such fine efforts to decorate the church for us in order to make us feel at home. For this we extend our heartiest thanks to you, dear fellow students! For the gracious presence of all of you who have assembled here to help us observe our last hours as students of Dr. Martin Luther College, many thanks! We are now about to part from a field in which we have been active for approximately six long years. During these years we have prayed and labored together with you, dear professors, and the time has not gone by without leaving its mark on us. Your advice and guidance have helped us out of many troubles, and we have profited by your teaching. For all this we can only express our thanks to you. May the Lord bless you for it! Als I said before, we are today leaving an old field of activity where we have been prepared and trained for another which we intend to enter this, fall. Our thoughts will on thia


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day, besides being busied with many recollections of the past, naturally also be occasionally turned to the future .. We know and have been toldthat there will be many, many things which will tend to dampen our zeal somewhat. That is the case with every vocation, more or less, and we do not expect anything different as teachers of parochial schools. However, my ob[ect today shall not be to dwell on these troubles for any length of time, although that might be profitable too, 'but to cast aside all doubts and look at the bright side of the life. We have just finished a few years of intensive study and training which will have much to do with the success of our work later on. We have enjoyed the golden- oppor-tunity of studying under a corps of most excellent teachers at an institution equal in efficiency to' many another. We have been prepared with everything that is necessary in order to perform our duties successfullv. We have received excellent training in Religion, Rhetorio, Science, Pedagogy, Music, and other branches of learning. Above all we have received what can be had only in very few other places in this world, and that is a Christian education, which tends to make of us true Christian .characters in word and deed. For approximately six years, during the most dangerous period of our life, when outside influence has so much to say as regards the building of character, we were kept under Christian surroundings. 'We had Christian teachers to whom we could look up for guidance and who were very much concerned about our spiritual welfare. We were daily reminded of our duty as Christians and carefully guarded against all evil influence. Truly, we 'have much to be thankful for if we only begin to count the blessings the Lord's grace bestowed upon ,us. And all this, a good Christian character plus, the mental training received, will now make us fit to cope successfully with the many difficulties that may confront us, thus making the work a pleasure in spite of adversities. What will this pleasure consist of? First of all, there is the fine opportunity of serving the congregation to which we shall be sent. Only a very few have a chance to serve their fellow Christians in this unique way. We are appointed to educate the children and lead them to recognize Jesus as their only refuge tor salvation. My friends, do you still remember how your teacher told you the stories of the Bible? If you do not, then by all means visit your SdlOOI some day, I mean esrpeciallythe lower grades, and see with your eyes how eagerly those little ones sit there and listen to the beautiful and fascinating stories of Jesus Christ, their Savior. To know that each one of those little ones sitting at your feet is a damned sinner eagerly learning of the only way by which he can be saved, and that you are the one privileged to teach them that way, is a joy without equal. But not only the little children


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will demand our attention. Some congregations have young people's societies in which the teacher as leader generally has an excellent opportunity to offset to a great extent the dangel's which surround the youth and to warn them against wandering on the broad path of luxury which leads to damnation. Some also, if not all of us, will have a chance to assist materially in the beautifying of the service through organ accompaniment and work with the choir. The organtst's influence in the music of the service is certainly one that will be felt in the congregation. We can do' much to lift the standard from the pitifully degraded state to which. it has fallen in many congregations. Moreover, after the people have once tasted the beauty of good Lutheran church music, they will certainly appreciate it and hardly desire to revert to the old. All this will keep us busy continually. Aind the work will be interesting, for there is no occupation that is so rich in content, that of the minister excepted. What is the trade of a carpenter, for instance? He may see many beautiful constructions grow out of the labor of his hands, but his buildings can not be compared with the Christian characters that live in them. 'I'he farmer may find joy in watching his fields progress and the fruit become ripe, 'but he will have done nothing toward the promulgation of the Gospel except it be to support that work later on when his crops are gathered in. Likewise the lawyer, the banker, and the businessman find satisfaction in nothing more than in having scraped together a certain amount of earthly treasure which is transient and more or less disgusting anyway and can only indirectly help toward the expansion of the k,inQ'd'omof Christ. But a teacher, although in many cases he has to be satisfied with Iittle earthly treasure, will yet have the satisfaction of having done something to save the souls of the children entrusted to his care; and if his school be ever so small and out of that group he have saved only one single soul, that is WOI'thmore than all the treasure the earth can ever hold. We shall have not only the opportunity to serve our congregation but also to help promote the work of the Christian church in general. The service which we bring to our congregation is in itself directly and indirectly a service of the church; for what is the congregation but a part of that great body of believers in Christ on earth? What we do to keep that part in the true faith and in agreement with the church as a whole, is that not of inestimable value? Besides, we may some day count among Lutheran pastors and teachers some of our former pupils, or we may find them here and there as faithful members, even leaders, of congregations. That would be a most gratifying result and one which wouJd be of great importance to the church as a whole, for the church and its. work rise and fall with the increase and decrease of its membership.


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We may also be instrumental in supporting spiritually as 'Wellas materially the various branches of Christian endeavor, as, for instance, missions, educational institutions, and homes for the sick and aged. All this will fully take up our time and leave very little chance for worry over mishaps of any kind, unless we want to indulge in it while we should be busy with other things .. And the resulting blessings of our labor as they show themselves, one by one, will really be something to rejoice in. Of greater import than the service of other people also is the service the parochial school teacher brings to his community and therefore also to his country. Nothing but the Word of God can educate a person so that he will become a member of society fit to do his bit toward the upkeep of the community in which he lives. Only a true Ohristian can be depended upon to keep his balance in times of distress. It is the aim of our teachers to educate their children by means of the Word of God to become such Oln-lstians, and therein lies their great service. 'l'he necessity of true peace-loving, law-abiding citizens whose first concern at all times is to preserve unity within, as well as freedom without is also recdgnized by the worldyminded, and they have tried hard to make such characters of their children. But it has been shown that there are a large number of criminals with public school education to every one with parochial school education, even if the comparison is made in proportion. Hence it is evident, and the worldy admit it themselves, that their attempts have been failures ..Why? Because they have not the one thing by which the end can be gained, namely the 'Word of God. Now what can give us greater joy and satisfaction than to be able to use the only remedy..for all the evils and to use it suceessf'ul.ly? Surely, if our work is of such great importance that the state with its best efforts can not equal it, we will do it and do it gladly. Moreover, a person enlisted in such service of church and state is really doing a deed which is, pleasing in the sight of God. He has commanded us 路to do so Himself and has given us such rich promises of success as, He has done with no other occupation. In Matth. 28, 20 Christ tells us, "Atnd 10, I am with you always, even unto the end of the world." Although these words are meant for all people, yet we know that they are especially addressed to ministers of the Gospel, for they are added to the command to go out into the world and preach the work of salvation. An,d we may be assured that if Christ is. with us in our work, all trials, all disappoirrtmeuts, and all sorrows which may confront us will vanish before His power and might. Again, we know that our work will not be without success, for God says Isaiah 55, 11: "My Word shall not return unto me void, but it shall accomplish that which I please, and it 'shall prosper in the thing whereto I sent it."


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We may not always be alble to see just what God has been . pleased to accomplish by our work but we can rest assured that success will nevertheless be there, and some day our eyes will be. opened and we shall see the glory of God revealed. Until then may God help us to work faithfully and diligently in the vineyard to which He Himself has called us. And let this be our motto: "Fear not, for I am with thee," saith the Lord! , Imbues our hearts with courage every word; Revives our spirit, wakes the tired soul, And SPUl'S us. on with strength to rea.ch our goal, No matter what the obstacles may-be That our weak nature had been prone to flee. "Fear not, for I am with thee,". saith the Lard! Let come who may; if it be all the world; We're not alone; there's SOID'eOne with us here Whom neither world nor devil could draw near. He's ever at our side with comfort true, In every trouble safely brings us through. "Fear not, for I am with thee," saith the Lord! o make us steadfast still to trust this word! When trouble'S mountains hide Thee from our view, And clouds of foes rain darts on us anew, When danger almost tends to bring despair, Let us be thrust into Thy loving care And faith in 'I'hee be strengthened by this word: "Fear not, for I am with thee," saith the Lord! K. F. O. '25. COD.VIME:NCiEMEINIT ADDRESS CLAISS MOTTO': F\E:.AJR NOT, FOR I kM WITH THE'E.* IBAIAJH 43':fj One night when Samuel had laid himself down to sleep, he heard a voice, and Samuel answered, "Here am 1." Then he ran to Eli and said, "Thou calledst me." Eli, however, reo plied, "I called not; lie down again." Once more he heard that voice; Samuel did as he had done 'before. He went to Eli, who said again, "I called not, my son; lie down again." But when Samuel If'orthe selfsame reason appeared before Eli for the third time, Eli perceived that it was the Lord who was *) After many urgent requests from all sides and especially from the GDASS ()IF 19'2'5,'Prof. Carl Schweppe has consented to let this his commencement address of June 17 appear in this, number of the MlESSEiNGIER.No doubt, everyone Who heard Prof. Schweppe's address will not hesitate to read it also.--1Ed. -


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addressing this young man. He gave Samuel certain instructions, and when Samuel heard that voice again, he answered, "Hpeak, for thy servant heareth." The Lord then spake unto him and gave him certain duties to perform; He then and. there installed him as His prophet who was to do Him special service. 'This little incident in the life of 'Samuel, I think, is somewhat parallel to your own experience, my friends. A number of years ago you came to our school, possibly not knowing exactly why or how. Perhaps your parents sent you of their own volition, or it may be that you made your decision at the requeet or invitation of some one else. At any rate, it is quite probable that in those early years of YOUT sojourn at our institution you felt just as S'amuel did. You were under the impression that your fellow men were responsible for your being where you were, and for your doing what. you were. As time went' on, however, it became ever more clear to you that it was the Lord who sent you here, that it was His will and His wish that you pursue that particular course of study, and that those people who apparently brought you to us were but instruments of the Lord, as was Eili in the case of Samuel. When this impression became a certainty, you also said as that young man there in the temple, "Speak, Lord, Thy servant heareth." You heard His call, a very specific one. He urged you to feed His lambs, to teach His children the way of salvation, to go out into our Christian day-schools to rear those little ones in the nurture and admonition of the Lord, to bring Jesus to, them and them to Jesus, to train them not merely to live, but to live eternally. That is the call which the Lord voiced to you thr-ough us and through others. But you not only heard. To-day you are saying to all those present here, "This will we do." Now is your commencement, the day when you begin, for from this hour you will be looked upon as special servants of the Lord, servants who have a definite call and duty. It means, of course, that your activities here will cease, that you will betake yourself to those places assigned to you by God. Yes, you are going away. Yet, it is not a parting. Even if miles do separate us, we are one in spir-it, in faith, in hope, one in our daily labors and prayers, with the same end in view: that we be saved ourselves, and that we save those who hear us. United we stand henceforth, more united than before; on an equal footing; common, ordinary servants of Christ. We are now co-workers. 'Therefore you will hear from me no word of farewell. Neither shall it be primarily a word of advice or a discussion of the principles of Christian education. You have heard those precious truths time and again, and I can safely assume that you are conscious of them. I shall not picture to you


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the grandeur and the magnificence of the task that you are about to accept. 'fhat I too shall take for granted. No, I feel that to-day one thought is uppermost in your hearts. You are consider-ing what lies hefore you; and the task, without a doubt, is immense, so great and so important that it may well cause you at times to be filled with fear and trembling. Therefor-e I believe that above all you are at this moment in need of A WORD OF ENCOURAGEMENT, that you may go forth with enthusiasm, with hearts that are happy and aflame with ambition. The material which I shall employ for this, you yourselves have chosen. We find it written in Is. 43:5: "FElAiRNOT, FOR I AiM- WITH THIElE." You decided on this .passage for your motto doubtless because it best expressed the ideas connected with your graduation, What are they? I find in this motto two most precious truths. I see in it, first, YOUR OW'N GON'FE'SiSIONOF WEAKNESS; I find in it, furthermore, GOD'S .AjSSURANGEOF SUOGESR "Fear not, for I am .with thee." On your part, this is a confession OIfweakness. 'I'he choice of these words implies that you do not feel a:ble to do your work single-handed and alone. There is within you a certain uneasiness; you are aware of your own insufficiency when it means the saving of souls for Christ. You realize that you must have some one to lean and to depend on, some one who will give you strength and power to do what is expected of you. In short, you know that with mdght of yours nought will be done. You are admitting that, publicly. Is that something to be ashamed of? Is it perhaps. a disgrace? All the world loves a person who 'apparently fears neither man nor devil. Most people are hero-worshipers to some extent; they admire boundless courage, but despise whoever shows the least signs of fear or hesitancy. Napoleon, cruel and ruthless though he was at times, nevertheless, to this hour has a host of people who idolize him. If a Goliath were to come down the streets of our city today, he would very likely have a troop of enthusiastic followers trudging at his heels. I am certain that his henchmen applauded when Belteshazzar said, "Is not this the great Babylon that I have built, by the might of my power and for the honor of my majesty T" Yes, a confession of weakness is, as a rule, received with a sneer, because the world to-day wants sufficiency,self-made men and women who can tell the rising generation what they have accomplished by their own industry and shrewdness, by their own superior intelligence. But I a.skyou, "Where are the achievements of Napoleon? What became of Belteshazza.r? What is that all these self-made men have done that can not be overthrown in an instant? What have they to show but a house built on sand, which the storm can destroy or the floods wash away?" The Lord


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God has said, "Without Me ye can do nothing." The Sooner we realize that, the better for us. All who would accomplish something truly worth while must be aware of their own weakness and inability, depending not upon themselves, but upon the grace and assistance of God. This is especially true of all who would render service in the church, as teachers, or preachers, or in any other office or capacity. We all know the history of Paul, the Apost!e. He was well educated. He worked hard and faithfully, establishing congregations here and there. He was shipwrecked; he was cast into prison; he suffered much. Yet in the end he had something to point to, did be not? Had he not gone where he went, the kingdom of God would have been the loser. But did he credit himself with these accomplishments? Did he claim the ,honor of having wrought these mighty works? On the contrary, he always looked upon himself as an unworthy servant, weak and not fit for the work that God had called him to do. Think of Luther standing before the Diet at Worms, defying the. high and mighty of the church and of the state. Was there any pride in him? With the power of the word that he preached be accomplished more for spiritual and political freedom than the greatest armies have done before or since. He has been called the foremost figure in modern 'history. Above all, he was instrumental in restoring to us the pure and unadulterated Gospel. S'tupendous achievements. Did you ever read of a single instance where he became haughty and boastful, where he gloried in bis accomplishments, maintaining that he himself had brought about the mighty Reformation? Always and always we find him saying, "I am not'hing." k worm he called himself. Inwardly he often shook and trembled, because he knew that if God would not work in him both to will and to do that which was good, all would be lost. 'While speaking of churchmen who recognized their own weakness and insufficiency, another one comes to my mind, not one who lived in ages past, but one with whom nearly all of us were acquainted. Four, yes, even five of you, are children of this congregation. You attended our parochial school; you 'Were confirmed by the same pastor; for years you sat at his feet here in this church; in fact, each of us did for a shorter or a longer period. Old and grey this pastor was. During his ministry this congregation grew and' prospered, inwardly and outwardly. I am now thinking of the day on which we celebrated his fiftieth anniversary. It was up there 'on the hill on that Sunday afternoon when after several speeches of congratulation and good wishes he felt it necessary to get up to say, "I have done nothing; God has done it all." Surely such confessions, coming from such people, must mean something to us; surely, they, are .an en-


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couragement for us, doubly so, because they are founded not so much on human experience as they are on the Scriptures. Very plainly it is written: "Except the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it." No, a confession of weakness is not something disgraceful. It is necessary; it is absolutely es'~ential in our and in every other calling. God will not go forth with the person who depends upon himself; He will never accept, and He will not bless what man tries to do by his own reason and strength. As we read your motto, we feel that you are thereby giving testimony of your weakness and inability. You do not want to travel your course alone. All 'Ofyour education, your knowledge, your efficiency, all-those you know and feel to be inefficient. And that is as it should be. Alfter all, what right has man to depend upon himself? Why should the spirit of mortal be proud? Who and what are we that we should dare to assume for one minute that we have knowledge and ability enough to work out our own salvation and that of others? Man tried that once, in Paradise. You know the result. ISin came into this world, and this sin has so weakened and infected nul' position and our thoughts, our deeds and our intentions that, ever since, we have been totally helpless, like invalids who must be upheld and assisted at every step, like little children who must be guided and led lest they go astray. Sinners we are who must daily throw ourselves down before our God to plead for mercy. 'Surely, these are not signs of strength and power, nothing to boast and to be proud of. In us, that is in our flesh, dwelleth no' good thing. Even if to will be present with us, to accomplish that which is good we find not. Sin has spoiled whatever chance we may have had for personal glory and honor and achievement. For that very reason we must now be humble, meek, and lowly, even when confronted with a most insignificant duty. But, my friends, the task that lies before you is not an insignificant one. The preaching and the teaching of the Gospel of Jesus Christ is the most important obligation God conferred on man. Others may deem it more essential to build empires and to rear magnificent structures, to do the most astonishing things, even at the price 'Ofthe greatest sacrifices, yet they will all come to. nought and end in dismal failure unless they are founded and shaped in accordance with the Word of Salvation. "For what is a man profited if he shall gain the whole world and lose his own soul?" You hope to render to mankind the most essential of 3,11service, You are going to take especially the children in hand, not so much for the purpose of drilling all kinds of book-knowledge into them. Knowledge a person may acquire without attending school. A good encyclopedia, thoroughly studied, will suprply


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a man with just as much learning as can be obtained in most of the schools in the land. It will be your aim to keep and to advance your scholars in the Ohristian faith that they may be able to use aright the knowledge and the wisdom they acquire from you, so they may know not only how to live, hut also how to die. You are the representatives of Christ, HiS spokesmen, stewards of His heavenly treasures. Do you think anyone can fulfill that obligation alone? Do you consider any human being sufficient for that? Then look at the opposition inspired by the devil and carried on bv his hosts. Thev called the Master of the House Beelzebuh: They finally cr~cified Him. The -reception accorded to His servants to-day is not much better. Those people may not lead you to the cross, but they will seek to crown you with thorns, nevertheless. The schools in which you will take your places are decidedly unpopular. Juc'ging by the efforts that are being made to outlaw them, one might be inclined to think that they are the Cens of thieves and the abidjng-places of rogues and scoundrels.路 'I'eachers such as you and we are being ridiculed. I think that at times they even question our sanity. Neither will the world as such ever recognize the supreme necessity of an education like that which we are trying to give to the youth of our day; nor will she ever lend us what we might call a helping hand .. Thus far it has heen a battle, and it will remain one unto the end. Now, when you consider all this: your own sinfulness, the great responsibility that rests upon you, the bitter fight it will mean for you, the ri1diculeand the open and the secret opposition that you will have to contend with, are not you, too, inclined to cry out, "0 Lord, who am I? I can never do this. I am too weak, too unworthy. So far as I myself am concerned, I have no hope if all depends on me." Judging by your motto, I assume that this is your attitude. But Paul felt the same way about it; so did Luther; so did your pastor of many years; so do all feel who render God efficient service. Your confession of weakness is not something to be ashamed of. It is an honor, worth more to you and to us and to God than the highest marks that the best of you ever attained at our or at any other institution. It is something that makes the devil tremble While the angels of heaven rejoice. Without this confession of weakness, not one of us could have the slighteet hope of your being able to do the work of Christian teachers in Christian schools. Why be discouraged? God is not looking for masters; He wants servants who rely on Him for everything. Discouraged? "God hath chosen the weak things of the world to confound the things which are mighty." God humbleth the proud, but "He exalteth them of low degree." You may well glory in your infirmities, for then the power of Chr-ist


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shall rest upon you. His "strength is made perfect in WEAJJ{NESS.," in just such people as you are. This confession -of yours is just what He wants to hear. 'I'hat brings us to the second point that I should like to make. Looking at your motto again, I find in it GOD'S ASSUHANCE OF SUCGEJSIS. "Fear not, for I am with thee." He speaks' these words to you who to-day have publicly testified that you are in need of His divine power and blessing, that you want them and that you can not get along without them, and just because of this confession of yours, His answer to you now is that you shall have them. "Fear not, for I am with thee." Who is this I? He tells you in the verses preceding our text. "I am the Lord thy God, the Holy One of Israel, thy Savior." The God who created you, the Ghrist who redeemed you, the Spirit who reared and kept you in the one true faith. In other words, the triune God will accompany you to work in you and through you upon the hearts of those children, to guard and to protect you against whatever enemies- may arise, to strengthen and to uphold you in your hours of affliction and despair. Oh, what an encouragement: What a power! What are all kings and emperors, what are all fleets and armies in comparison? What can the devil do and all his' hosts wben you march forth with such equipment? The triune God with you? Was He ever defeated? Did He ever fail to accomplish what He said He would do? Men have tried to depose Him, but He still sitteth in the heavens and has them in derision; He still rules supreme, with His throne just as solid and immovable as it was on the day of creation, almighty still and all-powerful. The triune God with you! Did He every betray those who trusted in Him? You know that He did not. Look at His church, In spite of all the persecution and ill will with which she has had to contend, that church still remains. Kingdoms and nations once strong and influential have dropped out of sight; the mightiest of the earth have fallen, but this little, faithful flock of His has come through trouble and turmoil without the loss of a single soul. Even when the odds seemed to be against the Christians, He always carried off the victory for them. When the Midianites, who were as the sand of the seashore- for multitude, invaded the land of Israel, those people of God were sore afraid, but an angel came to Gideon and said, "T'he Lord is with thee," and Gideon with three hundred men put the Midianites to flight. The shepherd boy David faced the giant Goliath and trailed his colors in the dust, because the Lord was with him. He accompanied Daniel into the lion's den ; He was present with those men in the fiery furnace. Even if the forces against


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you were a thousand times more valiant than they are, even then they could accomplish nothing. Where God has given His promise ,His children may depend on His assistance. And He speaks to you very directly and very emphatically .. "Fear not, for I am with THEE,"-with you, with each 'Of .you, always. Your work is just as important as was that of Gideon. You are just as precious to Him as' wde Daniel and David. Or would you doubt that? Looking at this fortythird chapter again, we find a statement that surely must remove the last misgiving that you may have. In the first four verses we read the following: "But now thus saith the Lord that created thee, 0 Jacob, and he that formed thee, o Israel, Fear not; for I hav-e rer'eemed thee; I have called thee by thy name; thou art mine. When thou passest through the wat-ers, I will be with thee; and through the rivers, they. shall not overflow the-e; when thou walkest through the fire, thou shalt not be burned; neither shall the flame kindle upon thee. For I am the Lord thy God, the Holy One of Israel, thy Savior; I gave Egypt for thy ransom, Ethiopia and Seba for thee. Since thou wast precious in my sight, thou hast been honorable, and I have loved thee; therefore will I give men for thee, and people for thy life." 'rhus saith the Lord, your Redeemer, He who 'bled for you on Calvary, who snffered the tortures, of hell fer you. Compared with that, the fulfillment of this 'promise that He makes you to-day is but a trifle. What! Not be with you '? Why, he left His throne in heaven because of you. What! Not help you? Why, He died for you. Amd if He has done the greater, will He not do the lesser? Besides, those children whom you are to teach are God's children; the church in which you are serving is His church; the word that you are to use is! His word; all is His. You are His representatives here to whom He says, "Be of good cheer and work. Leave all the rest to Me. 'The cause is Mine, not yours primarily, and I will carry it out to a most glorious consummation. You need have no misgivings, for if you were to fail, it would mean that I too should fail, and that can never be." Go then to do the work that He has entrusted to you; do it faithfully and prayerfully, in a spirit of weakness, never doubting, however, that He is with you. You have His unqualified promise. There are no strings attached to it, no "if's" and "but's" about it. Let the heathen rage and the mighty of the earth marshal their forces. Go your way quietly and humbly, without great show and ostentation, without fear and trembling. Take charge' of those children and know that you are doing it 'in the name of God and with the power of God. The Lord of hosts is with you as he was with your fathers. The God of Jacob is your strength. The


14

THE' D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

church will endure and triumph; no effort of the devil can destroy it. It has stood; it will stand until heaven and earth shall pass away, until that hour when He will summon all the faithful into that kingdom above. 'There and then, standing before His throne of glory, you and we shall sing a new song. Then we shall say, "Yes, He was with us'." Surely, with such an end in view, with such a spirit, with such a Helper and Protector, with such a One to back and to support us, we shall have nothing to fear. Without a doubt, we shall tare well. HERBsTGEDANKEN Kampf! Streit!

Blutiges Feld!

Alles

tot,

alles oede.

Jede Stimme dumpf, jeder Gedanke traurig!

Das schildert uns Len schreckhchen Krieg. Del' Fuerst hat seine Ritter ausgesandt, Sein letetes Kommando heisst : "Vorwaerts in den Kampf! Kommt nicht VOl' meine A:ugen, bis dass ihr den Sieg errungen habt!" Das mueszte doch ein feiger Ritter sein, del' sich so VOl' dem Kampf'e scheut, dasz er sogar willig sei, das freundliche Antlitz seines Fuersten zu entbehren; dae ein trauriger Zustand des Fuersten, del' auf solche Ritter seine Hoffnung setzt. Doch diesel' Fuerst lebt nicht unter solchen Zustaenden. Er giebt seinen Befehl; doch ist es kaum noetig. Lange haben seine Diener. darauf gewartet, Nun endlich ist ihre Hoffnung erfuellt, und sie eilen hinaus, urn ihrer Kampbegierde den Willen zu lassen. Wie steht es bei dein Feinde? Seine Recken stehen auch gewaffnet. Es ist diesel' nicht del' erste Atngrif'f',und er ist wohl vorbereitet. ABe seine Burgen sind befestigt. Da ploetzlich schall en die 'I'rompeten, .Ai'llf! Zur Wehr! Sie brauchen keinen zweiten RuL Nun entsteht ein schrechlicher Kampf. Die Sonne mit ihrem .ganzen Heel' von Strahlen bietet ihrem Feinde alien Trotz. Da schickt del' eisige Feind einen Pfeil, den Wind, in ihre Richtung. Eine Wolke aus den Gewehren folgt bald darauf und bedeckt und betaeubt sie fast. Nun ist del' erste Schlachtzug vorbei. Del' Krieg ;st abel' noch lange nicht zu Ende. 'S'obald wird die Koenigin Sonne sich nicht ergeben. Fruehmorgens waehrend del' feindliche Fuerst sich noch die Augen reibt, sehickt die Koenigin ihre Ritter, die Strahlen, aus, nnd im Triumphzug schreiten sie rasch vorwaerts. Doch nun entsteht del' schrecklichste Kampf von allen. Einmal scheinen die Mannen del' Koenigin zu g_ewinnen; dann schi'eitet wieder del' Fuerst an die Spitze seines Heeres und kaempft selbeI' so tapfer, dasz aIle seine Mannen wuchtig hinzugreifen. Da ist sein mutigster Kaempfer, Herr Weisvbart von Frost. Sein Antlitz ist :klar und edel, seine


THE D. M. r, C. MEISSFNGER

15

Stirne hoch, seine Stimrne rauh, seine Sprache lustig; und wenn er gar sehr kaempfen musz, so ruft er hinein, .dasz es sich anhoert, als sollten aIle Waende bersten, . Das endigt den Streit. Del' Fuerst hat den Sieg durch Weiszba r'ts 'L'apferkeit. Deshalb uebergibt er ihm auch seine' Gefangenen, die Sonnenstrahlen, Blaetter und Obst, Doeh dem guten Herrn Frost ist es leid, dasz er die Koenigin gar so schimpflich besiegt hat. Um nun dieses gut zu machen, gibt er ihr die gefangenen Strahlen wier'er frei. 'Sie duerfen in ihrem Reimatlande bleiben und umhergehen, wie sie wollen. Doth so waeren sie allzu gefaehrlich. Deshalb entwaffnet er sie, indem er die Waerme von ihnen nimmt. Wenn sie von neuem sich zu waffnen gedenken, .so schickt del' Fuerst wie::ier eine kleine Wolke hinueber, Da gedeuken sie an ihren vorigen Kampf, und sie ergeben sich gerne. . Die Koenigin ist darum traurig ; doch ihre Mannen sind es zufrieden. Da schickt die Sonne ihre btrahlen in eine andere Richtung aus, um dort zu kaempfen, und da gewinnen sie auch. Doch diesel' Kampf interessiert uns nicht. Kehren wir wieder zu dem alten Schlqchtfelde zuruel'k! Riel' sieht es gar traurig aus. Die Leichen liegen in Scharen auf dem Schlacht路 felde. Ja, noch fallen die Elenden vol' unsern Augen, und wir koennen ihnen nieht helfen. E's sind die bleichen, gelben Blaetter. Manche arme Mutter Baumstamm hat aIle ihre Soehne muessen ZU'lll Opfer hingeben, und nun steht sie traurig, elend und ohne Hilfe da. . Etliche sind nul' S'chwer verwundet, und das Blut hat ihre Kleider ganz befleekt. Seht die versehi_ecenen Rlaetter, die schon ganz und gar blutrot sind! Auch sie werden bald das Leben aushauchen. Es bleibt dann nUl' der eine Fluegel uebrig, del' nicht verletzt worden ist. Diesel' Fluegel besteht aus den Tannen. Ihre Spiesze, die Nadeln, waren zu scharf. Del' Feind konnte hier keinen Widerstand leisten. Del' grosze Fuerst moeehte nun zur Beute das Obst einnehmen, doch eine maechtige Raeuberbande, die Menschen,_ sind ihm vorgekommen. Das 路Obst halben sie schon sichel' in ihren Mauern. Wie stehen denn diese Raeuber zu dem Krieg? Manche freuen sich ueber den Sieg des Fuersten Winter; doch die aUermeisten sehen ungerne, dasz die freundliche Sonne so schmaehlich ueberwuncen wird. Ja, del' rechte Mensch denkt weitel'. Er. denkt an den groszen Gott, del' das Schlacht'feld bereitet hat, oer dem einen die Siegeskraft verliehen, dem andern die Macht genommen hat. Da vergleicht er hiermit sein Leben. Er ist eine SOllnenstrahle. Sein groszer Koenig, del' groeszer ist als die Sonne, ist Christus. Del' Herr schickt ihn in den Kampf gegen Suende, Welt und Teufel. Er ist arm, schwach und ge-


16

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

brechlich im geistlichen. Da macht del' Feind, besonder-s del' Fuerst Teufel, ihm den Weg gar schwer. Seine Ritter, die Weltlust und Weltsuende, kaempfen ebenso tapfer fuel' ihn, als Ritter Weiszbart fuel' den Fuerst' Winter kaempft. Da scheint es fast, als sei Christus, unsre SO'nne, selbst ueber-' wunden. Nieht also. Noch leuchtet er und zeigt uns den Weg zum groszen Sieg. Gleichwie wir wissen, dasz die Sonne nicht ueberwaeltigt ist, sondern nul' eine kurze Zeit dem Feinde die Herrschaft laeszt, dann abel' sich in neuer Pracht und Herrlichkeit zeigt, wenn der Lenz kommt, ebenso freudig ,sthaut eel' Ghrist auf die Zukunft, wenn unser grosser Held Christus wieder erscheinen wird, urn uns zum ewigen Sieg rind Frieden in die ewigen Huetten zu fuehren. , Mit diesel' Veberzeugung koennen .die bangen, traurigen Gedanken nicht lange bleiben; uenn die zukuenftigen' F'reuden des ewigen Fruehlings bringen schon Glueck und Seligkeit in diesem Leben. NEW ULlVI-OUR CHRISTIAN INSTITUTION Since its founding in .1855 by the old Swabian pioneers, New VIm has always been considered a favorite spot and a pleasant city. Especially everything of German descent or or-igin found welcome hearts and hands in this city.. On the wooded western hillside, .over-lookingthe peaceful city, stands the large Hermann Monument, which was built by a German lodge, the Sons and Daughters of Hermann. Every few years great festivities, which Americans of German descent from almost the whole eastern half of the "Iluitad ,States attend, were and still are held beneath the statue of Hermann the Cherusci. Hardly could a better place have been found than New VIm's bluffs for the only statue in the country of the great German hero and Iiberator, Although they retained their German customs, the old German settlers, nevertheless, were staunch Americans. Dur,ing the Civil War they fought that the Union might be preserved, their wives and children suffering cruel Indian attacks during their absence. Always since the "70's" the city has furnished a company of hardy soldiers and a band of good musicians for the National Guard. FrO'm the very beginning, toO',New VIm has been extending O'penarms to educatiO'n, both physical and mental. The New VIm TUI'llverein has dO'neits utmO'st to' develO'Psound bodies fO'r the hO'using O'fsO'undminds. GoO'delementary and hig'h schools- have been erected and heartily supPO'rted by the O'ld settlers O'f New VIm as a valuable treasure fO'rtheir children. In shO'rt, when any natiO'nal, state, O'rcO'mmunity welfare was cO'ncerned, the settlers of this city have always given their hearty supPO'rt and welcO'medthe oPPO'rtunity O'ftheir helping.


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

17

But all was darkness in the old city' Of New' Ulm! The Gospel had not enlightened the souls of .the old German "Freidenker" to find the wav of salvation. Defiant to God "a home for every German laborer-c-popish priests and lawyers excepted" was founded. Stubbornly all, inroads of the Gospel in the form of "Black Cloaks" were resisted. The old . inhabitants of New Ulm wanted to serve no God but their own body and mind. They wanted only to glory in their own deeds. In godless pride they aspired to make New Ulm a city of cities. The path of God's Word cannot be changed and hindered. Where God has decided to build a stronghold no enemy can resist. Even the staunch and hardv Germans of New Ulm had to yield at the approach of the "Light: Soon after the Indian War, midst bitter and aggressive opposition. a small band of Lutherans planned and started a church building. At the laying of the cornerstone a crowd of revelers and revilers did a11they could to stop the services; but even under the rain of stones and other missiles the small congregation continued their worship. When the church building was completed the congregation was less molested. The year following the founding of the Lutheran church, the Oatholics, who thus far only had a small chapel, together with other denominations, also built churches. Though the beginning was slow and difflcult, the congregation continuously grew in number and in its beneficial influence on the city: After the tragic death of Pastor G. Reim, the first minister who served for some length of time, when C. J. Albrecht was called as shepherd of the flock, New Ulm had already begun to look with respect upon a preacher. Under Pastor Albrecht the congregation viSIbly"increased in its respected position in the city. Even important synodical conferences could be held undisturbed in the neighborhood of unbelievers. When by the year 1883 Lutheran congregations had sprung up profusely in Minnesota, faithful pastors and teachers were in great demand. Up to now the institutions of the Wisconsin Synod furnished Minnesota's servants. But the congregations of the Synod of Minnesota felt the need of a seminary of their own.. In the year 1883, therefore, the congregations of Minnesota were requested by the synod to submit proposals for the erection of a "Progymnasium." By November 7 of the same year the congregations had to choose between New Ulm, whose congregation offered $7,000 and 11 acres of land, and Shakopee, who offered $3,000 and 10 acres. Before the selection, Pastor Allbrecht, then the president of -the synod, felt it to be his duty to remove a disadvantage for New Ulm, i. e., the opinion of the congregations that New DIm was still a godless city and therefore not fit for a Ohris-


18

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

tian institution. A'S pastor c f New路 DIm's congregation he expounded the location and character of the city as ideal for the proposed institution. When in November the votes of the congregations were counted, New DIm had been- chosen as the place for the seminary by a vote of 18 'to 5. That same winter, 1883, the Rev. C. J. Albrecht and the building committee started the erection of the building, although several tbousand dollars bad as yet not been subscriibed, which, according to the synod's resolution, should have been at hand before starting to build. Pastor C. J. Albrecht believed thus to have acted in the interest of the synod, as labor was cbeap in winter. In May, 1884, at Red Wing, he tendered explanation for baving acted contrary to the synod's decision. Nevertheless, the opening of the institution was made possible a whole year sooner. because of Pastor Albrecht's action. . On June 25, 1884, tbe 3541b anniversary of the Augsburg Confession, the cornerstone of the new institution was laid. With devout and thankful hearts the members of the local congregation and visitors from many other cities entered the St. Paul's Ev. Luth. Church in the morning. In the afternoon the whole grou\p of joyful Lutherans gathered in front of the church. How joyful must that procession formed have appeared as it wound its way up the College Hill! The Courtland band, drawn by four horses, led the way. Then came the pastors on wagons and forty wagons of visitors. A great throng of local congregation .members followed on foot. When tbe last of the procession had climbed the hill, the services were started, and Prof. Graebner of Milwaukee delivered the chief sermon of tbe day' on 1. Sam. 16, 11. After the second sermon by Pastor L. Frey, the cornerstone was laid by the Rev. C. J. Allbrecht. Evening services in the churcb concluded the festivities. With hopeful suspense and prayerful hearts the throng of believers went to their homes, On Sunday, Nov. 9; 1884, the institution, Dr. Martin Luther College, was dedicated. Another day of heartfelt joy it was for these Minnesota Lutherans. Pastor C. J. Albrecht held the chief sermon of the day on the theme: 芦When 'Will our Dr. Martiln Luther College be in truth a city on thehill? Answer',' 1) When the o'l'/;lytrue knowledge and wisdom is taught and learned therein j Ie) w'hen teacher and scholar will let 'their light slWnebefore the world." After the sermon the first teacher at our institution, Professor Burk, who is still serving the Lord at this time, was installed by Pastor Hoyer. During the noon hour, all the guests present at services were served in the dining room of the new building, .AJfternoon services and an evening concert by the St. Paul's Oongregation Choir ended the festivities of the day. On the next morning, Nov. 10, Luther's birthday, the col-


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

19-

lege was opened, ready to serve the Lord. Twenty students were enrolled; they were taught by the Professors Burk and Reim, Pastor Allbrecht assisting in instruction. In February, 1885, the Rev. O. Hoyer of Bt. Paul, Minnesota, was elected professor and director of the college. In spite of its humble beginning, the new institution was now fully equipped to prepare servants for the Lord's vineyard. Students came and went. New professors were added to the faculty. The number of scholars gradually increased. Visibly God has blessed the institution begun in His name. On Nov. 9, 1924, a student body of 225 students marched down to the St. Paul's Ev. Lutheran Church and celebrated together with the local congregation and numerous outside guests the fortieth anniversary of our D. M. L. C. The Rev. Immanuel Albrecht, a son of the deceased C. J. Albrecht, preached on the same theme which his father had selected forty years before, namely the question: Whvn will our D. M. L. C. be in truth. a c.ity on the hill? It was a day of great rejoicing and thanksgiving, especially at the thought of the growth of our institution. At the beginning of the new school year of 1925-1926about 260 students are enrolled. A faculty of twelve professors instructs every subject in the light of the Gospel. What a tree has grown out of the small seed planted in 1884 iuto soil that was thought to be unfruitful and poisonous! God in His grace has led everything. Today our student body bas outgrown the builrlings, every nook and corner being employed to the utmost of its capacity; The time is at hand that something has to be done 'Sothat the flow of servants and educated Christians issuing forth may not be hindered. May God find willing and thanksgiving Christians who will support the cause of the Word further with the means which God has given them. In three previous articles we have seen the city of Ne" DIm in its pioneer days and in its present bloom; we have seen its beautiful natural surroundings; we have seen it as a citadel of the Gospel, a center for preparing our youth for the most blessed work on earth. It is fitting, therefore, and proper to assert that New DIm is an idea] home for students. The city itself is not so large that it offers detrimental attractions, nor so small that it is lonely. 'l'he surroundings and nature of New DIm, with its many opportunities for recreation and amusement surely can help to drive away the "blues" and homesickness of any student. No boy 01' girl will regret the time spent at a Christian institution in the beautiful city of New DIm. A. F. R. '26.

•


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

20

OJ. messenger , The "D. M. L. C. MESSENGER" is published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not accepted .. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressed to the Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni undergraduates and friends. Entered as second class matter at the Post Office of New Dim, Minnesota.

EDITORIAL STAFF A. RA!USC'H!KE,Editor-in-Chief MISS E. ROiEiDER,Alumni W. WOiLTMANN, Business Mgr. MISS G. PAAiP, Co-Ed Notes H. I'HLlDNF'ElJDT, Asst. Bus. Mgr. C. FI\NUlP, Locals E. NOLTE, Asst. :Bus. Mgt. J. MEYER, Athletics MISS E. A:LBREJCHT, Exchange W. STIiNDT, Jokes E. KiRIlJEJGER,Coltege Notes

Volume XVI

"

September

No. I

1925

EDITORIAL

• NEW EDI'T'OR,S As two old "Messenger" staff members, Hertha Sievert and Leo Vergin, decided to wield the teacher's rod during the coming year rather than to wield the editor's pen, our editorial staff had to be reconstructed. '1'0 take the place of these two who left us, the faculty has appointed Gertha Paap and Helmuth Ihlenfeldt. May these companions of ours find their new work enjoyable and successful!


'l'HE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

THE DESTRUCT10N

21

OF THE SHEN;ANDOAH

The appalling IH~\VS of another catastrophe has swept the country and. left in its wake sorrow and lamenting. The Shenandoah, on its way from Lakehurst, New Jersey, to St. Paul, Minnesota, was completely demolished when it fell many feet to the earth. It carried a number of passengers, tourteen of them lo~ing their lives and other", being ser+ouslv injured. The cam-e of the disaster did not lie in the construction of the dirigible nor in the management of it by the crew. It evidentry encountered winds which it could not master. Investigations are being made to determine the exact cause. 'The people of the nation see in this nothing more than a stroke of ill luck or an act of fate. Their whole faith and trust lay in this machine created by the hands of men. 'I'hey thought that nothing could suppress this, giant of the' air. How vain and foolish was this trust! The Bible teaches us not to trust in the work of man's hand because the Almighty God can destroy everything that man attempts if He so chooses. Let us accept this disaster as a message from God. 'Phis is His way of showing us that anything that man creates, no matter how large and secure, is like nothing in His hands, Unless He is with us, all of our efforts are in vain. God can (Teate; God can destroy; He can put us conupletely to shame at every turn whenever we place our reliance on anything human or on anything built by human hancs. A word to the wise is sufficient; otherwise "He that sitteth in the heavens shall laugh: the Lord shall have them in derision." T. H. L. '26. SHORT "CUTS" Mistakes will occur; that's wh'y they put rubbers on lead pencils. Never mer'dle with a hornet or with a man who is minding his own business. Today is the tomorrow that you were worrying about yesterday. Another reason why the worm turns is because his back itches. A sock in the shoe is worth two in the eye. 'I'he good of a man's life cannot be measured by the length of his funeral procession. Self-made men are very apt to worship their maker. The world is always so~we never put flowers on a man's grave until after he's dead. Don't blame your stooped shoulders on to a heavy brain.


22

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Don't be afraid to blow your own horn, but don't do it in front of the procession; go behind and do it. Every black sheep was some one's pet lamb once. It takes all kinds of people to make our world and some are the kind that is just like weeds-no use and lots of trouble, but they make the flowers appear so much more beautiful. Go from pennies to dollars; not from dollars to pennies. J. F. M. '26.

.ALUMNI

Meeting of D. M. L. O. Alumni Association, June 16, 1925. Ais usual, the alumni gathered for the annual meeting on the day before commencement. In the previous meeting, a movement for a Reuter Memorial had led to the appointing of a committee to gather information and to suggest: some lplan according to which the above might be carried out. The report of this committee was read, and the following resolutions were passed: 1. 'l'hat the first paragraphs of the report be embodied in the minutes: "The object of this movement is the advancement of genuinely Lutheran church music. Since Professor F. Reuter devoted the efforts of his entir-e life to this cause, it seems to be a fitting memorial to keep alive in our Lutheran circles an interest in the results of his labor." 2. That the committee take into consideration the- suggestion made during the discussion and accordingly work out some plan of publishing some of Professor F. Reuter's compositions, as a memorial. How can the association be of benefit to the institution? This .question gave rise to a lively discussion which ended with the following resolutions: 1. 'That a circular letter be sent to all graduates, asking them to become members and to help carry out our plan. 2. That all graduates be asked to go before their congregations or societies within. their congregation and obtain


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

23

funds for the equipment of the addition to our boys' dormitory. After concluding the regular business, the meeting was adjourned to the oak grove west of the girls' dormitory. Here every one enjoyed a picnic supper prepared by some of the local members..,-"Yes, we enjoyed it and shall go back home and work hard for our dear AlImaMater!' Many had come many miles; many had not been here for years ; but all hope to be back for the next June meeting. Dear graduates, join in, become a member, and bel[>us work for the glory of the Lord and for the welfare of His kingdom! H. R. KLATT, Secretary. The annual increase of the alumni consists of eight members. Surely they carry with them the good wishes for success in their work, by all students and former graduates. This year's list of new teachers is as follows: Esther Buenger Sleepy Eye, Minnesota Arvin Jantz Benton Harbor, Michigan Laura Meyer Lewiston, Minnesota Frieda Mueller Monroe, Michigan Kurt Oswald Weyauwega, Wisconsin Sophus Stensrud Mlinneapolis, Minnesota Bertha Wilbrecht Hortonville, 'Wisconsin Carl Witt Boyd, Minnesota In the early part of the month of roses, occurred the wedding of Miss Caroline Marose of Brownsville, Wisconsin, .to Arnold Wilhrecht, '20, of Iron Ridge, Wisconsin. The groom's classmate, Gilbert Glaeser, acted as best man and, therefore, promised us a more vivid description of the affair for this column. However, being quite oisheartened by the fact that his outlook is not equally bright, he has failed to send any report. By the way, perhaps his change from Neillsville, Wisconsin, to St. Paul, Minnesota, has also caused him some trouble in becoming acclimated. Not wishing to be in arrears with his cousin, Theodere Pelzl, '20, also took the final plunge on June 28. Mrs. Pelzl was formerly Miss Ruth Brockmeyer of Mankato. Mr. Pelzl has accepted the call sent him by the st. Paul's congregation of New Ulm and was installed here on the ninth of August. He thus filled the vacancy left in the parochial school by Hedwig Naumann, '17, now Mrs. John Denninger, of St. Paul, Students have found a peculiar kind of satisfaction in Professor Backer's behavior. 'I'he reason for this '? Read the engagement announcement. Erna Albrecht, '19, engaged to Professor Emil D. Backer, '14, on July 19. Hearty good wishes and congratulations!


24

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

'l'he latest news rer eived : T'he engagement announcement of Sylvia Bieber, resident of Minneapolis, to John Hoffmann, '24, of 'l~awas City, Michigan. All join in extending best wishes and congratulations! Frieda John, formerly stationed at Fond du Lac, is now teaching in her own dear old "Ka.to." .<\Jt .the close of .the last schoolyear, the old twelfth grade of '23 had a class reunion: Lawrence Lehmann of Springfield, Illinois, was unable to be here at the time. Those present partook of a breakfast lunch, at which Professor Schweppe acted as chaperon. For further particulars, inquire of Paul Rohrke, Watertown, Wisconsin .. On a who had bride of D. M. L.

very fair Sunday in August, Irene Schnitker, '21, been teaching in Waukesha, Wisconsin, became the Rev. Mr. Donald Rossin, also a former student of C. They are at home in Lemmon, South Dakota.

Ida Muesing, of New Ulm, was the center of attraction at the wedding in which Herbert' ~itz, '16, also shared an interest, on Amgust 12. On the same day, Oconomowoc witnessed the marriage of Anita .schimmelpfennig, '21, to Franz Weinbrenner. A baby girl, Marie Nola, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Fred Meyer of Aa-lington, Minnesota, on July 28. . The sad news of the death of Mrs. Arthur Krueger of Cibecue, AJrizona,was a' shock to all college acquaintances. Mrs. Krueger, formerly Viola Plumb, passed away on June 28. She leaves to mourn her untimely death her sorrowing husband, her small daughter, her mother, and brother. May God in His mercy fill that vacancy which He has seen fit to bring about. Mr. Paul Hippauf, '09, teacher at Lewiston, Minnesota, submitted to an operation at the Union Hospital in New Ulm, on July 10. He is now again able to resume his work at school. A few changes of address: Anna Winter, '24 ._ AJdaSievert, '22 Esther Montgomery, '20 Lydia Winter, '20

_

_Des Plaines, Illinois Watertown, Wisconsin St. James, Minnesota Gaylord, Minnesota


THE D. M. L. C. MES,SENGER

25

co, j

Vacation is a thing of the past. A<lthoughit still lingers in our memory, we have returned for another year. of conscientious study. Not the student body' and faculty only, but also the Editorial Staff has assembled to carry out its assigned duties. Let us again be reminded of the fact that all publications cannot be perfect, The purpose of this department therefore is not to find fault or give praise, but to be a signboard, which points to the path of improvement and to the road to success. Let us give and receive all criticism in a friendly spirit that we may profit by them. Lastly, we invite all papers to make their appearance on our Exchange Table and assure them of warm welcome and recognition. Among the papers that now are at hand, our attention is drawn by a gold and purple pamphlet. It is the Commencement Number of the Hemnica, published by the students of the Red Wing Seminary at Red Wing, Minnesota. Our first greeting is a picture of the staff and then the Senior Class Song. Next we read a lengthy article on "Christian Education." "Education," the writer states, "is the noblest gift that God has given the human race. Therefore it is our privilege and duty to cultivate and nourish this gift. The first and greatest teacher of Christianity was Jesus Christ, who came not to advance intelligence to humanity, but to call sinners to repentance." The writer then expands on the different periods of Christian education. Ohristianity must be taught in its native purity and power. Ohildren must receive an organized knowledge of Christian truth to enable them to undergo the unfolding of the purpose of God. He closes with the plea that our Christian institutions may not decrease but increase. Then and then only shall the young


26

'fHE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

people of our church be saved from rationalism as well as from modernism. An editorial on the "Grandeur of Patience" depicts the great achievements and the noble results of the virtue patience. The Valedictory and Salutatory both contain many Christian thoughts and express the feeling and gratitude which are called forth by such an' event. Other interesting .articles that follow are Class Oration" Class Prophecy, Class History and Class 'Will.

C;uLLEGE

Board Meeting The entire board met MoIfday, September 7, to prepare for the erection of an addition to the boys' dormitory. Present were the Rev. G. ,E. Fritz, Fairfax; the Rev. Wm. Sauer, Watertown, South Dakota; Mr. R. Rohrke, Hoskins, Nebraska, and the Rev. G. Hinnenthal, Mr. F. H. Retzlaff, Mr. Herbert Sitz of New Ulm. After discussing the proposed size and changes, the board authorized -the executive committee to engage an architect and-to have a tentative plan drawn. This plan is to be submitted at a meeting of the local board. It is hoped that the building will get well under way this fall so that it can be completed as early as possible next year; Tour to the West The Professors Bliefernicht, Backer, Reim, Schaller and Palmbach spent part of their summer vacation on a trip to the West. They went in two cars, visiting the Black Hills, Yellowstone National Park, Billings, Montana, and other


THE D. M. L. C. MEISSENGER

27

points of interest. On their way up they took the Black and Yellow Trail, and on their way back they took the Custer Battlefield Highway and the Black and Yellow Trail. New Laboratory During the summer months the laboratory was moved' to a larger room on the third floor. Two new tables and new equipment were added so that the room is now fully equipped to accommodate fifty-six students. The old laboratory has been changed into a classroom. New Truck A new Dodge truck has been purchased to take the place of " 'l'he old one Hoss Shay."

\


-----

..

-.~..,~,'


30

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Positions wanted? Indeed not! Perhaps some of us may have filled other positions during the summer, but now we are all back at the old job, packing more Knowledge into om already overloaded (??) heads. Margot Schuetze and Hertha Sievert have left us for one year. They are teaching school, Margot at Ormsby and Hertha at Goodhue, Minnesota. Due to the untiring efforts of Mr. GoegJein, the effects of the June hail storm on our flower beds have been totally erased. During the summer months, clothes路 closets were added to rooms 7, 3 and 6 at Hillcrest Hall. They may sound like minor improvements to an outsider, but not so to the inmates. Perhaps some of the new girls at the dormitory may wonder why one of the beds in Room 7 is minus several iron rods. Explanation: Trudy John and Frieda Polchow used this particular bed for acrobatic exercises. Among the new coeds who are attending D. M. L. C. this year are Mabel Aasheim MoIly Bender Irene Althoff Gloria Benzel Dorothea Augustin Edith Bode Esther Bach Gertrude Buenger Esther Behrens Zylpha Busse


THE" D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Alice Domke Marie Duesterhoeft Erna Engelhardt Mathilda Fahje Agnes Fiene Eleanore Fischer Esther Gehlhaar Zelma Hill Margaret John . Olina Jordahl Emma Kirchhoff Amanda Klaudt Margaret Klug Irma Krause Viola Kremin Frieda Kuehl Hera Lemke Helen Limpert Selma Lohaefener Helen Luedtke

Margarete Martin Augusta Moerer Verona Nerese Alma Ottanbacher Olive Olson Hertha Penk Anna Plagge . Marie Plagge . Bertha Raduenz Edna Rauschke Frances Redeker Ruth Reuter Wilma Rust Gertrude Schmidt Doris Schnitker Dorothy SchwartzHilma Stallbaum Jacobina Weiss Esther Witte Mildred Zellmer


32

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

LOC

s

Another school year has begun; it has brought many new students. The following new fates may be seen in the boys' dormitory: Emanuel Arndt . . Watertown, S. Dak. Fred Beck -------Foley, Minn. Gerold Becker -----. -'St. James, Minn. Benj. Borgschatz -----------Zumbrota, Minn. Martin Busse --.---------.----.--:----. Appleton, Minn. Otto Dusterhoeft -.. Hutchinson, Minn. Ernest Eichelberg .. Glenham, S. Dak. Walter Engelhardt . EIgin, N. Dak. _ Richard Gensmer Lewiston, Minn. Robert Goeglein Sleepy Eye, Minn. Alrthur Haack Springfield, Minn. Fred Hagedorn --. Algoma, Wis. Herbert Hagedorn _. Algoma, Wis. Evan Hageman .__ . Sanborn, Minn. Henry Gruenhagen St. Paul, Minn. George Hartmann Glendale, Minn. Clarence Hauch Benton Harbor, Mich. Marcus Hoffmann .. Mayville, Wis. Martin Isberner ---. Nicollet, Minn.

..

â&#x20AC;˘

-,


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Herbert Kesting FJlmer Klawitter John Kluekman Albert Krueger John Martin Carl Mueller Ernest Mueller Otto Mueller 'Waldemar Pape Erwin Preszler Norman Rogers Melvin Schmidt Herbert Spalding William Sternberg ' Marvin Steuernagel Ernst Strautman Martin Uhlhorn An-noldVehling Hilmer Wessel Edgar Wiechman Traugott Zuberbier

,

."

;

:

33

: Hodar, Neb. Hutchinson, Minn. Harriet, S. D. Carlos, Minn. Stanton, Nebr. ~..Hemlock, Mich. Janesville, Minn. St. Paul, Minn. Manitowoc, Wis. Bison, S. Dak. Kaukauna, Wis. Bemis, IS. Dak, Wanda, Minn. St. James, Minn. Lewiston, Minn. St. James; Minn. , Darfur, 'Minn. St. James, Minn. Mound City, S. Dak. Elgin, Minn. Bondwell, Wis.

"'Tiloh" Leitzke spent a few days at Sprengeler's on his way home for vacation. Borde-late

as usual.

Mrs. Mary Hoffmann and John Hoffmann spent Sept. 2 with Martin and Marcus Hoffmann. We thought that "Fortissimo" Schulz had "bell路hopped" long enough, so we elected "Deuce" Larson to his place. Leo Vergin left for Kaukauna, Wisconsin, to wield the birch-rod for the present school year. Good luck, "Levi"! Immanuel, "Clip," Lenz visited D. M. L. C. on Sept. 4 and 5. John Heinitz was elected "creaser" for this school year. "Ted" Lau was pleasantly surprised by a visit from his brother, Edwin H. Lan and family. George Kiecker spent Sept. 6 at his home in Fairfax, Minn.


34

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

A1'HaiIC$

~

The following games were played too late to appear in the June issue: On May 23 our baseball team motored to Sleepy Eye to play the high school team of that city a return game. Quite a number of students accompanied them to help winthe game (rom the spectator's line. Amann, the first batter for Sleepy Eye, hit the first ball pitched for a home run. This was the only score they were able to get. Our boys had a better adding machine. 'They crossed home plate twelve times. 'One score was a home run bv Rossow. Leerssen struck out fourteen men. â&#x20AC;˘ , AB R H E D. ~L L. C ' 39 12 11 0 S. E,. H. S 28 1 3 4 Batteries: Gollege-Leerssen; Sprengeler. Sleepy EyePaulsen; Sherman. On June 13 the team of the Farmer's Lumber Company of Gibbon appeared in our ball park. AJfter College had piled up 4 tallies in as many innings, Gibbon came from behind in the fifth to tie the scot-e. Not another runner crossed home plate until the eleventh inning, when Oollege took the game. Leerssen was very effective in the pinches" striking out the batters when several times the bases were loaded and only one down. _ AB R H E D. M. L. C _ _ _ 38 5 10 2 F. L. 00 _ __ __ __ .__ _.. .42 4 12 2 Batteries: COllege-Leers sen ; 'Sprengeler. Fairfax-Jahnke, Glaeser; Olson, E. Besides the regular games, two practice games were also played with the team of New Ulm, member of the Southern Minnesota League. New Ulm won the first, 6-7, College the second, 10-5. Mangels and Stindt pitched for College in the first game, and Leerssen in the second.


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

35

Siuce football is not played at our institution, our thoughts will next be turned to basketball. Until the time for this arrives, baseball, tennis and hiking will furnish the exercise. .&lthough some of our basketball players have left us, we can hope again to put out a winning team.

When I was young, and in my prime, I used to work on the Big Soo Line; But now I'm old and grieve to tell That now I work on the M. & St. L. Gerhard Mueller : "Wir spielten bis Weihnachten drauszen; als es zu kalt wurde, spieIten wir inwendig." Gott ist allwissend, Gegensatz von Loretta Zorn: "Del' -Mensch ist dumm." Prof. Backer played a part wrong during vocal period. _ He excused himself: "I unconsciously was somewhere else." Larson (Looking at Geck's geometry paper corrected with blue pencil) : "Did you write that with a black or. blue pencil?"

There's a Reason The reason for calling examination booklets "Blue Books" is that it makes us feel blue when they are returned."


36

TIRE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Prof: "Characterize Henry VIII." Haertl: "He was as crooked as a snake." AI student, lacking money, wrote a letter to his parents containing only one word, namely, "Broke." A few days later the answer came. It read, "Harne." "'What did your little ones say when you told them there was no Santa Claus?" "They asked me whether I had just found out." Bill (In German) : "Die Waise wohnt mit ihren Eltern." Mother: "Did you ask in your prayer to be a better little boy?" Son: "Yes, and I put in a word for you and father, too. AI fly and a flea in a flue were imprisoned, so what could they do? 'Said the fly to the flea, "Let us fly." Said the flea to the fly, "Let us flee." So they flew through a flaw in the flue. Out of Chink's Deiectioe English: "Young Fortinbras had gatheFed young men that served him as food." I have been instructed by the Village Oouncil to enforce the ordinance against chickens running' at large and riding bicycles on the sidewalk. . , ., .

A Tie Vote '; .When both parties vote "Yes," and the preacher ties the knot. Preacher reading text: "And immediately 'the cock wept, and Peter went out and crew." Mrs. Newbride: "Well, Henry, I can always keep the wolf from the door by singing'." Henry: "There is no doubt about that, dear." "My heart is in the ocean," said the poet. "You've got me beat," said the sea-sick man, as he leaned over the rail. Prof.: "What is suffrage?" Floppy: "A calamity." 路Prof.: "That's only true when it's woman suffrage.


ADVERTISERS

IN "THE MESSENGER"

Andrew Saffert l. J. Vogel Lumber Co. i\.J"ndt8. Znpfer A. G. Plagens Anton J. Simmet, Barber

Bierbaum's Cash Grocery Buenger Furniture Co. B. J. Krahn Litlzens state Bank Crone Bros. Co. "has. Emmerich Champion Shoe Shop

Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr.

T. F. Hammermeister A. L. Knsske Wm. J. Von Bank Hugh C. Edmiston H. O. Schlender F. A. Kallusky

Dr. F. H. Dubbe Dr. Jos, P. Faas

Eagle Roller Mill Co. E. Wicherski Epple Bros. Ernest C. Vogelpohl Everltug Electric Co. Emil G. Berg Eagle Tailor Shop I,'. H. Retzlaff 8. Sons

Fred Meine Clothing Co. F. J. Backer Farmers Co-op, Creamery Assn. Gastler Studio Geo. J. Gag Hackbarth Shoe Store H. Goede Hummel Bros. Henry Simons Lumber CO. H. C. Prey, D. O. Henry Stelljes H. F. Raabe Haag's Rexall Drug-Store Interstate Power Co.

J. H. Forster

J. C. Penney Company J. M. Meyer Kretsch Auto Co. Lyric Cafe

Leo A. Sprenger Mnesing Drug Store Meyer Photographer ~I. J. Bieber .Mueller & Erickson Mrs. Anna Rinke

New Ulm Bottling Works New Ulm Sheet Metal Works Nagel 8. Leary Ne路w Ulm Greenhouses New Ulm Steam Laundry j'T ew Ulm Grocery Co. . New Ulm Brick & Tile Yards Olson & Burk

Otto C. Wichtel P. J. Eicltten Shoe Store Reim 8. Clmreh Robert Fesenmaier Sportsmen's Paradise Schulkes State Bank of New Ulm Somsen, Dempsey 8. Flor Saffert Cement Construction Co.

The Bee Hive Tauseheek 8. Green The Reid Front Grocery The Wonder Store The National Thea. Mueller The Emporium

Union Hospital Ulrich Electric Co. Vercoe's Plumbing Shop W. Eibner 8. Son Wei'Iandt 8. Stegeman W. Rluemike8. Son Walsh & Lodahl Motor Co. Yellow Cab


路'~,

w. ~,r e Carry

Ruemke &- Son a Complete L~ne of Fancy and Staple

Groceries. Dry

Goods a,nd Not~ons wh~ch we OHer

for Sale at Lowest Prices ALSO PAY HIGHEST

PRICE FOR BUTTER

AND EGGS

The Wonder Store 10-/2 So. Minn. St.

Is the Place where you will find your Friends Residence Phone 150

Office Phone 60

DR. F. H. DUBBE Physician and Surgeon NEW ULM

MINN.

H. GOEDE, Photographer THE LEADING

STUDIO

HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS Special Rater to Students

K 0 D A K FI N ISH

ING

Studio 107 N. Broadway

Do Your Banking With The

Citizens State Bank CAPITAL

$100,000.00

SURPLUS

$100,009.00

Member of Federal Reserve Banking System Being one of the oldest and strongest banks in southern Minnesota. we solicit your patronage

We are well supplied With money to loan

Modern Safe Deposit Boxes for rent at $/.00 per year


Fountain Selections Fountain Inn College Special High School Sundae Cupid Sandwich Eibner's Golden Orange Ade Walnut

Peach

Happy

Thought

Maraschino Cherry Banana Delight Silver Sprey Ginger Ale Fruit Salad Pure Grape Juice

w. Eibner Phone 128

&- Son


An Appetizing

Drink For Every

Occasion!

Whether you go on a trip. or entertain your friends at home. you will find a refreshing, appetizing flavor among the many different kinds of

FRENZEL'S

SOFT DRINKS

And there's nothing better for the family circle. I irder a trial case today 'and you'll agree with us. Phone 58.

New

Vim Bottling Works H. H. and A. I Frenzel. Props â&#x20AC;˘ Phone 898

SCHVLKES CroneBlock

307 N. Minn 51

New Ulm, Minn.

Otto C.

The Store For Beiter Ladies' Garments

}IV

ichiel

Monuments

Furnishings, Shoes und Groceries

ME .... BER MEMORIAL C~AFT5MEN

OF

New Ulm

AMERICA

New Vim Sheet Metal Vf;orks Frank A. and OttoL. Schaefer, Props.

Copper. Tin and Galvanized Iron Auto Radiators Recoring and Repairing 415 First S. St.

LENNOX STEEL AIR FURNACES

ROBERT

Phone 635

FESENMAIER

Hardware. Implements and Automobiles Alfred W. Mueller

GeorgeD. Erickson Law Offices

MUELLER &- ERICKSON New Ulm, Minn.


SPORTS~~1'fvs~E.~~.RADIS NEW

ULM

E路

MINNESOTA

Sporting and Athletic Goods Radio Walsh - Lodahl Motor Co.

Lyric Cafe Perfect health and Happiness

Authorized

Ford

depends upon the eating of properly prepared food

Dealers

Everling Electric Co. Electrical Supplies Storage Batteries Wiring. Etc.

HENRY

SIMONS LUMBER

CO.

Dealers in

ALL KINDS of BUILDING MATERIAL, COAL and FUEL Let us figure on your requirements in these materials

New ui芦

Minn.

DR. T. F. HAMMERMEISTER Physician. and Surgeon NEW ULM

MINNESOTA

The A to Z BARBER

SHOP

The Place where you get both Service and Treatment

ARNDT

~ ZUPFER

First North and Minn. Sts.


Service Quality Right

WE appreciate your

Price

patronage

which will always be filled to your liking and will

lead' to future

business relationship between us

Olson & Burle Phone 88 New Vim, Minnesota


1875

1925

Fifty Years of Continuous Service Proves Reliability and Durability of New Vim Brick Buildings erected With NEW ULM BRICK fifty years ago arc as strong and substantial today as the day they were erected.

BVILD

WITH

NEW VLM BRICK

- It Pays

NEW UlM BRICK & TILE YARDS New Vim, Minn.

See

CHEVROLET

and BUICK

First K retsch A ulo Company Telephone 323


When in need of FOOTWEAR be sure and call on us. We carry a complete line of men's, ladies' and children's shoes. We appreciate your business. Our prices are always the lowest. Quality considered.

Athletic Shoes Our Specialty

P. J. Eichtel?: Shoe Store New Vim, Minn.

Dr. w-, J. Von Bank

.Dr. Hugh C. Edmiston Osteopathic

Doctor of

Phusician

Dental=Surgeru

Phone 123 .

Weiser Block

New VIm

In New U/m since 1916

Breeder of

Ceo. J. Cag

Fancy

s. c.

â&#x20AC;˘

Rhode l sland Reds

Bicycle Repair and Sheet Metal Shop

H. F. RAABE New VIm

Minn.

315 N. Minn. St.

Phone 284

Give Your Eyes A Chance It isn't right to toil under-the handicap of defective eyesight. Poor eyes make backward students. They not only affect your work, but your nerves and health as well. We fit your .eyes right. grind lenses in our own shop and replace broken lenses on short notice.

Dr. H. O. SCHLEUDER Optometrist and Optician 102 N. Minn. 51.

New VIm

Telephone 87


Bierbaum's

Cash Grocery

Right Treatment Right Quality Right Prices Phone 188 101 S. Minn. St.

New Vim, Minn.

COLLEGI AN路 and EMBY CLOTHES

Athletic

are good Clothes Get your next Suit at

FOOTWEAR

Leo A. Sprenger

E. Wicherski

Clothing

Weilandt & Stegeman

J. H. FORS1 ER

Contractors & Builders Correspondence Solicited Work done in any sec/ion of the Community Plans and specifications furnished Estimates cheerfully given Ofi.ce 1100 Center St. Phone 571

F.

J.

Furniture, Carpets, Rugs and Wall Paper Minn.

New Vim

Backer

HARNESS DEALER Trunks. Traveling Bags, Suit Cases. Purses. KWik-Pak Parcel Post Laundry Cases and Other Leather Specialtie,

"


Daniel

Webster

THE WORLD'S

GREATEST

FLOUR

Used Where' Quality Counts Recommendedand Guaranteed by Lead~'l:1g Dealers

Eagle Roller Mill Co. NEW ULM, MINN.

CONSTANTLY IMPROVED BUT NO YEARLY MODELS

DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR VEHICLES

F. H. RETZLAFF Phone 1000

& SONS


J.

C. PENNEY

COMPANY

Corner Minnesota and Znd N. Strs.

New VIm. Minn.

OPERATING 676 STORES IN 44 STATES Where Savings are Greatest WE KINDLY

SOLICIT

REIM

YOVR

PATRONAGE

&- CHURCH

THE LEADING JEWELERS

Distinctive Clothing Sold on Quality and Merit alone

Tobaccoes Pipes

Cigarettes Snuff

CIGARS

Theo. Mueller manufacturer. jobber and retailer in

at

Smoker's Articles

Tauscheck & Green

204 N. Minn. St.

Nagel &- Leary

Mrs. Anna Rinke

New Vim

Millinery Dealers in

Wood.. Coal. Briqueits Coke and Sewer Pipe Telephone 304

-

Corsets and Switches Fancy War/;:

The latest in HATS . Always 122 N. Minn

St.

New VIm

When in Need. of an Electrician

Call 148 Ulrich Electric Company


M. J. BIEBER Lad~es', Men's and Young Men's Wear;ng Apparel of the better Grades at Reasonable Pr~ces.

Home of Hart Schaffner &- Marx Clothes

Our Best Attention Everything of a banking nature entrusted care, receives our best attention.

to

our

We shall be glad to have a share of your business.

State Bank of New Vim DRUGS EVERYTHING A STUDENT NEEDS

EPPLE

BROS.

DRUGGISTS

New Vim Greenhouses 20,000 square feet of glass

Prompt attention given to all orders for CutfloioerÂŤ, etc.

Flowers for all Occasions

"Say it with Flowers" Phone 45


Fine Clothing, Furnishings Hats, Caps and Shoes Intcrwovcn Stockings

Fred Meine Clothing Co.

Chas. 拢路mmerich Plumbing,

Steam and

Hot Water Heating Estimates Furnished on Application

Both Phones 281

Corner Center and Minn. Sts.

Ernest C. Vogelpohl PIPE ORGAN BUILDER New Vim, Minn.

R E UTE

R Pi P E

0 R GA N S

SERVICE STATION FOR PIPE ORGANS Rebuilding, Modernizing, Tuning and Care of Pipe Organs .ORGAN BLOWERS INSTALLED


Champion Shoe Shop We specialize in Seiberling Rubber Heels and Kori Krome Leather Heels

E. Freese & F. Wessel

Call a

o~ 4.~V\)

Baggage Transfer

24 S. Minn. 51.

T HE

Phone 194

EMPORIUM S70RE

DEPARTMENT

"Quality thai Tells -

Prices that Sell"

Ladies', Men's, and Children's Ready-to-~Vear and Furnishings Let us outfit .you from top to bottom You can STUDY LESS and LEARN MORE if your Eyes are properly jilted uiith Glasses

DR. JOS. P. FA AS Optometrist and Pharmacist Nell) Vim

Estimates Furriish ad We Guarantee Satisfaction

Emil G. Berg Decorating Painting Paper Hanging Furniture Refinishing Telephone 401 Nell) VIm

A. G. PLAGENS Registered Architect New VIm

Minnesota

Minn.


A.

J.

LUMBER

Vogel Lumber (0. AND

BUILDING

MATERIAL

The Yard that serves you 'best Quality, Service and Satisfaction

J. M. MEYER LEADING JEWELER

I make a Specially of Fine Walch Repairing Honest and Competent Work Guaranteed

We turn a House into

Buenger

Phone III

a

Home

Furn~ture

Co.

Stores, NeUJ Vim and Sleepy Eye

Henry

Stelljes

The Center Street Grocer A Fine Stopping Place For Students

SOMSEN. DEMPSEY

0-

Attorneys at Law New Vim

803 Center St.

Phone 133

FLOR

-

Minnesota


We Use Soft Water Only

Phone No.5

New Vim Steam Laundry 0110

F. Oswald, Prop.

First Class Dry Cleaning Department in Connection PROMPT

ATTENTION

GIVEN TO MAIL ORDERS

Our store is the

Eagle Tailor Shop

YOUNG MEN'S STORE of town At all times we show the latest in

JOE DEI BELE,

Young Men's Suits, Overcoats and Furnishings

Prop.

Cleaning and Pressing Alterations and Dying

Crone Bros. Co. The

505 Center St.

The National

Gastler Studio

Soft Drinks and Lunches

A good place to have your pictures made Lowest prices on

KODAK FINISHING

Corner Center and Minn. Sis.

High Gloss Prints

New Vim Grocery Co. WHOLESALE

GROCERS

Ask for

NEW ULM BRAND COFFEE in the Yellow Can

LOCATED TO YOUR ADVANTAGE


I

I

OUR SLOGA,V:

e9¥(ark evezy gravv

That splendid. imported German Granite always in stock Will erect work regardless of distance

B. }. KRAHN New Vim. Minn

Phone 1234

121 N. Broadway

Anton j. Simmet BARBER Shop belowFarmers &- Merchants Slate Bank

Use

ARTSTONE

in stock sizes or special made to order for your other buildings. ARTSTONE

You are invited

10

inspect

new home or the exhibit of

at our plant.

Saffert Cement Construction Co. New Uu«. Minnesota


Young Men's Suits, Overcoats, Furnishings Greatest Values per Dollar

14 N. Minn. St.

New Vim, Minn.

Vercoe's Plumbing

Shop

221 N. Minn. St. (Next door 10 Saffert'Âť M~at Mark~t)

Visit our Show Room and see "Standard" Enamel Ware and other Modern Plumbing and Healing Appliances The only ground floor Plumbing Shop in the city. OFFICE PHONE

95

Phone 292 RESJDENCE

5~7

Dr. F. A. KALLUSKY DENTIST over Arbes Drug Store h I 9:00 to 12:00 Office ours I 1:00 to 5:00 Evening by appointment

Farmers CO-Op. Creamery Ass' n. We make and sell the famous

GOLD MEDAL BUTTER Churned from sweet pasteurized Cream WHOLESALE

Eyes examined-Glasses

and RETAIL

fitted-Lenses

ground in our OWn shop

Specialist in Eyesight and Optometry H. C. PREY, D. O.


The Best Place to Buy

Your

CollegeSupplies. Fountain Pens Stationery. Eastman Kodaks. Films, Etc.

Haag's Rexall Drug Store Formerly Arbes Bros. Drug Store

"THE BUSIEST STORE IN TOWN" "There must be a good reason why"

The

Bee

Hive

J. A. OCPIS 6- SON Ladies' Ready-To-Wear and Dry Goods Everything for the Co-Ed For the Lowest Prices of Dress and Athletic

FOOT WEAR In the City Go To the

Hackbarth Shoe Store Dahms 6- Lindemann, Props. All Kinds of Repairing Neatly Executed.

225 N. Minn. St.

MEYER The Leading Photographer 213t N. Minn. St.

Tel. No. 268


UNION

HOSPITAL

New VIm. Minn. A fireproof hospital supervised by graduate nurses giving the best service Phone No. 280

When you do it with heat, You can do it better with GAS.

I niersiaie Power Company Ceo. B. Fesenmaier

A. L ,Kusske, M. D. Practice limited to

Eye, Ear, Nose & Throat and Fitting of Glasses Offia over Farmers & Merchants Slate Bank Building.

New VIm

Minn.

H. M. Siebenbrunner

The Red Front Grocery The Store of Quality and Service Phone 43

New Vim. Minn.


. SCHOOL SUPPLIES

A COMPLETE'

DEPARTMEN路T

.MUESING路 DRUG' SIOR!, PHONES

,

.

52 -- 341


DEAlJ.ER IN

,"Where You, Buy Quality"

.

Terms Weekly

,,' 219 N. Minn.-St.


CONTENTS December 1925

LITERARY a) Peace on Earth, Good Will to Men

3

b) Ein [reudiger Heiliger Abend c)

4

Mrs. Jone's Poodle

8

.

d) Eine Lehreruiahl im Jahre 1729.

.

.11

e) Our Christian Viewpoint in the Teaching of Geography _13 f) Die staatliche Anerlrennung unserer Schulen g) For the Sake of Humanity .

EDITORIALS a) The New Editorial Staff

.

ALUMNI

.

.

.

. .26

NOTES

28

EXCHANGE.

.

COLLEGE

29

.

.30

CO-ED NOTES.

.

LOCALS.

.

AT H LET I CS

.

JOKES .

25

.

. .

-'7 .20

. 24

b) The Sunday School c) Societies

.

,

.

.

. . .

.

33 .34 37 .38


asv LS

DNI'MIL:!l'M::!IHL

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THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

PEAC'E ON EARTH; GOOD WILL TO MEN Christmas hells are loudly ringing, Pealing out their merry din;, ' All of Christendom is singing Hymns of thanks to God again: .

".

Throughout ages man held firmly 'To the promises of old, ' Trusting that the Christ would surely Come as prophecies had told,

will

"Peace on earth; good to men," Hosts of angels sang from heav'n.. ,Shepherds joyously did hasten To the child in, Bethlehem. Lying in a humble manger , , . Was the Ghrist-child, God and ,Man; All to whom God,was a stranger He would reconcile again. Christ has come .to' save Hi,s!peOl)le, Us, who' wandered from .His fold:' Ring it out from every steeple ; Have it all blind sinners told. Every year I hear it over: Christ was born a man for me; All my sins He wants to cover, 'Bring me back my liberty.

3


THE D. M. L. C. MESSElNGER

Every year His grace is stronger, Washing dean my newest guilt; Every 'year He tarries longer, Till my heart with joy is filled. Chr-istmas bells, continue ringing Till with saints I rest in heav'n 'Near my Savior, who was bringing Peace on earth, good will to men! A. F. R. '26 ,EIN FREUDIGER

HEILIGER ABEND

Es war Heiliger Abend. Dicht mid ruhig fielen grosse weisze Plocken ISchneevon dem-Himmel und ueberzeugen die kahle Erde mit einem \veihnachtlichen Kleide, Aus den Fenstern eines kleinen Haeuschens zu Oody, elnein .kleinen Staedtchen in dem noerdlichen Teil Wisconsdns, leuchtete ein Licht. Hier wohnte del' junge Pastor August Bussar t mit seiner jungen Ehegemahlin Hilda. Es war des 'SeelsOl'gerserstes JabI' im Amte, und seine meiste Arbeit war Missionsarbeit. Eine kleine Kirche stand nicht weit von dem Hause entfernt. Hier. hatte 'heute A\bend die junge Gemeinde sich versammelt. Sie wollten aus dem IMundeihrer freudigen kleinen Kinder, mit denen del' Pastor und, seine Frau ein Weihnachtsprogramm eingeuebt batten, die frohe Weihnachtsbotschaft hoereno Nach del' Feier war das junge Paar nach Hause gegangen, -und hier saszen sie nun in dem kleinen 'Studierzimmer, welches sehr huebseh nnd weihnachtlich ,geziert war. Die junge Frau sagte : ','Wie raichlich uns doch diese Leute beschenkt haben! Es haben nun schon acht nach del' Feier angeklopft, urn uns Froehliche Weihnaehten zu wuenschen nnd uns zu besthenken. Aber in aile meine \Veihnachtsfreude draengt sich immer wieder die Frage, wo mein Bruder Karl jetzt wohlsein mag. Ob er wohl noch lebt, odeI' ob er schon hente Abend mit den Engeln im Himmel den Heiland preist .?" "Ja," erwiderte ihl' Mann, "das' wird wohl eine Sache sein, die wir nicht el'fahren koennen, sonst haetten ,vir schon laellg'st von ibm geboert; delln del' Krieg ist doeh nun schon fuenf Jahre vorueber., Wir haben in Deuts'chland drei J'ahre auf ihn gewartet, uno da nns anch der Bericht seines Todes von del' Regierung gesClhicktworden ist, muessen wir doth wohl annehmen, dasz er tot seL" "Ieh 'habe mil' das, anch heute schon immer wieder gesagt, wenn mil' Bolche Gedanken kamen, abel' sein Bnd steht mil' trotzdem, allzu lebendig VOl'del' '8eele." Karl war del' einzige Bruder Hild~s. Er muszte als Soldat an dem Weltkrieg t~ilnehmen und seine 'Schwester, die


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

5

sonst keine Verwandten besasz, in einem Waisenheim zuruecklassen. Hilda wurde kurz nach dem Kriege mit August Bussart bekannt, waahrend er mit den amer-ikanischen Truppen eine Zeit lang in Deutschland war. Naohdem er wieder nach Amerika zurueckgekehr t war, studierte er drei Jahre in einem Predigerseminar, um. sich fuer das Pf'arr-amt ausbilden zu lassen. Nachdem er ausstudiert harte, Iiesz er die einsame Hilda herueber kommen und verehelichte sich mit ihr. Waehrend all diesel' -Jahre hatte sie nur dieses von ihrem Bruder gehoert, dasz er auf einem Unterseeboote ertrunken sei. Dieser Bericht schien ihr aher stets etwas zweifelhaft zu sein. "Ach, lasz UDS ein werrig auf dem Klavier spielen und singen," sagte Hilda, "damit wir auf andere Gedanken kornmen." Die jungen Leute hatten sich aber kaum au das Klavier gesetzt, da klopf'te es an der Tuer. "Was mag denn nun los sein ?" sagte August, Er ging an die Tuer. Als er sie oeffnete, da stand ein groszer, baertiger Mann VOl'.ihm, dessen Ueberrock ganz mit 'Schnee bedeckt war. Man konnte ihm gleich ansehen, dasz er ein Holzhauer war. "Is dies, wo dei lutherische Paschtor wohnt?" sagte del' Fremde in eiuer tiefen Baszstimme .. "Ja," antwortete A'u'gust, "seien ,Sie willkommen, und treten Sie herein." "Nei, nei, beste Dank;" sprach 'del' FV€lllde, "aber ich moec'hte' Ihn oitte, ()b Sie nicht so gut wollte sin un mit mi na wei Kamerade gehe, deun sie m()eclite'Ihne gern sehe, da esc heut Aibend·ja die heilige Ohristriacbt ist. Wi moe,c'hte gem a kleines Festdiens,t habe'.',' Der junge Pastor stand verdutzt dR. 'SoJ,lter mit diesem 'gruseligen, fremden Manne gehen?' ,Was mRg ihm bevorstehen' dort drauszen in dem Walde? Wer weisz, wo diese"Gesellsehaft sich aufhaelt, und .,was sie elgentlielh im Sinn haben? Kein Wunder, d,a,sz ihn soIche Gedanken bestuermten. Gerade kuerzlich ;hatte er gehoert, wie eine ISCh~l~von Maennern einen Pastor gefangen genommen und ihn beinahe zu Tode gepeinigt hatte. Wuerde ihm das auch passieren-? E'J.'entschlosz s.ich abel', mit diesem Manne· zu gehen, wei! es s€ine Pflkht wm', den Notduerftigen in Ohristo zu Ihelfe!}. ' "Hilda," sagte er, "geh hinuehel' nach del' Fran Marks und verbrjnge den Abend bei ihr; denn ic'h mnsz mit diesem Manne auf das Land." Weiteres 'sagte er ihl' nkht, damit sie sich Imine unnoenge Sorge UIll ihn mache. "Zi,e'n s,i sich warm an, denn es wil'd kalt sin. So sehl' schnell koenne mer au ,ni fruhl'e; denn del' Weg ist fUel'ehterlich," sagte del' Holzhauer. "Mer misse auch ei gauzes Ende fahre." In eineill altcll, gebrec1hlichen Ford fuhren die zwei 'Muenner fort. Es hatte aufgehoert zu sclmeien, und nun kam der Mond hier nnd da zum VOl'schein; es wur~'e aueh schon kaelter, als es frueher. am Albend gewesen war. Auf 'I~


6

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

dem Wege wurde sehr wenig erzaehlt, da del' Fremde seine ganze Aufmerksamkeit auf das Steuerrad richten muszte ; denn die Strasze war von dem 'Schnee glatt geworden und war nul' ein krummer, engel' Pfad. Nach einer Fahrt durch den tiefen Wald von ungefaehr sieben Meilen kamen die zwei endlich zu einer kleinen Lichtung, in welcher etliche Huetten standen. Ein schimmerndes Licht schien aus den Fenstern des einen Gebaeudes. ,VO'r diesem hielten sie. "Nu sind mer hie. Steige Sie abo Die Junges werde sich freue." Del' junge Pastor erstaunte, da er in das Zimmer kam. Els waren eine Zahl von ungefaehr fuenfundzwanzig Maennern in diesem.Raum versammelt. Alle sahen grob und roh aus ; denn es W::Jr nicht einer rasiert. "Nun moechte mil' a richtige Heiligabend-Feler habe, wie mer frueher zu Hause hatte. Erst moechte mer mal wieder die Weihuachtsgeschichte hoere, und dann wolle jner singe." Nun. nahm der Pastor seine- 'I'aschenbibel und las den Maennern die WeihnachtsgesC'hiehte vor, Dann predigte er ihnen die Predigt, die er am naechsten '.Dagin seiner kleinen Kirche zu Cody predigen wollte, Wie ruhig, wie andaechtig Iauschte diese kleine Schar den Wocten des Pastors! Als die Predigt vollendet nnd ein Geoot gesprochen war, fragte August: "Was fuel' ein Lied, wO'llenwir denn nun singen? Ge,sangbuecher haOOn wir keine, daravs wir die Worte lesen kO'ennen." "Was GO'tt tut, das iSlt wO'hlgetan!" erschO'll es ans dem Munde einer gan.zen Ainzahl; deun dies wal,'ein Lied, das aIle auswendig kO'nnten. Del' PastO'r merkte nun, dasz ein juengerer Mann aus einem Besteck eine Violine 'hervO'rnahm. Er stil1l!Illtean. KO'enntihr euch diese kl'aeftigen Maennerstimmen im tiefen, ruhigen W'alde vorstellen? Wie in del' Nachtstille die freudigeu Stimm:en erlklingen! Waehrend des ~ingens OOobachtetedel' PastO'r den ,Spieler, del' Siehl'kunstfel'tig die Violine spielte. Aehnelten nicht die Zuege seine., Mun'des beim Singen denen seiner Hilda? S'3:hendie Augen denn 'auch nicht 'aus wie IIildas? Nein, es 'kO'nnte dO'ch nicht (ID'O'eglieh sein! 'Violine konnte jim Bruder .abel' dO'ch auch' spielen! Abel' wie unvernuenftig, so etwas zu denken! Denn Karl war dO'chals to't berichtet wO'rden. Nach dem Liede leitete der- Spieler ueber auf eine' andere MelO'die,naemlich "Vom Himmel hO'chda kO'mmieh her." Nun sang er auch mit,einer hel'l'lichen TenO'rstimme. Koonnte es W'il'klichKarl sein ?, Denn gerade heute Abend hatte Hilda davon geredet, wie sie und i'hr.Bnlder fl'ueher dieses Lied so fl'eudig zusammen ges\mgen hatten: NaC'h dem Liede entschlo'sz sich del' PastO'r kUl'zer Hand, den Mann anzureden. "Bitte, mO'echten路Sie m~r nkht sagen, ob Sie nicht in der Stadt Mainz in Deutschland gewO'hnt'haOOn,und ob Sie nkht auf. einem UnterseeboO'tangesteUt waren ?', Del' junge Mann starrte mit Erstaunen den PastO'r an.


THE D. M.

L". C. MESSENGER

7

"Ja, das ist wahl', abel' woohaben Sie diese Auskunft bekommen? Diese ganze ISchar war eine Unterseebootmannschaf't. Wir w:urden waehrend des Krieges gefangen genomman und naeh Ianger Reise nach ,Saskatehewan transportiert. Nach del' F'riedenserklaerung galb man uns frei,' und dann kamen wir nach den Vereinigten ,staa ten, wo wir uns genug Geld verdienen wollten, dasz wir heimreisen konnten. Nachdem wir zwei Jahre uns Geld gespart batten, hoerten wir von den schlechten Zeiten dort drueben und karnen zu dem Entschluss, hier zu bleiben und unsere Verwandten und Bekannten durch amerikanisches Geld zu ernaehren." "Haben Sie eine Schwester namens Hilda gehabt?" fragte del' Pastor in groszer Erreg1ung weiter. ~'Ja, wahrlich! Sollten Sie diese kennen? Lebt sie denn noch ? Ist sie hier in Aunerika? Bitte reden ,Sie, denn ieh habe nie wieder erwartet, von ihr zu hoeren." "Ja, ich kann Ihnen eine grO'sze "Veihnaehtsueberrasehuilg bereiten, so wie Sie mir eine bereitet huben. Hilda ist mein Weib und wO'hnt m'it mil' in CO'dy. Oft haben wir Ihrer. gedacht und haben alles 'MO'eglieheversuclit, Sie zu finden, abeT es ,sehien aUes fl'uehtlos. Die Regiel'ung hatte beriehtet, dasz sie mit dem Untel'seeboO'te untergegangen seien. NUll wO'llen wir abel' zurueek naeh Cody. Dies ist fuerwahr eine grO'sze Weihnaehtsfreude!" sagte del' PastO'r. "Gott sei Dank, unsere Bitten . sind erhO'ert worden !" spraeh Karl nun freudig .. Laszt tillS nun na,eh CO'dygehen. Ieh kann nieht warten, Ibis ieh meine 'Schwester sehe." Nun setzJen ,sich die zwei Maenner in das alte FO'rd, das einzige Fuhrwerk, das zur Stelle war, und fuhren nach Cody. Es war nun sehO'n beinahe Mittel'nacht. Del' ganze Himmel war besaet mit 'Sternen; denn die Wolken waren nun aIle verschwunden. EiS'schien, als: ob del' Weg noch eimnal sO'weit sei, als er frueher am Abend war. Als die zwei bei dem Stadtturm v'orbeifuhren, da ,sehlug die Uhr gerade hallt eins. Ails sie bei dem kleinen Haeusehen des Pastors anlangten, nahm .A(ugust,seinen Schwager .hinein, ging zu den Na('hbarn nnd 'holte Hilda. Was fuel' eine grO'sze Freude diesen S{) lange getrennten Gesdlwistern zu ']"eil wurde! Hilca war so ueberra,s<.:bt,dasz sie VOl'Freude nieht wtlszte, was zu tun. E'he diese frO'ehlieben, dankbaren Leute zu Bette gingen, dankten ,sie ihrem GO'tte fuel' die langerwuenschte lDrfuel11l11g ihrer Bitte. Waere jeliliand in del' Nae'he gewesen, del' haette ZpT"" Sehlusz das wO'hlbekamite Lied geh()el't: Nun danket alle Gott Mit Herzen, Mund und Haenden, Del' grO'szeDinge tut An uns und allen Enden, Del' uns von lVIutterleib Uud Kindesbeinen an Unzaehlig viel zu gut路 Dnd fiO'chjetzund getan! W. E. \V. '26.


8

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

'MRS. JONES; POODLE Mrs. Jones was one of those good-natured ladies who are taken with but one serious fault-that of having overdue regard for a four-footed creature. In this instance it happened to be a poodle dog. Poodle was a very striking little ball of whiteness with two eyes as bright as diamonds and a nose as black 'as a piece of coal. His tail had a curl to it that might be described as clever, Mrs. Jones lived in. a small town where there were a goodly number of ladies, like herself, interested in poodles. On this particular afternoon, had we visited here, we would have found her v~ry busy. She was seated, at her writing desk. For a while she would sit in deep thought 'and next she would be busily writing down what she' had, thought out, She was preparing an essay on the "Care' and Training of Poodle Dogs" to be read the following Friday night at the "WomenlS'P.oodleClub!' Just as Mrs. Jones was well started 'at her work, the door, leading to the kitchen opened and Mary, the maid, spoke, "Ma'm, there's a man at the door who wants to know if you want to buy some extracts, liniment, baking powder, and what not." "Tell him I'm supplied in that line, and, furthermore, I am! too busy just now to bother." Mary disappeared, and Mrs. Jones, turned to her essay. "Let me see, what was I going to write just as Mary interrupted me? Oh, yes, 'A ipoodleshould have a nap at least once during the day, preferably in the afternoon, immediately after dinner. He should have a comfortable bed, and you should be very careful not to disturb him while he is sleeping. A nap, besides being very conducive to good health for the poodle, gives one time to do one's work! If Reginald were not sleelLJing now, I 'could not be writing this." At this moment Mary again put her head in through the door. "Ma'm, there's a lady at the door who wants to see you." "What does she want?" "I forgot to ask her." "Please go back and find out." "'T'heidea of Mary's not finding out what the lady wanted, before corning in and bothering me. She ought to realize the importance of my work." Mary had returned. "Ma'm~ she wants to know if you wouldn't buy a cook book. Lt's a very nice one, Ma'm." "Well, what next? Mary, I want you to understand you are not to bother me with such things. If anyone comes with something to sell again, send him away. I must get this speech done for tomorrow night, and how can I if I must tend to 'everything else?"


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

9

Mary went away qnite disappointed. ,She had hoped that her mistress would buy the hook because it was just what she needed. Mary had the cooking and other housework toO do here. It was not hard work as there were no children in the family, unless Reginald could he classed as one. According to Mary's idea of it she would have that "pup" outdoors in a minute, but she knew her rrrlstress too well to try anything as desperate as: that would be. "When Mary interrupted me what was I writing? Oh, yes! 'A poodle should be given a 'bath every day. He should be washed with a pure soap in warm water, then dried with a soft towel. _Alfterhe is thoroughly dry, dust him with talcum powder.' " Mrs. Jones leaned back in her chair with a 'sigh of relief. AJtleast the worst half of her paper was done. Aill she had left to tell about was the moral training of a 'Poodle. 1\,s Reginald was a well-behavedyoungster, she took great pride in telling how she went about to train him. Just as she started to work again, Mary opened路the door. "Well; who's the next intruder?" asked Mrs. Jones in not a very mild tone. "Two ladies, Ma'm," answered Mary. "They want to see you. Here are their cards," and' she handed two 'calling cards to Mrs. Jones. "Oh, yes, Mary, tell them to c?me in. ,\hey are old friends." They proved to be girlhood chums of Mrs. Jones. 'I'hey ta lked over past experiences and happenings. Jennie was living in California, and .Elsie. was on a farm in the Middle West. "But why haven't we seen each other oftener?" remarked Mrs. -Jones. , "The children have kept me busy. W路ealways had all we could do to get our work done from day to day," answered M.rs. Brown. . "The same is true of me," said M,I'iS. Johnson. "Oh, yes, I suppose you do have to work N keep children out of mischief. If Reginald weren't so good, it would make it impossible for me to take care of him mYEelf." "Reginald! Who's he?" exclaimed Mrs. Brown. "Why, he's my own dear pet. If he weren't sleeping, I 'Wouldshow him to you at once. However, he may be awake. I'll see." Mrs. Jones went into the bedroom and cautiously approached the dog',!;bed. 'She could, find him nowhere. She ran back to the parlor screaming. "Oh! oh! oh! where is my Reginald? He's not there. He'S lost." Natuarlly this shocked her visitors. As yet they understood Reginald to be a child of .Mrs..Jones' and not a poodle.


10

THE

D. M. fL. C. M.ESSBNGER

Mrs. .Iones was very excited. Mary heard the noise and came to her mistress. "See if you can find Reginald anywhere around. I looked everywhere in the room and he's not there. He couldn't have gotten out of it without my seeing him because I was sitting right in the door all the time while he was sleeping. Look in the yard, down cellar and everywhere you can think of." During the next few seconds everyone was 'running from place to place, looking for the lost "pet." Next Mrs. Jones was at the phone calling the police department. The neighbors were coming out from every direction. Some were looking for a child and some for a .poodle, Those who knew it wa-s a dog would take special pains to see that he was not on their premises, and then they would discontinue the search. Just as the pour bereaved mistress was almost giving up hope of seeing her dear Reginald again, a knock came at the door. She eagerly" 'Opened the door because she thought, "Rurely they have found him." It was only the washer woman returning the wash, Bridget did not notice the pale color in Mrs. .Iones' face because she was herself too angry to notice things. She rushed into the room and set the basket. on the floor, exclaiming, "Ma'm, 1's sorry but I 'ull haf to quit washin' fer ya'. I can't stan' no .sich foolish stuff." Mrs. Jones wondered what had happened to Bridget. She had been washing for 'her for eight years, and there had never been any disagreement like this before. "Why, Bridget,' why do you talk like that? What's the matter?" Bridget was plainly very angry. "Don't yo come with any 0' yo niey, nicy talk to me now. Yo all know what's de matta. I's willin' to wash clothes fer ye but not any four-feeted critters like 'what yo' tried to fool unto me." "Now, Bridget, don't get unreasonable with your talk. I don't understand you. As far as I know, 1 never have asked you to wash anything like 'critters', whatever that may be." "Huh, so yo' hasn't, has ye? What yo' done call that, huh?" Bridget reached under the clothes in the basket and held before Mrs. Jones a very terrified little white something. Mrs. Jones clasped it to her heart. "Oh, m:)' own dear Reginald!" Although many people were around her, Mrs. Jones was unheedf'ul 'Ofthem all. "1 see it all, you poor little pet. You fell out of the bed into the basket, and they carried you off." 'I'he rest that Mrs. .Iones said could not be understood by the people, but undoubtedly Reginald understood. We can imagine the surprise and consternation of those who were looking for a lost child and now were finally brought to understand that the poodle was the lost article. O. O. '28


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

11

EINE LEHRERWAHL.IM JAHRE 1729 Unter .einem Haufen pommerschen Akten fand sich folgendes Protokoll ueber eine 1729 in einem Dorfe stattgefundene Lehrerwahl: "Nachdem auf gesl'hehenes.toedliches A1blebendes bisherigen Sehulmeisters skh nul' fuenf Liebhaber gemeLlet, so wurde zuvoerderst vorn Pastor loci in einer Bestimmung nach Matth. 18, 19.-20. die GeIDIeindezur Erbittung goettlieher Gnade zu diesem wichtigen Geschaefte erinnert, sodann in del' Kirche VOl' Augen und Ohren del' ganzen Gemeinde die Singprobe mit denen Bewerbern fuergenommen und nach deren Endigung dieselben im Pfarrhaus von endesunterschriebenen Personen noch weitel' auf folgende An-t und Weise tentiret: 1. Martiln Ott, Schuster allhie, 30 Jahre des Lebens alt, hat in del' Kirche gesungen: a) "Chrilst lag in 'I'odesbanden," b) "Jesus meine Zuversicht," c) "Sieh hier bin ich Ehrenkoenig"-Hat abel' noch viel Melodie zu lernen, und koennte seine Stimme bessel' sein. Gelesen hat er Genesis 10, 26, bis all's, buohstabirte V. 26. his 29. Das Lesen war angehend, im Buchstabiren machte er zwei:Fehler. Dreierlei Handschrift hat er gelesen-mittelmaeszi.g; drei Fragen aus dem Verstand beantwortet=-recht ; aus dsm Cateciuemo de s. coena und die 54. Frage rezitirt ohne Fehler; des Reehnens ist er durehaus unerfahren. 2. Jakob Maehl, Weber aus D., hat die Fluenfzig hinter sich, hat gesungen: a) "0 Mensch, bewein, Dein," b) "Zeuch ein zu deinen Thorent c) "WeI' nul' den lieben Gott." Doch Melodieging ab in vIde andere Lieber; 'Stimrlllie,solltestaerker sein, quiekte mehrmalen, so doch nieht seill musz. Gelesen Josua 18, 23-26 ohne Fehler; dreierlei Handschriften gelesen-schwaeh und mit Stocken; drei Fragen aus dem Verstand, hierin gab er S-atisfaktion. AJusdem Katechismus' den Decalog und die 41. Frage rezitirt ohne Fehler; dJi.ctando drei Reihen gescrieben-fuenf Fehler; des Reehnens au-ch nicht kundig. 3. Philipp Hopp, 'Schneider aus G:, sehon 'dn alt gebr,ech!i(路her Mann von 60 Lebensjahrell, sollte lieber zu Hause gebliebeu sein, als .sich dieses vermessen. Hat gesungen: a) "E'in Laemmlein geht," b) '''Mitten wir im Leben." 8timme wie ein bloekend Kalb, auch oeftermalen ,in unrechte Lieder verfallen. Gelesen Josua 19, 7-13., gar jaenrmel'lich, buchstabirte 18, 22-23 mit viel AnstoSrzen,das grosze T ein Stein des Anlaufens, kam endlich ruebel',' Drei Fragen aus dem Verstand-blieb fest sitzen. Dreierlei Handschriften 'gelesen, schon im Anfang gesagt, dals,zer des ilic'ht erfahren sei. Dictando nul' drei Woerter gesrhrieben..--lmitMuehe zu lesen. R.e(hnen ganz U11bekannt.er zaehlte an den Fillgern w.ieein klein Kind. Wurce ihm gerueldet, dasZ''el" thoer'iCht gehan-


12

THE D. M. iL. C. MESSENGER

delt babe, sich zu melden, was er auoh mit 'Phraenen und Seufzen bekannt. 4. Jo1uJJrm Sotvuetl, ein Kesselflicker von allhier, hat 50 .Iahre des Lebens auf Erden gewandelt und hat gesungen: a) "0 Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort," b) "Eins ist noth," c) "Liebster Jesu wir sind hier" mit ziemlichem applauso. Gelesen und buchstabirt Genesis 10, 13-18, auch nicht uneben, Beim Katechismus bemerkte man, dasz er sothanen Stuecken noch nicht im eaieroitio stehet. Diouuuio drei Reihen geschrieben-ging an, was Buchstaben betrifft, doch 10 Fehler. Des Rechnen nul' im Addiren erfahren. 5. Friedrich Loth, ein Unteroffizier aus Bchl., so iill hochedlen von Grumkow'schen Regiment den Feldzug gegen die Schweden gemacht und alldort ein Bein verloren, 45 Jahre des Lebens alt, hat gesungen: a) "Chrh'lt lag in 'I'odesbanden," b) "AUein GMt in del' Hoeh',"-gut, starke Stimme, doch fehlt die Melodie im Ganzen, fiel einmal 'in ein ander Lied. Dreierlei Handschriften fertig gelesen. Gelesen und buchstabirt Genesis 10, 13-18, ging ziemlich: Katechismus-wohl in" ne. Vier Fragen aus dem Verstand-ziemlich. Dictando drei Reihen, doch mit acht Feblern; Rechnen-A'ddiren und :Subtrahieren inne. Es wurde nun einmuetig davon gehalten, dasz JaJwb Maehl wohl del' kapabelste, allein da derselbe fremd und ohne Vermoegen, haben etli'(~heAnwesende dem Pastori angelegen, dasz FOlJR-MESSENGER' er zu einem bekannten Manne inklinieren wDlle, ob sie schon wissen, dasizer die groeszte Muehe mit ihm haben werde, ibn zu informieren, er sei gar nkht .so schlecht und erboetig, Informationen anzunehmen; itCim 'sei seine A;uffuehrungbekannt und gut, wogegen den andern, namentlich dem Kesselflicker, nicht zu trauen, sintemalen er viel (Lurchdie Lande streiche, dagegen del' Kriegsknecht wlahl die Fuchtel gegen d.ie armen Kindlein zu stark zu gebrauchen in Verdacht zu nehmen seL was deren mitleidligenMuettern derselben d<whsehl' ins Herz stechen und wehe tun koennte, auch sei zwischen roben 801daten und solchen Wuermlein d,uchern Unterschied zu setzen. Pastor liesz nun votieren und wurde Maehl eill'stimlmtigerwaehlt. Da nun ,s.elberJak()b M'aehl allezeit bonae to/mae gewesen und die ganze Gemeinde Pa!'toren darum bitten, so giebt 'auch dieser im Vertrauen auf Gnttes 'Segen gemeldeten Maehl sein votWfq, abo Nach abgelegten votis wurde ,solchem del' Ents'chluss nebst erforderlkhe Erinnerung und Verhalten eroeffnet, auch angezeigt, dasz er flugs zuzieben ,sollte.-Hierauf wurde bei berzlichen S€genswunschedes Pastoris mit des,sen und del' ganzen Gemeinde Befried1gung, auch beiderseitiger Einigkeit solches Protokoll verf'Rsset und unter~{'hrie· ben." Luth. Kircbenbl.

",'


THE D. M. t, C. MESSENGER

OUR CHRISTIAN

VIEWPOINT IN THE TEACHING GEOGRAPHY

13

OF

There is perhaps no subject with the possible exception of history which has caused as much discussion during the past few year's among schoolmen as the subject of geography. We hear much of regional geography, problem method, home geography, , type geography, vocational work, human geography, phyeiographic influences, trade relations and other factors' bound up in the teaching of geography. The' geographical pot is boiling merrily. Whether this paper adds salt or straw to the geographical soup remains to be seen. My task, as I understand it, is this : to show at the hand of a popular textbook in geography how we ,can make the teaching of this subject subservient to our Christian aims in education. In fulfilling this task, I wish to emphasize three points, namely, what the aims of geography teaching in the public schools are, what the aims are in our schools, and, how these last are to be given consideration jn our classrooms. The first two 'portions will be but briefly treated, while the last portion is to receive a more or less "detailed' treatment in outline form. First of all, what are the aims of .the geography work in the public schools? I think I can safely ignore the aims of a large portion of the' geography teachers in most schools who find their highest ambitions realized when they have passed an appreciable number of pupils through the state examinations safely. Although at bottom they are among the chief aims of the public school system, they' are of rio value in this discussion. The aims we are concerned,with are those the writers of textbooks and the s'o-called authorities in geographical science harbor and attempt topass on in varied forms to the pupils.' T'he~eaims are already' indicated in the general definition geographers give of their' science. This reads somewhat as follows: Geography is the study of the earth as the home of man, or as J~e physical environment of man, and at the same time the study of man as he accommodates himself "to this 'environment. '1'here we have the twofold viewpoint' indicated, which finally finds its common root in evolution. ' For a study of causal relations will demand an explanation of the origin of this physical environment and so we have first of all, that' sweet little fairy tale beginning, "Millions and millions of years, ago, when this old world was in its infancy . . ." and then let your imagination go as fast and as far' as it pleases. So by a curious system of rising and falling of the crust of the earth with the help of unexplained and unexplainable changes in temperature, with the help of great ice sheets and glaciers, we have a perfect picture of the causes for everything found over, on, or under the earth's surface. The sec-

,<

'(_l

\'


14

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

ond portion of the aim is the one we find at Babel, well indicated by Dr. Neumann in his 'book, "Edut"ation for Moral Growth," page 277. . He says : "Geography teachers can do much to cultivate this better conception because, from the ethical viewpoint, geography is the study of what man's will and reason can accomplish to overcome the difficulties of his natural environment. ,The story of civilization is. the tale of how mankind has triumphed over wild beasts, plagues, excessive heat, biting cold, and other obstacles. The ocean, which was once a barrier, men have turned into a road by which swift, luxurious steamers 'bring land. and land into touch. Man 'has 'wrought for himself still another road through the air, just as he has also built roads beneath the earth and beneath the water. T:o avoid dangerous routes he has built a Ca:peCod Canal, to save more lives he has erected a sea-wall at Galveston, he has irrigated deserts, drained swamps, cleaned up plague 'spots, tunneled mountains, connected oceans Iby canals, conducted drinking water for a city from a reservoir over 100 miles away. All these are the conquests of man's will and reason over the difficulties presented by his natural environment." In short, "These be thy gods, o Israel." This leads Neumann and his followers to the following conclusion, 路'the aim 'of these' people in almost all branches of so-called 'secular education: "We shall have a world free from the assaults of the brute in man when enough men and women take to heart sound ideals of the purposes for which human will and intelligence are most wisely spent." In other words, let'路s use the subject to evolve out of man some of his brute instincts and thus do our share for the salvation of the world, for the brotherhood of man. In spite of the high sounding phrases just heard, the ends sought are these : a world with all the unpleasant features such as disease, sin, and restraint evolved out, so that the wild lust for self-gloriflcation and' carnal pleasures may take an unhindered course. Summarized, the aims of the 'public school will be as follow's: Evolution is to be taught as a proved and incontestable fact. .This process of evolution is still going on, for environment 'has an influence on mankind. and mankind has an influence on environment. 'This is carried out to show the interdependence 'of peoples, which in turn is to assist in suppressing the brute instincts still left in man as the result of incomplete evolution. Now to lead over to our aims. There allow me also to form my definition of the term geography. Geography is the study of the earth as God's 'creation, given to man as his temporal home. This definition will give us a twofold viewpoint also. First we will study the earth as the masterpiece from the hand of the Creator. We wi l.l lead the child to see and feel the power and glory of God as it is revealed in His creation, we wiII lead him to see the lore and wisdom of


THE D. M.~.

C. ME:SSENGER

15

God in His provision for the needs of men in all climates and under all oouditions. The second viewpoint will be indicated by God's command to Adam to subdue the earth. Here we have the opportunity to show how man has made use of, or has abused, these gifts of God. Those, I think, should be our viewpoints. Our aims I have summed up in our own course of study as follows: 'We wish to lead our children to realize with. the Psalmist: 1. 0 Lor-d, how great are thy works. Ps. 92. 2. Whoeo is wise and will observe these things, even they shall un deretand the loving-kindness of our Lord, Ps, 107. 3. 0 give thanks unto the Lord, for He is good, and His mercy endureth forever, Ps. 106. If we accept the principles laid down in the foregoing paragraphs, it follows that our work in geography cannot concern itself only with a negative correction of wrong 路01' partly wrong statements and viewpoints. vVe 'cannot be satisfied with the correcting of such statements as: "Millions and millions of years ago, before man lived on the earth, coal was formed . ;" or, "The ancestors of our birds were not like the birds today. They had teeth in their jaws and scales instead of feathers." True it is that we must speak of these things and set them rilght if we use textbooks in which such statements occur, But our Ohristian faith is positive, not negative, and our teaching of geography in the light of that faith must be of a positively Christian nature. Allow me to outline briefly a course in geography indicating the method of approach we have tried to use m our own school durdng the past few years. Our geography class begins with the third and fourth grades in a combined 'class, There the subject is of necessity of a home geography nature, arising from the environment of the child. We make use of no text-book and thus arrange and present the subject matter to suit ourselves. We begin by correlating the first Bible 'story related in the religion class with the geography work We refresh in the memories of the children the story of Paradise, emr.JhasiJ\ing the fact that Adam and Eve had no need of worrying about food, clothing, or shelter, as such as were nee 'ed were supplied by the Lord. After the Fall, however, we find that the need for clothing was aprparent at once, for A'dam and Elve were ashamed of their nakedness. The Lord also calls AJdam's attention to the fact that the gathering of food will' henceforth be a bur-den to him, for "In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till thou return -to the ground." The need, then, for clothing, food, and shelter is thus shown to be the result of sin and we attempt to impress that fad from the beginning. But although sin has caused the need, God in His great mercy order-athings so that the need can be satisfied, not without trouble and burdensome labor indeed, but still the Lord.


16

THE D. M. L. C. MESSElNGER

does not abandon sinful man to his own devices. "Unto Adam and his, wife did the Lordi make coats of skin and clothed them." God still :provides by placing H1s blessings on the labor of the hands of sinful man. Man needs food, clothing, and 'shelter, and shelter as .a result of sin. " Fooda) Grains" .mdlling. "Genesis 1, 23. b) Meat, cattle-raising, eggs, milk, butter, cheese, Genesis 1; 28. ' c) Vegetables, fruits, "beverages, spices. Clothing. Genesis, 2, 21. a) skins, leather. b) wool. c) cotton: d) flax. e) silk. Sheiter. \rhe tents of Abraham- will .provide a good introduction to- this portion of the work. 'fihe materials used 'in the construction of various shelters are discussed, such as stone, brick, wood, ice, cement, steel. God provides materials suited for every climate in abundance. All the materials discussed so far must appear as gifts of God to man for his' use. .Man sometimes makes use of them to the glory of God and, to the good of his neighbor, but more often he follows the example of the men at Babel, misusing the gifts of God to make a name for himself. Next follows a study of the fam'iliar geographic forms, such as pond, river sys,tem, lake, ocean, valley, hill, forest, soil, etc. The thought we wish to stress here is the one of an all-wise Creator who .rasnioned the earth as a dwelling place for man. Here again the Creation story will be at hand to serve us. Naturally we will not talk of that in every lesson. The aim is ,to have the children at all times conscious of the fact that all we study about the world around us is due to God's providence solely. When we discuss, the so-called rules of nature we are reminded at 'once of Noah's blessing. "fhere are no rules of nature, there is only God. Mining forms another topic for study in these grades. The viewpoimt is this: God has placed all minerals in the earth for the use of man----ceoal,iron, copper, gold, silver, tin, aluminum, platinum, nickel. Manufacturing forms the next topic. God allows man to invent machinery and' new methods of carrying on work, so that His name may be glorified and so that man's fellow may be better served. Man uses most inventions to serve himself and to promote his own carnal pleasure. We then take up, the study of the 'People of other Ian {'S, especially of the child life in other lands. Esquimo, Indi-an, Ohinese, .Iapanese and other life is taken up. We show here that the differences in peoples are not due to the environment in which they live, but rather due to sinful pride shown at Babel. Here we also call attention to the religions of the' people and show the miseionary oppor-tunities and the need of the G.ospel in those lands, 'Jlhe life of the people is em-


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

17

phasized rather than economic or 'physical geogra'phy. In the fifth and sixth grades geography of a more formal nature is taken up. A!. study of the United States in detail has as its special aim the observance of the goodness of God in so signally blessing our land with every manner of natural resource in great profusion .. The different sections as studied in regional fashion will bring out the fact that God has given each section some special gifts by which the inhabitants are enabled to makea living. The mountain states afford little opportunity ror agriculture, but God has given the ore-beariug mountains to provide the people with a livelihood. The sparsely watered foothill region He has clothed with grass which provides ample fodder for large herds of cattle. 'I'he results of the study of the geography of our country must be thankful hearts, giving God the glory. After the study, of North America has been completed our course takes up the study of winds, seasons, zones. Here again, as in all workings of nature, we recognize the hand of the wise and merciful God, who sends rain ou the just and on the unjust, and Whose voice even the winds and the sea obey. He has wisely provided various climatic and 'soil conditions in order that a great variety of plant and animal life may exist which can <bemade use of' by man. These same considerations will govern the study of the 路geography of the remaining, continents. ,Southern European geography can he 'correlated with the Biblical account of the spread of Christianity by the apostles; JDgypt will be given a fine setting through the review of the story of Joseph and the history of Israel; the Near East will be closely linked with Old-and New Testament happenings in the lives of the patriarchs, prophets, apostles, and of Chvist. . In general I would say that we can learn much from the .authors of our textbooks. Although we can seldom point out specific references to the term evolution, yet their entire geographical work is built up solely and consistently on that one idea and from that one viewpoint. Let us a's consistently teach our geography from the viewpoint of the Gospel and of our Christian faith. If we do that, we are teaching a subject not embraced in the public school curriculum, namely, Geography, a science of God's wonderful creation and providential maintenance 'Of the earth as the temporary abiding place of man. H. S. '16. DIE STAA'TLICHE ANERKENNUNG (ACOREDITATlON) . UNSERER S'OHULE'N ' Nach dem Entscheid des Bundes-Obergerichts (Oregon Fall) muss der Staat den Eltern das Recht lassen, die IDrziehungsanstalt fuer ihre Kinder selbst zu waehlen, muss aufs


18

THE D. M. L. ,C. MESSENGER

Ersiehungsmonopol verziehten und aueh andere Sehulen dulden und. '(anerkennen." Wie ioeit ersireckt sich. nun solche «Amerlcennumq" oaer ((accreditation"? Die Opportunisten uuter uns gestehen dem Staate volle "supervision" zu, solange er uns nicht in den Beligionsunterrieht dreinredet und in den weltliehen Faeehern keine geradezu wieder-biblischen Lehren fordert. Die besten unter diesen Opportunisten, die del' ,Sache ueberhaupt nachdenken, sagen etwa so: Die .schule sei das Grenzgebiet, wo die drei Hauptstaende (Naehr-, Lehr- und Wehrstand) gemeinsame Jnteressen haben, naehmlich die Ausbildung und Erziehung des Kiudes fuel' }< amilie, Kirche und Staat. Darum sei jeder ddeser drei Faktoren berechtigt, ja, verpfliehtet, darauf zu sehen, dass seine eigeutuermlichen Iriteressen im Unterricht ,und in 'del' Erziehung nicht zukurzkommen, Wie abel' die Kirche keine Sehule "akkredi'tiere," an del' nicht ein von ihr "zertifizierter" Lehrer in ihrem 'Sinn und Geist erzieht, so koerme auch del' Staat keine .Schule "akkreditJieren," an eel' nicht ein staatlieh "zertifizierter" Lehrer so viel Zeit und Kraft auf gewisse Faecher verwendet, als er (del' Staat) fordern zu muessen glaubt. ,S'oll abel' del' Staat eine Schule "anerkennen," dann mueS'seer auch das Aln£sichtsrecht haben und ,ausueben. So ist denn in einem Staate unter Mithilfe und Zustimmung unsrer:seits ein Schulgesetz zus,tandegekommen, das einen staatlichen ",supervisor" vorsieht mit weit· g'ebenden Ma'chtbefugnissen. Jener "supervi,sor" fing seine Arbeit damit an, dasz eT den Unterricht in d~r Religion nnd in del' deutschen Sprache waehrend del' regelrechten S·chulzeit einfacohverbot und dasz er unsre Lehrer zwang, in den Faechern des weltlichen Wis'Sens sich genau nach dem "time· allotm3ut" d'er n-aerhsten 'Staat<S's,ehulezu richten, an del' 'oefters junge Mae:lcben das Zepter fuehrten, die nicht einmal die e~nfache Hochschule a.bsolviert hatten. So kam es z. B. VOl', d,ass eine nnsrer mehrkla.ssigen Dorfs,ehulen mit vier er· fahren-en Lehrern das "time-aJlotment" einer einklassigen Landschl1'lemit einer juugen, unerfahrenen Lehrerin erhielt! F:_erner,nach jenem Gesetz duerfen Lehrer, Lehrerinnen und Pastoren, die kein Srtafrtts,-Zertifikathaben, vom ersten l:lep· teruiber an nicht mehr unterriehten, und es ist aenszerst schwer, fuel' mane'he fast unmoeglich, ein soJ.ches"certificate" zu erlangen. Infolgedessen baben mehrere Lehre'r bereits Berufe in andere Staaten angenomrnen. Wenn nun au~h die betreffende Staatsbeh{)er-de'beide Augen zudruecken sollte, so bleiht doch da'l! f'aLs'chePrinzip m~tsamt dem boesen Gesetz bestehen. WuenschenSlwerter waere es daher, dasz die Staatsbeamten dies "vicioUislaW''' streng durchzufllehren 8uchten, damit die Frage naeh del' staatlichen Beaufsichtigung unsrer Schulen dn einern Test-Fall VOl' Gericht einmal grundsaetzUch entschieden wuerde. Leider ist del' Fall von vorneherein gegen uns stark praejud.iziert, da jenes Gesetz von uDsern Opportu-


THE D. M.,L. ,C. MESSENGElt

19

nisten mbtverabfasst wurde." Zudem enthaelt die Entscheidung des Buridesgerichts im Oregon-Fall einen sehr- bedenklichen Paragraph en. Eine gerechte, und billige Anerke1nnung In einer Rlepub'llk beruht vieles auf Treue 'Ltnd Glcuben. Wo dieses fehlt zwischen Buerger und Buerger, zwischen Beam ten und Buergern, da wohnt sich's: bessel' in einer Monarehie. So wurden die Verhaeltnisse unertraegltch, aLs das Spitzeltum sein Unwesen t'deb urid ohne jegliehen Grund berechtigten Verdachts die Wohnungen ganz unbescholtener Buerger durchsuchte, und sie selbst auf S'c-hritt und Tritt beobachtet wurden ,(Vrgl. die 'Kriegaspitzel ). Del' Staat muss auf 'I'reu und Gluuben .annehmen, 'dasz wir, die wir uns die E'rziehung unsrer 'Kinder s'o"'viel eRVl'a kosten lassen, dazu sehen werden, dasz ,sie ret'llts'c:haffene Buerger und brauchbare ,Mens-chen weI'den., Wir"Ju'n und treiben nichts im Verborgenen: unsre 8chnlen sind von keiner hohen Mauer umgeben, sondern stehen jedermann 'offen; unsre Lehrer Wleisen sich ueberall als 'ordentliehe Menschen aus; unsire Schueler stehen denen del' Staatsschule im Betr,agen in und auszer eer SchuJe wahrlich nicht n3;('h; unsr,e S(~hulbueeherenthalten nieMs Alnar路 cliistiselies, Revolutionaeres. WeI' nkht bnes,willig die Augen verschlieszt, muss, jederzeit davoll ueberzeugt sein, dasz die ehristliche .sclmle, ein InstituL ist, das dem GemeinwohI nul' diell't, das daher del' Sta:at v'onvo'rnhereiil "anerkennen" und in Ruh lassen sollt!:), solang:e nicht, das Gegenteil offenbar wiT'd. Elne an dere "Anerkennuug;' odeI' "laccreditatiO'n" such-en und wollen wir nicht. Drumdtist dle "poJizei,Uche lnspektiou" des Staates nicM ausgeschlossen. 'Ei' m:ag darauf seh~n, dasz unsre Sichulhaeuser in sanitaeter EIilliS.ichtalleu vernllenttigen Anspruechen genuegen, ob uns-re Scbueler ansteckende Krankheiten hahen u. a. i'Und, del' Staat soil anch hiel'in njeht allzn 'fmeddlesome" sei~nund skb. nie'ht von "clubs" ueberspannter Frauen zum 'Buettel machen lassen. Was i~t zu tun zwecks siaa;tlicher "Anerke~nun.g"? Zunaechst niehts BesO'nderes: laszt nus "mit stillem We路 ,sen gewissenhaft und treu arbeiten." Dar'auf Jegt GO'tt seinen Begen" und wenn Er aU!'izerdemuO'eh ein Uebriges tUll will, wil"d E.r es_fuegen, dasz sO'lche treue Avheit anc'll bei denen, i die, drauszen Hind, "Anerkennun~" findet. Mit lauter Reklameund "publicity" wir-d del' Sacbe schlecht geclient. Wenn mal ,gegen eine bestilll'lll,te Schule :an einem bestiIDfmten Ort del' VOl~wurf.schwacher I~eisttJllgen erhoben wO'r{en is,t, mag man bei passender gelegenheit, wen'll ll1!ankann, dem PubHkum das Gegenteil beweisen. SoOnstaher in den eig:enen Blaet'ern und in weltlkhen Zeitungen immer wieder aU'sPO's,aunen,was in del' und del' Schule geleistet wurde, el1tspricht wed,er dem stillen, ruhigen, bescheidenel1vVesen, das das EVM~geliwn wivkt


20

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

und fordert, noch laeszt sich solches Gebahren decken mit dem Spruch : "LaSISeteuer Licht leuchten VOl' den Leuten." Die rechte " publicity" F'raeulein L. steht seit Jahren bei del' Familie N. in Dienst. Besonderer Verhael tnisse wegen wird die A'rbeit immer schwerer, ohne dasz del' Lohn dementsprechend steigt. F'reuudinnen haben ihr laengst zugeredet, leichtere und bessel' bezahlte Arbeit anzunehmen. Auch sind tihr mehrere verlockeude Angebote gemacht, Abel' sie bleibt, weil sie fast unentbehr lich ist und in treuer Ergebenheit an ihrer Herrschaft haengt. Da ist Herr St. IEI' verrichtet schwere Arbeit in einern Kohlengeschaef't. Sein "boss" und dessen Kunden koennen sich absolut auf ihn vet-lassen. Andere Firmen haben ihm wiederholt bessere Stellen angeboten. Alber Herr ,St. bleibt, weil er weisz, das alte Geschaef't wuerde Schaden haben, wenn' er giIlJge--Beide 'haben die zehn Gebote riach 'Luthers Erklaer-ung gelernt (Vrgl. das 7. 9. und 10. Gebot)Wenn es uns gelingt, recht viele solcher .schueler aus unsern 8chulen zu entlassen, d'ann lassen wir in gottgefaelliger Weise unser ,Licht leuchten. Das ist driebeste "publicity," die auch allen ehrbaren Weltmenschen einleuchtet. Fr. M. FOR THE SAKE OF HUMANITY

.-

It is a dull day for the boY'Sand girls of a little village. 'They do not seem to know what to do. Two boys are walk路 ing ou opposite sides of the s<treet. They do not seem to n()o tice each other until one of them yells, "0 Johnny, c()IIDe here and let us play something." "What should we play? We play~d almost everyth~ng alreadv." Let us play funera.l. I know where I can get some crepe to hang on the dooT. You can get YOUT wagon, and I will bring the 'olldcat that died last week. You know every'body loved it, so we shall be sure of numerous mourners." , "Alll l"ight, I'll do that, but where ,shall we play; we can路 not use the street, because the cop wi'll chase us away." "'IVe'll go into Bill Johnson's place. You know he is sick; he will not be able to chase us off his ya'rd. We could ,use the front door ro hang the crepe on." "Oh, that will 'be fine." W'ith that the tW'o boys s'eparated. Aibout ten minutes later they carne back again., but with them were several other boys and some girls. All were excited over ,some路 thing. After everY'0ne wa:s in the yard, little -Sammy explained ,,,,hat they should do. ' "Now," s,ai路dSammy, "Dkk, you be the preaeher; Susie, "you be the preacher',s wife. I will be 'chief m!ourner. The rest of you c'an be m'Ourners too."


THE D. M. L. ,C. MESSENGElt

21

Then they started 1'0 play, First they placed the box in which the eat was on the steps where everybody could see it. The mourners then came and expressed their S'Ol'l'OW to poor weeping Sammy. After Sam had filled two 'Pails with tears he had to cease crying, because they were afraid of getting the yard 'all muddy. Then preacher Dick started the service, "Ladies and gentlemen, you all have heard of our' poor eat's death. You 'also know that he had been ill with lumbago for the last forty yeacs. Hi'S constant pleading to the Great White Gat has been heard at last. He has been taken to the land where pickled rats and mice are found, There he will get the daily saucer of milk which he never got while on this earth. When he was on this earth, did you treat him kindly? Did you pat him the right way, or did you rub your hand along his back to make sparks fly 'so that he could not see well during the night. Ladies and' gentlemen, just think the things over that he has done for you during .his short stay. Imagine how he had to work to keep the rats and mice out of your cellars and how you treated him. Now, fellow men, is the chance to show your penitence for all the cruel things you have done to him. We shall now go on with our program." Then followed a wild scramble among the boys to be pall-bearers, Evel'ybody wanted to be one, but as theycould not agree, they stopped playing.. Sam then told them to take the things away, but nobody would do it. He then had to do it himself, but he forgot one thing, and that was the crepe, which he had left hanging on the A; little while after they had' 'gone, Miss' Greene, the vil~ lage gossiper, came walking down the street. When she came opposite Bill's house" she sand to herself" "I'll stop in and Fee the poor fellow. I haven't seen or heard anything of' him for about two hours." Being near-sighted, she did not' see the crepe until she was near the steps. When she did see it, her eyes just about fell out. "They did not even tell me about it. I'll just go down and tell Mrs. ,smith." With the speed of an express train, she left the yard and started for Mrs. Smith, her eo-worker. When Miss Greene arrived there, 'She found bel' putting a cake into the oven. She cotnld hardly wait until she got into the house, When she did tell her MI'8. 'Smlithbe, came very excited. She wanted to tell the news to everybody, hut there was nobody around. She had to tell someone ; 89 she and Mis's Greene left the house to tell every sO'Q.I in town. It did not take them long to carry the news all over towu. Everyone whom:they met they told the 路news. ,'When they came to John, the undertaker, they rushed in on him like wild cats and just about ki lled the poor man. He received the news of Bill's death with joy, beenuse now he had a .hanr e to make a little 'money. This also would save him the trouble of look-

'door.

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THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

2'2

ing for another job. This would give him some money, and then his wife would: stop complaining about his lying around. He quickly put on his best suit and started to wait patiently for a call from Bill's wdfe, which he never got. When Mrs. Sm'ith reached home, she t~u:nd,her cake burned black, but she did not mind that, because she had been' one 'of the first one's to receive the news of the death. That evening as Mrs. Johnson· was 'hanging her husband'a trousers on the line, a few of her neighbors came over. They were 'surprised to see her doing that, for they had expected' to. find her in tears. '.' -., ·c· -. . "Well," said Mrs. J ohnson, ,"this ds the last, time I shall hang these trousers on the line." Her neighbors were a li.ttle bashful and thus expressed their sorrow in a meaningless way. Hhe did not know what they meant, but she was not very Inquisitive. After a few more unsuccessful attempts to. start a 'conversation, the, neighbors. left.· l'he, next morning something happened that made ·her'·1)hink. Hhe had received a bouquet of flowers, and on it was a note saying, "In remembrance of Mr. Will'iam'.Iohnson." She did not know what to think of it. Putting everything together that had happened siuce her neighbors' visit, she came to the conclueion that her husband was supposed to be dead, 'Phis made her laugh. When Bill, who was feeling pretty good,that morning, heard this, he forgot that he was sick, for he laughed so hard that Iris wile thought 'he was going to, fal'l out of bed. It took BiH quite a while .ltefore he was .quiet enough ,to speak. But then at intervals- he would break 'out with a sudden peal of laughter. "Well," said Mrs. Johnson, "bow: does it feel to be dead?" "It feels fine, but how in the world did they find out I was dead?" "Let me think. Yesterday there were s-omechildren around here playing funeral. I believe they. had some crepe put up somewhere. If I remember r.ight, little .Iohnny brought some. I will go 1:0 the front and see if, it is; -still hanging there." , When she left, Bill let out another peal of laughter. was not finished wUillit when Iris wife came in with the crepe. "Here it ,js. I thought it must be out there, but I don't see how so. many found out about' it. "rhere must have been S(]I1leone winowent around and told all, the 'people. I believe there is only one person here that can tell news so -fast, and that is Miss Greene. Don't you think SIO '!" "You are correct. I remember now seeing her coming up the walk quite slowly, and' then I:tgbt after. that she left nearly on the rub': ,\Ve'shiaU'have 00 give her a reward for what she did for us. Gan you th~ll'kof any '1" "You know she is afraid of gbosts: Well, you sneak into her house and make believe'it is your gho.st."

He

1

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THE D.' M: L. C. MESSENGER

23

"Good idea! Won't I surprise her!" Wdth these words he left the room. It took about half an hour to get ready and another 'half to 'arrive and to get into Miss Greene's 'house. When he was inside, he made dif.ferent kinds of queer noises. Miss Greene's. keen sense of hearing made bel' notice all these. After having her at her nerves' ends, he suddenly stepped out from a dark corner. When she saw ,him, she let out an awful scream and, left the house, with Bill at her heels. Whenever she looked 'back, she screamed and ran a, little faster. After chasing her for about five blocks, Bill stopped running. and went home. That was the last they ever heard of Miss Greene, because' she took the first train out of town. . . When the village hoard beard about thedisappearance of the gossiper, they wanted to give Bill a reward. He 'would not take it; he simply said, "I did it for humanity'e sake." C. S. '28.

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THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

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The "D. M. L. C. MESSENGER" is published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not accepted. We request payment in advance. ""The Messenger" is continued after+time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressed to the Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished ori request.' Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates, and friends. Entered as second class matter at the Post Office of New Vim, Minnesota.

A. RAUlSCiHKE, Editor"fn-Chief MIlSIS.lE. 'ROEDER: Alumni Ed W. WOLTMAININ,Business Mgr. 'M]SISG. PAAiP, Co-Ed Ed. H. l'HlJENIFElLDT, Asst. Bus. Mgr. (J. WINUP, Local Editor J. RJEINIT'Z, Asst. Bus. 'Mgr. J. MEYER, Athletic Ed. MLSISE. A:UBRIDCHT, Exchange Ed. W. STINlDT, Joke Editor E. KiRUEJGiER,Call. Notes Ell.

Volume XVI

..

December 1925

No. II

II

EDITORIAL

THE NEW EDITORIAL

S'TAFF

With this issue the senior members of our "Messenger" 'staff conclude their activity. We, who look back UpOIl our work as editors, thank GOodfOorour sue-cess and humbly give all glory and honor to Him. We all,sOo want to shower our successors with hearty wishes for success through God's assistance.


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

.25

The editorial ~taff which begins its work with the next Issue consists of, the following editors': Helmuth 'Ihlenfeldt ........•......: ' Editol'·in~Chief William Woltmlaun ,.: ::.: , Business Manager John Reinitz ....~ ~_ ..~ ~: ~ssistant Business Manager Herbert Kuehn " ~ Alssietant Business Manager Martin Alibrecht, ... , :..: , Assistant Business Manager Erna A'l'brecht · .; Exchange )<)ditress Inez Skogen : : Gollege Notes E'ditress Adelheid Muelle~:,·.' ..~..: ~ Alumni Editress Gertha Paap .:~ r ~: .' Co,lDdNotes Eddtress Carl Pinup Locals Editor Harold 'Backer , Athletics ElditoI' WaMemar ,Stindt ..,..: ~ ., .,'; _ _ __ Jokes Editor

. mE. SUNDAY SCHOOL In the latter half of the eighteenth century an Englishman. Robert Raikers, noticed that the children of the poor people in 'his,'country received no education, neither secular nor r:eligiollS:' He, therefore, resolved to give these children at least. some' knowledge of their Savior and ill 1781 established the firsf'f;llunday School at Gloucester. , Sunday schools spread quickly throughout England and soon were .also estabdished in Almerica.. in Reformed circles. They were united fOol" their work in interdenominational bodies, such as the American Sunday School Union and the International Sunday School Association. Our Lutheran Ohurch did not at first adopt the Sunday school, system,.' VlTedid not have the appalling Ignorance of religious matters among our children, for they attended our Christian day 's,chaol and Qn Sundays our GeI'lIl'l!an "Ohristenlehre," then tQgether with their parentS' the regular services. Gradually, however, 'Sunday Schools witll their divisions into ddfferent cIa,sses were begun also in our circles, but not in the unionistic IS'P,iritof the Reformed churches. Ours is a distinctly Lutheran Sunday ISchool, .in whieh the child learns Bi'ble H,isto:ry, Sitripture passages, and Luther's Small Catechism. "l'he;)chief aim of our JJutheran Sunday Bc.ho-olis to supplement, the r~ljgious tracining that. the child receives at home and in our 'Ghd,stian 'day schools. But they dare not be 10Qked up,on as a substitute for the training. of home and school. . T,he Sunday SchQol must co-operate with the home and the school in strengthening the child's. faith and ill building a Christian character. . When there is n;oChristi-an day school, the Sunday Sehool is of double im!portance in aidillg 'J}arents to teach their children about Jesus.


26

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

The ,Sunday !School is also of great value as a missionary agency, for many people, though they thennselves do not go to church, yet send their children to Sunday 'School, and through a 'Sunday "School such children _may often 'be won for our week-day schools. In rna.ny cases the Gospel may through such children be brought into a godless horne. Through its Junior and Adult Bible 'Classes" When there are such, the Sunday ,Schooll helps to keep the confirmed youth in faith. Here the systematic religious instruction which would otherwise cease with -the eighth grade of our Ohristian day schools Clanbe continued. However, the 8und:ay :School &180 has its deficiencies. Where the work of the Sunday 'School is not supplemented by a Christian day school, the religions' training is hardly adequate. How can a child become firmly grounded in its faith with only thirty to forty minutes' instruction once a week. In many cases it happens, too, that 'the teachers have not the necessary training. At the most, they are graduates of our Ohristian day schools and many are not even that. Some atso do not take the interest in this work that they should. They are not 'Paid for their services and therefore do not feel in duty bound to do their best. Where we have pupils of our Chr-istian day school together with children of unchurched people, We are confronted with the question, How shall we divide them into classes? 'Surely one cannot put a twelve-year-old child -together with a sixyear-old child, sirrlply because the former comes from a churchless home. .Thelr ages demand different treatment, and - if we' divide them accor-ding to ages, the children of our day schools always have a greater advantage over the rest.' ' But in spite of these deficiencies and in spite of the fact that we must constantly: guard against the idea of some people that 'if they send their children to Sunday School they need, not send them to our Chr-istian day school-for our Ohristian day school must 'always come first-in spite of these deflciencies and disadvantages, I say, the .sunday ~khool is, of untold va.lue for children whom we cannot reach , through our Christian day school, L. M. Z. '26.

SOCIE.TIES? In our church circles today, we hear that very frequent cry, "We must organize." Men must organize; WlOIDen must organize ; the young people must organize. Clubs and societies should, be formed¡to keep our Lutheran ipeople together. :Truly a laudable thing if it would promote the work of the Gospel. If they who are great propagandists of 'such organizing arâ&#x201A;Ź asked for their purpo'se, they say, "Oh, well, in this


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

27

way our peonle wi ll ,h'ave a better place to' gO' to on evenings than if tIle]r only chance for amusement were a show, a -danr-e, 0'1' a card par-ty." Rur'ely a good purpose. But show me the average yQung person of QUI' faith today who will sar-rifk-e a show or a dance for a yQung people's meeting. "fhis only pertains to societies which hav'ÂŹ been estabhshed for some time; not the beginners. Young people's societies, just beginning, usual ly show good results and then, after a course of time, their meetings become monotonous. It's the 'same thing over and over. They crave exci temerut ; flnalty the 'Society does not offer the necessary stimulus. For example, whom do yQU find at bazaars given by our Ladies' Aid Societies? One will find the leading merchants of the town there. Member-sof other- denominatlons attend to' show their good s-portsmanship, expecting of course that when they arrange for a dinner, our people too will 00 present. Do our people gO' to' such attractions ? Tihey do, and many gO'for the same reason the others did when they attended our festivities. Our people are taking a wrong step in this way. They want to do something fQr the church; hut they go at it in the wrong "nay. By contributing to' the funds of other chueches, they are working against themselves, for surely such funds are used to promote the faith of such denominatlons. Furthertnore, giving bazaars and dinners and selling' tickets to infidel and Christian alike is absolutely not the proper action. Even if the money of these 'people is used tor- a good purpose) can we SHy that it was given in tlle r-ight Sllidt?;, Of course, not all can be 'Condemned. There' are still societies in which the work is carried OIl in the right spirit. Young People's Societies, Ladies' Aid 'HQc'ieties,'and other organizations within the church can do very much toward helping the Kingdom of God if everything done 0'1' given is done or given out of 3 thankful heart tQward '(mr Lord and Maker. 'IX> obtain such result,s" their meetings should be made intO' Bible houl"'S, led by one who has a. thQrough knQwledge Qf . S("ripture, the vasto!", who l'an then ineuk:ate in his 'peQple the right spirit. ' H. 1. '27.


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'TIRE D. M. 路L. C. 'MESSENGER" ,

:'/'

,

ALUMNI

On October 9, Frieda Gedicke, '20, 'became the bride of Mr. Ar-thur-Fenske of New DIm. :"fhe couple is at home on North Broadway, New DIm, Mlinnesota." At this occasion the followdng alumnae participated. Esther Huehnerkoch, '24, Lydia Winter, '20, and, Esther Montgomery, '20. I

But a few days later! Mr. W'~ter .Hellmann. and 'Olga Klause were united' in marriage. Mr. Hellmann is .JlOW con: ducting a drug store in, Nicollet, Minnesota. ' .'

the

We have been Informed' fhat on October 29, wedding of Mr. George Rixe, '18, of J:Ohnf>on,Minnesota, and Miss Grace' Alswege,also of Johnson, was , .. duly performed. " The Rev. Mr. Kurt. Timmel and.wife visited at New-Ulm ., ' while on their wedding trip. This stamps the old class of '20 from Bethany as a settled trio. They are Mrs. Ziegler Beisel, Mrs. E. Beisel Bradtke, and ;Mrs. K. Koehler Timmel. To all these newly-wed-s,hearty good wdshes! Occasionally the old spirit r-eturns to the Girls'. RJOom,for Bing, last year's monitress, comes now' and then to 'see that her injunctions are conscientiously carried out. Financial Report of the Alumni Association of Dr. M. Luther College, New DIm, Minn., Juue 14, 1921 to Nov. 30, 1925: Receipts :-Dues $210.75 Disbursements :Postage, stationery, printing, etc $]3.17 Donation to D. M. L, C. Library 16.00 "Messenger" subscriptions 24.75 Annual plcnlies fJ.'7.70 71.62 Balance, Nov. 30, 1925

$139.13 E.. TRlErl"l' IN, Treasurer. Box 402, Stanton, Nebr.


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

29

EXCHA,Nt;[ S",.N

~fany Exchanges have arrived at D."M. L. C. since the issue WHh great interest we :peruse your artides. Your paper gives us an insight into yorn- school and shows us your activities. 'l_'IheBlack and Red has changed its color, and The Comreniatn looks very inviting since a cut of the Moravian College and Theological Seminary has been placed on its cover. The A'rIJ,gsburgEcho has' changed from a literary form to a paper. I now shaH turn my attention to The C91W01'dia Comet, a quarterly published by the students of OOlJicordiaCollege, St. Paul, Minnesota. They "said, "We can a,d will make a success of it." 'Thus The Concordia Com.et has come into our hands. The blue cover with its blazing Comet and Lamp of Wis,dl()lm and the rear cover design, a cut of the Luther statue on the Concordia campus, imlmedrately take' our eye. On turning the cover, we see that The- UoncordiÂŤ Comet has a (well-organizedstaff. Tlhe table' of contents contains a long list for an initial issue. ' The first' article entitled The NoW Dormitory shows the utmost need of a new building. The writer then gives us a vivid description of .the edifice. God through His bountiful grate has given you favorable opportunities and additional comfort and conveniences. We rejoice with you and join with the writer, in saying, I"May the new dormitory at our Saint Paul' Concordia long serve as a comfortable: home to young men, Whoare here ipreparing for a life of unselfish service to the Word, -and may it 'be an added inspiration to them to devote themselves whole-heartedly to the work which they have so nobly chosen as their life's calling." Next follows an interesting article on "IEvents in Jewish History." The Editorial Column contains' three aeticles : "Our Bow," "We Dedicate," and "Our Cover". In the latter article the editor describes the cover. The head of the Comet, as it appears in the front cover design, is 'the college seal with its motto, In iitterie PI'O'(icC1'e vola) mala d'iligere JeS/I1I', "I am desirous of our fall number,


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

30

of progressing in learning, but I prefer to love Jesus." The seal is made up .of crossed PEZllS, the moccasin flower and the student's lamp. " Other columns which follow are Sports,. News, ~IIurnni and Slivers.

'

Continue in like manner.

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'We wish you success.

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.)

C;vLLEGE

ADDITION

S'i~~ ,- ,~

TO BOYS' DORMITORY \',

.

The general contract for this addition was given to MeGoug'h Bros. of St. Paul; the plumbing and 'heating was given to Emmerich of New Ulm; and the electrical '\v:ork\v:asgiven to the Ulrich Elec. 00., also of New Ulm. ,,', At the time of this writing, the hasemetl't and the first floor are done. They are now ready to J-ay_thebrick and will continue doing this as long as the wearher-perurits. .

..Âť>'

'PLANS FOR NE!W RE'CITA'TlON BUILDING "

It is very evident tbat a new recitation 'building is a great' necessity. Tbe old 'building is entirely inadequate .for the present day. The class rooms are too small, and the organs which are placed in these rooms take up still more space and are also a great annoyance to the teachers and their classes. 'l'he kitchen and dining room are also too small. Furthermore, the building has no ventilation system, and, being partly a wood structure, it may any day become a fire trap. It has heen decided that the Synod set aside the Diamond. Jubilee Collection for a new recitation building. 'The plan is to erect a R-ecitation Hall, as it is needed, for tbe sum of approximately $175,000. However, we all hope that the Synod will include in this plan the necessary auditorium, so that we


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.THE D. M. L. C. MESSE:t-fGE:R \\

81

;:<

'have room for devotion, concerts, and graduating exercises; and that the 'Synod will also include in this plan a gymnasium. Our present gymnasium is in the basement' of the boy's' dormitory and therefore is not accessible to ,the girls. Furthermore, it .is by far too small for the, boys to carryon basketba II. We, hope that all congregations throughout the Synod contributed liberally toward this' new building. 'The St. Paul's Lutheran Congregation of New, Ulm raised the splendid amount of appl路oxim3Jtely'$'3,60n.OO.In this amount is included a sum of $363.76,'which was collected in the student body of our school, If erVerycongregation in the Wiscousin .synod contributed proportionally, .the Synod would have ample funds to provide our school with the proper buildings. ' , CHOIR TAKES PART IN DIAMOND JUBILEE The D. M. L. C. Choir also took part in the jubilee celebration. On November 8, a selected choir of twenty-one members, boys and girls, directed hy Prof. Backer motored to Arlington to help them celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of .the Wisconsin Synod. T'hey all reported an enjoyable time. 'The following Sunday, November 15, the entire D. M. J~. C. mixed chorus sang in the local ,st. Paul's Lutheran Church, . rendering the numhers "Tod und Auferstehung" and "Du Rirte Israels" in connection with the German service. SLIDES ON ~SWITZERLAND On Nov. 13 a number of slides were shown in our music hail, giving our students a picture lesson on the scenery and. geography of ,Switzerland. HEIDERICH-WILLIA:MS DUO On October 13, the Heiderich-Williams Duo gave a concert in the armory under the auspices of D. M. L. C. The violinst appeared in New DIm for the first time, whereas the harpist has appeared here before. The concert was well attended:and appreciated by all. PROFESSORS J{EPT BUSY DELIVERING :SERMONS On November 8, Professors Wagner and. SC'hallerpreached at Cedar Mills, Professors Schweppe and Janke a.t Arlington. On November 15, Professor Bliefernicht preached both at Sanborn and at Fairfax, Professors Schweppe and Wagner at The Rev. Schuetze's Congregation near Litchfield and also at Lynn, and Professor ,8>challerat New Ulm. November 22, Profes'SOl' Janke preached at Sanborn and Revere, Professor Schal-


THE D. M. L. C. MESSE'NGER Ier at Zumbrota, and Professor Wagner at Rleepy Eye. December 6, Professor Bliefernicht preached at Balaton for ffi

combined jubilee, the twenty-flfth anniversary of the church and the seventy-fifth anniversary of the Synod. December 13, Professor Bliefernicht preached alt Winona f@r the dedication of a new chu:reh. IMPROVEMENTS Formerly the' exits of the' second and' third floors of the recitation to the fire escape were' window'S. In order to make the escape easier, the window'Swere replaced by doors, and steps were placed in front of them. There were' also some, new fire extinguisher's placed into the recitation building. The city of New DIm, under the direction of the city council, is cleaning our septic tanks and is' taking care of our sewerage problem according to an agreement of 1911.

BOARD, .MEETING T:he OoUege Board met November 24, to discuss matters connected with the boys' dormitory. TH~SGIVlNG VACATION 011'1' /Dhanlksgiving recess started Wednesday noon, Noverm'ber25, and ~lld~d Monday morning, November 30. The ladies of the local St. Paul's congregation donated It Thanksgiving' dinner to those students who remained on the hill during this recess, It, was high.ly a:pp~eciated,fwd the students heartily tlHink the, donors. _'"_,

PROFESSOR

JAHNKE RECEIVES GUEST,S Professor Janke- entertained his 'father and mother o.f Lewiston, Minn., and his sister, who is teaching at a parochial school in North La 'CT 0 sse, Wis(;onsin, as guests during the 'I1hanksgivingHolidays.

BIRTHDAY

ANNIVERSARY

On November 25, professor R. M. Albrecht started his second half o.f the century. In honor of this occasion, he entertained the entire faculty that evening at his house.


"TIHrED. Y. L. "C. MESSFNGElR

t ." -

On Septenill:Jer.12, Ftried:a Polehow left for Olaremont, Minnesota, where she took upon herself the obligations of a teacher. 'The evening previous to her, departure, the I Normal girls bade her farewell in the form of a picnic supper out at the garden bouse beyond the baseball diamond. Mildred Albrecht and Mildred Zellirier came to the conclusion this fall that their tonsils were of no use to them: Consequently, they willingly submitted to the painful operation of their removal. Arnold Srchwep,pecalled on former ctassmates at Hillcrest Hall 'September 14. Adelheid Mueller was made happy on September 26 when her friend Agnes Winter dropped in unannounced. It seemed good to see both members of "Einfieisch", together again. Mr. H. Goeglein was called to Fort Wayne, IndiaiIa,' oetober 3 to attend the funeral of his brother. Alnna Dahle was absent from her studies for five weeks because of an operation for appendlcitis. ' Leona Price, Valborg Leverson, and Inez Skogen were among those who attended the Queen Esther Cantata given in the Norseland church near St. Peter on October 4. Mildred and Erna Albrecht were called horne October 30, because of the death of an aunt. Gertrude Dey has left our midst for the remainder of this year and has accepted a position as third teacher in Mankato, Her <Classmatesgave her a send-off in form of a Bunco Party.


34

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Alma Hafner spent the first few days in November with her brother at Rochester, who was ill in a hospital there. Wedding hens 'summoned Irene Kramer, Leona Sprehn, and Martha Seehusen away for a few days in the past month. Hilma IStallbaum and Margaret Martin have filled the vacant places at Hillcrest Hall .. The Girls' Room has just lately been transformed into a menagerie, and, strange to say, they did this by only putting up classy curtains. ' 路Several of the co-eds 'had the honor of teaching Hoffmann, Kiecker, and Lau the art of speeaddng sandwiches. What is HarmlOrny?----'A much discussed subject among the ''Ilwelfth Grade Girls of Hillcrest Hall. Eleanor Rudolph was compelled to leave school until Christmas, because of illness. .

LOC

Winter is here. This we deduce from the .fact that every one has brought his heavy quilts up and. is making good use of them. ' ' , I ~.

:i~,

"Fat" Denninger and Art. Spi'engel~r spent O~t/3i2 S:t. Paul. A'l't. visited his brother," Ernie, 'and "Fat/:. . .' \ We are pleased to welcome Wm. 'S'ch'll1leding "and, Paul Heck into our midst. The vacation did Heck' some \good if we can judge from the extra avoirdupois he is carrying.' The other morning we were awakened by the most urie~rtb'~ Iy noises, moans, groans, and shrieks, We found out: later that it was Ottenbacker playing on his '-'sax." ., \ ,

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THE D. M. r, C. MESSENGER

35

A few days latel' the "dorrn'" was fined with an obnoxious odor. We' investigated and' found that it was Hoffmann frying onions. First Normal misses its jolly classmate "Tiloh" Leitzke. He left to teach in Weyauwega, Wisconsin. Good luck, "Tiloh" ! Wm. 路Sternberg and Alber-t Krueger suffered a severe attack of rheumatism. It necessitated their absence. from school for it, few weeks. "Ba.lloon" is able to be around again. Beginning,with to-day, sleeping at the dinner table will be positively prohibited. ,Evan Hageman, take notice! 'I'he latest college yell: "We want lights." What's .the attraction at Gibbon, Grimm? . Our entertainers, Hans and Fritz, are frequently seen in College Park. We wonder what "shenanigans" they are up to. "Speed" and Neubert spent Oct. 24 at the latter's home in Mankato. On the same day, Nolte, Sehulz, and Woltman hiked to ,Sleepy 'Eye to attend the Mission Festival. First .Normal's favorite expression: "What have we in Methods?" i.

"'8hado-w,""Chuck," "S'heen," Humann, Woltman,' and Rutz tried their skill in wheeling cement, They found that it was no snap. Students, please do not bo-ther the workmen, Marcus and Martin Hoffmann spent the evening of Nov. 1, at, Mr. and Mrs. Sauer's, North Jefferson street.

J

German-class seems to be 3; good 'place to sleep. Especially for "Ohuck." " '!Adoll-!'h .Fehlauer 'Was pleasantly surpr-ised by his uncle, Emil, on Nov. 9. "Fat" Denninger attended -the wedding of an intimate (?) friend on Nov. 10. .. "Floppy" Zeitz woke up the other morning to find his trousers sewed up. Who's guilty? Many "studes" a.re trying to raise a "mustachio-." Even , 'Prof. Wagner caught the fever. Helmut and Edgar Wiechmann were brother, Harold, of North Dakota.

visited

by

their

One of the ''profs'' thought that "Spuds" Mueller was resting too much, so he graciously condescended to give him so-meextra work.


T(aE D~ M. r, C. MESSENGER Rossow had the IJlllisf(li~tune to sprain his ankle in the game between 'f1.welHhGrade and: the Normals.; He is getting .along tine. Rauschke, Backet-, Meye-r, and Bar-tela 'bad a chance at teaching at Goodhue, Minn. Ea(!h (me reported some interesting (?) experiences. The other morning Bruns and Wiechman got up at two o'clock to '"buck." 'They set :the alarm for five, but, unfortunately, it went off at two o'clock. ISuch'luck'! There has been a great demand for strap oil, TurkishGerman grammars, aspirin, and Greek hymnals. A:H were found in room 50 on the bottom shelf of the book-case, "SlpudLS,""Ohink/' and. "Airt" weuld rather shoot fish than catch them, "Gerry," "Charlie," and "Airt" spent Nov. 1 at ~St.JameS. . A new musical composition said to revolutionize -rnusic and called "Die Bimmelungs Oadenza" has been composed. For particulars see "Hans" 路Meyer.路 i., "Fritz" and "Herb' , Mangels left for their home, Nov. 14, in Dempster, 8. D., to .help celebt'at-e -their pa.J.~nts'. silver wedding. . Wm. Sieg:el W1~S visited Iby luis 'Parents on路 Nov. 12. A day later Mr. Haertel came to spend a few days with his Bon, EImer. ' ; , Fred Zarling and Ben. Bcrgschatz motored to ,~he latter's home in Zumbrota, Minn., Nov. 4. "Slim" Baumann successfully passed through l!n operation for appendicitis. We are glad to see him among us again. Gerhard Mueller spent Nov. 21 and 22 at his home in Janesville, Minn. ' ..' .' Louis Broeker visited Fred, and Herbert Hagedorn on Nov. 18. . Editors may come, and editors may go, but some go on forever. I must go on for another year. Please bear with me. . ji


a, C. MEISSENGER

TIlE D. M.

3"7

AiBLt71CS

~'

Since basketball is the favorite pastime of many of our :students, the followers of the game turned their attention to it very early this year. Early in October class teams were formed and practice bevan immediately. "fhe line-up of the teams was as fol lows~ I Ninth Tenth ; F,levellth Twelfth Normals R. F Beck Bullis ", Paukow . Reuter Bartels ,Albrech t Meyer Rausehke L. F Stindt Heck Mueller Pless O H:palding Albrecht Schultz Tha.lmann Kettenacker Rossow R. G....•:\{.artin ~le'yer Hauch lcaasch Mangels L. G..... Fritz Huber Meyer Rossin Krueger Goeglein Roeder Koester Albrecht Hellmann Zarling Denninger Rutz Backer / ,

i

,The first games were played on the College' floor. The were playe.l in t:h~\App:Qry.,T;he following are the games:

, rest '1\

!

r; :.

. "..;

Odolber 14

i

r

,I

..

_'

i '.

i",.

Ninth vs.: Twelfth ' ."Tenth vs, E~eventh _ October 17 \iNormals vs. Eleventh

\i"

'.

J

"

:.

('\.

Oc+ober 21'

'rE(nt,h VS':_ '~rw€:lfth ~~

:

: .4-68 __ _..__ .:._ 20-19 __ ..•............:38-11 ..__.__..

.._.14--41,

tNinth 'vs: Eleventh .........................• _.3--47 Normals 'l\;nth ~.r._...•••....• _26-15 October 24, Ninth VIS•. Tenth __ ~ _ 7-50 N'orin~alsvs, Twelfth 19-22 October 28 Normals vs. .Ninth _.: ~.__ 48--4 Eleventh VB. Twelfth _ _ 10-48 October 31 Ninth vs. Twelffh _ __ 2-78 Tenth vs. Eleventh 17-20 .November4 Normals vs. Eleventh .._ : 38-19 Tenth vs. 'Twelfth 14--34 November 7 Tenth VS. Eleventh 18-11 November 11 Normals VS. Tenth __ 29-21 Eleventh v's.'Twelfth 16--41 November 14' Ninth vs. Tenth ._.._ 10-28 Normals vs. Twelfth , 15-30

vs.


38

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

November 21 Normals vs, Ninth 29-5 ,November 24 Ninth vs. Eleventh 6-17 Twelfth Grade won the championship. After the games were played, the teams stood as follows: Pet . Lost. . Won. o ' 1.000 'TIwelfth ~ :::.8 '.750 2 Normals , ~:..~::.6 , .444 5 Tenth _. ~ 4 .333 6 Eleventh ~ 3 .000 8 Ninth 0 , Immediately after, the class-games were over, the college. squads began practice. 'E.verything is now being .put into .readiness for the first game, December 4, with 'Sleepy, Eye. I.

,

)1

,. Prof: "What was the name of the governor of Virginia?" Onions: "Wdndiddie" (Dinwiddie). Teacher (trying to show the difference between "-befehlen" and "geh()rchen.") : "Wenn eure ElItern sagen, dasz ihr nicht hinaus gehen sollt, W!\S tut ihr dann ?" Donnie: "Dann gehen wir doch." Prof: "What is the 31st of October?" (Wanting Reformation Festival as answer.) ,Student: "'The last day of the month." T:rudy: "Honest, Finup, I can't play with mly feet."


THE D. M. L. C. MEISSFINGER

39

. 0 SCHOENEZEIT! J. Es war ein Sonntag fuerchterlich; Geregnet hat's ganz jaemmer lich, Als sie und i6h und ich und sie Spaziel'ten ohne Parapluie, " Zu regnen hoerte es nicht' auf, Da gingen wir ins KaJfeehaus. 路0 schoene ZeitlO sel'ge ,Zeit! . Sie trug ein blau kariertes Kleid;

2. Ein Berg von Kuchen mil' .zum Grauen-sWie konnte sie nul' das verdauen l AJcht Tassen Shokolad' dazu Verfilgte sle in Seelenruh'. ,I Die .~ec~te drueckt ich ihr gallant, Da frasz, sie mit del' linkelJi Hand. O schoene Zeit, 0 sel'ge Zeit! Ihr platzt das blau karierte Kleid 1

:3. Dud als wir- gingen dann naeh Haus,Sie wohn ta' weit 路zur Stadt lrinausBlieb sie auf einmal stille stshn Und sprach : r"Ich kann nicht ,welter gehn,' Da sah' kh sie so frageno' Sie s:prach: "Dort drueben 's'telit meiu' Mann." O schoene Zeit, 0 -sel'ge 'Zeit!I" Wk tu~ mil' heut d~s ~el? noch leid!"

an. '- - _

Prof: "Pironourice this word::, 'C~ndidate.' " Hezel: "Oan-i-date." Prof: "Herel, call' liir'di 'd~tes possible/' Trud'y: "M'y 'hIstory teacher is the meanest man in the world." Prof: "How's that?" 'l'rudy: "He bor'ro,ws the pearl-handled knife I got for' Christmas and sharpens his pencil to give me a poor mark."

A Tender Touch Women of, China never kis'~,' so 'when a Ohinese -woinan wishes to s'hmv her affection she gently presses the, hand of her "Chink."

True Enough' Stop, Look, and, Listen! " ''l'he reflective man stOip:ped to read the famon:s warning. "Those words. '-illustrate the whole -scheme of life," said he. "How is that?"" -I '. ' "Y ou Isee a pretty girl; you stop; you look, and after you're married, you listen."


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Stelljes (M-eaning;~I Just played my piano lesson) ; "I just , pianoed." Manager = "I Iiave summed YQ;U up, Brown. Wh~ I arm not here, you are the laziest man in the' office." Prof = "011' what was Venus the goddess?"

Hans: "Of drawdng pencils," Art ('1'0 Prof. in didation) : '~Wie ruachst du ein gL'os~e~ ~X'?" , I,',. " Prof: "Wenn wir mit dem Peonomen fertig sind, erw'al;t~ Ich, dass du mich mit del' Hoeflicbkeitsforrn 'Sie' anredest.". Art: "Da kannst du dich drauf veelassen,'

I!

" )1:

9

Hans says that the thrashing of the cranber-ry CN)P 3 his farm two miles east of Milwaukee was' exceptionally good -i , _ this year, ' , Prof: "What did General Gates do when he was defeated?';' " ,Wiechman ~ "He said, 'Feet, do your duty." ,,. . ,!

.shadow (Giving a !ren~~~hods)

â&#x20AC;˘

: "The cow mews,'

.

;,\.1, ~

Prof: "Wa:rum gehen die Leute im Fr'uehja'kr naeh D001> County, W-iS?~f I" Glaeser: "Urn Kirschen zu pfluer-ken.' A. teacher requested her pupils to draw II picture of Ply-. mouth Rock,' after she had told them. of the landing ,of the. Pilgrims. Most of them went to work at: once, but one pupil raised his 'hand. '¡What is it, Willie?" the teacher asker], "Please, ma'am, do you want, us to. draw a . hen or. a 1'oosterT" ,. Miss Inquisitive : "Is that a flat tire?" Mr. Peeved: "No, the air only leaked out." . .

-

,

Emanuel Jackson, a mule driver, appeared au cru tches one morning. "Lawsy/' exclaimed his friend, "I thought you were one of de best mule drivers in the country?" ' "Ya, man, 'but dot was no mule; Got was 'file wife," , Prof: "Napoleon had six hundred thousand men when h~ went to Moscow. How many did he have when he returned T" Bchuetze: "'Twenty million."

------

Rutz: "One litter (liter) of gas in burning combines with two litters of oxygen." Fritz (After the test papers had been returned) : "Eagle Beak, what did you get on your paper?" Eagle Beak: "Bloody murder.'

I"

<:


Fountain Selections

,-

Founta~n Inn .College Spec~al High School Sundae Cupid Sandwich E~bner'sGolden Orange Ade Walnut Peach Happy

Thought

Marasch~noCherry Banana Delight Silver Sprey Ginger Ale Fruit Salad Pure Grape Juice ~AT~

-We Eibner & Son Phone 128


,.

Service,

Quality ",

.

Right

WE appreciate your

Price

patronage

which will always be filled to your liking and will

lead to future

business relationship between us

t

Olson &0 Burk Phone 88 New Vim, Minnesota


1875

1925

Fifty Years of Continuous Service Proves Reliability and Durability of New inÂŤ Brick.

..

"-

BUildings erected with NEW ULM BRICK fifty years ago are as strong and

substantial

today

as

the

day

they were erected.

BVILD

WITH

NEW VLM BRICK

- It Pays

NEW ULM BRICK & TILE YARDS New Vim. Minn.

See

CHEVROLET

and BUICK

-First K relsch A uio Company Telephone 323


.;Daniel I

-Webster

THE WORLD'S GREATEST FLOUR

Used Where Quality Counts Recommended ond Guaranteed

by

Leadillg Dealers

Eagle Roller Mill Co. NEW ULM, MINN.

CONSTANTLY IMPROVED BUT NO YEARL Y MODELS

DODGE BROTHERS MeToR VEHICLES

F.H.RETZLAFF Phone 1000

tYSONS

I


W. Ruemlre & Son W芦 Carry a Complete Line of Fancy and Staple Groceries. Dry Goods and Notions which we Offer for Sale at Lowest Prices ALSO PAY HIGHEST

PRICE FOR BUTTER

AND EGGS

The 路Wonder Store /0-12 So. Minn. SI.

Is the Place where you will find your Friends Residence Phone 150

Office Phone 60

DR. F. H. DUBBE

I

\

f路

Physician and Surgeon NEW ULM

H.路" GOEDE, THE LEADING

MINN.

Photographer STUDIO

HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS Special Rater to"Students

KODAK

FINISHING 11

".

Studio 107 N. Broadway

.

Do Your Banking With The

Citizens State Bank CAP_1TAL $/00,.000.00

SURPLUS

$100.000.'00

Member of Federal Reserve Banking Sqstem Being one of the oldest and strongest banks in southern Minnesota. we solicit your patronage

We are well supplied With money to loan

Modern Safe Deposit Boxes for rent at $1.00 per year


J. C.

PENNEY

COMPANY

Corner Minnesota and 2nd N. Sirs.

New VIm. Minn.

OPERATING 676 STORES IN 44 STATES Where Savings are Greatest WE KINDLY

REIM

SOLICIT

YOVR PATRONAGE

& CHURCH

THE LEADING JEWELERS路

Distinctive Clothing Sold on Quality and Merit alone at

. C;gareiies

Tobaccoes . Pipes

Snuff

CIGARS

Theo. Mueller manufacturer. jobber and retailer in

Smoker'禄 Articles

Tauscheck ~ Green Nagel &- Leary

204 N. Minn. St.

New Vim

Mrs. Anna Rinke Millinery

Dealers in

Wood. Coal. Briqueits

Cok.e and Sewer Pipe Telephone 304

Corsets and Switches Fancy Work

. The latest in HATS Always 112 N. Minn St.

New Vim

When in Need of an Electrician

Call 148 Ulrich Electric Company

!


Young Men's Suits, Overcoats, Furnishings

New VIm. Minn.

14 N. Minn. St.

â&#x20AC;˘

Vercoe's Plumbing Shop 221 N. Minn. St. (Next door to SaJfert's Meat Market) .

Visit our Show Room and see "Standard" Enamel Ware and other Modern Plumbing and Heating Appliances The only ground floor Plumbing Shop in the city. OFFIOE PHONE

Phone 292 RESJDENOE 597

95

Dr. F. A. KALLUSKY oe

'J/cce

DENTIST over Arbes Drug Store h j 9:00 to 12:00 ours I 1:00 to 5:00 Evening by appoinfment

Farmers Co-op. Creamery Ass' n. We malee and sell the jamous

GOLD MEDAL BUTTER Churned from suieet pasteurized Cream WHOLESALE

Eyes examined-Glasses

and RETAIL

fitted-Lenses

ground in our own shop

Specialist in Eyesight and Optometry H. C. PREY, D. O.


.'.

\

An Appetizing Drink For Every Occasion! Whether you go on a trip. or entertain your friends at home', you will find a refreshing, appetizing flavor among the many different kinds of

FRENZEL'S

SOFT DRINKS.

And there's nothing better for the family circle. Order' a trial case today and you'll agree with us. Phone 58.

New

Bottling

Vim

Works

H, H. and A. j. Frenzel. Props.

Crone Block

307 N. Minn. St.

Phone 898

SCHVLKES New UEm.Minn.

The Store For Beller Ladies' Garments

-

Otto C. W ichiel Monuments

Furnishings, Shoes und

\ MEMBER

Groceries

MEMpRIAL CRAF:r~MEN A~~RICA '

New Vim Sheet-Metal

0'"

New Ulm

W~rks

Frank A. and Otio L. Sc/lpeJer. Props.

Copper, . Tin and Ga/vc1nii-eJ('I~Qn . Auto Radiators R_ecoring, and Rep(lfri'ng , ':. 415 First S. St.

LENNOX STEEL AIR FURNACES

,\:

Phone 635

ROBERT FESENlvtAJER ;.\ Hardware, Implements and Automobiles Alfred W. Mueller , Law Offices

MUELLER 6- ERfCK~Q.N New

tnÂŤ. Minn.

',\

'

'.


When in need of FOOTWEAR be sure and call on us. We carry a complete line ofmen's, ladies' and children's shoes. We appreciate your business. Our prices are always the lowest. Quality considered.

Athletic Shoes Our Specialty

J.

P.

Eichten Shoe Store New Vim, Minn.

Dr. Wm:J. Von Bank

Dr. Hugh C. Edmiston

Doctor of

Osteopathic Phusician

Dental Surgery

Weiser Block

New Vim

Minn.

Breeder of

s. C. Rhode i

i I.

J. Cag

Bicycle Repair and Sheet Metal Shop

Island Reds H. F. RAABE New Vim

I~ New VIm since 1916

Ceo.

Fancy

, Phone 123

Minn.

315 N. Minn. St. Phone 2.84

Give Your Eyes A Chance It isn't right to toil under the handicap of defective eyesight. Poor eyes make backward students. They not only affect your work, but your nerves and health as well. We fit your eyes right. grind lenses in our own shop and replace broken lenses on short notice.

Dr. H. O. SCHLEUDER Optometrist and Optician 102 N. Minn. St.

New Vim

Telepho~e 87


The Best Place

10

Buy Your

CollegeSupplies, Fountain Pens Stationery, Eastman Kodaks, Films, Etc.

Haag's Rexall Drug Store ,

Formerly Aries Bros. Drng Store

"THE BUSIEST STORE IN TOWN" .. There must be a good reason why"

The

Bee

Hive

}. A. OCHS 0- SON

Ladies' Ready-To-Wear and Dry Goods Everything for the Co-Ed For the Louiest Prices of Dress and Athletic

FOOT WEAR In the City Go To the

Hackbarth; Shoe Store Dahms <5- Lindemann, Props. All Kinds of Repairing Neatly Executed.

225 N. Minn. St.

MEYER The Leading Photographer 2131 N. Minn. St.

. Tel. No. 268 ,


SPORTS~~fj;s~E.~~.RADIS NEW ULM

E

MINNESOTA

Sporting and Athletic Goods Radio "Trq the Sport Shop First"

Walsh - Lodahl Motor Co.

Lyric Cafe Perfect health and Happiness

Authorized

Ford

depends upon the eating of properly prepared food

Dealers

Everling Electric Co. Electrical Supplies Storage Batteries Wiring. Etc.

HENRY

SIMONS LUMBER

CO.

Dealers in

ALL KINDS of BUILDING MATERIAL. COAL and FUEL Let us1igure on your requirements in these materials

New Utm

Minn.

DR. T. F. HAMMERMEISTER Physician and Surgeon NEW ULM

MINNESOTA

The A to Z BARBER

SHOP

The Place where you get both Service and Treatment

ARNDT.

& ZUPFER

First North and Minn. Sts.


M. J. BIEBER

.', ",",'3:0

Ladies', Men's and YO,ung Men's Wearing Apparel of the better Grades at ReasonablePrices. Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes

Our Best Attention Everything of a banking nature entrusted to our care, receIves our best attention,

We shall be glad to hade a share of your business.

State Bank of New Vim

DRUGS EVERYTHING A STUDENT NEEDS

EPPLE

BROS.

DRUGGISTS

New" .Ulm Greenhouses 20.000 square feet of glass

Prompt attention given to all orders for Cut./lowers, etc,

Flowers for all Occasions , .

"Say it with Flowers" .Phone

45


-,

...

UNION

HOSPITAL

New VIm. Minn. A fireproof hospital supervised by graduate n.urses giving the best service Phone No_ 280

When you do it with heal, You can do it better with GAS.

I niersiaie Power Company Ceo.

B. Fesenmaier

A. L. Kusske, M. O. Practice limited 10

Eye, Ear, Nose & Throal and Filling of Glasses Office over Farmers & Merchants State Bank Building

New

Mtnn.

VIm

H. M. Siebenbrunner

The Red Front Grocery The Store of Quality and Service Phone 43

New Vim. Minn.


Fine' Clothing, Furnishings Hats, Caps and Shoes I nterWoven Stockings

Fred Meine Clothing Co.

Chas. Emmerich Plumbing,

Steam' and

Hol Water Heating Estimates Furnished on Application

Both Phones 281

Corner Center and Minn. Sis.

Ernest C. Vogelpohl PIPE ORGAN BUILDER New VIm. Minn.

R E UTE R PIP E 0 R GA N S SERVICE STATION FOR PIPE ORGANS Rebuildins. MoJerni:z.ing. Tuning and Care af Pipe Orgam

ORGAN BLOWERS INSTALLED


A.

J. Vogel Lumber LO.

LUMBER

AND

BUILDING

MATERIAL

The Yard that seroes you belSt Quality, Seroice and Satisfaction

J. M. MEYER LEADING JEWELER

Phone 117

I make a Specialty of Fine Watch Repairing Honest and Competent Work Guaranteed

We turn a House into a Home

Buenger Furniture Co. Store», New Vim and Sleepy Eye

Henry

Stelljes

, ,The Center Street Grocer A Fine SlOpping Place For

SOMSEN.

DEMPsEY

& FLOR Attorneys at Law

Students New Utm 803

CenterSt.

Phone 133

Minnesota


We Use Soft Water Only

Phone ,No.5

i :

Nell) Vim Steam Laundry Otto F. Oswald. Prop.

Firs! Class Dry Clea~ing 'DeparJmenl , .in Connection •

I·,

PROMPT A1'TENTION GIVEN TO MAIL ORDERS

Eagle

Our store is the

YOUNG MEN'S 'STORE of town '~,

'

j

At all times we show the latest in

Tailor Shop JOE DEIBELE, Prop.

Young Men's Suits, ·Oeer:,,' coats and F 'urnishings

Cleaning and Pressing Alterations and Dying

Crone B'ros. Co. The

505 Center St.

The National

Cast ler Studio

Soft Drinks

A good place to have your pictures made

and Lunches

Lowest prices on

KODAK FINISHING, High Gloss Prints

";

Corner. Center and Minn, Sts.

New Vim Grocery Co. WHOLESALE GROCERS Ask for

NEW ULM BRAND COFFEE in the Yellow Can

LOCATED TO YOUR ADVANTAGE


/'

Bierbaum's

Cash Grocery

Right Treatment Right Quality Right Prices Phone 188

s. Minn'.

101

St.

New Vim. Minn.

COLLEGIAN and EMBY CLOTHES are good Clothes Get your next Suit at '

, Leo A .. Sprenger' i

, Cl~thing

Athletic

FOOTWEAR

E. Wicherslri

Weiland,t & Stegeman J. H. FORS1 ER Contractors & Builders Correspondence Solicited Work done in any section oj the Community .

Plans and, specifications furnished Estimates cheerfully given 'O/lce 1100 ,Center St. Phone 571

F.

l.'

Furniture. Carpets, Rugs and Wall Paper New Vim

Minn. ,

Backer

HARNESS DEALER Trunks. Traveling Bags. Suit Cases. Purses. KWik.-Pak Parcel Post Laundry Cases a~a Other Leather Specialtie,


Champion Shoe Shop We specialize in Seiberling Rubber Heels and Kori Krome Leather Heels

E. Freese & F. Wess~l

Call a

, * C)

~~V\) '.,Phone 194

~V

, Baggage 'Transfer

24 S. Minn. St.

T

HE EMPORIUM DEPARTMENT

"Qua/ily that. Tells -

S70RE

Prices thai Sell"

Ladies', Men's, and Children's Readu-to-Wear . ,I' and Furnishings Let us outfit you from top to bottom You can STUDY, LESS and

Estimates Furnished

are!j}irUfJerly fiued with Glasses

DR ..JOS. P. FAAS Optometrist and Pharmacist New Vim

"r ~

'."

Emil G. Berg Decorating

Painting

, Pa~e; Himging

F urniture. R,dinishing Telephone 401 New VIm"

A. G. PLAGENS Registered Architect New VIm

~

We Quarantee Satisfa.ction

LEARN MORE if your Ey~

:

Minnefota

Minn.


I

I

OUR SLOGAN:

e9짜(ark eveu gravv

That splendid, imported German Granite always in stock Will erect work regardless of distance

B. J. KRAHN Phone 1234

New Vim. Minn.

Anton

121 N. Broadway

J. Simmei

BARBER Shop below Farmers &- Merchants State Bank

..

..,___

Use

ARTSTONE

in stock sizes or special made to order for your other buildings. You are invited ARTSTONE at our plant.

10

inspect

new home or the exhibit of

Saffert Cement Construction Co. New Vim, Minnesota


Bank with

Farmers &- Merchants State Bank New Vim. Minnesota

Friendly Helpful Service at Your Command

Marti &- Simmei

Patronize

MUSIC STORE Classical and Popular Sheet Music

" ll1essenger

Everything in Musical Instruments

Advertisers' ,

Fritsche Block

Phone 1100

The Kemski Stationery Store BOOKS. GIFT ARTICLES. GREETING

I

FREE

A Loose Leaf Biplex Memo Note Book to ~eaders of this .magazine and others. Come In and ask for It.

R. R. KEMSKI Printers

CARDS

Stationers

PRINTING

CO.

Office OUtjiliers


I I

~

CONTENTS March 1926

LITERARY a) I ch sage 'euch, so diese werden scluoeigen, werden die Stet e schreien, Lukas-19, 39

3

b) The Christian and Higher Education

9

c) The An lo-Saxons and Their Literature

.11

d) Good Q een Bess

.13

EDITORIALS

15

a) Introdu tory b) Keeping Fit c) Stage-Fr'ght

..

.16 .17

l_

ALUMNI

!.

NO ES

.18

EXCHANGE

19

COLLEGE

.21

CO-ED NOTE

24

LOCALS

25

ATHLETICS.

27

JOKES

30


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

3

IOH :SAGE EUOH, SO DIE,SE WERDEN SOHWEIGEN, WERDE,N DIE S,TElNE SOHREIEN. Lucas-19,39 Unser Heiland war auf seiner letzten Reise naeh Jerusalem nahe gen Bethphage und Bethanien gekoffilmen. Grosze Taten waren in den letzten Zeiten geschehen, und herrlic!he, erbauIiche Reden hatte sein Volk mit anhoeren duerfen zu ihrem Seelenheil. Wenn je, so galt das Wort Jesu, an Johannes gerichter, von dieser Zeit : "Die Blinden sehen, die Lahmen gehen, die Aussaetsigen werden rein, die Tauben hoeren, die .'r:oten stehen auf, und den An-menwird das Evangelium gepredtgt," Lukas erzaehlt uns in dem obengenannten Kapitel, dasz die Juenger und Freunde -Iesu, noch erfuellt mit heiliger Schen ueber das Gesehehene und Gehoerte, mit Jubel ihre Etimmen erhoben, um Gott zu loben fuer das, das sie gesehen und gehoert batten. Ihre Freude klang aus in den Jubelruf: "Gelobet sei, der da kommt, ein Koenig, in dem Namen des'ReITn. Friede ,seiIm Himmielund Ehre in der Hoehe." - Doch nicht alle in seinem Volke zaehlten zu diesen Getreuen, die GMt die Ehre gaben; es' war nur ein ver-schwindend kleiner Teil, S'O das'z dJe Schrift miit R.eeht von dem Yolk als Ganzem.-spricht: "Del' Herr karu in sein Reich, aber die Seinen nahmen'ihn nicM aUJf." Das Yolk wur-de dem Teufel ein gefueg,igelsWerkzeug und wi<ders,trebt,eallezeit Gott und den Wirkungen des Heiligen Geistes.. Je lauter die Taten die Gottheit Jesu predigten, desto lauter ihr Ruf: "HinW'eg mit dies-em,wir wollen nicht, dasz dieser ueber uns herr-sche."Jesus klagt und weint ueber dies abtruennige Yolk in diesem 19. Karpitel, und Liebe und Sehmerz reden in den Worten: "Wenn du es wueszte8t, 'SowueI'dest du auch bedenken zu diesel' deiner Zeit, was zu deinem Frieden dient, a>bernun 1,st"Svor dronen A!ugenver!horgen." Als Grund fuer -diesen tr,aurigen Seelen-


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

zustand eeines Volkes gibt Jesus an am 'S'clhlusseseiner Klage: "Darum, dasz du nicht erkanrrt bast die Zeit, darinnen du heimgesucht hist." A(och bei Jesu Einzug und beim Lobgesang Gel'.Iuenger nahen die Pharisaeer uudeprechen zu Jesu: "Mei.ster, strafe doch ceine Juenger." Er abel' antwortete und sprach : "folk sage eucn, '1.00 aiese wm'den soIuweigen) so uierden. aie Steine schreien;" Jesus sagt ihnen damit : "Es ist undenkbar, dasz so1che Taten koennten verschwiegen bleiben. ,So ihIr euer Herz verschlieszet gegenueber dell, gnaedigen Wl3lten Gottes, wuerde dde tote Natur .ihre Stimme erheben nmessen ZUlli' Lobe l'hres 8'cnoepfers."800war es damals, wie Ist es heute? Es ist nicht besser .geworden. Nul' ein geringer Haufe i'st es aucn heute noch, oer mit Jesu geht und sein Lob verkuendigt, Und wie stellt sich dae Welt ihnen und ihrem Herrn gegenueber? Man will eine einheitliche Religion einfuehiren, eine AlleI'weltsreIigion, die ein hoe!heresWesen anerkennt und )edem einzelnen dann ,seine Amschauung ueber Gott, Himlmlel und Hoelle ueberlassen. Man leugnet die Gottheit Jesu, und wo ,man ihm ueber'ruau}.lt noch eine Stelle einraeumt, ist er hoeC'hSltens'ein Tugendmensch, -~den .m~n 8ich in vielen Stuet:;ken zu einem Vorhild rna'chen koeune. -M'an bemieistert die -S.chrift und stellt drus .mei,stein das,Reich del' FaibeL ,M-anver:wirft die ganze Genesds und bemitleidet die Dumlmle)1,die das 1. Kapitel del' Bibel noch als G,ottes, ,geofi'enhar'tes Wm:t anerkennen. "Hinweg mit aie&em,wir Wlollennicht, dlllszdlieser ueber uns 'heI"rsche," 80 klingt's aucih heute wied,er mehr den'll je, und mehr und mehr verstummen die t,reuen Ze'Ugen"die da fest Istanden in, Lehre und Praxis, und dis gJeiC!hgueltigeWe;,:enund -dieSatthe-it â&#x201A;ŹTfueUen dins Volk. Alberein anderer Zeuge steht auf. ((Wo diese sohweigern, so werde,n die Stei;ne scwreiOl'/,.)) WeI' hoert nicht den Ruf der Steine gel'aae in letzter Ze-it? Welch herrhche PredigiJen liefern slie UllS! Wlie rufen sie UUtS 'do~h heute 'zu: "Glaube nul', 'so wirst d'll leben." UIIli un,s diese herrl'iche BotJsdhaft zu bringen, mus,zte Napoleon Gott unbeWllliszt ein gefuegiges W!Olrkzeugsein, urn seinen PI'an aliszufue!hTen. Was .:Jahertansende im Bande 'verho,rgen gelegen, 'solilte er einer proJhlerisehenj'teuflischen Gelehrsamlk'eit widererlegend gegenuebe'I'stellen. Er sollte den, Ainfang Ul!llIchen, die GeheimniSISeeiner vergungenen Zivilisation in Aegypten, Aissyrien, del' Halbinsel ,E1inai,Pala~Sltina, A'I'abien,und auderen Orten wieder aus Licht zu_bringen. Gegen Ende des 18. Jlahrhundects vichtete Napoleon Bonapalrte seine BlIicke auf dieses alte, Land una rnachte es ZuT Grundlage eines seiner vielen gigantischen Plaene. Er hatte, in jener Zeit seinen E,roberungszug ueber eillen groszen 'Teil Europa,s unsgebreritet, abel' in dem Inselreiclhe Englands boten -sieh ibm besondere 81chwierigkeiten, <lieses Land 2JU uMer-

j


THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

jodheu, sodasz er dey Plan vor-laeuflg aufg3Jb urid besehloss, zunaeohst England in seinem Handel zu si haden. Zu dem Zwecke unternahm er einen Feldzug nach Aegypten, urn dieses Land den 'I'uerken zu entreiseen und so einen kurzen Handelsweg n3JChIndden ueber das Miittelmeer zu schaffen.. Die Englaender konnten dann die reichen Schaetze Indiens nur nach einer .langen Reise urn' das Kap del' Guten Hoffnung erreiehen. Dieses Land sollte aber nicht nurr erobert, soudern auch error.scM werden, Zu dem Zweok zogen etwa oinhunder-t del' beruehmtesten .Maenner Frankreichs mit dem Heere n.ach Alegypten. Es wa:ren dies Maenner- del' Wrissenschart und der Literatur, Archaeologen und Kuenstler. Es wird une berichtet, ,o:a:Scz dies Reel', als €IS die Ruinen Oberaegyptens zu Geskht bekam, ploetzlich stille stand in stummer Verwunderung und 'dann ebenso einmuetig die !Stille der Wueste mit dem Buf del' Bswunderuug erfue1lte. Das Heel' der Neuzeit brachte einem Yolk de,r Vergangenheit seine .Huidigung dar. Ueber,alLfand ma,n Steine mit einer Schrift bedecM, hestehend aus Dal'lsiJ:ellungenvon Tieren, Gewaeehsen, DingelJ rum Him!IDel,j.m Wasser und auf del' Erde. Aluch fand man M3Jl'llskripte und Dokumente auf Papyrus geschrieben, wegen des~en Velrfertigung' AJegypten einflt s.o beruelhmt war. Aibertwa,sfuel' ein A(Lpha.betund was' fuel' 'eine ISpl"aehe war dies?, • Die Bchrift waene moM nie entziffert wOl"den,wenn nicht eine glueckHche ffintdeckung Leutnant Bouchards, eines del' . Offiziere Napoleon'S;,d'alsRaetsel ZUlli 'Dei] gel.oest haette. Die Soldaten gruben den Grund aus zu einem FlOrt und fanden den beruehmten Ro.setteJStein, einen Stein, del' €line In:sc1brift iIn dr-ei Schriftar-tern enthtielt 'auf d'l'ei verschiedenen SeiJten. Man saogtesich glekh, Idries·edrei Sdhriftarten ermelhlen wahl da,s'selbe, und fand sach drurin auch nicht getaeu8'cht. Die eine S:cillift war die griecJrische. iMit Hilfe diesel' griechi,schen Bprrache gelling es spaeter aueh, die all!deren zu entziffern. SoO wlmde diesel' 'Stein del' 'Scihlu~sselzu den Gesehichten des AItertums,. . Del' Mann, del' SiL"ili am mei,sten verdient gemaclht hat untel' all den Wei,sen serineI' Ze~t, war Jean-F.rancois OhaintpoUion. Er war sieben Ja:hre alt, als Napoleon seinen FehlJzug unternalhm. 'Els jst· nlicht notwendig, 'htier die J:ange, interessante Geschich,te seines Lebents einzuflechten, nul' SOO viel sei erwaehnt, dasz, a].s am 4'. Maerz 1832 sein Leben zum Abzclhlusz. kam, er auch eine ae",ry,ptiSiehe Gl'ammatik z'l1mA\bsichluszgebraeht. hatte, deren Ietzte Seiten er seinem BrUl~er sterbend diktierte. uDa luJ".~tdu CS;'dM soU, 'Wic ich hoffe, rn,cine Visitenkarte /uer- die Nachwelt 8ei1~,"waren seine Worte, als er todesmatt ,!l!achdel' AiIlstrengung :auf sein Lager zurueck~ank. E,s. war i'hm gelungen, d~e S:pI"3JChen Aegyptens zu entZ'iffern. "Seine


6

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Entdeckungen .w€irden so lange rortdauem, wie die unetet-blichen Denkrnaeler, mit denen er uns bekannt gemacht hat" ('Silvester de Sacy}. "ISeit deli' Beginn del" Wissenschaften hat es wenige Maenner gegeben, die solohe Ddenste geleistet haben, wie nie, welche oen Namen OhMll'poUioll's der Unsterblichkeit geweiht lhaben." (Ohateaubrrand}. Irn folgenden werden nun einige. der 1USlchriftennnt dem Bibelbericht uer Genesis vergli<chen. Das erste Kapitel der Genesdsenthaelt einen Bericht von Taten, die Gott vollbrachte, ehe ein menschlicher Zeuge gegenwaertig war. Den einzigen Bericht ueber diese Tuten Ihaben wir durch goettliche Oftenbarung im ersten Buche Mose verzeichnet. UeberrasClhendist ee nun, uas,z wir in der ,Literatur Babyloniens, AjssJ'l'iensund anderer Laender bestaetigende Aiussagen ueber das enste Kapitel del' Bibel finden. Es gibt, wie wir sehen werden, Anzeichen davon, o.asz die Sch(]ep.fungs·g€S'ch:khte .schOonVOl" Mose bekannt war, unn ci'ai&z es· eine lH'anfaengliche O.flenbarung gegeben haben musz. WiJr finiden Trruemmer dieser Offenbarung ueberall in den 'alten Religrionen der HeiLen. ,So wurden von Smith und R'3Jslsamin assyriscihen RlUineneine A!nza:lrlsogenan,nten Sch{)epfunlgls'tafeln gefunden, von denen man annimllllt, d13'szsie aus del' Zeit zw,ischen 2000 und 1500 VOl" Christo stammen. F'lolgendes-sind Beruehirungspunkte zwischen der G~nesils unld den Bericlhten der Assyrlschen Tafeln. Die Sdhritt berichtet von Gemerst en Zustand der Dinge, Gen. 1,-2: "Und (1'ieElrde W3Jl' wiUestund leer, und es war fiIllSt€rauf der Tiefe." Die erste Sc'hoepfungstafel hringt uns ein klares 'Elcho in den Worten: «Als droben die Himmel noch keinen Namwn verkue;ndeten 11Inddtrwnten die Erde nooh keinen bezeu,gte, Da war der A1bgru,nd d,er Wasser a,m A.'IJ'I,ta;ng ihr Erzeuger, das Chaos de?' Tiete WW" es, das sie alle gebar. Ihre Wasser warem gesamm,elt a;n ei1LC1'n Ort, das Schilt wwr niGht erschieneil, das K1'(J!Utdes F eldes nicht gewachsClfl, .." Leider existieTen uur Bruchsrtuecke der'Dafeln. Die dritte Tafel ist ziemtlichv;oHstaendig, aber sie oost'ilr'eibt nur einen KaJID'pfzwilscrhen-den Goettern. Der fuenfte Stein aber. ent'spTioht ~lar dem vierten Schoepfungstage, an' dem Gott die Hiffiilllelskoerper schuf. (1 Mos-e1, 14-18). Die T~a:'rel l'3;utet: "Er bereitete die Wohnllng der groszen GoeJtterj er s(')tzte die Sterne, die illlrwn ent· sprechen, die Zwillingssterne. Er ord'1tete das, JaM' wnd bestim,rnte die Zeichen des Tierkreisesj tuer jed-en detr zwoelt Monate setzte e'r dlrei Sterne, von dfJm Tage, da da·s Jah1' her"1XYr'geht,bis zu seinem Ende. Er !JrU&ndetedlie .Wohnung des Sownengottes, der e;ntlang geht ,die Bahin, aut dJaszsie kewrwn ihre Grenzem, dasz sie rl!icht itrregeh.en, noah abtoeichan irgend wie.


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

7

.Br errichtete die WoOOurng dem Bal und Ea bei sich selber.

Ueberdies tat er Tore auf an jeder Seite, er maebte fest die Riegel zur Rectden. umd.zur Limken., und in der Mitte setete er eine Treppe. Er erleuchtete den Mondqott, dasz er sei der Waechter der N acht, umd. -oerordmete, dase er ende die N achs, auf dasz man kenme den Tag, umd sprach: (Mmwt wuf Mortat 600 Unterlasz halie Wache in deiner Scheibe. Am Atnfang des Monats geh' at'!'fglaenz61~d (JIm Abend, mU Ieuciuenden;H oernern, dasz die Hirnrmel es ioieeen, (JIm siebenten. Tagc eei heU dein K1°eis.'" Hier klingen deutlieh hindnrch die Worte des Bibeltextes : "Und den T1atgund die Nacht rogieren," und "geben Zeichen, Zeiten, 'Tage und, Jahre." Von einer an deren, der 6. oder '7. Tafel, haben wir bis jezt nur die Amfangszeilen, aber diese fuehren die Sc'hoe-pfungsgesc:hiohteweiter in der Ordnung des bibli,schen Bericlhtes. ,S,ie luuten: "Zu dieser Zeit schufen die Gor;:tterr, da sie versanund,t waren. Sie rnachten die, lebendigen Gesahoopfe, die Timoe des F eldes, da8 Vieh des F eldes und die kriechelnden ,Tiere; des Feldes." l!Ji'nandel"er Text gibt uns den Namen des ersten Menschen an. Er wird "Adarna" gen1annt. Wie ein goldeneT l0aden zieht sich hier dUl'ch da~ Wirl"sel der heidillilsc:henMythologie die goeitliclhe Offenbarung und zeigt, dlws'zauch die Heiden diese einst reich und unverfaelscht geh1abthaben. Aluch del" Bibelbericht des siebenten 'T'ages findet seine Bestaetigung in Tafeln, die man in BaJbylon gefunden. Obwdhl einzelne Voelker im Daufe der J!a:hre die Ze:itdauer del" Woche geaendert hatten, so finden wir ar{llsden Berichten de'r babyloni,S'chenAufzeidhnullJgenganz genaue AIJJ:gaben,d,ie s~c:hzum gros,zen Teil mit dem Bibelbericht decken. Eine in Babylon auillgefundeneT1afelsehr alten Ursprltngs zeigt uns, dasz die alten Babylonier die siebenta'egige Wocne haiten und den Srubbathstreng beobachteten. Del' 7te, 14te, 21te und 28te 'Tag des MOll'atsrwird Sabba,th genannt. AJn diesem Tage war jegliche Airbeit, SO@arIdrusOpfel" fuel' die Goettel' verboten. Man findet dort aU'ch den Na:men Sabbathum, und er wird erklaert als ein Tag der Rtthe fuer das H erz. Eine andere Bezeiclhnung nenut den SaJbbath den Tag der Vollerndung. M'an verglei'che hiermit Genesis 2, 2. Mlm hat 'clIucheine Auzruhl-AJndeutungen gefunden ueber d!ie E'rsc,lmffung des el"s,tenMenschen durch die Goettel", die sich alle in del' Haupt'sache aehnlich 'sind, naemli'ch, d1aszdie Menschen aUisEirde oder Ton ersehaffen wmrden. Folgendes 1st ein kurzel' AJus~ug aus einem laengeren Gedicht: (Di-e Goettin Aruru WtUschihre Haende, kl1etete Ton wnd bereitete ihn aUf der Erde;. Sic erscht~f H eabani." In cinem Bericht ueber die ISuendflut finden WiTden Satz, dasz die Menschen,


8

THE

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

die in del' Flut umkamen, "eurueckkehrten. zu tlem. Staub, von dem; sie ge1wrnrnernuxiren:" . . Dae Para-dies, de?' Suendenfall 'urnd die Su·endtZut. . Auch als Bestaetigung fuel' die Wahrheit dieses Berichtes in del' Genesis finden wir viele A:ufzekhnungen und Andeutungen derura lten Voelker. Ganz besonders ueber die Sluendflut finden wir Alufzeichnungen, die mit dem Bibeltext beinahe woertlioh uebereinstirnmen. Die aseyrischen Insehriften haben in den Ietzten Zeiten eine reic!hlkhe Bestaetigung del' GeschicMe des Paradieses geliefert. In einer !nsllhrii t ist die Rede von einem "heiligen Baume von Eri<dlll,"d. h. Paradies. In dem Berrcht :heiszt es : "In Eridu eruniche ein. Palmenreie schattenreioh: am lwiliger Staette tGl(JJrd es gruen; Seine ltY'u.rzel 'von hellem. Laeursteim, dol' sich. etreckt in die Tiete; dem Gott Ea W1l.ohs ee in Eridiu" oott Fr'U.()htbarkeit ; seine Staette war der Mittelpwnkt der Erde; Sein Laub war dae Ruhebett von Zikum, dol' ereten. Muttwr. In das H ere dieses heiligern H auses, da,s semen Bc;hatten awsbreitete glmch einem Wald, ist kein M~ch get1-etern." Dar~tellungen von d~esem "Palm,reis" ,odeI' diesem «Heiligen BaU111~"wie er auch auf anderen, aehnlichen InSlcib.riften genannt wird, findet man auf Denkmaelern aIler Art an. Er sc:heint eine bedeutende -Stene in' del' Rreligion del' babyIonisehen und la,ssYl'isehenReiche eingenommenr zu haiben. Des Oef'teren wird auf Inrschrilften «die boese Schlarnge/! «die Sdhlange dwr .Finsternis" erwaehnt. Boscaven hat kuerzlich mn Brruchstueek gefunden, in welchem del' Fall des Mens,chen in deutliciben. Alusdrueeken bes,c1hriebenscfheint. E:r gi,bt folgende Uebersetzung d:a.von: In S'uernde karnfln beide uebe?·6Ji,r.,.--DasGebot war gegebe-n' im GlJ:rten des Gottes. Vorn, Asanb,aum aszen sie und br·achen ihn entzwe'i. Soinern StieZ zerstoer·ten sie, den suesen Satt, der dtyn K oerper schadet. Gr'osz ist ihrre Suernde. Sich selber erhobern sic, dern Melradoch, ihrem Erloeser', ueberwies wr, der Gott Sa-r, ilvr Geschick. Tn einem alten indli,schen Tempel findet man ein Bild, welches deutlioh darauf hindeutet, da:sz die Gescb.i.chtevom Suendefall und die erste Verheiszung von Jesu (1. Mose 3, 15) sich aueh unter diesen heidnisehen Voelkel'll fortgepflanzt lmt. Es stellt einen Mann dar, den eine grOlsze'S'Chlangeum,suhlilllgt undr in die Ferse beisz-t. Daneben steM derselJbe M1ann,del' sieh yon der S'CIhlaJ?ge losgewund'en hat, ihren Leib 1rr'iumphierendrin den Hiaenden lhiaelt und m!it einem Fusz auf illrem Kopf tri tt. Das deut)iicibste Zeugni,s fuer die Wlruhrlheitder Schrift liefern abel' die atS1s'Yrirschen Denkm1aelerin rSchrift und BUd. 1m Britisc!hen Museum warmein ZyIinder von harteIIll Stein aufbewahrt, del' in As'syrien gefunden wurde. Die~er Zylinder stellt d~s Bild eines Baumes' darr, auJf jeder Seite ein

i


THE

I

It

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER'

9

Bueschel Frueohte haengend, AJn einer :Seite des Baumes 'sitzt edn Mann, und auf del" anderen Seite ein, Weib. Sie sind in Beratung und deuten auf die Fruechte, waehrend hinter dem Weihe sicih eine !Schl'angeemlportebt, mit ihr und nicht delIliManne spreehend. Es ist die GesllhIichteeel' Versuchung im' Bilde. Die -Steineschreien gegenueber dem Spott del' Unglaeubigen, die die Gesehichte des Suendenfa.lles in das Reich del' Fabel eingliedern. ('Tohe continued.) Published by Prof. Sotindt upon request of Second Year Normal Olaes, THE CHRISTIAN AND HIGHER EDUCATION The term higher oducation, as here used, designates education beyond the elementary grades, as in high school, college, ailld university, not including preparation fOT the 'holy ministry and the offi-ceof teacher in a Ohristian Day School. What is true education? Is it acquisition of knowledge and development of mental faculties ? Indeed not! Edncation without character training is not sufficient. I refer you to the Leopold-Loebmurder. These men were highly educated and cultured, but their lack of Christianity made them dangerous to their fellowmen. Other examples of this education may also be mentioned, such as Greece, Rome, and the other pagan nations of anrtiquity. ' We are better educated now than at any time in our history; yet crime has increased over one mmdred per cent in the last few years. About sdxty per cent of iJhe institutlons OIfhigher learming do not profess to believe in God. This kind: of education is most detrimental to our youth. The rising generation must be. trained in Ohristianity, for the youth of to-day is the church of to-morrow, and also the bulwark of the nation of to-morrow. A certain Methodist once said, "Take the fear of-God and His laws out of a 'man, and how Clan.he have the same respect for our 113JWS that were founded upon God/s laws?" Let us turn to Scripture. What does it say of true education? In Proverbs 111, 10, we are told that "The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom." Paul, in his letter to the Ephesians, says, "Ye fathers, provoke not your children to wrath : but bring theml up in the nurture aiRd admonit~onof the Lord." . Ohristianity is a t!hing wibich must be taught. Religion and eduoation are not in opposition to each other as is the opinion od'many; neii!her is Christianity narI'OWor an enemy of true slCienlCe.lS,oime of the greatest sciholam of their d'ay were great men of God, such as Moses, Solomon, Daniel, St. Paul, and St. Augustine.


10

THE D. M. 'L. C. MESSIDNGER

What is the Ohriatian philosophy of life? It is in all things to seek God-s glory and to serve God and his fellowmen. In MattJhew6, 33 we hear, "Seek ye first the kingdom of God and' his righteousness." The Ohristian . considers higher education from an entirely differer t viewpoint than does the natural man. The latter deeires higher education from selfish motives and for selfish ends: namely, to obtain mlore money, ihigh places of honor and power, and a life of luxury and ease. The Chr-istian sees in higher education an opportunity for greater usefulness and better service in the kingdom of God,and; will, use it with that end in view. The 'educated Ohristian is the very best servant of the church and of the state. In places of power and influence, he is not Oldy efficient in serving his country, but also in serving his church, His Christian training will influence him to act honestly in all things, regardless of the many evil wi,sihesand desires of others which are set before 'him. Public opinion tOI()is molded by the educated class of people. How different it might be if true Christians, especially Lutheran Christians, could always mold public opinion l There are of course dangers connected with education: dangers in acquiring it, and dangers in possessing it. Wlh,ena student attends a college or university, he comes in contact with people of var-ious denominations. College fr-iendships develop, and a student of sectarian faith, who advocates gambling, dancing, and various other' evils, will eventually convince;'his Lutheran friend that to ibe a good sport these tlhings must be done. Most colleges and universities are hot bees of infidelity. If a y,oung man or woman who is only luke-warm in faith attend 'a university, nine times out oil'ten he or she will return a non-Christian and often a great scoffer, Few univereities do not abound in the teachings of Darwin, If a' student accepts these evolutionistic theories, it is evident that he is rejecting the Bible. 'Dhu8',simple faith in the Scriptures as the verbally inspired, inf'allible Word of God is ridiculed and treated with silent, or even open, contempt. Every university and college has fraternities, sororities, and societies, It is usually the aim of these organisations . to create entertainment fOTtheir students. But what usually occurs here? 'I'hings 'are said or done that tend to make a jest of the Word of God, or braveundue reference to the Sixth Comrnandmetrt, or make light of grievous sins. Such entertainment will undermine Christian faith. T'M Christian student lives in an atmosphere hostile to spiritual life. To attend chapel once a day is sometimes a requisite, but how can fhis be a Hue devotion, having fellowship with a Oatholic, a Jew, or an Altheist, In many universities devotion is never, given a portion of consideration.

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THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

11

The student will become careless in his prayer, and what can his life he without supplication? Alfter anyone is the possessor of a good education that has been acquired at a university, pride, false aelf-reliance, and flattery find space in his heaet, ThuS' trust in God and Christian humility are stifled. What i,BQUI' church doing to encourage Christian education ? We have a Iew high sehools: one at Milwaukee, one at Ohicago, one at Dreshler, Nebraska, and one at For-t Wayne. Indiana, but what is that among so many? The sects have mauy more, Catholic institutions are-numbered by tihe 'hundreds, and we had not a single institution of that kind unti l the recent purchase of the university at Valparaiso, Indiana, took place. 'This is certainly not in harmony with Lutheran tradition. Luther was decidedly active in the movement for higher education, especial.ly also for 'girls. Another evidence is this. The so-called Lutheran countries, Germany, Denmark, S,wedenand Norway, have the least number or illiterates. When the Lutherans first came to America, they immediately recognized the necessity of educating the younger element. Als a result of this, the first college was, es,tablished in Perry County, Missouri, in 1839. Our Lutheran church has been graciously blessed in the success of our Christian day schools. Wby do we not have more colleges and universities? Since 'We do not have them, our young people are obliged to attend other institutions to receive a highee education. Is our church doing its duty concerning the' welfare of these students? Fur-thermore, what can he cone in this respect? Full-time Lutheran student pastors can be placed at the universi'ties and colleges. These pastors are sustained by the Wisconsin and Missouri Synods. Their particular work is to preach to these' students, to=vielt them, to instruct, advise 0'1' admonish them when necessary. In 1920 the first University pastor was placed at the University .of Wieconsin. Since then, provision has been made at the Universities of Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa and Chicago, May God grant, that in the future we ma,y have more of our own institutions of higher learning. L. P. and H. Z. '26.

THE ANGLO-S!A.XONISAND THEIR LITERATURE The first 'uhabitants of Great Britain were known as Celts. In 449 the Teutons, consisting of" Amgles,Saxons, and Jutes, crossed the Nor-th Sea and took poesession of the southern part of England. These people were Germanic tribes that came from different parts of Denmark, nor-thern France, Germany and the Netherlands. The Jutes settled in Kent, the Angles in the north midlands, the Saxons in


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THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Essex, Wessex, Sussex, and in Middlesex. All these separate provinces were gradually united into one kingdom under one king. The Angles constituted the largest number. This, perhaps caused the new home to !becalled Angle-land, Which was later changed to the name of England. Tnese 'I'eutons contributed' boundless courage, abdlity to fight, and sternness of mind to the making of England. ~l'hehabits of these people are peculiarly revealed in their literature. They spent their time in hunting, fish!ing,fighting, and in tilling the soil. War, however, Wl1JS their tavorite pastime. Their whole literature treats of three themes: sea, war, and death. They aIM must have been 'Peoplethat reveled in much drinking and feasting, for their epic poem Beowulf tells us that "It ran through Hrothgar's mind that he would give or-ders for men to make a mighty mead-house, and when night had come, Grendel went to visit the lofty house, to see how the Ring-Danes after their beer-feast might be faring, He found therein a hand of nobles asleep after feasting." Besides that they were hero-worshippers, for the scops' and gleemen that sang in these mead-halls portrayed mainly the manifold heroic deeds of their warriors. The Anglo-Saxons were heathens and worshipped Gods such as "Vnden, 'ThOT,and others. In Bede s Parable of a M,wws Life, we read, "So this life of man appears for a short space, but of what went before, ,or what is to follow, we are utterly ignorant." In additionto this, they were very superstitious, believing in jotuns, orken-creatures, elves, and nickers. In 596 Pope Gregory, wino had in his former life once seen some golaen-iliairedAngle children and had traced their place of inhabitation, sent SO'IIlÂŹ monks over to England under the leadership o-f St. Augustine. These monks budlt monasteries and began the conversion of England. 'I'he AngloSaX'onsimmediately displayed their newly-found Christianity in their poems. "Then there reached us 'help, that to harbor of Healing homeward led us on-He the S'Pirit-...Son of God," writes Cynewulf in The Christ. During this time Oaedmon alSIO 'WI10rte his Paraphr'aSe of the SG'ripturcs, which WaJS a free tr-anelation of Genesis, Exodus, 'and Daniel. Heretofore all the Alnglo-S,axonliterature had been handed down verbally from generation to 'generation. l']'Ihemonks, however, immiediately went to wor-kto copy the exieting literature on paper. They also substituted Ohristian ideas for the paganism found in their writings. The poetry written during this age was either martial or Biblical, while the prose was mostly all history and very simple and imitative. All this was: written in Latin and was, therefore, read only by the educated class'. Alfred the Great, the last writer in this period, was more interested in the common people than were his predecessors, He gathered scholars around him and translated many valuable books into the A!nglo-Saxon language, Be-


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13

sides that, he himself wrote many things directly in that language. Thereby volumes of history and religious teachings were made accessible to the people, and a general educational system began to spring up. But because of the restricted themes in the Anglo-Saxon literature, an intellectual ~ regeneration had to come about if it was to survive. G. 1\ V. GOOD QUEE,N BESS You a:ll have heard of the Elizabethan Algein the History of English Literature. But 00 you know the personality of , the noble queen after whom this period was named? Ellizabeth was born in the 'Palace at Greenwich on September 7, 1533. ,She was the daughter of the much-married Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, who fO:Iimerlywas his first wife's maid, Elizabeth was fourteen years old when Henry died. Slhe grew up at ,his court and probably was the best educated woman of her century. ,She could speak French and Italian with fluency and, besides, was an alble scholar of Latin and Greek. She also 'Wasan elegant penman and skillful in music, but did not delight in it. Elizabeth ascended the throne in 1558, in he,r twentyfifth year. A)t this time the illngliishnation was surrounued by difficulties. It was entangled in a war with France. Calais had been Joost,and trade wit!li the continent suffered. England also was distr-acted by religious problems,and animosities. But all this did not appal the staunch queen. IShe was a bold beauty, vain, untruthful and far from staunch and loyal to her friends. S'he WaJS selfish and egotisti~ cal. A great historian once said, "To Elizabeth, a lie is simply an intellectual means of avoiding a difficulty." She had many feminine weaknesses. She affected the dress and manners of a coquette to the day of her death; and constantly expected her attendants to heap flattery upon her. She was very fr~volous, loved courtly pomp and magnificence, and is 'said to have had three thousand dresses. A German who visited her court on a ,Sunday when she was sixty-five years of age states that she appeared stately and ,majestic; her face oblong, fair hut wrinkled; !her eyes small, yet black and pleasant ; her nose a little hooked; her lips narrow, and her teeth black, I 'am unable to explain the la.tter, but I once heard that the teeth were blackened as a means of drawing attention. Her hands were slender and 'her nngers long. She took great care not to hide them when in the presence of 'her audiences. In her ears she had pearls wi th rich drops; she 'WIOre false red hair, and had a small crown on her bead, '8he was clad in a dress of white silk, bordered with pearls the size of beans. The collar was gold, be=ecked with jewels. Thus arrayed, the queen passed along, smiling graciously on


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THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

, the spectators who all' fell upon their knees as she approached. A bevy or ladies, dressed in white, followed'her. On either side she was guarded :byfifty gentlemen, carrying gilt battleaxes. In spite of her weakness,es,she had strength as, a sovereig,n. Dlizabeth was a woman of ability and of.undoubted patriotism. S'he was ambitious, fond of power, and 'had the strength of character to work for the good of her people. From her father she inherited a strong body, a powerful intellect, dauntless 'courage, a haughty temper and an imperious will. Elizabeth was devoted to Etngland. Her puupose was not to favor a certain paa-ty ; but sihewas determined to work for the English nation as a whole, ''[Ihequeen repealed many oppressive laws. Ooinage was restored and the wage problems were solvedâ&#x20AC;˘. 'Tilleconditions of the common people were improved. 'Schools and' colleges were encour-aged,and manufactur-ing was Ibuilt up. Bur-densome taxes were removed, Comfor-table houses, were built, and dirt floors and straw, beds became less common. Her treatment of the unfortunate afforded her the name of Good Queen Bess. I . Alt heart ,she was a Protestant. She and her ministers settled .upon a middle 'course, going back in all matters of doctrine and ceremony to that of the reign of Edward VI. She dlsliked the Catholics and Puritans and favored the Huguenots in France and the Protestant Party in the Netherlands. Nevertheless, she was 'far from tolerant. lier foreign policy was strong. During this reign, England became the leading maritime .power of the world. Here we list the exploits of >SirFrancis Drake, Sir Walter Raleigh, Captain J()ihn Hawkins, and the destruction of the Spanish AJI'IIl:ada.During this time the foundation of the British Empire aleo was laid in the new world. Her=marr-iage plans are amusiug and ridiculous. Her devotion to England. and her unwillingness to lose the freedom of her single state always prevented the marriage from taking place, until she grew old and died in 1603,unmarried. Much could be stated about good Queen Bess of the English people, but why restate what history relates. Her reign ]S considered the greatest in English History. The :beginning presents the country divided and unsettled in every way, but soon we find social contentment everywhere and Elngland united. Elizabeth piloted her ship through rocks and shoala into open water. This period is important for us' in so .far that it introduces the English Drama and many emdnent writel'S, such as William Shakespeare, Edmund .spenser and Francis Ba-

eon.


THE

15

D. M. L. C. ME'SSENGER

UJl1e m. B. 'iG. QI. Beaaeuger The "D. M. L. C. MESSENGER" is published quarterly during the school year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price is seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued after time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressed to the Business Manager; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributions to' our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates, and friends. Entered as second class matter at the Post Officeof New Vim, Minnesota.

EnITORIAL H. I'HILENFIET.. ..DT, W. WlOLTM:A!Nh,,"', Business Mgr. H. KDlDHN, Asst. Bus. Mgr. M. ALBRECHT, Asst. Bus. Mgr. MIISS E. A·lJBRECHT, Exchange Ed. MISS I. S;K;OGlE1N, oou. Notes Ed.

Volume XVI

,II

IS:TAFF Editor-in-Chief MISS A. MUEII.JL:Elli, Alumni E'd. .'MISS G. PMP, Co-Ed Notes Ed. C. ,FINUP, Locals Ed H. BACKER, Athletics Ed. W. STINDT, JOk9S Ed.

March 1926

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No. III

EDITORIAL

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• INTRODUCTORY With this issue the new etaff begins its duties. We shall endeavor to <carryon the work so far accorrsplishedby former editors of this quarterly. We shall always 'be willing to submit to criticism where criticism; is due. John Heinitz who had been elected to the new staff as assistant business manager has discoutinued his course' of studies at our institution. .His work 'WIa8 divided among the remaining business managers.

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TijE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

KEE,PING FIT K eep fit! This is a ipromlinentslogan to-day. Newspapers, periodicals, magazines are filled with' articles on "How to Keâ&#x201A;Ź!pFit." What is meant by ilhis term? First of all, this term implies keeping your body in- a healthy p;hy'sicaicondition to be a pleasure -to yourself and not a burden to your fellowman. It is evident that health is a g;reat factor for man's happiness ; those who have withstood a serious Illness will affirm) this as a fact. III health is a grindstone for yourself and a burden 'for your neighbor. Ke;epinf} {it is a .pl'ime duty of :man. Without being fit, that is, being in a healthy condition, it is very hard for a person to meet the duties and responeibilities of life. What is more, he <cannot 'perform them perfectly while in a poor physical state. Psychology teaches us correctly -that our . mental activities. are influenced by our physical conditions. When we are in ill health, our mind is handicapped. Mental work is very difficult, Keeping fit, therefore, not only impries our 'Physica,l well-being, but also our mental. M! keeping fit is such a great factor in our entire wellbeing, why should- we not all observe it? Ai few minutes' exercise each morning and evening, fresh air as much as possible, ;pure roocs and pure drinking Wiater,good ventilation in our rooms, good care of our body will keep us fit. But tihis is too much for sOlIDe;"fheythink it is "bahyis!h" to do that; they would rather pay a large fee to the physician and talk about their narrow escape from death. The preceding paragraphs, however,.do not fully come up to our Christian view-point, 'Should we Ohristians then _not keep fit, or do 'Wenot need. to do it? Yes, we should keep our body in a 'healtley state as much as lies in our power, because it is the temple of the Holy Ghost, as 1. 001'. 6, 19.20 tells us, "Knorwye not that our body is the, temple of, the , . Holy Ghost? Therefore glorify God in your body-and in your splrrt, 'Which are God's." Prom' ..our OlIfistjan view-point we may define keeping 'fit as' follows: .Praying to God to defend us against all d'ariger and then doing our utmost to keep our health for the glory of God our 'Creator, not ,pFimarily for our 'hrup'Pines,s.Our body is not our- own property, 'but God's, as 1. Gar. 6,20 says, "Glorify God in your body and in your spirit, Wihdc'h Me G()d/s." ¡1\Isour body has 'a divine ownership, we should take good care of it,' not for our own sake, hut for the eake of its owner, which is God. We keep ourselves fit in the same manner as all the rest do: namely, by correct and temperate living. Thus far we have avoided the question, "When should we keep fit'!" "AHlour life" is one correct answer. But when one is sick aiready-{llliaybe born sickly-it is then impossihie to keep fit; that unfortunate person would, first have to


THE D.. M. L. C. MESSENGER

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get fit to keep fit. Keeping fit is then only a slogan for the healthy. What about the sick ? Does this slogan not apply to them? No, not in the worldly sense; but fr-om our Ohristian point of view it does, We Christians should first of all put all our hope and joy and trust in God. In Him shall we find happiness. In Him shall 'we----<siek and heali!hy-kcep (it to. enter His eternal home. A. F. R. '26. STAGE-FRIGHT

)

What i,s stage-fright? Is it something that only some people have? May we overcome it? Stage-fright is shown by the nervousness of an amateur speaker. 'l'his makes it difficult and often impossible for him to find the exact words wirh which he wishes to exprecs himself. In schools where students are required to give short speeches before their classmates, stage-fright may he 'plainly seen. Have i stage-fright? Of course I have. But why have I? When I srpeak to my classmates, I have stage- fright, because I know every persou in the audience, If I were to. speak before an audience of strangers, possibly I should feel more at ease. A person may also have stage-fright if he should aprpear before an audience not knowing dearly what he wishes to. say. If this is the case, it is self-evident that he will stammer. 'Dhe audience will then watch him more closely, and some will show pity for him. The speaker will notice these actions of his audience, and this is just the thing that makes himjwish he could sink through the floor. Has everybody stage-fright? . Yes, I think that every amateur speaker has some stlllge-fright. There are, however, a few exceptions, to. this. Some people are. accustomed to being among crowds 011 people. They may also. have a talent tor speaking. T'his will enable them to appear before' an audience and feel perfectly at ease. Can I and those of you who have stage-fright overcome it? Yes, I think it is possible. But how?-You should be well IJweparedto speak before you attempt it. You should know what you want to salJ, get up and say it as if you were the only one in the room, Of course, one must not talk as. if he were speaking to. vacant seats. He must bear in mind that he has an audience that would possibly like to hear him, but lie should not have that peculiar feeling that everybody. is watching him. Allthough I have stage-n-ight, I try to overcome it by telling myself, "Wlhat should 1.be afraid of? Let my classmates 10Qk at me. If they haven't seen me 'before, it's time that they do, and, so far as the professor is concerned, he will just give me a number accordingly." H.. K. '28.

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ALUMNI _

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The following alumnae were among those who attended our Ohristmas concert: Gertrude Haertel, '22; Verona Messerli, '23; and Ethel Giziewski, '24. Laura Meyer, '25, paid the old haunts of D. M. L. C. a\ visit during Ohristmas vacation. ,The Rev. R. Luennig, who was a student at D. M. L. C. frQIIJ!'18 to '20, is, at present vicaring at Lyons, Te:x:as. IHe is enjoying his 'work and finds Texas a pleasant state to live in. Mrs. Arfuur Fenske, '20, although married, is still loyal to D. M. L. C.; for since Christmas she has taken two co-eds in board. Bertha Wilbrecht, '25, is now teaching at Malone, Wiscousin. A letter has been received from Mrs. Donald'Rossin, '21, of Lemon, ,South Dakota. She tells us that she has already learned to go "Jagden" in the Wild West. Mr. EmU Trettin, formerly stationed at ,Stanton, Nebraska, has 'accepted a call to the Jerusalem congregation at Milwaukee, W:iSICoilsin. Mr. Godfrey' ISchu!lz,.'21, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, recently became engaged to Miss Vera Kaueier, daughter of the Rev. Wlm. Kausier, also of that place. Frieda John, '23, and Mr. Hellermann, '98, both teachers at 'Mankato, paid their old Adma Mater a visit on February 12. Professor Duin, '09, submitted to a serious operation at the Union Hospital on February 14. Miss Erna Albrecht, '19, is taking charge, of his piano classes. Former students who still have a warm spot in their heart for good,old D. M. L. C. are asked to kindly broadcast any items of news to the imaginary receiving station located in the Staff Room'of the Recitation Building. Station D. M. L. C. is now signing off.


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We 'have hefore our eyes The Spectator) a monthly issue ipuhlished by the Concordia Teachers College, River Forest, Iillinois .. "rhus far we' 'have received three issues, the initial number appearing in November. Who is winner, the athlete or general who rushes through at breakneck speed? Indeed not. Only he or they, who, after careful deliberation" have viewed a 'situation from various angles, then slowly approached the desired object with dauntless courage and painstaking energy, will come out with flying colors, We feel assured and, have evidence that The Spectator has successfully taken these steps, The Specta1;lo'l' has not disregarded the literary form but has accepted it. Ajs yet it retains the name of pamphlet; but good beginning is usually followed by a good ending. AJsthis paper has no definite cover, our attention is immediately drawn to the printed matter. 'I'he Spectator has a large and well-organized staff. In the first article of the November issue the writer depicts the purpose and results, of such a paver in his Ylour' College Paper. "It represents the ideals of tlhe college. It fosters a spirit of loyalty for; the school, forms a closer bond ;between the alumni and their AlIma Mater, and furnishes wholesome publicity for the college." 'Next our attention is centered on an article on Cheerimg in which various questions are discussed. . This is followed 'by a series of well-wr-itten, short, and conci-se paragraphs.

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'The December and Janua.ry issues indicate an improvement in arrangemlent. The articles and paragraphs are listed under the following headings: Current CollegeTopics, Briefs, Alumni, Sports, Amnouncements, and Fun Furnace. We are looking forward to the March issue which will 'be devoted to compositions find sketches by members of. the Senior, I Normal and II Normal classes. Continue, 8pectator, we wish you success! Let every student at Concordia rejoice and shout: "More precious far than gold refined is the iSpectator, knit with heart and mind. Gold may go its flckle.zway,but our paper will ever -stay."

A COUNTRY SCENE

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~LLEGE

,Addition to Boys' Dormit:O!ry On NovemberL, 1925, McGough of St. Paul received the general contract" on the building. 'The work was begun immediately, and in a few w'leeks they had excavated for the basement. ISoon we could hear the 'Pounding路 of hammers and the noise of cement mixers. Day by 'day we could see the progress of the work, F'ina.lly 'by February 1, the build-

.. ing, consisting of a basement and four stories, was finished with the roof ready tor shingling, Tlhe windows were alse 'Put in by this date. The electrical wiring, of 'Which the Ulrich Electric Co. of New Ulm had charge, is completed. "Dhe plumbers are now !busy installing' radiators. Tlhe radiators are legless, wall radiators. 路They have the advantge over those of the old dormrtory in being elevated about one foot above the floor, thus making the sweeping under them easier. As soon as the


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plumbers' have completed their work, the building will be heated for a few days, in preparation for 'plastering. The companies that manufacture equipment have noticed the splenoid 'progress made, and a shower of agents r-epresenting every possible interior equipment has been hounding

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Professor Klatt. He is, nevertheless, bearing up wonderfully under the strain. The addrtion will not be occupied this year; but owing to the rapid progression of the work, we feel assured that it will be completed by August 1, 1926, God willing. Band Concert On the evening of February 7, the D. M. L. C. band under the supervision of' Armin Rauschka ' rendered a very interesting program. AiU intermission was given in which the , audience joined in singing old folk songs, both in the German and in the E,nglish language. The concert was enjoyed immensely by all, and it is desired that more be rendered SOon; Winter Sports Students have been very 'bus~ skating, skiing, and tobogganing this year. Not only the rink and the Cottonwood were occupied this year, but they also had an opportunity of skating through all the streets of the city. Some of the students even showed their 'skill by skating down college hill. Professors Absent On February 12 and 13, Professor Leverson was' absent on account of illness. On February 15, Professor Duin underwent a serious op-, eration at the Union Hospital. We wish him a rapid recov-

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ery so 'he again can nndertake his work at college. Miss Erna Mbrecht is now taking his place in piano instructing. On February 14 and 15, Professor Bliefernicht attended a conference in Milwaukee. Slides Shown On the evening of January 13, slides' were shown in the

parochial school showing the students and others the conditions among the Atpache Indians. Al lecture by Mrs. Guenther of Ar-izonawas rendered before the slides. On February 2, the students had the opportunity of seeing the slides of the Lady of the Lake and Quo Vad;is. Credit Where Credit Is Due A word of appreciation for our College Board, especially

the Executive Committee, is surely in place. With untiring efforts has this Ibodytaken hold of the erection of our new dormitory addition. Thus, lest we forget, the rapid progress made on the building is to a great extent due to the activities of this board. Meeting upon meeting was held since December, 1925. Weare told that one of the members came thirty miles in rain or shine to attend sessions. On one trip his car"had to be towed from the ditch nine times on account of slippery roads. Equipment Neede,d Our new dormitory addition is to be furnished with individual steel lockers, beds, tables, and chairs. Would it not be a splendid oppoeunity for graduates of our dear Alma Mater to lend a helping hand in raising funds for the equipment of.the new addition ? Necessary information in regard to needs and approximate cost will gladly be given by Prof. 路Bliefernkht upon request.

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S(YlviaBieber from 'Minneapolis visited with Luella Ross December 17 and also remained for the Ohristmas 'Concert. Anyone wishing for information concerning toboggan sliding is advised to go to Hilda Zahn or Inez 'Skogen. Hilda advanced so far in the art that she found it unnecessary to attend classes foil'a few days. AI group of girls from Hillcrest Hall was pleasantly enterta.ined at the home of Hertha and Irma Oswald January 24. Anne Bpangelo of A!lbert Lea and Hermina Detterer of Lockridge, Iowa, are again numbered among our list of co-eds, AlIma Ottenbacker was made happy by a visit from her father the last two days in January . . Irma Hoffmann was mysteriously called home on February 7, but soon came back smiling. If your curiosity is aroused, ask her about it. A few friends gathered at the home of Ruth Klatt on Valentine's Day to make things merry for her on her birthday. The tinkling of wedding bells summoned Viola Kremin to Vesta, Minnesota, on February 14. Whenever our little "Dumpling" gets hungry, she is immediately afflicted with homesickness. We can consider ourselves as having been very fortunate this year in regard to illness in our midst, Irene Althoff being the only one that broke the record, However, f3herecovered from; her attack of pleurisy within a week.


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Frieda Uetzmann, .a former student here; visited old friends and classmates February 20 and 21. Tn prove that Hillcrest Hall lives in the memory 'Ofthose that left it, the iQI1()IWin,g paid us a short visit during the past month : IMargQt'Schuetze, Frieda Polchow, and Gertrude Dey. Because 'Oftheir expertness in the teaching and training of children, they gladly gave encouragement, discouragement, 'Or whatever was desired, to every 'One.

'After a long Christmas vacation, the students returned and attacked their work with increased vim- and vigor, If we can judge by appearances, we must come to the conclusion that "ISanta Claus" was very bQuntiful again the past, year. The nâ&#x201A;ŹlW'year brought with it two new students, .Ewald "Ike" Nolte and Oscar "Whisikey" Schultz. George Hartmann submitted tQ an operation fQr appendi- . citis 'OnJan. H. He is getting along very nicely. - We were very sorry to hear -that Fritz Bartels and WITh Sch'illeding had to withdraw fr'Om QUI'midst _ Bartels _had to leave 'Onaccount ofsore eyes, and Schmeding 'Onaccount 'Ofrheumatism. He went to Mud Baden to take the 'baths. 'I'he "KangaroQ Oourt'" is very inactive this year: ::O'Q.ly two complaints have 'been registered thus far against S1IDok~~~~ , "'Slim" Baumann was pleasantly surprised by a visit from his brother, Frank, of Elkton, ISouth Dakota, on Feb. 18.


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER ! John Heinitz and Walter Hezel are .not numbered among the students of D. M. L. C. any longer. A new style of "\balloon pants" appeared, in algebra class a short time ago. The style was' too extreme and' was "shagged" out. Arthur Ottenbacker's father was a visitor at the college on Jan. 29 and 30. Robert and Charles Meyer were visited by their father, Mr. Charles Meyer, on Feb. 3. '

Sometimes out-of-town basketball games bring trouble to people. Ed. Krueger, after a game at Mankato, was stricken with the mumps. Later we heard that some one at Mankato also had the mumps. Our new "Zanol" agent, Eugene Huber, is busy "peddling his wares." -" During the time that Erwin Wilde and Airthur Haack were sick in bed, they were visited 'by the "kitchies." Will.e was promised some cake, but he is etill waiting for it. We believe that we shall have to re-Introduce the cold shower again. Monitor of room 46 take notice. We are, "wise" to that "cousin" game. "Elrv." Neubert spent Feb. 14 with his brother in Mankato. We are glad to hear that the band has been increased by several new members. They are Wm. Siegel, alto; II. Hage'dorn, cornet; Ed. Nolte, clarinet; Osc ar t::khultz,clarinet, and Arthur Ottenbacher, saxophone. Vvehope that more will be- , come interested. ' , , . Ed. Rossow was 'obliged to 'spend a few <la.ys'at his home, due to an attack of the barbers? itch. ' Art. Koester is a very mannerly person. Every time he gets up to recite, he bows. Thus far we bave been fortunate this year, only a few having been sick. Some of the unfor-tunate ones Were Vie. Schultz, chicken pox; "Wow" Wichmann, tonsilitis; "Jiggs" Steuernagel, tonsilrtis ; Isherner, grippe, and Martin Hoffmann, rheumatism. "Bozo" Mueller learned to his chagrin that trains do not wait. He wanted to go home Friday, but the train was gone. Gerhard Mueller is trying his luck in the practice school at the present time. He says, "'Some job!" 'Many of the students are taking advantage of the two 'and one-half days' vacation and are spenning them at their homes or at the homes of friends.

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27

ATHLE.TICS \~

Immediately after Elmer" Haertel's TWeifth' Graders walked away with the class channpionship, our coach, Professor Leverson, busied himself with selecting the players for the coming season. The following .players were chosen and divided into two squads: .Second Squad. First Squad. M. Albrecht First Team. bewnd Team. W. Engelhardt G. Reuter C. Mueller A. Koester T. Meyer (Capt.) E. Krueger H. Backer H. Rutz W. PIes's G. Albrecht E. Backer E. Tahlmann E. Pankow R. Kettenacker V. Schultz J. Roeder C. Spaulding E. Wilde AI. Hellmann With a practice period every Wednesday and Saturday afternoon at the New Ulm Airmory and on the College floor every Tuesday and Thursday, Iqoach Levorson, ably asslsted by Elmer Haertel and Guenter Waidelich, soon had its team in readiness for their first game of the season, This game was played with the Sleepy Eye High Sehool on their floor, December 4. Due to the kindness of Mr. Eibner and Mr. Saffert, over thirty rooters were able to ac- . company the team and urge them on to victory. The second team assisted by Ruben Kettenacker began the game. Sleepy E(Yeimmediately obtained the lead, but Ruben's brilliant defense work and Pless' baskets turned the tide to a 6-5 score in our favor at the end of the first quarter. In the second quarter the first team men came to fighting "Steer's" assistance. Although it took them two quarters to get started, our men showed their stuff when they placed the game out of danger early in the last quarter. The game ended 30-19 in our favor. This was the first time in our basketball history that we have been able to take home the "baeon" from the Sleepy Eye floor.


---_._--

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

On December 12, Sleepy E:ye gave us a return game at the New Ulm AJrmory. The Sleepy Eye boys were out for revenge, hut our players forced them to be satisfied with the short end of the score. Our second team again began the game, but the opponents soon obtained a 4-1 lead, so Coach Levorson substituted his entire first team. For almost .two quarters the opponent's uttempts to pierce our air-tight fivemen defense Iprovedfr-ultless, Only in the last quarter were they successful ill sinking three field .goals, while our first. team men succeeded in piling up 18 points. The game ended 19-10 in our favor. In the preliminary our second squad defeated the Mankato Walther League 21~11. On January 15 the "Levocsonians" suffered their first defeat <of the season at the hands of the Mankato Commercial College on the Mankato Y. M. O. A. floor. A pat. hed line up started the game on account 'OfMeyer"srelent sickness. The Commercial's imme...lately shot ahead of the D. 1\1:. L. C. on a series of "hope" shots. The quarter ended 10-4. In the 'second quarter College held' their opponents scoreless and succeeded in piling up ten points. rrhe second half saw the Commerdal's first team in action, but our boys continued their rally and the quarter ended 19-14. In the' final period Mankato carne back strong and 'piled up enough points to defeat Oollege. Score 22-19. On January 18, our boys tackled the Markato Y.. M. C. A.' at the New Ulm A~路mory. "Spuds'" quint again had the honor of starting the game. In the se.ond quinter the first t-eam men came to their assistance, and Capt. Meyer led the attack with four field goals. Final score was 28-20 in our favor. Out for revenge, 'Our boys took the "laurels" from the M. C. C. by defeating them in a hard fought game at the "NewUliniAwmory'OnJanuary 30. During the first half the Maroon and Gray Reserves were trailing by one point. . Four minutes before the half, Coach Leverson put in a fresh squad, but they were unable to 'Overcomethe lead. The second half was a "s-eesaw~'affair until our boys surged ahead in the final period. ,Score 28路20. . February 4 the "Levorsoniana" motored to St. Peter. to play the preliminary for the Gustavus-St. Mary game with the Gustavus second squad. . The first quarter was a neck to neck race which resulted in a tie 5-5. But in the second quarter 'Our boy's became winded because they were not accustomed to play on such a long floor, and' the Gusties had, their own way for the rest of the game. Score 25-1~. On February 4, Coach Haertel and Professor Palmbaoh took the second squad to Nicollet. 'LThey defeated the Nicollet High Sohool 23-13. .


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

On February 10, the second squad, encouraged by their first victory,. motored to. Mankato to play the Mankato Walther League on the Bethany 11001'; but they. were forced to drop the game by a 7'-6 score. On February 22, our second squad defeated the Nicollet High Sch-ool at the New VIm Airmory 25-19. St. John was scheduled to play our first team, but they failed to arrive. On February 26, the D. M. L. C. clashed with the local High !School at the NeW'VIm; Amnory to determine the city championship. The High School "quint" obtained an early start and were in the lead 16-8 at the balf. In the second half our boys tightened the defense and held their opponents to 3 baskets, but were only successful in piling up 8 points, Final score 22-16. 'This, being the last game of the season, ended the 'basket ball career of the following players at D. 'M. L.. C.: Rnben Kettenacker, Theodore Meyer, Edgar Backer, Helmut Rutz, Waldemar Pless, Adalbert Hellmann, Edward Krueger, and Carl SpaUlding. Now that our basket ball season bas drawn to a successful dose, our thoughts are directed to tbe coming tennis and baseball season. With the following letter men back from last year: Bullis and Reuter, infield; Hauch, Rossow and Hellmann, outfield; Stindt and Mangels, pitchers, and such promising material as "Dynamite" Mueller, "Elm" Haertel, "Lusch". Pless, '''Nut,s''· Kuehn, "Dady" Pape, "'T'llUnderbolt" Huber, and numerous others to 'Pick from, we have every reason to look forwar-d to a successful baseball season. Hopes are also running high of duplicating last year's record of a 1,000 percent.· Manager Haertel has been booking some of the fastest teams in this sectien of the country and assures us a heavy schedule. 'Students,! let us all turn 'out and back our team! Let's help them win!

! •


so

..

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

'TiheTown-Bory's OoUegiateCan A Ford car with piston rings, Two hind wheels and one front spring, Has no fenders, seat made of plank, Easy on gas, but she's hard to crank. Carburetor split half way through, Engine missing, hits on two. Leaking oil, radius rod bent, Elxtra tire, isn't worth a cent. Gasoline tank is leaking gas, Good windshield, but has no glass. Ten spokes twisted, wheels aren't plumb, Three old tires, tubes on the bum. Hind axle twisted in the differential gear, But the horn's got a honk both loud and clear. Two spark plugs, just bought new, Don't fire any better than the other two. Starts in low, stops in high, Has to let the other cars go by. 'She's got a pip if you turn her loose, Burns gas, coal, oil, or tobacco juke.

Fat, Take Notice Zellmer (at the dinner ~table): "I am going to eat all, kinds, of meat. I'll get 'Fat' anyway."

The End of the Rope Here lies the body of Edison Barr, He 'learned to smoke on a five-cent cigar. Prof (in chemistry) : "Give some of the uses of sodium chloride or common salt." Haertel: "It's used to catch rabbits'; you spr-inkle it on their tails."


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Was a New Ulmer tut A.ch, du-Iieber-Louis-lachl .Jetz' schon wieda viadelnach? Kanm nab' ich a Stund geschlaf'n, Muss Ich wreda auf mich raff'n, .' Rauf den Berg nach Weisheit Iauf''n, .Husten, schwitzen, pusten, sehnauf'n; Noch nicht oben, ibimmelts schon l Und noeh rauf nach 'fawn Boys' Roome Hundert steps, d-iemuss ich jumpen, Buechel' 1schnellvon schelf abdumpen, Runterfegen, rein nach chapel! Orgelton gespielt nach Kaeppel Macht mich wach und ruhiger. 8ing'n, ja brummen tu' ich sehr, Dass dib vocal-cords sich stretschen, Dud del' 'Ton sich raus muss quetschen, F'roh, weil er nicb- mehr muss sing'n Und die kids die Ohr'n vollkling'n. Wa~ nach chapel denn passiert.c-ÂŤ Well, das wird nicht hergeschmiert: Das koennt mich zu leicht verklatschen. Und den laughing spot nul' touchen. Manehmal geht es schief und krumm. Oft, ja, wird's mich gar so dumm, Dass ich -schulgehn quit ten will. Hat kei use, ich bleib doch still: Meistens bin ich. schuld dar-an, Wehl> ich denken will und kann," Dass ich bin unfair getreat Dud in jede Eck gecheat. Doch,-das weisst du Jo, fUel' sure, yon jetz' an da watch ich nUl' Mich allein aI-s guilty one, Wenn mich ,scheint a Leid g.etan. Fancy: "Geck~wie viele falsde mistakes hast du gehabt ?"_ Prof: "What is The Tenure O'f Office Act?" Steer: "It was a law that the president had to serve ten years in his office." One Explanation Teacher: "Wie hat Moses ,seinen Namen bekommen?" Pupil: "Er war so lange ins Wasser, dasz er ganz voll Moos war." , Ba: "What do you do wHh the lost note in a composition?" Fat: "Don't beat it."


THE D. M.

L.

C. MESSENGER

Offizier: "'Sie sollten doch einen Bericht abgeben ueberdie Kommunisten, die hier im Dorfe sind.' Buergermeister : "Herr Offizier, was! sind das denn fuel' Leute?" Off'izder : "Na, das sind Leute, die mit del' Oednung nicht zufrieden sind, die wenig arbeiten wollen und einen groszen Lohn ziehen wollen." Buergermeister : "Hann haben wir zwei hier: Der 'Schullehrer und del' Pfarrer."

He:r:e and There Lost: Fountain pen, by a lady half full of ink. For Sale: "A folding bed iby a lady that doubles up and looks: like a rpiano.-Ex. ,Shadow (writing) : "He was, a man, free from all per-tidy." Prof: "Why have you the words 'a man' set off with commas?" Shadow: "Because:those words are unne: essary. 'He' explains that." "Hans" and "Fritz" say that \1 certain dog named "Max'.Y always reminds them of "His Master's. Voiie,' (With apologies) .


Fountain Selections Fountain Inn College Special High School Sundae Cupid Sandwich Eibner's Golden Orange Ade Walnut

Peach

Happy Thought Maraschino Cherry Banana Delight Silver Sprey Ginger Ale Fruit Salad Pure Grape Juice

'W.,Eibner Phone 128 /

& Son


--------;---~

W. Ruembe &- Son WÂŤ Carry a Complete L~ne of Fancy and Staple Groceries. Dry Goods and Notions which we Offer for Sale at Lowest Pr~ces ALSO PAY HiGHEST

PRICE FOR BUTTER

AND EGGS

The Wonder Store 10-12 So. Minn. St.

Is the Place where you will find your, Friends Residence Phone 150

Office Phone 60

DR. F. H. DUBBE Physician and Surgeon NEW ULM

!y1INN.

H. GOEDE, Photographer THE LEADING STUDIO HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS Special Rater to Students

KODAK

FINISHING Studio 107 N. Broadway

Do Your Banking With The

.Citizens State Bank CAPITAL

$/.00,000.00

SURPLUS

$100,000.00

Member of Federal ReserrJe Banking Sqstem Being one of the oldest and strongest banks in southern Minnesota, we solicit your patronage

We are well supplied with money to lodn

Modern Safe Deposit Boxes for rent at $/.00 per year


1875

1925

Fifty Years of Continuous Service Proves Relia-bi/ftg and Durability 'oj Nell) Vim Brick. Buildings erected With NEW ULM BRICK ,fifty years ago are as strong and

substantial

mday

'as the

day

they were erected.

BVILD WITH NEW VLM BRICK

- It Pays

. r

NEW ULM BRICK &' TILE YAROS New Vim, Minn.

See

CHEVROLET

and BUICK

First Kretsch A uio Company Telephone 323


We Use Soft Water Only

Phone No.5

New Ulm Steam Lau路ndry Otto F. Oswald. Prop.

First Class Dry' Cleaning Department in 'Connection PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO MAIL ORDERS

j

-----------------------------1 Eagle j Our store is the

YOUNG MEN'S

STORE

of town

Tailor Shop

At all times we show the latest in

JOE DEI BELE. Prop.

Young Men's Suits, Overcoats and Furnishings

Crone Bros. Co. The

Gastler Studio A good place to have your pictures made

Cleaning and Pressing Alterations and Dying 505 center St.

The National Soft Drink$ and Lunches

Lowest prices on

KODAK

FINISHING

High Gloss Prints

Comer Center and Minn. St禄,

New Vim Grocery Co. WHOLESALE NEW

GROCERS

Ask for ULM BRAND COFFEE in the Yellow Can

LOCATED TO YOUR ADVANTAGE


I

Bierbqum's

Cash Grocery

Right Treatment Right Quality Right Prices Phone 188 New Utm, Minn.

101 S. Minn. St.

I, ----------------------------~----------COLLEGI AN and t EMBY

Athletic

CLOTHES

are good Clothes Get your next Suit at

FOOTWEAR

-

~Leo A. Sprenger ,

Clothing

Weilandt & Stegeman

!

E. Wicherslei j. H. FORS1 ER

Contractors & Builders ,

Correspondence Solicited

j

Work done in any section of the Community Plans and specifications furnished Estimates cheerfully given Off.ce 1100 Center St. Phone 571

Furniture, Carpets. Rugs and Wall Paper New Vim

Minn.

F. J. Backer .HARNESS DEALER TrunklS. Traveling Bags. Suit Cases, Purses, KWik-Pak Parcel Post Laundry Cases and Other Leather Specialties


J. C. PENNEY

COMPANY

Corner Minnesota and 2nd N. Sirs.

New Vim. Minn.

J

OPERATING 676 STORES IN 44 STATES Where Savings are Greatest WE KINDLY

SOLICIT

'j

.

YOVR PATRONAGE

REI M &-. CHURCH THE LEADING JEWELERS

Distinctive Clothing Sold on Quality I and Merit alone

Tobaccoes Pipes.

Cigarettes Snuff \

CIGARS.

1 heo. Mueller manufacturer. jobber and retailer in

at

Smoker's Articles

Tauscheck & Green'

204 N. Minn. St.

Nagel &- teary

Mrs.AnnaRinke

New Vim

Millinery Dealers in

Wood. Coal. Briqueiis Coke and Sewer Pipe Telephone 304

Corsets and SWikhes Fancy Work

The latest in HATS Always 122 N. Minn. St.

New Ulm

When in Need of an Electrician

Call 148 Ulrich Electric Company


New {{1m. Minn.

路14 N. Minn. St.

Vercoe's Plumbing Shop 22'1 N. Minn. St. (Next door to Saffert's Meat Market)

Visit our Show Room and see "Standard" Enamdl Ware and other Modern Plumbing and Healing Appliances The only ground floor Plumbing Shop in the city.

Phone 292 RlI:SrDlI:N ell: 597

OFFJClI: PHONlI: 9;;

Dr. F. A. KALLUSKY DENTIST over Arbes Drug Store h J 9:00 to 12:00 O'a" 'JI.ce ours I 1:00 to 5:00 Evening by appointment

Farmers Co-op. Creamery Ass'n. We make and sell the jamous

GOLD MEDAL BUTTER Churned from sweet pasteurized Cream WHOLESALE

and RETAIL

Eyes examined-Glasses fitted-Lenses

ground in our own shop

Specialist in Eyesight and Optometry H. C. PREY, D. O.


M. J. BIEBER Ladies', Men's and Young Men's Wearing Apparel of the better Grades at Reason&ble Prices. Home of Hart Schaffner 6- Marx Clothes

Our Best Attention Everything of a banking nature entrusted care. receives our best auention,

to'

our

We shall be glad to have a share of your busines芦,

State Bank of New Vim

DRUGS EVERYTHING A STUDENT NEEDS

EPPLE

BROS.

DRUGGISTS

New Vim Greenhouses 0/ 20,000 square feet

glass

Prompt attention given to all orders for Cut/lowers. etc,

Flotoers for all Occasions

"Say it with Flowers"路 Phone 45


The Best Place,

10

Buy Your

College Supplies, Fountain Pens Stationery. Eastman Kodaks, Films, Etc.

Haag's Rexall Drug Store Formerly Arbes Bros, Drug Store

"THE BUSIEST STORE IN TOWN" .. There must be a good reason why"

The

Bee J.

Hive

A. OCHS & SON

Ladies' Ready-To-Wear and Dry Goods Everything for the Co-Ed For the Lowest Prices oj Dress and Athletic '

FOOT WEAR In the (ity Go To the

Hackbarth Shoe Store Dahms & Lindemann. Props. All Kinds of Repairing Neatly Executed.

225 N. Minn. St.

MEYER The Leading Photographer 2131 N. Minn. St.

Tel. No. 268


An Appetizing

Drink For Every

Occasion!

Whether you g" on a trip. or entertain your friends at home. you will find a refreshing. appetizing flavor among the many different kinds of

FRENZEL'S

SOFT DRINKS

And there's nothing better for the family circle. "rder a trial case today and you'll agreewith us. Phone 58.

New

Vim Bottling

Works

H. H. and A. ]. Frenzel. Props.

SCHVLKES Crone Block.

Phone 898

307 N. Minn. 51.

New Vim, Minn.

Otto C. W ichiel

The Store For Belter Ladies' Garments

.r.

o.,

Monuments

Furnishings, Shoes und Groceries

MEMBER MEMORIAL CRAFTSMEN OF

New Vim

AMERICA.

New Vim Sheet Metal Htorks Frank. A. and 0110 L. Schaefer. Props.

Copper. Tin and Galvanized Iron Auto Radiators Recoring . and Repairing 415 First S. St.

LENNOX

ROBERT

STEEL

AIR

FVRNACES

Phone 635

FESENMAIER

Hardware. Implements and Automobiles I

Alfred W. Mueller

George D. Erick.son Law Offices

MUELLER 6- ERICKSON New Vim. Minn.


SPORTS~~'i':~~E.~~.RADJS NEW

ULM

E

MINNESOTA

Sporting and Athletic Goods Radio "Trlj the Sport Shop First"

Walsh - Lodahl Motor Co.

Lyric

Perfect health and Happiness

Authorized

Ford

Cafe

. depends upon the eating of properly prepared food

Dealers

Everling Electric Co. Electrical Supplies Storage Batteries Wiring. Etc.

HENRY

SIMONS LUMBER

CO.

Dealers in

ALL KINDS of BUILDING M{1TERIAL. COAL and FUEL Let us figure on your requirement" in these materials

New Utm

Minn.

DR. T. F. HAMMERMEISTER Physician and Surgeon NEW ULM

MINNESOTA

The A to Z BARBER

SHOP

The Place where you get both Service and Treatment

ARNDT

e9 ZUPFER

First North and Minn. Sts.


--------------~~--------------- ---

Bank with

Farmers &- Merchants Slate Bank NeW Utm, MinnesIJ-ta

Friendly Helpful Service at Your -Command

Marti &- Simmei MUSIC STORE

Patronize

Classical and Popular Sheet Music

" Messenger

Everything in Musical Instruments

A dverti sers' ,

Fritsche Block

Phone 1100

The Kemski Stationery Store BOOKS. GIFT ARTICLES. GREETING CARDS

IFREE

A Loose Leaf Biplex Memo Note Book to ~eaders of this magazine and others. Come In and ask for It. â&#x20AC;˘

R. R. KEMSKI PRINTING CO. r Printers

Stationers

Office Outfitlers


A.

J.

LUMBER

Vogel Lumber (0. AND

BUILDING

MATERIAL

The Yard that serves you best Quality, Service and Satisfaction

J. M MEYER e ,

LEADING JEWELER

Phone 117

. I make a Specialty of Fine Watch Repairing Honest and Competent Work Guaranteed

We turn a House into a Home

Buenger Furniture Co.Stores, New Vim and Sleepy Eye

Henry

Stelljes

SOMSEN. DEMPSEY

The Center Street Grocer

& FLOR

A Fine Stopping Place For Studerus

Attorneys at Law New Vim

803 Center St.

Phone 133

-

Minnesota


路 .Fine Clothing, Furnishings Hats, Caps and Shoes I nterWoven Stockings

Fred Meine Clothing Co.

路Chas. Emmerich Plumbing,

Steam and.

Hot Water Heating Estimates Furnished on Application

Both Phones 281

Corner Center arul Minn. Sts.

Ernest C. Vogelpohl PIPE ORGAN BUILDER New Vim. Minn.

REUTER

PIPE

ORGANS

SERVICE STATION路 FOR PIPE ORGANS Rebuilding, Modernizing. Tuning and Care of Pipe Orgam

ORGAN BLOWERS INSTALLED


When in need of FOOTWEAR be sure and call on us. We carry a complete line of men's, ladies' and children's shoes. We appreciate your business. Our prices are always the lowest. Quality considered. I

Athletic Shoes Our Specialty

P. J. Eichten Shoe Store New VIm. Minn. r

[,.. Dr. Wm.J~ VQnBank

Dr, Hugh C. Edmiston

Doctor of

Osteopathic

Denial Surgery

Phusician ,Weiser B10ck

o

Minn .:

New VIm

Breeder Qj

S. C. Rhode Island Reds

J. Ga'g

Bicycle Repair and Sheet Metal Shop

H. F. RAABE New VIm

In New Vim since 1916

Geo.

Fancy

Phone 123

Minn .

315 N. Minn. St.

Phone 284

.Give Your Eyes A Chance It isn't right to .toil under the handicap of defective eyesight. Poor eyes make backward students. They not only affect your work. but your nerves and health as well. We fit your eyes right. grind lenses in our own shop and replace broken lenses on short notice.

Dr. H. O. SCHLEUDER Optometrist and Optician 102 N. Minn. SI.

â&#x20AC;˘

. New Vim

Telephone 87


UNION

HOSPITAL

New Ulm, Minn. A-fireproof hospital supervised by graduate nurses giving the best' service Phone No. 28'0

When you do it with heat, You can do it better with GAS.

I niersiaie

A. L. Kusske, M. D. Practice limited to

Eye, Ear, Nose &- Throat and Fitting of Glasses Offia over Farmers & .Merchanis State Bank Buiidi'}8

Power 'Company

Minn.

New Vim

H. M. Siebenbrunner

Ceo. B. Fesenmaier

The Red Front Grocery ••

"i'.

The Store of Quality and Service Phone 43

New Vim, Minn.


,

Webster

, Daniel

THE WORLD'S GREATEST FLOUR

Used Where Qualily Counts Recommended and Guaranteed

by

Lead~ng Dealers

Eagle Roller Mill Co. NEW ULM, MINN.

CONSTANTLY IMPROVED BUT NO YEARLY MODELS

DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR VEH ICLES

F. H.路RETZLAFF ,

Phone 1000

& SONS


Champion Shoe Shop We specialize in Seiberling Rubber Heels and Kori Krome Leather Heels

E, Freese '& F. Wessel

Call a .~

a

Phone

-{V;'vV

194

Baggage Transfer

24 S. Minn. St.

-THE EMPORIUM DEPARTMENT

':Quality thai Tells -

S70RE

Prices that Sell"

Ladies', Men's, and Children's Readu-io-Wear and Furnishings Let us outfit uou from tqp You can

STUDY LESS and LEARN MORE if your Eyes are pro-per(y fitted with '\ Glasses

DR. JOS. P. FAAS Optometrist and Pharmacist New VIm

Estimates

to bot/om Fur-nished We Guarantee. Satisfaction I

e-uc. Berg Decorating Painting Paper Ha~ging 'Furniture RefinisTting Telephone 401 New

otÂŤ

A. C. PLAGENS Registered Arehiied NeLl) Utm

Minnesota

Minn.


I

OUR SLOGAN:

e9楼(ark e1Je'O' gra1JV

That splendid. imported German Granite always in stock Will erect work regardless of distance

B. j. KRAHN Phone 1234

New VIm. Minn.

121 N. Broadway

Patronize "Messenger"路 Advertisers Use

ARTSTONE

in stock sizes or special made to order for your other buildings, ARTSTONE

Saffert

You are invited

to inspect

new home or the exhibit of

at our plant.

Cement Construction New Utm, Minnesota

Co.

I


Service Quality Right

WE

appreciate

Price

your patronage

which will always be filled to your liking

and

business

will

lead

relationship

to future between

us

Olson &- Burl; Phone 88 New Vim, Minnesota

1<:"


'A COMPLETE

,PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENTo

, ~,

PHONES


DEALER iN

F~esh and" Salt Of ..All .Kinds .

~.-

路Wholesale. /

Terms Wee~ly

a


CONTENTS June 1926

I.ITERARY a) Class Poem '26

~

~.~

,'b) Class H istory

~

~

c) Class Prophecy

.26

,

__.~

~ ~

Id) Class Will '26

,.~

,

~

re) Class Will-- Tertia '26 f) Music

7 7

,..~

,

,~...... 9 ) 3

__

_

.15

_

in Our Schools

16

;g) "Ich sage euch, so dlese uierden schwdgen. uierden die Steine schreien." Lukas--19, 39•., , ~,..~

EDITORIALS a) Faithfulnes$ b) Lest We Forget

" _

,

,

~,

~ _~ ~..~ ,

AL UMN I NOTES

_..22

~,

~ .29

..3,

~

EXCHANGE

.32

COLLEGE

34 37

__

CO-ED NOTES

_.....•......_ _

LOCALS

_

_.....•................;.......•....._

ATHLETICS JOKES

29

_ __

-

__ _._ _

__

.38

_ _

39 ~

:42


EDGAR BACKER, New Ulm, Minnesota: "Abu" A.1lgreat men are dead; I'm not feeling well myself.

FREDA BARTZ, Minneapolis, Minrresota "Spartz!"

The mildest manners and the gen t lest heart.

GEORGE DENNINGER, St. Paul, Minnesota "Telzel" People will some day know my worth,

ANGELICA GLAESER, Tomah, Wisconsin "Geli' , She's determined to do, and to do the right thing,


ALMA HAFNER, Glenham, South Dakota "AI" My tongue within my lips I reign, For who talks much must talk in vain.

HERBERT HAUCH, Benton Harbor, Michigan "Chink" Full of fun and mischief too, Doing things he shouldn't do.

MARTIN HOFFMANN, Mayville, Wisconsin "Matz"

JA little nonsense now and then Is relished by the best of men,

THEODORE LAU; Spring Valley, Wisconsin "Ted" And his greatest fault was bashfulness.


JOHN MEYER, Wauwatosa, Wisconsin "Hans"

He has wit and humor and delightf ul proportion, But he believes III health will result from too much exertion.

GERHARDT MUELLER,

,Janesville,

Minnesota

"Pungo" A man who delivers the goods in a quiet and. unassuming manner.

LEONA PRICE, .

Milbank, South Dakota "Caprice" I always laugh at jokes, and sorneone's always joking.

ARMIN RAUSCHK'E, New Ulrn, Minnesota "Ammie" A student, an athlete, a fine fellow, a rate combination.


EMMA ROEDER, New Ulm, Minnesota "Em" Her care was never to offend, And every creature was her friend.

GUENTHER WAIDELICH, Kawkawlin, Michigan "Shadow" I'm not in a hurry, and I never worry.

HILDA ZAHN, Cecil, Wisconsin "Toots" She seems to have been born for friendship, with a grace to win, and a heart to hold.

LORETTA ZORN, East Cleveland, Ohio "Zorn" An independent Miss with opinions all of her own.


OLASS POEM 1. Hast thou never, 0 Heart, felt thy weakness." I~'hy sorrow, affliction, and pain? Hast thou never, 0 Soul, felt a longing, After sin, peace with God to attain? Ain! Altonem.ent God Himself doth provide Since the Son on the cross once hath died. Now tile Father the sinner receiveth, The Spirit all anguish relieveth With, "My grace is sufficient for thee." 2. Often hast thou 'been proved unfaIthful, As a Jonas thou oft wouldst have fled. Had not God in His mercy recalled thee, On the devil's stray paths thou'dst been led. God Himself showed the way thou shalt go; He himself gave the seed thou shalt sow; o the ways: of His mercy make known; To the world let this clear truth be shown: "My grace is sufficient for thee." 3. Though the world often seems to o'erpower thee, Though the devil himself would devour thee, God Himself bids thee then have no fear, He has promised to he ever near. 'This in truth then our motto remains, Since as shepherds of His lambs God ordains Us. In heaven revealed it shall be: "My grace is sufficient for thee."

CI.ASS HISTO.RY One beautiful September morning in the year 1920 a young lad could be seen slowly walking down Center Street. As he came to Payne 'Street, he saw his friend hurrying toward him. The newcomer greeted his friend with, "Hel lo, Fritz!" "Hello, Amnii," was, the answer. "WiHst mitfahr'n?" "J a! Gehst du gleich rauf nach Oollege? Ich wunder, wieviele neue Classmates wir 'haben werden."


\

THE D. M. L. G. MESSENGER

When they came up the .hi ll, they were astonished to see so many strange fates. After they had been in chapel, they w, nt over to the Recitation Hall and there for the first time saw their new classmates. They found that seventeen new student's, eleven boys and six girls, had decided to join their honorable class. This brought the number of students in the ninth grade up to thirty-one. Al year had elapsed when the same two boys could again be seen plodding up the Weary Way to Wisdom. Only a few new faces appeared a,mong the classmates, These took the place of a few old ones : Frieda Hanken, Alice Schramm, Clarence Kuehn and Herman Bundschuh, who did not return. The new ones were Albert Emmel, Arthur Koester, Otto Lackmann, Liebhold Mantel and J'ohu Meyer, Vera Albredht left the group in June to take up training as a nurse. In the year 1923 seven new students, Hermina Detterer, Angelica Glaeser, Helmuth Ihlenfeldt, Tbeodore Lau, Anton Loock and Milton "I'schir-Iey, came to take the place of four students, August Eifert, A!dolf Heier, Elmer Jordan and Frieda' Uetzmann, WhDdid 'not return. During this year it so happened that our class was under the direction of a new professor in German. This brought about quite a change. 'I'hings never wanted to go right. Of course the motto, "Festina Lente," which was soon adopted, made a great difference. We lrad to live up to it. 1'0 celebrate the adoption of our motto, the class had its first picnic at Red Stone. A!s one of the profe~8'ors 'wanted to have a picture of our class, we decided to have one taken. Each member was given a letter and then told to stand in a row. Atfter all were lined up, the letters formed the words "Fe~tina Lente." In the following year we proved etill more that the right motto had been chosen for our class. Ailthough eleven members of' the former class left and George Denninger, Mar-tin Hoffmann, Leona Price, Ernst Rekow and Guenther Waidelich, the newcomers, tried to remove it, they did not succeed. In spite of the motto, the class finally reached its goal and wa~ now ready to take up the Normal course. Four boys, Herman Mutterer, Pritz Reuter, Albert Wdnter and Alnton Loock, having taken the pastor's course, were ready to continue their studies at. Watertown, Wisconsin. A great change of class' membership took place the following September. Fourteen of the twelfth grade graduates returned and to these were added Emlma Roeder, Gerhard Mueller, Freda Bartz, Anita Brenner, Lora Haehlke, Loretta Zorn, Hilda Zahn and Herbert Hauch. 'These increased our number to 'twenty-two. In November Martha 'Sievert and Helmuth Ihlenfeldt left to teach a year. Hermina Detterer : also had to leave us toward spring because of ill health. To


/

"THE D. M. L. C;-MESSENGER

celebrate the achievements of our class and those of the Second Year Normal in Church History and Isogogics, we decided to have a farewell picnic for the honorable gra-duates and also for A/nita Brenner and Lora Haehlke,: who decided to wield the rod during the following year. During the school-year 1925-'26 no new faces appeared to help us when we came into a, "pickle." We, therefore, had to keep on as we had done in the preceding years. We regretted to see Fritz Bartels leave us soon after Christmas, but his health demanded it. This leaves us a class of sixteen to graduate in June. Of these, only three took the complete six years' course at D. M. L. O. Soon these famdliar faces will disappear from the campus, but we hope that they will be remembered as well as D, M. L. O. will he remembered 'by them. '26. CLASS PROPHECY It was a beautiful warm day in May, and my history book was' lying open in front of me. I didn't feel like studying; but now the teacher's droning voice reached my ear and awoke me from my reverie. There carnie the habitual "Now, children," and with it carnie,"Let us now summarize the lives of those great men and women we have just studied; for they shall live forever on History's golden pages." Those particular pages in my book were thumb-marked and worn, <becauseof my especial interest in those characters. I took my note-book in hand and placed into it the outline of each, as follows: Edgar' Backer did not, as did a great Mohammedan of similar name, further a new doctrine, but his writings might easily zival those of that illustrious, Ajrabian. Mr. Backer's book on "The Method of Intensive ,Studying" has been introduced in the leading universities of the country. Theodore Lau is at present professor and presir'ent, of the . Chicago Conservatory of Music and as such has:given that university the renown of being the leading musical institution in tihe land. Freda Berte, upon achieving one success after another in the educational world', was finally elected Superintendent of Schools O'f the Synodical Conference, with headquarters at Zion Oity, Illinois. Herbert HaUGhis a name that will forever 'be fmnHiar to' baseball fans. Placed beside Hauch's name, Babe Ruth would be written with small letters: Gerhaed. 1Jr[uelletr, as teacher at Northwestern Oollege of Watertown, Wisconsin, has introduced in that place a course in Domestic Science for the co-eds: Mr. Mueller has always been a firm believer in Domestic Science for girls. George Demwnqer has become famous a'Sthe author of the pamphlet, "How to Train the Young"; but in his case "the


<,

THE D. M. fL. C. MESSElNGEiR

young" refers to the small plants, and trees of the Horticultural College of Minnesota, at which he is a teacher. JiJ1M'fI(L icoeder has won for herself the honor of being the first woman Baclriuterpreter of America.; as such, she is now touring the country, exhihiting her talent before thousands of people. Her advertising manager is jJ[(iirtin H OffmlLnn. Webster would have retired to the background had he heard but one of the many eloquent speeches delivered by Manager Hoffmann in the interest of his business. Armin Ra1uschke is the leading pharmacist of the day and is at the head of the famous .Rexall 'Stores; the sale of Rauschke Gough Medicine has been enormous, due to the soothing effect of the ingredients, land has caused his trade to tlhrive. Hilda. Z,ah~~,having read much about the need of -deaconesses in India, decided that she too would join their ranks. She is to-day to 100 found as, one of the deaconesses'in a girls" school at Vaniyambadi, India. A.lma Hafner, after devoting a number of years to musical 'stUdy,is now singing exclusively for the royalty of the European nations. At the same time she is there introducing the method of teaching 'songs by rote. Loretta Zorn was a teacher a number of years in Oleveland and also in New Mexico. But due to outside influences she has deserted the profession and is now 'assisting her husband in the writing of Kindergarten text-books, John 111ey.m·,once a great theologian, is now the world's leading composer of classical jazz music. (l-uenther W,aidelich, head of the Oollege at Saginaw, Michigan, reigns supreme there, ruling his flock with an iron hand. He is especially famous for his course' of shadow drawing. Leona Price has achieved renown as announcer of Radio Station. Z. M. 0., Pike's Peak, broadcasting the latest market reports and giving· musical and dramatic renditions herself occasionally. Many improvements in radio broadcasting are ascribed to her ingenuity. Unfortunately space does not permit enumerating other numerous achievements which Leona.Price accomplished for thegood of humanity. Angelica Glaeser, having become famous as a short story writer and editor of the agricultural journal, "'Successful Farming" (Des Moines), has entered the field of art and is now devoting her time to painting scenes from nature, such a's "The Return of the Ducks," "The Waterfall," and "The Last Stand of the Icicles." 'I'he book closed and slipped out of my hand; I also felt that I was falling and dropping slowly through space. And again eam€ the voice of the teacher, saying, "Toomorrow we shall continue this work, as there are no ·name,s on these pages so worthy of being remembered." L. P., G. M., A. G.

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13

THE WILL We, the class of 1926 of D. M. L. C., in the 'Township of Kew UIm, County of Brown, State of Minnesota, Domain of the United States, Oontinent of North Annerica, having or-thodox judiciouaness and unimpaired memory, well aware of the evanescence of our temporal existence, and desir-ing to uispose of the exuberance' and copiousness of our personal effects, do hereby design, ordain, promulgate and reveal this to be our Last Will and Testament: First, it is our intention to bequeath our much renowned and well-fitting motto, "F~stina Lente," to Ninth Grade, sincerely hoping that it will 'bring them success, much as it helped us to achieve our aim. Second, we fully entitle our highly respected Professor Bliefernicht to the sole use and possession of the "NuernJJ.erger 'I'richter," through the skillful use of which he imparted to us a great stock of knowledge. Third, it is our greatest pleasure to leave behind for the benefit and edification of First Year Normal all books eJited by Klapper. Fourth, seeing the dire need of such action, we will to Tertia Our Revised Rules For Modulating and Directing. , Individually' we bequeath the following: I, Edgar Backer, do will my "Nei DIm Deitsch" to Harriet Maakestad, in the sincere hope that it will prove olt'value to her. Furthermore, I take great pleasure in bestowing on Gerhard Reuter my buckship of the town-boys' 1'00111. Probably superfluous noise will be eliminated under his reign. I, Freda Bartz, will my matronship at Redeker Hall to Ella Gifford, thinking that her sedate manner will be of incomparable value. The vocal chords I inherited from Oaruso, I will to Ervin Bar-tsch, Gesundheit.l I, George Denninger, take pride in presenting my invaluable medals won in pole vaulting to Al1'bert Krueger. The art of rolling the German "1''' as taught by me I leave for Gertrude Schmidt, I, Amgelica Glaeser, bequeath to Margaret John my devout demureness.. while I ami 'sure Martha Sievert will appreciate receiving and cherishing my love for Method. I, AJIma Hafner, do bequeath my loquacity to Sylvan Broker. since I 'am well aware of its uselessness to a teacher. My black hair ribbons I render unto. ,eelma Hill. I, Herbert Hauch, do will to Fritz Bartels my perfect glasses for .which I have no further use. My ability in cornposing music for the piccolo. I give into. the possession of Paul Heck. , I, Martin Hoffmann, do will my class speeches, characterized by some as "Fourth of July" orations, to Olina Jordahl, who has all qualifications, needing only a "soap box." My (

)


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

ice-worn "Johnsons" I deposit with Fritz Hagedorn, whose intentions are to bring to' D. M. L. C. next year's state championship. Best wishes, Fritz! I, Theodore Lau, bequeath the skill of. using the German articles with which I have been bounteously blessed to .Atnne Spangelo. My creased balloon trousers I devise to Lester Raabe, to whom they may be of service when performing with Ringling Brothel_;sa's "The World's Smallest Man Up-to-date." I, John Meyer, will my Greek vocabularly to Ernst Eichelberg, a "graduate" 01' the Latin course; who is g,rown to full maturity for 'advancement. My capability of teaching astronomy I bequeath to Selma Lohoefner. I hope she will make this her subject when she has become .a faculty member at the Manaos University, Brazil. Helle Lichter! I, Gerhard Mueller, bestow upon Algnes Fiene my superabundance of nature-knowledge gained on hiking trips. To Hilma Stallbaum I will all the weight I gained while fasting; I found it a substantial and easy cure for colds, I, Leona Price, beqeath my pcoficiency in dramatic art to Elmer Klawitter. With great joy and pleasure I give to Irene Althoff my meekness with the ardent hope that she will utilize it to the fullest extent. I, Armin Rauschke, do win my commanding author-ity to Hilda Martin. Moege es ihr zu grossem Nutzen gereichen! It is my desire that my bathing suit be used in the future by "Dr." Stradtmann. But keep away from AJtlantic City! I, Emma Roeder, will my iron rule of the Oity Girls' Room to Frances Redeker, trusting that her keen influence will keep the book shelves in good order. The usufruct of my much-renowned Latin I deposit witih Herbert Spaulding. I, Guenther Waideliclr, ,bequeath my proficiency in organplaying to Henry S.chulz. I think he has long been seeking such a treasure. The :precedent set by me in sreering a toboggan, I hope, will eonscientiously be followed by Inez Skogen. I, Hilda Zahn, do impart to Herbert Kuehn my enjoyment' in reading, Peter Bosegger. Lass's gut schmecken ! My breakfast appointments I bequeath to Martin Isberner. I, Loretta Zorn, will to Fred Zarling my Volume I of Poems. I hope some day he will be the author od'the revised edition and thus share mly for-tune, M,yknowledge of world history I have communi ooneensu reserved for Ernst Mueller. Coneluding, we appoint and ordain Monsieur 'I'sohaikhoven to be Executor of this our Last Will and Testament, revoking all former wills composed by us. In Testimony 'Whereof, we have hereunto subscribed our name and affixed our seal, this fifteenth day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and twenty-six. . Second Year Normal of 1926. (Seal) This Instrument was on the day of date thereof signed, "

.

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THE D. M. tL. C. ME'SSENGER

15

published and declared by the said Testators to be their Last ~Willand Testament, in our presence, who, at their request have subscribed our names thereto ae witnesses, in their presence and in the presence of each other. Mr. "Nick" Schriefer, residing in New DIm, Minnesota. Miss Fence Post, residing in New DIm, Minnesota. Mrs. GoHegeBelle, residng in New DIm, Minnesota. CL,AS'S WIL,~TE'RTIA

'26

Being about to' leave this institution, we, the Tertia 'of 1926 of D. M. L. C., do herewith make our Last Will and 'I'es+ament. vVe bequeath to the classical department of Eleventh Grade our brilliant records in Latin and Greek. To the Tenth' Grade we will our punctuality in coming to and leaving German Olass. ' That is all we, aSIa class, have to will, but individually there are manj' things we wish to be relieved of', I, Stanford Bruns, bequeath my ability of playing basket'ball and baseball to Ernst Mueller. May he some day become AJthletic Director at Klossner. On Wa.ldemar Stindt I confer l11iJ' position as pianist in the "Twelfth Grade Symphony Orchestra," I, Adalbert Hellmann, do bequeath my hasty preparations of Greek and Latin to "N'O'lYby" Boock. May.he profit by this and some day become Dean -of Greek at this our Dr. Martin Luther College. My last year's straw hat I will to Waldemar Schuetze. Mav he use it for a tent on his next camping trip, My nickn~me "Onions" goes, to. my classmate Gerhard Reuter. I, Ruben Kettenacker, bequeath my knowledge of languages, especially Latin, to Professor Schweppe. May this prove highly beneficial to him. 'I'o "Spareribs" Beck I bestow my posdtion as stationary guard. I, Burton Larson, do bequeath my superfluous flesh to "Balloon" Krueger. ITo Victor ISchultz I leave m\)"infallible knowledge of German Grammar. ~fay this save him many troubles in constructing "Praedikativische Temporalsaetze." I, Ervin Neubert, in the presence of youes truly, solemnly bequeath my own Ford (with all liens and chattel mortgages attached) to my honoralble friend, Prof. Wagner. May he, in the time of need, find some spare parts for his own good st.eed-"Hanserola,." I, Waldemar Pless, do will illy dreamdng .in Lat.in Class to. Gilbert Albrecht. 'ÂŁ0 Victor Schultz I bequeath my position on first base. I, Ernest Rekow, hereby solemnly bequeath my dislike for' all feminine relations to my "fox," Ray Heck, hoping he may


THE D. M. L. C. MESSIDNGER

16

find it a sure preventative for measles. To Harold Backer I decree my superfluity of Latin and Greek so that, as "Doctor of Foreign Languages," he. may further develop a solid foundation for his clasaical career at the Essig Academy. I, Helmuth Houtz, bequeath my position as center in basket ball to Lester "Giant" Raabe. My station as Secretary of the Committee on Woman Suffrage I confer to "Senator" Otten'bacher. I, Carl Weber, will my tall stature to Ervin Wilde, hoping he will then discard his short trousers, My soprano voice I will to Otto Dysterhoett. Be may need it tor his career. upon the stage. \ I, Wilhnar Wichmann, hereby bestow my office as referee upou Fred Hagedorn. May he then obtain more exercise than can be had by sitting in his room, wr-iting dtctionarles. Furthermore, I 'bequeath my ability to speak upon Wilham Woltmann. Ma,y this enable him to makeva success of his future political career. I Lastly, do we appoint Prof. Schaller, our Class, Guardian, to carry out this our Last Will and Testament. T'ertia of 1926 Witnesses: Prof. 1. M. Dumlb. 1. Berry M. Dee'p, Mortician. 1. M. Rich, Banker. MUSIC IN OUR SCHOOLS E. D. Ba-cker (Printed upon request of the Minnesota State Teachers Con ference.) Music is one of the several subjects in the curriculums of our Lutheran schools, which have received little, yes, practically no interest on the parts of teacher and pupils. The reason for such a condition may be manifold, but I am positive in my statement when I say that the fault in most cases must be placed with the teacher. Incompetency in schoolmusic teaching, lack of systematized music coursea, poor and uninteresting song-material, yes, laxity in preparation for the music period on the part of the teacher are at the root of this existing evil. Preparation for the music period muet be upheld, as this is for other subjects. Song appeals to the emotion's. Emotions in children are plaetic and delicate. Plasticity and delicacy demand training. Thoughtful and systematic training calls for preparation. Before going into detail of school-music and its method of teaching, we shall briefly discuss its value and development. Good music is a. power and force. Aincient mythology is I


"THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

17

full of reference to this marvelous power of musk. Arpollo !Soothed the vigilant Al'gUSto sleep with his lyre. Orpheus, by his song and tones of his lyre tamed the flercenc-s of the beasts, moved the rocks and trees, etc. What did the Ancients mean :by these myths and stories? They meant that t:he mind and heart, expressed through muaical sound, had power over everything created. Let 118 look at truths and facts of Bsblical history, where we find four thousand musicians employed in the temple' services of King Solomon; in which David soothed with hi's lyre the aberrated and maniac heart of Saul; where we find joy, happiness, yes, salvation in the psalms of David; and in that exhilerant message from that Choir from heaven, arrnounÂŤ ing peace on the earth and good will toward men. Mighty was that word of God, clothed in and expressed through the medium of song and lyre. If music is, such a force, it must be taught, practiced, and instructed. ISuch instruction falls into the realm' of the school. 'The Greeks considered the study of music of extreme importance since their education of the youth compri-ed but two topics, music and athletics. During early Christendom we find song an essential part of the service. This music, as we heal' from Hieronymus, was diligently practiced and drilled in the schools. Through the reformation and its reformer, musk, and especially music of the church, took great strides in development. In Luther we find its greatest supporter when he says: "Music is 'one of the most delightful and magnificent presents God has given us. It is the only art that can calm the agitation of the soul." F'rom the aforesaid statement we can realize why he did his utmost to develop it in church, school, and horne. .Ap.thougha great number of our chorals found their inception in the early Christian Church and. Gregorian Chant, it was through, the Reformation and the periods following that the greatest number originated. The' Reforrnation brought more than this: 'l''he extension of the Lutheran School and the adoption of singing as an essential subject of its course. From this developed the singing school which found its climax during the time of the great Thomas Cantor, J oh, S. Bach. ' The second half of the eighteenth century with its rationalism brought an unfavorable influence upon church and choral. The choral became shallow, and the singing-school fell into ruin. The refo-rmation of this lamentable, 'existing condition was slow and lasted to the latter part of the nineteenth century. In the early part of this century 'We find men like Pestaloezi and Herbart, Both had their conception about the teaching of singing. Of these, Pesta.lozzi was the most radi-


18'

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

cal who based his method entirely upon technical facility, thus neglecting the opportunity of the child to express its emotions through the medium of song. Some of Pestalozzi's pr-inciples were, however, maintained, carried out, and improved upon by Christian Natorp, 1813. His method was again extended boysuch men as Gersbach and Hentschel. A final standard was set by Dr. Friederich Schuetze, upon whose method the school singing of today is based. Schuetze compared singing. with language, maintaining that the child is first trained in language before the elements of speech are taught. The result of this comparison was that he published a song method in which he set into practice his principles, that the child received a store of songs for the first two years, after which followed the technical side of song-singing together with more beautiful song material. . Song finally received its proper place in the schoolroom. The rise and the growth of school music in America have been a record of marvelous, but somewhat inconsistent development. The inception of the plan to teach music to all children, as attempted in Hartford as early as 1830, and more systematically under Lowel Mason of Boston in 1837, is to' be traced directly to the influence of Pestalozzi. Here in Amierica also the technical side of music was considered for many years as the most important. The big factor was to' drill the children in the REA[)ING of music. 'The inherent beauty of song and the joy of singing songs were completely overshadowed by the practice in technique. . 'I'he revolution in reading methods brought about a great change in school-music teaching here in America, which no doubt, resulted in the acceptance of the Schuetze principles: viz., a treasure 'of song before technique. The first music course published upon this basis was the Modern Music Series in 1898, by Eleanor Smith and Robert Forseman, The arrangement of material in these books was not ideal, but they 'contained many, many beautiful songs. This series, followed by others like The Progressive Music Series, The Universal School Music Series and' The Hollis Dann' Music Course, have, as Gehrkens says "laid emphasis upon the music tha t is being read rather than the reading of music." From the above paragraphs we notice' the' growth and development of school music from the very early stages up to the present era with its emphasis upon the teaching of good song mater-ial. Method is an outward thing, a means to the end, based upon logic and psychologic" principles. It is insignificant if compared with the subject at hand which is to be taught. We as workers of the church fully agree in the method of teaching with the educators of the Public Schools. Wherein does our school music differ ? If it is not in the method, then it


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER'

19

most assuredly must lie in: the material and the Christian character which is to impart this material. Educators of the Public gChDOlshave come to realize that it is not the method, but rather the material which is to have a bearing upon mind and character, Material, yes, Material! New music courses are published every year; DId editions are revised; songbooks are abr-idged or enlarged, all for the 'sake of presenting the very best song material that might be advantageous to the moral bringing up of a child. In them one may :find beautiful songs of nature, smJ.gs of patriotism and heroic deeds, songs of play and study, and even folksongs. (In regard to the latter, the authors have been very careful of late, however, to eliminate as .much as possible those of German and Amstrian origin.) In the appendix one is sometimes reluctant to :find ;:t, few flimsy gospel hymns, usually taken from a sectarian church hymnal. For character building, practically everything, from the depths of ethics to the field of history, is explored to set to music several stanzas which may lead to the moral good of the child. They look. but they look in vain and will continue to look in vain for THA'T song which they (maybe) would like to teach, but cannot and dare not. Their texts contain beautiful art, rote, and partsongs, but vheJ' lack the one most high, The Song Of God. Luther says, "Musk is one of the most delightful and magnificent presents God has given us." It is a gift, delightful and magnificent. Yes, that H is in every sense of the word. If so, then God has given it to us as a devine art in which we may rejoice, express Our grief and sorrow, repentance a.nd salvation. This does not mean that our course of 'study should be solely based upon sacred music. He it far from it. The music course of our schools must contain a goodly number of secular songs, among which folksongs, songs of nature, play and action, description, humor and patriotism should be found. Such 'Songs may be sung in the spirit of the song at hand; and still, when taught in a Ohristian school room and by a Christian character, be in the atmosphere of the church, in the submission to and the glory of God. Whether we <ing the songs of heaven and earth, nature and action, work or play, all is done to the glory of God. Whether our songs are sacred or secular, all are sung in a feeling of contentment and happiness with Our expression of praise to the Most High, who gave us this art. 'I'his brings me to the subject of material. Material! What a word of insignificance at first sight! But, after all it is the success of our teaching and a joy to , those being taught, if it is well selected. Song material is the stumbling block of many teachers and especially of those who go to the piano or organ at the beginning of the lesson


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

to look fOl' ~![AT,ERIAL. On the careful selection of songs rests the greatest percentage of success. Material is divided as sacred and secular. Under sacred music we place most high our Lutheran choral. What ll! treasure have we in it! The choral has had centuries of development. Through the origin in the Gregorian Choral, the . old hymns .and sequences, the Latin songs of .folksong nature, the German sacred folksong, and. the tunes of such men as Luther, Grueger, Walther, and' others, our choral has grown and developed in the church and from the church. The fact that it is based upon divine truth and simplicity, that the poetry and song 'burst from the hearts of men with earnest and enthusiastic convictions, places our Lutheran choral on a pedestal where it cannot be surmounted by any hymn in . dignity, loftiness, and simple devotional earnestness.' It is lamentable toot so many English songbooks which are termed as Lutheran Hymnals, and I include our own, contain such a vast number of gospel hymns, none of which have their origin in the Lutheran church, but in the sectarian church. I am convinced that editors of such books gave their atten-: tion more to simple, appealing, and to some extent sentimental, melodies, rather than to conviction and deep religious feeling. We have a treasure in our choral. Great musicians and people of other denominations realize it. Let us esteem it highly and cherish it. If our choral is the 'backbone of our church music; then it must have its proper place and care in the school. Here we must say, first our choral, then other material of value. Ohoral singing in the school should not terminate with the singing of a choral in the morning devotion or the singing of one after another in the regular singing lesson, f'or the 'purpose of filling in time. ,Such a process is monotonous and a waste of time. Gres t stress must be placed upon the exactness in melody, time, rhythm, enunciation and pronunciation. Melody is the element which is "preserved in most cases. This may also be said of time, although some chorals are sung too slow; others, too fast. Lack of rhythm is usually the "lbugbear." It is the life in music. Choral rhythm must be exact, marked and vigorous. In it lies conviction and solidity. Fermatas should be, elimiinated, with a few exceptions, espacially where a long .phrase cannot be sung with one breath. in the school-room more time than heretofore should be spent upon drill andIndividual work of the choral. To the second group of sacred music fall the English hymns, songs of God,and heaven, of the church year, of praise and 'Prayer. Here the teacher must exert care that the song chosen expresses the doctrine of our church; that it is interesting and 'befit.ting to the grade in which 'it is taught. In secular music we find grave dangers for the school.


'l'HE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

21

Music appeals to feelings and emotions. With feelings and emotions we mean certain states of mind, such as anger, fear, hate, love, joy, grief, etc. Emotions of the child are delicate and irr-itable, They are like habits and bec'ome strengthened and fixed by good Dr had and oft-repeated,' persistent use. Bartholemew says, "Emotions are a good servant, but a terrible master. The feelings:, if kept under control and guided aright) are a mighty power for good; but if allowed to run wild, they are a dangerous power of evil." From the .albovewe hear that they (emotions) can be guided. We say they can be guided aright when under the influence o.f a Christian character and of good substantial material. Songs of the lighter type intoxicate the senses. They consist of sound only, soon pass away, but many times leave behind an evil and dangerous root, If music has such a bearing upon the emotions, then care must be exercised at all times in the selection of secular songs. Music courses published by the various publishing concerns contain a vast number of good secular songs. Neyertheless, the number of light melodies with flimsy and dangerous texts is [uet as great and even greater in other cases. Under secular songs we find such as play and action songs (lower grades) folksongs, songs of seasons, description, humor, home and country, canons and rounds. I deem it unneccessary to explain the various subdivisions of this group since all are understood. Never-theless, a few remarks concerning the folksong would not be amiss. FolkmusiÂŤ is the free, spontaneous, natio-nal expression of a particular people, the outgrowth of a people's development. Folktunes are the first effort made 'by man to express his feelings and emotions. Pryberger says, "It (folkmusic) is emotional rather than intellectual and expresses' the human 'Side of man. Hence it has been called heart music." Without any further explanation regarding the above, we can easily see that folksongs should receive an important place in the music courses of our schools. ' Ai folksong must appeal to the heart, and be accepted by a community. It must be simple that everyone may learn it. It must be tuneful that everyone will like it, and sincere that it may reflect thenature of a 'people. In them may be found expressions of joy, sadness, and religious fervor. Upon such characteristics rests the value of folkmnsic. Since the folksong; has its origin in the emotions of a people, it is certain that it muet appeal to the emotious of' those who sing it. , In the teaching of the above, great caution must prevail. Some music termed as folkmusic has not the above mentioned characteristics and is based upon texts which are plain .and cheap,


22

THE D. M. L. C. MESSIDNGER

Folkmusie selected for the course M study should contain songs of various' countries. It is insufficient to sing only American, German, and Austrian folksongs. People in certain localities live under different conditions which have a marked bearing upon feeling and emotions. IThe people of sunny Italy.. for instance, have brought forth an entirely different song than that 01' a depressed Russia. One is gay, happy, contented; the other, somber and depressed. Marked characteristics may be found in the "folksong of every nation. Yes, it is the mirror of a certain people's heart and its condition of living. From the above pages we have come in contact with the value of music, its general value and 'place in the schools, and its process of development from the early Christian Church to our present American system. We have seen how methods have changed and that they are only a means to the end; that the strength of OUR. school music lies in our song, The Song Of God, which we find embodied from the choral down to the little four measure melody of the kindergarten.

ICH SAGE EUCH,SODIESE WERDEN SCHWEIGEN, WERDEN DIE STEINE'SCHREIEN. Lucas--19, 39. ZWE~I'TERTElL

DIE SINTFLUT George Smith entdeckte in 1872 Bruchstuecke eines Gedichtes aelter als A)braham. Er wurde 1873 auf Kosten des "Daily Telegraph" wieder ausgesandt, urn die noch fehlenden Tontafeln, auf denen das Gedicht geschrieben war, wenn moeglich zu finden. Unter den Schaetzen, die bei dieser zweiten Expedition entdeckt wurden, war auch die Geschichte von der- Sintflut, die im Zuzarmnenhange mit einem der Vorfaelle in dem Gedicht erzaehlt wird, . Del' Inhalt ist folgendel': Die Goettel' hielten einen Rat und beschlossen eine Flut ueber die Erde kommen zu l-assen. Dem Hasisadra wird der Besohlusz offenbart und ihm sogleich .befohlen, sein Haus zu verlassen, ein groszes Schilf! zu bauen und Samen alles Lebell'S hinein zu bringen. Die Masze fuel' das Schiff wurden rhm von dem Gott gegelben. Hasisadra erzaehlt, wie viel Pech er auf die Aiusenseite des SIC'hiffesstrich und wie viel auf die Innenseite, und wie viel Vorrat an Brot und Wein und Futter fuel' die Tiere er mitnahm. Del' Sturm, del' die Sintflut einleitet, wird geschildert, 'So schrecklich ist er, dasz selbst die Goettel' YOI' ihm fliehen. Sechs 'Page und sieben Naechte raset del' Sturm, un'd die Flut w'irft alles zu Boden. Die ObeTflaeche del' Wasser ist mlit Leichen bedeekt wie mit BauIDis,taemimlen. Hasisadra weinte. Das Schiff wird gehemmt auf einem Berge, del' Nizir hei'szt. Folgendes ist


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

23

nun woertliche Uebersetzung-c-Hasisadra erzaehlt: "Beim Anbruch des' siehenten 'I'ages nahm ich eine Taube heraus und liesz sde tliegen. Die Taube flog hiehi:n und dahin; weil sie indes keinen Ruheplatz fand, kam sie wieder . .Dann nahmr Ich einen R'aoon heraus und liesz ihn fliegen. Del' Rabe flog fort, und als er sah, dasz das Wasser gefallen war, naeherte er sich wdeder, watete vorsichtig, abel' kehrte nicht zurueck. Dann sandte ich (aIle) nach den vier Wint en .aus. Ich brachte ein Opfer dar. Ich errichtete einen Altar auf del' Hoehe des Berges. Ich setzte hin Adagur Gefaesze, je sieben. Unter sie legte ich Schilfrohl" Oedernholz und Gewuerz. Die Goettel' atmeten einen Geruch ein. Die Goettel' atmeten einen Wohlgeruch ein. Gleich Fliegen 'sammeln 'sich die Goettel' ueber dem Opfer." Die Goettin Iehtar- richtet auf den groszen Bogen, ((d,ern A!rH~ geschattern hatte," und auf ihren Antrieb wird ein anderer Goetterrat gehalten, und Bel, del' Urheber del' Flut, wird getadelt. gin audrer Gott tritt dazwischen und stellt die Forderung, dasz in Zukunft jeder Mensch fuel' seine eigene Suende leiden soll, Bei weitem abel' del' wicbtigste Fund, den die Assyriologie his jetzt zu Tage gefoerdert hat, ist VOl' etw'a.18 Jahren durch H. HUprecht, Professor del' Universitaet von Pennsylvanien, einem Lutheraner und Mitgliede del' luth. Koerperschaft des General-Gonzils entziffert worden. E-g 1st das. Bruchstueck eines mit Keilschl'ift bedeckten路 Steines, del' einen Bericht ablegt ueber die Sintflut. Es ist ohne Zweifel die aelteste AJufzeichnung del' groszen F~ut, die his jetzt gefunden worden ist. Folgendes ist die genaue Uebersetzung del' einzelnen .Zeilen, so viel daran uebrig ist: 2. Zeile--I ch will los machen~ 3. Zeile-Es soOllhinwegfege-n alle Menschen ?nitemander4. Z'eile--Lobern, ehe (]Jie g1'osze F lut einb?"icht. 5. Zeile-Ueber so viele wit?; do, sind, will iah bringen Ur//tergang, Z&l'stoC1'ung, 11ernichtung.6. Zeile-Batu3 ein groszcs Schiff U,l1Jd7. Zeile--g1"OszcHache soll sein sein BaA,t8. Zeile-Es soll ewn H,al/),sbootsein, t1'agend, w'as gerettet VXJrden ist von seitner Airt.9. Zeile-:.-Mit star'ken1JDache da1'Ueber10. Zeile--Das Boot, wclc71JCSdA~ machen solll'tt11. Zeile-bring hitncin die Tiere des F eldes, d,ie 11oegel des Him(mlels-anstatt einer Anzahl-路 12. Zeile-Und dJie Farmilie. Unwillkuerlich moechte ma.n hier ausrufen: "'V'a,s be"uel'"en w.ir weiter Zeugnis路?" Die Steine .s-chreien and verkuenden., o Gott, Deiner Ha.ende Werk. Der Turm zu Babel Halben wir auszel' del' Bibel il'gendwelche Beweise, dasz del'


2'4

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Turmbau zu Babel ein wirklich historischee Ereignis in der Geschichte del' Menschen ist ? Es haette wohl del' Fall sein koennen, -dasz bei airier so cntfernten Per iode kein Beweis moeglich ,gewesen waere. Die neueren Eilltdeckungen haben abel' auch fuel' diese Ges.chiochteBeweise geliefert, die ueber alle Zweifel erhaben die Wahrheit dieses Bibelberichts bezeugen. 'Uan hat Bruchstuecke einer alten Geschichte Chaldaeas gefunden, die in alter Zeit einst von einem Priester ges'chrieben wurden. Fclgendes Ist ein Auszug diesel' Geschiehte: (IEs unrd. gesagt, dl(MZdie ersten. MensGhern'ueber aue Maszen autgeblasen durch ihre Staerke umd. Groesze, wnfingen die Goetter zu vemohten usul. sich. fuel" erhabener zu haiten: AI1tgetl'ieben von dies em Gedwnken bouton. sie einen 'I'urm. 'Pon ttngeheurer' H oehe, der [eiet babylon ist. ET hatte beinahe den Himmel erreiciit, als die Winde den Goettem zu Hilfe kcmen. usui das ga1vze Gor'U68t UArll8tieszenwnd es aWf die Baule-u,te'War路ten. Sci1W Truemmwr 'We1"denBabylon genOl/'lfnt,und die Me1VI8(Jhendrie bis dahin cine Sprache hatten, begannen von da an aut Befehl der' Goetter ve'rschiedene Dialekte Ztt reden." Ein anderer Berieht sagt: AUe Mens.ahen hatten ein,e Sproche tI,nd bwute1nevnen sehq'"hohen Tunn, tMn in den Him~ rn.elZtt s+eigen. Abe1'"der maechtige Gott er'regte -einen Sturrn und gab jedenn eine verschiedooe Spmche. DMU1n u;ird die Stadt Babylon genannt. Die uebrig~n Beriehte weiehen aile etwas mehr von dem Bibeltext abo Del' Turm, so wird uns gesoagt,war ein ungeheurer Bau, und jene Leute ,strengten ihren aeuszersten IS'charfsinn an, ihn dauerhaft zu machen. "Laszt uns Zicgcl st1leichen ttnd sic'v'Ocllig bretvner"," (naeh engl. UehersetzuIl!g)"Und sic nahm,en Ziegel zu Stein urvd ErahaT"z Zu Kalk." Ein Gebauede so aufgebaut, konnte nicht leicht gaenzlkh zerstoert werden. Es i,st ja auch eine allbekannte Tatsache, dasz die Grundmauern des 'L'mmes lleute noch stehen. Ba!bylon, die stolze, ist gefaIlen, fllber s'Uedlieh vom 'Truemmerhaufen finden wir die Stadt Hillah mit etwa 10.,0.0.0. EinwO'hnern. Etwa acht Meilen noerdlich v,on Hillah sind die Ueberreste vom Tu'rm lIU Babel, del' heute den Namen Bir;s-Nimrod odeI' Turm des Nin1['od fuehrt. -El' hedeckt eine Flaeche von 490.00.Fusz und ist 30.0.Fusz hoch. Man hat zwei Zylinder bei del' Grundlage gefunden, die uns erzaehlen, dasz Ne,bukadnezar den 'rurm zum Teil wiederaufrbaute. E.s,war aJber nul' eine Ausbesserung und Vallend-ung dessen, was aus fernen Tagen stammte.

Abraham Rev. Brooke ein moderner Kritiker, sagt in seinem Buche, "The Old Testament und M,odern Life" f,cilgendesin Bezug auf die Zeit von A braham bis Elias: "N'ieht eine del' hier be- .


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

2"5

Iiaudel ten Er-zaehlungen wir.d als geschiclrtlu h wahl' angenommen, Eiinige 'I'atsachen liegen gewoehnlich zu Grunde, aoer je aelter die Erzaehlung, desto weniger geschicht:iche Wahrheit ist in ihr zu finden. Die groszen patriarcbalischen Erzaehlungen im Buch del' Genesi sind vorgeschiclrtlich und haben nicht meh r historische Wahrheit .als die Fabaln von Aehil les, von A1eneasund von Koenig, Arthur," Was erzaehlen uns die Steine ueber- die' Patr'iarchen ? Von (en vielen Beweisen, die den Bibelbericht bestaetigen, rmoechte ich lrier eine einfuegen. Ailte Unkuriden, die in den 'I'agen Abrahams und in eben dem Lande, wo er lebte, geschrie1benwurden, sind wieder ans Licht gekommen. Ein Assyrischsr Kanon wur -e :gefunden, del' die Namen hervorragender Maenner des Landes anfuehrt, und da finden wir den Namen Abumn;o, oder Abram. .. Eine spaetere Liste enthaelt den Narnen JaJelkk-ilu und Jueh-ubilu) (Jakob-el und Josephpl) auch SrkT-ilu und I sme-iiu. (oder Ismael) , 'Sodann findet sich dort auch del' Name Mutu-sa-ili '(odeI' M~thu-sael)_ In eilliger Veraenderung abel' unverkenntlioh bezeichnet findet m,an' den NameD. !Cedor Laomer. Die Geschichte Josephs Die Geschichte J osep-hl>bildei eines del' 8chDensien und ['uehrendsten Gemaelde, die in dem ganzen W'OFteGottes ent·halten sind. 'Sein Leben ist ein wechselvolles. Obwohl tief 'erniedrigt VOl' den Menschen, steigt er doch hoeher durch Gottes Gnade alB seine Vaeter. E,r is'l: uns ein Vbrbild im stillen Dulden, in tiefe1' Demut, im herzli.c'hen Vel'geben, in Liebe zu Gott und dem Naechsten, im Gehorsam gegen die EIter-n. Gerade diese li€bliche Geschichte finaen wir wohl reichlicher bestaetigt durch Steinesinschriften als i1'ge'ndeine andere. Folgendes, sind einige del' vielen Bestaetigungen des Bibeltextes: 1. MoOse37, v. 3 heiszt es: ((Is'f'ael rnachte ihm einen buiYUen Rock.)} 'War dies ein Gewand, das ihn VOl'der Welt laecherlich machte? Denkmaeler und Malereien Syri'ens :zeigen uns, Ma,enner und Frauen in Gewaendern g~klei et, in denen Rot, Blurt und Weisz wechselten und milt'1'eiche1'Stickerei versehen waren, waehrend die AJegypter wei,sze, durchsich· tige Leinen ohne jegliche Verzierung trugen. Nach Mo:se 50, 4-6 hoeren wir in del' 8chrift, da·sz Jose'"h sich die Erlal]hnis, seinen Vater seinem Schwure gell1'aes'zim ,Lande !Canaan zu begrahell, nicht persoenlich Yom Pharao e1'bittet, ohwohl e1' sonst im regen Vel'kehr mit ihm stand, s,ondern dasz er sich durch Ve1'mittlung del' Dienerschaft yom Pharao die Erlaubnis einholt. Wie laeszt sich die~es el'klae. l'en? ms wal'. Sitte ThndGebl'auch bei den Aegyptern, dasz irn _Todesfall in del' Familie bei ihnen in besonderer vVeise betrauert wurde. Folgendes sind einige Gebraeuche damaligel' Zeit': In del' Zeit zwischen dem Tode und dem Begraebnis lies,zen die Maennel' Bart und Haare wachsen, waehrend die


es

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Frauen in del' Zeit ihre Haare nicht flocbten, aueh keinerlei Schmuck anlegten. AIle Trauernden enthielten sich des Weines, des F'Ieisches und 'des Weizenbrotes und lebten von Schwarzbeod und Wasser. Vergleichen wir diesen Gebeauch mit einem Gesetz, das zu dama liger Zeit an den Hofe Pharaos in Kraft war, so find en wir .auch diese Begebenheit in einfaeher Weise geloest. Man hat eine Tafel gefunden, 'auf del" die Anstandsregeln verzeichnet waren, nach denen sieh die Leute am Hofe Pharaos zu rich ten batten. Unter anderen war es aueh Gesetz, dasz niemand ungeschoren VOl' den Koenig treten durf'te. Das erklaert Josephs Verhalten in diesel' Angelegenheit. Auf einem Felsengrab zu El Kab fin det.man eine Inschrift, die im engen Zusammenbange mit .Iosephs Geschichte steht. Del' Eigentuemer des Grabes, ein Beamter mit Narnen Baba, diente unter einem Vasallenkoenig, del' wiederum unter A'pepi stand, demselben Pharao, dem, wie man mit ziemlicher Bestimmtheit annehmen kann, aueh J oseph diente. -In einem Loblied ueber seine Taten sagt er unter antieremr: "Tcli sammette die Errue evn als ein. Freund. des Briueqottee. Ichi war wacheasn: in der· Zeit des Saeens, Und nun, als e'ine 'l'euentng learn, d'rie viele Jahre dW!/C'rte, liesz ich der St(t,dt Kor'n zukomm·en in jedem Jahr deT' Teuer-wng." Wenn man diesen Berieht im Zus,ammenhang mit andel'en Berichten da· maliger Zeit v€l'gleicht, 8'0 musz man den Sehlusz ziehen, dasz die vielen Jahre del' 'Teuel'ung in del' Zeit des Ba-ha genau uebereinstim'lllen mit Oen sieben Jahren del' Teuerung un tel' .J o-sep,bsPihal'ao, einem del' Hirtenkoenige. Els sei nun in Bezug auf Josephs Gesehichte nul' noeh einer Platte Erwaehnung getan, die man in Aegypten bei den AJusgl'abungen gefunden. Diese Platte erzaehlt uns, dasz waehTend deT Regier"1M1.,g des vier'·ten RhOlrao, des dtt,rGh ge-, schichtliche Tatsaohetn u11.luJidJer·leglich bewiesenen Plwrao zu Josephs Z&iten, der Nil sie'ben J ahr'e lang seine Ufer nicht ueberrschw1errlrrnte, ulnd d,arurn cine Tellerung ,a'llsbT'achin 1?ielen Daender'n. AegY1Jtfln allein. 'UjYltr·de ger'ettet dur'ch e'inen weisen Mct,nn mit N(J!Jnern Joseph, cle;r in guten Jahtren Getreid,e tleber-· reic;hlich. ges(J!Jnrrrvelt ha,tte wnd nt~n vC1"lwufte. Diesen setzte Plulr'ao 'Ueber sein ga'fLzesDand 'Und ga b ihm die TochtClr eines Priesters Z1lm Weibe. Man vergleiehe diesen Berieht mit 1. Mose 41, 38·57. Ieh sehliesze hiermit den kurzen UebeDbliek ueber die Genesis. "E:s gab nie ein Zeitatler, das so viel dazu beigetragen hat, den Glauben an die voellige Genauigkeit, des Wol'tes Got·. tes zu bestaetigen, als gerade das jetzige Zeitalter. "Del' Kampf uelber die Bibel i,st nun nioht mehl' iIll Kampf des Glaubens gegen den Unglauben allein, sondern er gestaltet sieh illl'mer mehl' zu einem Kampf del' Wissensehaft mit einer pralel'ischen Sdulgelehrsarnkeit" (Urquhart).


THE D. M. L. C. ME:SSENGER

2"7

Wie stellt sich die vVeIt diesen Entdeckungen gegenueber? Es sind gewisz nul' wenige, die ihr Harz den erneuerten Otrenoarungen Gottes erschlieszen und sich einreihen lassen in die Zahl derer, die in Demur und Glauben und in kindlichem Vertrauen den Herrn beim "Vort nehmen. Von del' ueberwiegenden Mehrhait kann wahl gesagt wei-den, sie glauben Mosen und den Propheten nicht, sie wuerden auch nicht glauben, wenn einer von den Toten aufer-stuende und i'hnen den Heilsweg offen-barte. Wir' Christen aber freuen uns und danken Gott ueber eh; e jede neue Bestaetiguug der Bibel, und lassen sie uns zur Staerkung des Glaubens dianeu. Ndcht, dasz wir diese Berichte zur Grundlage unseres Glaubens machen wollen, renn fuel' einen Chr-isten ist del' Bibelbericht vollstaendig genuegend, Im einfachen, kindlichen Glauben wollen wir festhalten an unserer Bibelwahrheit und nicht zweifeIn, wenn uns aui h jetzt noch manches unkrar, erscheint. Jenes Muetterchen na.hm den recbten Standpunkt ein, das da el'ldaerte: "lcll wuerde dem Biibelw_!wteauch glaU!ben,wenn da staende, dasz Jona den Walfisch verschluckt hahe." vVir wollen nns das Wort des Apostels Paulus an Thuotheus gerichtet ius- Hel'z reden lassen, ",enn er spricht: "Bewahre, das dir vertrauet ist und meide die ungeistlichen losen Geschwaetze und das Gezaenke del' falschberuehmten Kunst, welche etlkhe vorgeben und fchlen des Glaubens. Er, unser Herr Jesus Ghristus und Gott und unser .vatel', del' uns hat geliebet und- gegeben einen ewigen Trost und eine gute HoffDung durch Gnade, del' ermahne unsere Herzen .und -staerke uns in aUerlei Lehre und gutem Werk." Hilfsquellen: "Urquhart", "Atbendschule" und andere Zeits-chriften. Das Ende. (Published by Pt'of. Stindt upon request of Second Year Normal Class.)


Zg

'DHE D. M. L. C. M~gSENGFR

The "D. M. L. C. MESSENGER" is published' quarterly during;the school year by the students of,Dr, Martin Luthee College. The subscription price is. seventy-five cents per annum. Single copies twenty cents. Stamps not accepted. We request payment in advance. "The Messenger" is continued' after time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arrears are paid. All business communications should be addressedl to the Business Manager; al] literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief, Advertising rates will be furnished on request. Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni; undergraduates, and friends. Entered as second class matter at the Post Officeof New VIm, Minnesota.

EnITORIAL tHo rJI!LENF'ELDT, W. WOLTMAJNlN',BUsiness Mgr; IL KUBJHN, Asst. Bus. MgT. . M...kIJBREJOHT, Asst. Bus. Mgr. IDS1S E. ALBRECHT, Exchange Ed. MISS 1. 'SKCOGlEJN, CoIl. Notes Ed.

,. Volume XVI

SITAFF Ed ito r-In-Clrief MISS A. "MUEIIlLEIR, Alumni 'Ed. ·MESS G. PAA'P, Co-Ed Notes bed• C. FENUP, Locals Ed H. BACKER, Athletics Ed. W. STJ:NDT, JOIDesEd.

June: 1926'

No. IV

ED [TO R f A'L

ED'ITORIAL With this issue we, th-e 'editors, shall lay down our pen for a few months. Let us take occasion in this last issue of this school year to thank friends and supporters of our "Messenger" for their co-operation, May we again have your help in September.


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

29

FAITHFULNESS A common expression in the speech of the people has always been : "Be faithful-to your God, to your fellowmen, and to your duty." Few realize how much is asked in tho-se two words,- ,be faithful. .-Aill know, however, that to live up to this motto is indeed difficult, as faithfulness includes honesty, trustworthiness" constancy, and sincerity. It is indeed a Herculean task that is placed before all of us; but :such a difficulty does not justify the nonchalance with which this trait of character is regarded to-day. At the present time faithfulness to God, to fellow-men, and to duty has 'Stepped into the background and is disappearing rapid.y from sight. Why ? Because the people of to-day, and espedally the young rpeople, disregard everything but their own pet idol-themselves; this is the undesirable, selflsh, faithfulness, not worthy of further consideration. I am sure aU will agree with me when I say that we should discard this high regard f.or self and in. place of it set again the true faithfulness. The development of this characteristic would not only add to a person's prominence and good name bef~re the world in general; no, it would also cause a secret satisfaction to glow in the heart and to radiate joy and contentment; and above all, to be faithful would mean to fulfill the command . of our Heavenly Father. . He even promises us a reward in His Word, saying, "Be thou faithful unto death, and I will give thee a crown of life:" ,(Rlev. 2, 10.) Aind even in this world we should receive a blessing. Oontent.ment and happir ess are desired by all; how can we be content if we find ourselves to be wavering and unreliaJble? Let us again-as we all undoubtedly have done 'befor~resolve to be faithful in the future-efaithful to God, to' our fellow-men, and to our duty. A. G. '26 LEST WE FORGE'T How often we see the editors of the alumni colnmns vainly scratching their heads for material to put into the college paper. I say "vainly," ,for facts are necessary, not the poetical art of an intelligent mind. This neglect of sending news to the alumni column is long prevalent among us. In spite of the fact that we hear many assertions, such as "'Those good old college days! They're gone forever!" and others expressing like sentiment, we see little 'Proof of such feeling. Now the atitude in itself is praiseworthy enough i but why, then, leave such a deep gulf between our life as alumni and our good old Ailma Mater? It usually reveals negligence to- perform a slight deed of loyalty or shows, indifference to the school we once loved, either of which is rep-

,.


THg

30

D. M. L. C. MESSENGER:

rehensible enough. Our meager and uninteresting alumni: column cries. to us for help. It moans, "I am accused of drawing ~own the standard of the paper." Besides this, we must hear- such remarks as, "'l'here's nothing in it." Put something into it! If each alumnus: and alumna would bear in mind that the: college is just as much alive as it was in thedays: gone !by and that the boys and girls. of to-day are just as interested in the affairs of former stu-tents as they wereat that time, surely, that ought to induce us toosend something at least once or twice a year! Or has our life after' our college days become so dry and uneventful that there is. nothing worth recording? vVe hope not. "Dhinkof what you would like to know about your old classmates and friends and then send a note- about yourself and your experience to the alumni editor. If all do this, we may safely expect a more interesting alumni column and, therefore, a better pacer, E. S~R. '26

..

Minnesota River Scene near New Ulm.


TIlE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

ALiUl'1Ni

rhe sixteen members of the graduating class of 1926 have 路.recei-vedcalls to the f'ollowlng places: Backer, Edgar _ _ _ Oudahy, Wisconsin Bartz, Freaa , Kenosha, Wiscons.in Denninger, George _ Milwaukee, .vYisconsin Glaesar, .Angelica Toll1'ah,.Wisconsin .Hafner, Alma _ New-Loudon, Wisconsin Hauch, H(lI1bert Kenosha, Wiscousin .Hoffrnaun, Martin Kaukauna, Wisconsiu Lau, 'I'heodcre _ _ Green Bay, vVis"oI!sin .Mueller, Gerhar-d Lake Mills, Wisconsin Price, Leona _ , Goodhue, Minnesota Rauschke, Armin _ Stanton, Nebraska Roeder, Emma _ Hortonvi.lle, 'Wisconsin 'Vaidelich, Guenther 路 _ Milwaukee, Wisconsin Zahn, Hilda West Benld',Wisconsin Zorn, Loretta South E1udid, Ohio May the Lord bestow his richest blessings upon them in their chosen work Viola Oetjen, '24, has resigned her position at Iron Ridge, Wisconsin, and will remain at her home for the ensuing year. Her worthy successor will be Ethel Giziewski, '24, who has been teaching at Cedar MilI:s, Minnesota. Perhaps the Wisconsin air will assist Ethel in successfully overcoming her difficulties in the "del'," "die," "das" question. Antoinette Nolte, '22, formerly stationed at Hortonville, Wisconsin, has accepted a call to Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The graduating class of 19,23 boasts of the following engagements: Pauline Hafner of New London, 'Wisconsin, to Raymond B. AJrndt of Green Bay, Wisconsin. Anna Falk of GiJbbon, Minnesota, to William E. ISpaude also of Gibbon, Minnesota. Lillie Giegling, '2,2, who taught at Cudahy, Wisconsin, for the past four years, has resigned on account of her health. She is now at her home in Canistota, South Dakota. We hope that she will soon recover in the "Land 'of ISunshine." .Gertrude Gieschen, '24, has resigned her position as - teacher at Milwaukee, Wlsconsin,


,---

THE D. M. L. C~MESSENGER

Bemesterschl usz There is, perhaps, no word so fraught with meaning and expressive of the thoughts that run through our minds as the semester of a school-year draws to a close as the Anglicized Semesterechlue禄, '~'Semester路close"-what does it mean to us '/ Alre we to 'b卢 numlbered among those to whom this is merely a period of reckoning and to' whom Semesterechlusz means nothing more than the tell-tale reading of reports, with its possibi lities of a "condrtion" or "failure?" Surely not. This is rather a time of taking stock, a period of inventory, and on occasion to examine our accounts carefully to see whether the credits and debits lbalance. Have we given the best that is in us in our work as students and in other branches of student activity which appeal to us? Or have we, perhaps, as "the man on top," conscious of our superior gifts and ability, neglected to criticize and 'perfect ourselves ; or have路we, conscious of our inability and yielding to our disinclination given away to a spirit of negligence, forgetting that "can't" should be the-word given least prominence of all, and that any special aversion for this Dr that matter may be overcome, more often than one would suspect, by becoming more thoroughly acquainted with the subject, by getting on speaking terms with it, as it were? A,s we balance our ledger, all these thoughts should be taken into account, And the credits and debits will balance only then, when all our endeavors have been made, and all difficulties breasted, with a whole-hearted application to' our undertakings and a willingness to perform such things as are expected of us. Let us,


TiHJE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

33

then, scrutinize ourselves and our work in the semester that is now drawing to a close most carefully, and let us labor to extirpate such things in ourselves and in our methods of work .as may not prove themselves commendable; but let us continue in such approved methods of which we are firmly convinced that they will further our striving toward the goal we have set ourselves. The Ooncordia Comet. Suocess What everyone hopes for, and dreams of, is success. What is success? We can say, at the least, that it is 'being above the average in one line of endeavor. "lie can say, in a larger sense, that it is excelling the average in all-around ability and accomplishment, provided that ability and accomplishment is used for the betterment of humanity. In .this latter case the goal may be attained by activities such as teaching, preaching, manufacturing, labor-ing, printing, farming, all of which are essential for the full development of our civilization, but in which you and I may not excel in a single one-yet. It behooves us to think of what service we shall render to God and humanity in the future. It behooves you and 'me, whatever be our endeavors, to prepare ourselves today f.or tomorrow to the end that we may do our work effectively.A. C. R. The AJugustana Mirror. Signs of God in. Nature There is a signature of wisdom and power impressed upon the works of God, which evidently distinguishes them! from the feeble imitations of men. Not only the splendor of the sun, _but the glimmering light of the glow-worm, 'proclaim His glory.-J. Newton. Luther Echo. How Old Ar,e YiOlU? 'The question, "flo,,, old are you" is not meant to embarrass any blushing young woman or cause any young man to stare open-mouthed. People judge your age Iby the amount of 'common sense you have and show. If, when the bell rings for class dismissal, you make a mad scramble for the door, as if pursued by some venomous reptile, 'it would seem as if you were hardly old enough to attend , even. high school, and surely some dignity is expected to be present among college students. Then, in chapel you again have the opportunity to show the training of a few years. If you reveal a lack of selfcontrol rbygiggling and whispering unnecessarily, you emphasize the fact that although you may be phsyically grown, you are mentally childish..' , Thus it goes-from gum-chewing in public, to note-writing


34

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER ,

and cribbing, and from racing down the halls to taking stairways at leaps and bounds. In this and in many other ways you reveal your mental age. HOW OLD AIRE YOU?-M. H. 'fhe Concordian. â&#x20AC;˘ Beware the Grouch "'Take a good-sized grouch and let it have it,s way, And it starts its' work of havoc at the very break of day; It gets down to business early at the office or the den; Amd it makes a lot of devils ont of first-rate working men . ."It's a thing to be aware ¡01 at whatever task we're caught; It can queer the brightest nature, it can cloud the happy that; If you don't watch out, it will get you when the brightest moments shine, No matter how your spirit may to peace and love incline." The Amgustana Mirror.

~LLEGE

ANNUAL S,PRING OONCERT On Friday evening, May 28, a 18pring Concert was rendered in the Alrm!ory under the direction of Professor Emil D. Backer. The program was as follows: 1. Gemischter Ghor Ostergruss -----------------. .._._._ ..__ ....Francke (Auf eine altkirchliche Weise) Piano: Emma Roeder 2. Piano 8010 Impromptu in A flat ------------.-----------------....-....__ ....Schubert Irma Hoffmann 3. Maennerchor _ a) :min geistlich A1bendlied .__.__ . . .._. __ .Schubert ib) 8turmheschwoering __ .. _ _ Duerrner 4. Piano 8010 l\1i nuetto _.. .. .. ._ _. ...Sch ubert Luella Hoss


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

35

5. Mixed Ohorus For the Mountains Shall Depart . .__ .._..._._._Reuter 6. Duet a) Evening Song , .._.. ..__ ....__ ..__ ..Abt b) Wenn (lie Rosen .bluehn .. .. Klengel ,Soprano: AilmaHafner. Baritone: Oarl Pinup 7. Ladies Chorus Wandering in Spring .. .._Wallnoefer Piano: Emma Roeder 8. Piano Solo March of the Dwarfs .. .. .. :_Grieg , Martin Albrecht 9. Male Octet Viking ISong .. ..S. Coleridge Taylor Piano: Henry Schulz 10. Piano Bolo Rigaudon .. .. .. MacDowell Henry Schulz 11: Mixed Chorus: Russian Church Music a) Lord I Cry Unto Thee ..__ ..__ .. Kalinnikoff b) Glory to God .._.. .. Rachmaninoff Slides on National Park On the evening of A;pril 21 slides were shown at the auditorium of the parochial school, picturing sceneries of the Yellowstone Park. During the presentation of the slides" a lecture was also given concerning the pictures. Arbor Day kfter ~aster vacation the students were again busy with their work. On Apri] 14, however, they did no mental work. All were gathered on the campus; some were raking, and others were doing various other tasks. Shortly after dinner the work was finished, and the campus appeared very neat and clean. At intervals some selections were rendered by the band. Commencement Exerdses On Tuesday, June 15, D. M. L. Oollege held its annual commencement exercises at the Ev, Luth. St. Paul's church. The program was as follows: 1. Organ: Fantasia .. ...._.. .._..:_.._ J. S. Bach . Emma Roeder 2. Choral: Now Do We Pray God, the Holy Ghost. . Organ: Theodore Lau 3. Scripture Passage and Prayer. 4. Mixed Chorus: Lord, I Cry Unto Thee ...Kalinnlkoff 5. Address ...._..__ .. .. ...... .. .. Professor John Meyer 'Theological ;Seminary, Wauwatosa, Wisconsin


,TIHE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

36

6. Choral: If God Were Not Upon Our Side. Organ: George Denninger 7. Distribution of Diplomas Prof. E. R. Bliefernicht 8. M'ixed Chorus: For the Mountains S'hall Depart.. Reuter 9. Valedictory Ger-hart It Mueller 10. Ohoral : 0 G{)d,Thou Faithful God. Organ: Edgar Backer 11. Benediction.

Board Meetimg During the days of April 28 and 29 the College Board held its annual meeting. AJIl the members, with the exception of Mr. Rohrke of Hoskins, Nebraska, were present. 'I'he Board heard the report of the school year 1925-1926and also a report on the addition and construction of tpe boys' dormitory. Some of the resolutions' which were passed are as follows: 1. A landscape architect was engaged to survey the college campus and to locate proposed new buildings, 2. Alll the present employees of college were reappointed. Mr. Seehusen was appointed full-time janitor to assist Mr. Roeder. ' 3. It was decided that all students living in the dormitories should pay a medical fee of three dollars a year. 4. It was decided that a new pi'pe organ should be furnished for practicing purposes. , 5. It was decided that a delegate should be sent to the meeting of each district synod this summer in orr'er to impress the necessity of a new recitation building at New DIm .

â&#x20AC;˘

Our New Dormitory Addition Our new dormitory addition is nearing its completion. Ori June 27, dedication of the new erlifice is to take plaice. If the reader is planning a trip to Minnesota at .this time, it would be splendid opportunity to pay a visit to Dr. Martin Luther Oollege. You are heartily welcome. Donations for the equipment of the new addition have been received. We are only within a few hundred dollars of the needed amount. Let us hope that more kind donors are found to make up the balance.

a

Band Concert On May 21, the D. M. L. O. Band under the direction of AIrmin Bauschke rendered its second program in our music hall. During the intermission the band quartet favored the audience with a vocal selection. Leona Price gave two recitations with Luella Ross accompanying her on the piano. ATthur ,sprengeler recited a' Low German poem during the intermission. A good program was reported, by all who were present.'


THE D. M. iL. C. MESSENGER

37

With Mr. Rauschke at the head,Jhe band 'has made splendid progress in the past year. Let us hope that the members of the band continue their good spirit in their band-work. Organ Dedication On Easter Sunday, AJpril 4, a new pipe organ was dedicated in the 1St. John's Lutheran church at Fairfax, Minne-. sota, In the- afternoon Professor Bliefernicht preached a sermon in the German language. Professor Fettinger presided at the organ and a large chorus sang appropriate 'selections. Tn the evening Professor Backer gave an organ recital and an address on music and the new organ. Professor's Death On Friday, AJpril 30, Professor Duin passed away after undergoing a second serious operation. Professor Duin has been a music instructor at D. 'M. L. C. for one and a half years. We extend our heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved.

The Style Show held at Hillcrest Hall this spring was well attended. Eleonora Rudolph visited with her sister Adele the first part of May. A:nna Dahle has discontinued her studies here on account of her heal tho The Irrepressible Quintet made its first extensive exploration trip on May 4. It carried them into the jungles skirting the Minnesota River, from which they emerged happy and tired and oh, so much wiser.


38

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Hertha Sievert visited D. M. L. C. to see if a year's absence had. wrought m'au changes. . \ On May 8, the city girls planned to have a real. picnic out at Hunter's Rest, but their lnteutior s were frustrated by an unexpected shower of rain. However, they made the best of it 'by transforming their outing into an inning and enjoyed themselves immensely up in the Girls' Room of the Redtation Hall. Em, Olive, and Sammy, fearing dissolution, came up in John's truck, in the back of which they all crouched under one sheepskin coat. Olina and Jeanette Jordahl were called home by the death of their grandfather. 'file girls of our college wish to express their heartfelt sympathy to their school-mate, Hertha Penk, in her recent bereavement, caused by the death of ;her father. Hildegard Bussmann and A:lma Ottenbacher submitted to operations for appendicitis at the Union Hospital. With the coming of June comes the parting- of friends. This June will be no exception to the rule, 'but we do hope that parted friends will again meet at D. M. L. O. ll

/

s .....=:.--'-

-=--:::-.

~~ ~

--=..._..._.-.~-Adthough Fritz Bartels is no longer with us', the influence of the "Katzenjammer Kids" is still felt. For particulars ask tlie recipients of the April Fool cards which they received during the Easter vacation. Victor Fritz is convalescing from a severe attack of pneumonia. He is expected to be able to leave the hospital in a short time.


f

THE D. M. L. C. MEISSENGER

39

A Challenge! "Chink" and Pape, occupants of Room 52, will take on anyone in a free for all wrestling match. Arthur Haack submitted to an operation for appendicitis at the Union hospital Alpril 19. On the morning of Ma.y 5, "Fat" was obliged to breakfast with the girls. he tells us that he was so shocked that he was unable to teach that day. A short time ago the most unearthly noises pervaded the college premises. Upon investigation we found it to be only the twelfth grade orchestra practicing for its banquet. May 12 the 'Twelfth grade enjoyed a most pleasant banquet. It was given in honor of the minister's division. l'he monotony of Dnglish class was somewhat relieved by a speech on "'Woman's Suffrage" by our "Senator" Ottenbacher. According to reports, he seemed to be very much at home iJ1' the subject. Professor "Hans" Wagner rejuvenated his "Lizzie" with a set of new tires and a coat of paint. It acts almost like a "two-year old" now-almost. "Floppy" Zeitz oidn't seem to be very much enthused with the reception given him on his birthday, Apri] 29. He even left before the festivities began. Sunday, May 16, I. and II. Normal enjoyed a picnic at Hunters' Rest. A1 very pleasant time was had by all. Many are still suffering from the after-effects.

ATHLETICS

e;,,(r)~ ~~

The year 19,26¡will stand out very prominently in our future 'baseball history. 'I'his year our manager, Elmer Haertel, has succeeded in scheduling games with some fast teams, and we were fortunate in receiving permission to play home games on Sundays. This is also the first year that a professor has taken a very active part in coaching our team. Allthough Professor Palmbach, cur present athletic director, has always shown a great interest in our team, his other duties have prevented him from coaching our team during its practice periods, and so the greater part of the work was

â&#x20AC;˘


40

â&#x20AC;˘

I

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

left to the captain. But this year Professor Schweppe consented to coach our team. 'The ability of this former D. M. L. O. and Northwestern star as a coach may well be deduced from the results of the following games: 'The first game of the season was played against Fairfax, on their diamond, May 1. As usual, our boys went into extra sessions to. win the "opener." 'l'hey finally came thru in the eleventh inning with three runs to SeW up the game. Mangels, 'Our left fielder, was the hero of the cay. He saved the game in the tenth with two sensational catches, and in the first of the eleventh he drove in the winning run. J olinson and E. Borth pitched excellent ball for Fairfax until the fatal eleventh. Mueller and Hauch, former M. L. S. 'battery of Saginaw, Michigan, started the fracas. Mueller pitched superb ball until the seventh when several errors and a triple -tied the score, He struck out seventeen men and allowed three hits in the seven innings that he worked. In the eighth he was hit by a pitched ball and forced to retire. Rtindt took his place and struck out five men and allowed two hits in the remaining four innings. 'Summary; Total D. M. L. C. 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3-6 Pair-tax 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 '0-3 'Battery; Fairfax-Johnson,' E. Borth and Bruggaman. D. M. L. O.~Mueller, Stind~ and Hauch. On May 8 our boys motored to Faribault to play the Shattuck Military Academy, but rain prevented the contest. But on Saturday, May 15, our boys defeated a Fairfax delegation by a score of 7-3. 'Stindt, Mangels and Mueller pitched excellent ball for the Oollege Warriors, while Borth of Fairfax was hit freely. ISumm'ary: 'I'otal D. M. L. O. 0 0< 1 1 2 0 3 0 0-7 Fairfax 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0-3 Battery: Fairfax-Borth and Bruggaman. D. M. L. 0.Stindt, Mangels, Mueller and Haertel, Hauch. On Sunday our team again donned their uniforms and defeated the Gibbon nine 12-1. Halverson, the Gibbon twirler, was unable to stop the College attack which was led by Kuehn and Haertel. Summary; Tota) D. M. L. C.. 3 0 4 4 0- 0 0 1 O-l~ Gibbon 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 -1 Battery: Gtbbou=-Halverson, Mickelson and Sauter. D. M.. L. C.-Mueller, Stindt and Haertel. Wednesday, May 19, the team motored to 'Sanborn to play the Sanborn H. S. 'They defeated this team by a score of 5-1 in a seven-inning tussle: -Hellmann had a perfect day in

â&#x20AC;˘


I

,

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGE,R

41

fielding, handling six chances without an error. Hauch obtained two hits out of two times at 'bat. Ringli hit a circuit drive off Mueller for their lone tally. Summary: Total D. .M.L. C : 0 1 0 0 3 0 1-5 Sanborn 0 0 0 0 0 0 1-1 Battery: Sanborn-Yo Luther and Wagner. D. .M.L. C.Mangels, ~tindt, Mueller and Haertel, Hauch. Sunday, May 23, our boys fought their hardest game of the season against the crack Fairmont city team, Stindt went the distance for College and pitched a good type of ball. His excellent support helped him out of a few tight places, Only one error was charged against the team. A timely hit from: Hellmann and a bunt from Stindt with the bases filled netted the winning runs in the fourth. Harder and 'I'heabolt led the attack for the opponents, each making three hits. ' ~~~: ~~ - D. M. L. C ~._ 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0-3 Fairmont n 0 () 0 1 0 0 0 0-2 Battery: Fairmont-Sims and 'I'heabolt, D. M. L. C.Stindt and Hauch. On May 26 our boys motored to St. Peter to play a practice game against the Gustavus first team, hut lost 7-0. The Gusties obtained all their runs in the last three innings when our pitching began to weaken. . The following is the standing of our players: Batting AB R H PO A E Av. 6 1'1 7 1 .300 20 4 Bullis ss, ...................................... 19 2 4 36 2 2 .211 Hauch cf., C. ................................ 8 10 2 .287 Reuter 2nd (capt. ) ....................21 4 6 2 2 0 .313 16 5 5 Mueller f., p. .............................. 22 5 5 35 3 1 .228 Pless, 1st ...._................................ 0 8 1 .176 17 4 3 Hellmann, 3rd ............................ 5 1 2 .211 19 4 4 Kuehn, f., p. ................................ 16 5 7 28 4 3 .438 Haertel, f., c. .............................. 2 0 .100 10 0 1 0 Stindt, p. ..........~........................... 6 2 1 .300 10 1 3 Mangels, f., p. ............................ 1 0 0 o 0 0 .000 Thalmann .._--------------------------------1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Huber -------------------------------------------172 34 44 1'31 41 13 .255 We still have the following games on our schedule: .May 30 (Sun.) Nicollet (Here). May 31 (Mon.) M-organ High (T'here). June 4 (Fri.) Sanbol'n High (Here). June 6 open. June 12 (Sat.) St. James "I'igers (Here).


42

THE D. M. L. ,C. MESSENGER

I'm short on jokes; they are so few. don't be cross if the joke's on you.

ISO

Prof (A,fter explaining a geometry theorem) : "Watch the board now while I' go through it again." ,

,Ai sign before a shoe-shine parlor read: "Your pedal teguments artistically illuminated for the infinitesimal remuneration of five cents." Prof: "Are you certain that this composition is original?" Student: "Yes, 'but you may run across one or two words in the dictionary." Gertha: "A girl in our high school at home thought pineapples grew on trees." Mack: "Well, don't they?" Klinker: "S.omething happened to me yesterda.y that can never happen again if I live to be a hundred years old." Friend: "What was that?" Klinker: "I was twenty-one years old." Fat: "What can I do to bring my weight down?" Oompanion : "Step on a banana peel." Prof. Klatt (Making an announcement in chapel) : "Found, a fountain pen engraved with the letter F' on the campus."


THE D. M. L. ,C. MESSENGEiR

43

Mule in the back yard, lazy and slick; Boy with. a pin on the end of a stick Creeps up behind him sly as a mouse, Crepe on the door of the little boy's house. Eighteen¡year-old: "I'll have to smoke a cigarette to take this onion smell away." Twelve-year-old: '"I'll have to eat an onion to take this cigarette smell away." Molly: "His father died before he was born." Prof: "What is a goblin?" Art: "A turkey." First Normal: "When I sing, tears come to my eyes. What can I do for that?" Second Normal: '"Try putting some cotton into your ears." What Kind? Hill (who was absent the day before) : ",Say, Klinker, did you get many notes to-day in History class?" Klinker: "Yes, quite a few." Hill: "May I copy them?" Klinker: "Well, I guess not!!!" In a Pen? If anybody wants to buy a big pig, come in. and see me.-

Sam Jones.

Ex. _

Can You Imagine? Wilde wearing short pants? "Chink" playing the organ in church? Kuehn having his mind on the game when we play? Asher Backer keeping order in the town boys' room? Lu being quiet? Amdrae looking serious? "Balloon" doing the Oharleston? '\Ernie" E. bemg prepared for classes? Armin AlIbrecht staying at home?

â&#x20AC;˘ /


, ADVERTISERS

IN "THE MESSENGER"

Andrew Saffert A. J. Vogel Lumber Co. Arndt & Zupfer

J. M. Meyer Kretsch Auto Co. Lyric Cafe

A. G. Plagens Ben's Music Store

Leo A. Sprenger :&Iuesing Drug Store ~Ieyer Photographer; ~I. J. Bieber

Bierbaum's Cash Grocery Buenger Furniture Co. B. J. Krahn

Citizens State Bank Crone Bros. Co. Chas, Emmerich Champion Shoe Shop

Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr.

A. L. Kusske Wm. J. Von Bank Hugh C. Edmiston H. O. Schleuder F. A. Kallusky

Dr. F. H. Dubbe Dr. Jos. P. Faas

Eagle Roller Mill Co. E. Wicherski Epple Bros. Ernest C. Vogelpolll Everling Electric Co. Emil G. Berg Eagle Tailor Shop Farmers & Merch. State Bank

F. H. Retzlaff & Sons Fred Meine Clothing Co. F. J. Backer Farmers Co-op. Creamery Assn. Gastler Studio Geo. J. Gag Hackbarth Shoe Store H. Goede Hummel Bros. Henry Simons Lumber Co. H. C. Prey, D. O. Henry Stelljes H. F. Raabe Interstate Power Co.

J. H. Forster J. C. Penney Company

Mueller & Erickson Mrs. Anna Rinke

New Ulm Bottling Works New UIm Shoot Metal Works Nagel & Leary New Ulm Greenhouses New Ulm Steam Laundry l"T ew Ulm Grocery Co. New Vim Brick & Tile Yards Olson & Burk

Otto C. Wichtel P. J. Eicllten SllOe Store Reim & Church Rexall Drug Store

Robert Fesenmaier R. R. Kemski Printing Co. Sportsmen's Paradise Sehulkes State Bank of New Ulm Somsen, Dempsey & Floi' Saffert Cement Construction Co.

Tile Bee Hive Panseheck & Green Tile Red Front Grocery Tile Wonder Store The National Theo. Mueller

Union Hospital Ulricll Electric Co. Vercoe's Plumbing Shop W. Eibner & Son Weilandt & Stegeman W. Rrnemke & Son Walsh & Lodahl Motor Co. Yellow Cab

â&#x20AC;˘


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â&#x20AC;˘


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New Vim Sheet Metal Utorks Frank A. and OttoL. Schaefer, Props,

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FESENMAIER

Hardware. Implements and Automobiles Alfred W. Mueller

GeorgeD. Erickson Law Offices

MUELLER & ERICKSON New Vim, Minn.


~A. ~f 1

Young Men's Suits,

Overcoats, Furnishings

~

Greatest Values P" Do/1M

Hummel

Brothers

14 N. Minn. St.

New VIm. Minn.

Vercoe's Plumbing

Shop

221 N. Minn. St. (Next door to Saffert's Meat Market)

Visit our Show Room and see "Standard" Enamel Ware and other Modern Plumbing and Heating Appliances The only ground floor Plumbing Shop in the city. OFFICE PHONE 95

Phone 292

I

RESIDENCE

597

Dr. F. A. KALLUSKY DENTIST over Arbes Drug Store On: h19:00 to 12:00 'JI,ce ours) 1:00 to 5:00 Evening by appointment

Farmers Co-op. Creamery Ass'n. We make and sell the jamous

GOLD MEDAL BUTTER \ Churned from sweet pasteurized Cream WHOLESALE

Eyes examined-Glasses

and RET AI L

fitted-Lenses

ground in our

Specialist in Eyesight and Optometry H. C. PREY, D. O.

OWn

shop


"Save with Safety" at the

Student's

Rexall Store Walter Hellmann

W.alter W. Muesing

"THE BUSIEST STORE IN TOWN" "There must be a goodreason why"

The

Bee J.

Hive

A. OCHS &- SON

Ladies' Ready-To-Wear and D~y Goods "Everything for the Co-Ed For the Lowest Prices of Dress and Athletic

FOOT WEAR In the City Go To the

Hackbarth Shoe Store Dahms & Lindemann. Props. All Kinds of Repairing Neatly Executed.

225 N. Minn. St.

MEYER The Leading Photographer 213t N. Minn. St.

Tel. No. 268


We Use Soft Water Only

Phone No.5

New Vim Steam Laundry Otto F. Oswald, Prop.

Ftrs: Class Dry Cleaning Department in Con~ection PROMPT ATTENTION

GIVEN TO MAIL ORDERS

Our store is the

STORE

Eagle Tailor Shop

At all times we show the latest in

JOE DEI BELE, Prop.

Young Men's Suits, Ooercoats and Furnishings

Cleaning and Pressing

YOUNG MEN'S of town

Alterations and Dying

Crone Bros. Co.

505 Center St.

The

The National

-Gastler Studio A good place

Soft Drinks and Lunches

to have your

pictures made Lowest prices on

KODAK .

FINISHING

High Gloss Prints

Corner Center and Minn. Sis.

New Vim Grocery Co. WHOLESALE NEW

GROCERS

Ask for ULM BRAND

COFFEE

in the Yellow Can

LOCATED TO YOUR ADVANTAGE


M. J. BIEBER Ladies'. Men's and Young Men's Wearing Apparel of the better Grades at Reasonaqle Prices. Home of Hart Schaffner &- Marx Clothes

Our Best Attention Everything of a banking nawre ~ntrusted care, receives our best .attenlion.

to

our

-,

We shall be glad

10

have a share of your business.

State Bank of New Vim DRUGS EVERYTHING

A STUDENT NEEDS

EPPLE

BROS.

DRUGGISTS

New Vim Greenhouses 20,000 square feet of glass

Prompt attention given to all orders for Cutfioioers, etc.

FloUJersfor all Occasions \

"Say it with Flowers" Phone 45


E

5 SPORTSf:1}/i:s~E.~~.RADI NEW

ULM

MINNESOTA

Sporting and Athletic Goods Radio "Trq the Sport Shop First"

Walsh - Lodahl Motor Co.

Lyric Cafe Perfect health and Happiness

Authorized

Ford

depends upon the eating of properly prepared food

Dealers

. Everling Electric路 Co. Electrical Supplies Storage Batteries Wiring. Etc.

HENRY

SIMONS LUMBER

CO.

Dealers in

ALL KINDS of BUILDING MATERIAL. COAL and FUEL Let us figure on your requirements in these materials

New Utm

Minn.

DR. T. F. HAMMERMEISTER Physician and Surgeon NEW ULM

MINNESOTA

The A to Z BARBER

SHOP

The Place uihere you get both Service and Treatment

ARNDT

t!l' ZUPFER

First North and Minn. Sts.


When in need of FOOTWEAR be sure and call on us. We carry a complete line of men's, ladies' and children's shoes. We appreciate your business. Our prices are always the lowest. Quality considered,

Athletic Shoes Our Specialty

J. Eichten Shoe Store

P.

New VIm, Minn.

Empty your purse to your head, And no man can take it from you; An investment in knowledge pays th e best interest, -Benj. Franklin.

Osteopathic Plu.sician Phone 123

Weiser Block,

A Friend

In New U/m since 1916

Breeder of

Ceo.

Fancy

S. C. Rhode Island Reds

J.

Cag

Bicycle Repair and Sheet Metal Shop

H. F. RAABE New V/~

Dr. Hugh C. Edmiston

Minn.

315 N. Minn. St.

Phone 284

Give Your Eyes A Chance It isn't right to toil under the handicap of defective eyesight. Poor eyes make backward students. They not only affect your work, but your nerves and health as well. We fit your eyes right. grind lenses in our own shop and replace broken lenses on short notice.

Dr. H. O. SCHLEUDER Optometrist and Optician 102 N. Minn. St.

New VIm

Telephone 87


W. Ruembe & Son \Ve Car~y a Complete L~ne of Fan~y and Staple Grocer~es, Dry

Goods and Not~ons which we Offer

for Sale at Lowest Pr~ces ALSO PAY HIGHEST

PRICE FOR BUTTER AND EGGS

The Wonder Store 10-12 So. Minn.

SI.

Is the Place where you will find your Friends Residence Phon! 150

Office Phone 60

DR. F. H. DUBBE Physician and Surgeon NEW ULM

MINN.

H. GOEDE, Photographer THE LEADING STUDIO HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS Special Rater to Students

K 0 D A K FIN

I S路H I N G

Studio 107 N. Broadway

Do Your Banking With The

Citizens State Bank CAPITAL

$/00,000.00

SURPLUS

$/00,000.00

Member of Federal Reserve Banking Sustem Being one of the oldest 'and strongest banks in southern Minnesota, we solicit your patronage

We are well supplied with money to loan

Modern Safe Deposit Boxes for rent at $/.00 per year


--

----

--------------

1875

1925

Fifty Ye~rs of Continuous Service Proves Reliability and Durability of New Vim Brick Buildings erected with NEW ULM BRICK fifty years ago are as strong and substantial today as the day they were erected.

BUILD

WITH

NEW ULM BRICK

~ It Paqs

NEW ULM BRICK & TILE YARDS New

uiÂŤ

Minn.

See

CHEVROLET

and BUICK

First Kretsch A uio Company Telephone 323


A.

J.

_.,,- LUMBER

Vogel Lumber (0. AND BUILDING

MATERIAL

The Yard that serves you best Quality, Service and Satisjaciion

J. M. MEYER LEADING JEWELER

Phone 117

I make a Specialty of Fine Watch Repairing Honest and Competent Work Guaranteed

We turn a House into a Home

Buenger

Furniture

Co.

Stores, New Vim and Sleepy Eye

Henry

Stelljes

SOMSEN. DEMPSEY

The Center Street Grocer

& FLOR

A Fine Stopping Place For Students

A ttorneys at Law New Ulm

803 Center St ..

Phone 133

.: Minnesota


Bierbaum's

Cash Grocery

Right Treatment Right Quality R.ight Prices Phone 188 . 101 S. Minn. St.

NeUJ Vim. Minn â&#x20AC;˘

COLLEGIAN and EMBY CLOTHES are good Clothes

Athletic

FOOTWEAR'

G~tyour next Suit al

Leo A. Sprenger Clothing

Weilandt & Stegeman

E. Wicherski J. H. FORS1 ER

Contractors &- Builders Correspondence Solicited Work done in any section of the Community Plans and specifications furnished Estimates cheerfully given Office 1100 Center St. Phone 571

F.

J.

Furniture. Carpels. Rugs and Wall Paper NeUJ Vim

Minn.

Backer

HARNESS DEALER Trunks. Traveling Bags. Suit Cases. Purses. Kuiih-Pal; Parcel Post Laundry Cases and Other Leather Specialiies


J. C. PENNEY

COMPANY

Corner Minnesota and 2nd N Sirs.

New VIm. Minn.

OPERATING 676 STORES IN 44 STATES Where Savings are Greatest WE KINDLY

REIM

SOLICIT

YOVR

PATRONAGE

&- CHURCH

THE LEADING JEWELERS

Disti ncti ue Clothing Sold on Quality and Merit alone at

Tobaccoes Pipes

CIGARS

Cigarettes Snuff

7 heo. Mueller manufacturer. jobber and retailer in

Smoker's Articles

Tauscheck & Green

204 N. Minn. St.

Nagel &- Leary

Mrs. Anna Rinke

New VIm

Millinery Dealers in

Wood. Coal, Briquetis Coke and Sewer Pipe Telephone 304

Corsets and Switches Fancy Work

The latest in HATS Always 122 N. Minn.

St.

New VIm

When in Need of an Electrician

Call 148 Ulrich Electric Company


Bank with

Farmers & Merchants State Bank New Vim, Minnesota

Friendly Helpful Service at Your Command

Ben's Music Store

Patronize

Classical and Popular Sheet Music

" Messenger

Everything in Musical Instruments Fritsche Block

A dvertisers' ~

Phone 1100

The Kemski Stationery Store BOOKS. GIFT ARTICLES, GREETING CARDS

I FREE

A Loose Leaf Biplex Memo Note Book to readers of this magazine and oth.ers. Come In and ask for It.

R. R. KEMSKI PRINTING Printers

Stationers

CO.

Office Outfitters

I -


Fine Clothing. Furnishings Hats. Caps and Shoes Interwoven Stockings

Fred Meine Clothing cs,

Chas. Emmerich Plumbing,

Sleam and

Hoi Waler Healing Estimates Furnished on Application

Both Phones 281

Corner Center and Minn. Sts.

Ernest C. Vogelpohl PIPE ORGAN BUILDER New Vim. Minn.

REUTER

PIPE

ORGANS

SERVICE STATION FOR PIPE ORGANS Rebuilding. Modernizing. Tuning and Care of Pipe Organs

ORGAN BLOWERS INSTALLED


Daniel

Webster

THE WORLD'S

GREATEST

FLOUR

Used Where Quality Counts Recommended and Guaranteed by Leading Dealers

Eagle Roller Mill Co. NEW ULM, MINN.

CONSTANTLY IMPROVED BUT NO YEARL Y MODELS

DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR

VEHICLES

F.H.RETZLAFF & SONS Phone 1000


Champion Shoe Shop

Call a

We specialize in Seiberling Rubber Heels and Kori Krome Leather Heels

o~

<..~Y

Phone

'\)V

E. Freese 6- F. Wessel

194

.

~

Baggage Transfer

24 S. Minn. St.

Patronize "Messenger" Advertisers

You can STUDY LESS and LEARN MORE if your Eyes are properly jilted with Glasses

DR. }OS. P. FAAS Optometrist and Pharmacist New Ulm

Estimates Furnished We Guarantee

Emil G. Berg Decorating Painting Paper Hanging Furniture Refinishing Telephone 401 New Ulm

A. G. PLAGENS Registered Architect New uiÂŤ

Satisfaction

Minnesota

Minn.


I'

OUR SLOGAN:

<8짜(ark epezy grapv

That splendid. imported German Granite always in stock Will erect work regardless of distance

B. j. KRAHN Phone 1234

New VIm. Minn.

121 N. Broadway

Patronize Messenger" Advertisers H

Use

ARTSTONE

in stock sizes or special made to order for your new home or other buildings, You are invited to inspect the exhibit of ARTSTONE at our plant.

Saffert Cement Construction Co. New Vim, Minnesota

I


UNION

HOSPITAL

New Vim. Minn. A fireproof hospital supervised by graduate nurses giving the best service

Phone No. 280

When you do it with heat, You can do it better with GAS.

Interstate Power Company Ceo. B. Fesenmaier

A. L. Kusske, M. O. Practice limited to

Eye, Ear, Nose & Throat and Fitting of Glasses Officeover Farmers 6- Merchants State Bank Building

New Vim

Mtnn.

H. M. Siebenbrunner

The Red Front Grocery The Store of Quality and Service Phone 43

New Vim, Minn.


Ser o ice

Quality Right

WE

Price

appreciate your patronage

which will always be filled to your liking and will

lead to future

business relationship between us

Olson &- Burk Phone 88 New Vim. Minnesota


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DEPARTMENT'


1925-1926 DMLC Messenger Vol. 16  
1925-1926 DMLC Messenger Vol. 16