Page 1


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E s tablishe d 1875

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F. W. EIBNER, _Propr. I have recently added material improvements to my establishment , making it one of the most up-to-date in this section of the state, and am now in a position to give my many patrons the v ery best of service. We la) particular stress upon cleanliness and quality. You are cordially invited to make my establishment your headquarters at any time when you are in New Ulm


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.I

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VOLUME 4

'

NEW ULM, MINN., SEPTEMBER, 1918

JAPAN. Japan is a country made up of more than thirty-eight hundred mountainous islands. It extends for more than two thousand miles North and South. There is probably no other land in the world which has a greater variety of beautiful scenery. The camellia and the magnolia grow wild upon its green hills, and the Japanese call their country the land of the chrysanthemum. Japan has today more than fifty steaming volcanoes, and there are hundreds of others which may at any time burst into eruption, though they now lie entirely quiet, like other mountains. It is also a land of earthquakes, and a shock is felt at least once every day ..Centm:;ies ago the Japanese believed the earthquakes were caused by some gigantic fish which lived in the sea, and which, at times when its anger arose, struck its tail or nose against the coast , which naturally caused

NUMBER 1

the earth to crack and tremble. In 1894 an earthquake took place which made the earth rise and fall like the waves of the sea. Buildings in the palace grounds were thrown down, the home of the United States minister was wrecked, and several foreign buildings were entirely destroyed. The Japanese as a people are very bright, they understand the science of irrigation quite as well as Americans do. They dam up. streams in the mountains and the water is carried from one place to another thru winding ditches, so that one stream feeds many farms. The mountainous nature of Japan is such t hat less than one tenth of it is under cultivation; but that one tenth gives about half t he people constant employment. Although the soil is not any richer than ours, the Japanese can so f ert ilize his ground路 that he can raise four and five times . as much on one acre as an American can on the same space


, 2

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

of ground in America; and it in all kinds of goods and in all is said that in Japan there are the world's markets. A. M. F. farms which for centuries, have produced two crops a year. There are no very large fields, "THE JOURNAL OF VASCO the average farm being less DE GAMA." than two acres in size, upon Twelve years after the unwhich are grown rice, wheat, successful voyage of Bartholobarley, tobacco and cotton. Rice mew Diaz, in 1486, to seek a is the most important crop of water way to India, King Emthe country, for it forms the anuel-:: of Portugal, sent out an· chief food of the people. other skillful seaman, by the In the stock exchanges we name of Vasco de Gama, to unlearn something of Japansee dertake this hardship. trade, which is carried on mostHe began the expedition on ly ·with .ithe United States and the 8th day of July, 1497, from Great Britain, although we buy · the coast · of Lisbon. After a more of her than she does of few days at sea, he reached the us;: but ·her trade ·· with us is Cape Verde Islands, which howconstantly · increasing. ever, had been discovered beThe chief things that we ex- fore. After delaying here a port ·to ~Japan are kerosene oil, few days, he again set sail on machinery ' and raw cotton. August 3rd, along the coast of More than half the homes of Af,rica. Reaching the Belt · of the •Japanese people are now Storms, · which caused the re• lighted by American oil; and turn of Bartholomew Diaz's many of the mills have machin- fleet. Vasco de Gama's comery from America. panions lost courage; they comOn the other hand though, manded him to return. But he the Japanese ship silks, rugs, refused to do this; he put the ma-de of ·cotton jute, and some leaders of the movement in of the most beautiful matting irons and sailed on jnto the in the world, to the United Belt of Storms. When they reached the southern most point States. These rugs are mostly made of Africa, they turned eastward by children from ten years up- and took the way along the wards, who work for five and eastern shore Proceedings on thi s ten cents a day. The workmen course they soon discovered also receive low wages and the city of Mozambique in the when we note how cheap every- country of the same name. thing is, we see that the JapaFarther north Gama ' reached nese could easily live upon what Mombassa in British East Afwe Americans waste. We also rica: The inhabitants of this take notice of the lavor-saving country were Mohammedans. inventions, and we wonder if As they encountered with Gathe time .will not soon come ma's fleet, they soon recognized when these people, with their the same ·folks with which they skill and low wages, will be had war several year s before. competing , with our workmen They therefore pursued the Por-


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

3

tuguese. As they tried to cut become a Presbyterian minisoff the course of the Potuguese, ter. Gama conquered a ship of 17 of The barefooted boy attended them and proceeded to Melinda, a school kept by Dr. Waddell. where the king of these natives He made commendable progress lived. The Portuguese entered in his studies, but he loved fun into friendly relations with this even better than books. He king and he gave them a pilot, was persevering in everything who guided them across the that he did. Andrew protected 路 Indian Gulf. After 23 days' the younger boys, but would travel from Melinda they reach- take no insult from any older ed Calicut May 20, 1498, the ob- boys. The boy loved his mothject of their search. Thus a er, and this he showed by doing water , way to the great com- what she told him. Andrew mercial country of India was used to say in later life: "My established. Here Gama met settled course thru life has been with the unfriendly Arabs, who to bear in mind what my mofor esaw that the Portuguese ther told me, and never insult would take trade out of their anybody, nor let myself be inhands; but Gama narrowly es- sult ed. Andr ew did nothing slowly or caped this danger. He therefore immediately set sail for indifferently. He bent his will the homeward voyage. On the to his work, even at that early way he stopped off at Melinda age, and knew no such word as to take an ambassador aboard failure. During t he Revolutionary war, to Emanuel's court. He arrived at Portugal on Mrs. Jackson moved from their the 29th day of August, after old homestead to a place of an absence of 26 months. safety with a distant relative. A year later, when Mrs. JackEmanuel received Vasco de Gama with great honor and son r eturned to Waxhaw, Anpermitted him to bear the title drew and his brothers were of "lord of the conquest of . taken prisoners in a skirmish. Ethiopia, Arabia, Persia and In- Andrew, being commanded to clean the boots of a British ofdia." ficer, refused saying: "Sir, I C.H. am a prisoner of war and wish to be treated as such." The ANDREW JACKSON. angry Englishman drew his Andrew Jackson, a man from sword. Andrew tried to defend the wilderness, was born at himself but received a 'gash in Waxhaw, North Carolina, Mar. his left hand and also on his 15, 1767. Andrew became the head. Soon after he was taken idol of his mother's heart. with other prisoners to a prison Three weeks after he was born in Camden. . his mother moved to one of her The prison was a wretehed brothers-in-law, because her place, where small-pox was raghusband had died before An- ing among the iumates. Mrs. drew was born. His mother Jackson, hearing of this, came hoped that he would one day and took her son home.


4

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

After this Mrs. Jackson hastened to the Charleston prisonships to care for the wounded. Here Mrs. J acksori was taken ill with ship-fever. She died after a brief illness, leaving Andrew an orphan. 路 Fatherless, motherless, the boy of fifteen looked about him to see what his life work should be. Andrew went to a relative who was a saddler, and worked at that trade six months. He remembered that his mother wanted him to be educated. When nearly eighteen he made up his mind to study law. If he studied at all, he wanted to be under the best teachers, so he rode to Salesbury, seventy-five miles from Waxhaw, and enter ed the office of Mr. Spruce McCay, an eminent lawyer. Here he studied for two years enjoying also the sports of that time. When in the White House forty-five years afterward he said: "I was but a raw lad then, but I did my best." When his t wo years of lawstudy were ended, the work was just begun. There was reputation to be made, and perhaps a fortune, but where and how ? For a year he did not find a law opening. He probably worked in a store owned by some acquaintances, earning for daily needs. At twenty-one came his first opportunity to practice law. Mr. John McNairy, a friend of Andrew's, was appointed judge of the Superior Court of the Western District of North Carolina (Tennessee) and young Jackson public prosecutor of the same court. He often had to ride

thru the wilderness and over t he mountains, often among hostile Indians, his life almost constantly in danger. Sometimes the young lawyer slept in the wilderness for twenty successive nights. At Nashville he found lodgings in the house of the widow of Colonel J ohn Donelson, a brave pioneer of Virginia, who had been kil1ed by the Indians. And here Andrew Jackson met the woman 路who was to prove his good angel as long as she lived. Rachel, t he daughter of Mrs. Donelson, was marr ied to Lewis Robards. The man grew angry at Jackson, and made her life so unhappy t hat she separated from him and went to Natchez. After a divorce in 1791, Jackson married her, when they were each twenty-four years old. Wit h the world he was thought to be domineer ing and har sh, and was of ten profane ; but with her he was patient, gentle and deferential. When he won renown she was happy for his sake, but she did not care for it herself . She was a comforter to all. Jackson now began to prosper financially. Often he would r eceive his fee in lands, so that after a time he was possessor of several t housand acres. When a convention was called to for m a constitut ion for the new state of Tennessee, Jackson was chosen a delegat e, and, when she y;anted a man to represent her m Congress she sent him t o the House of Representatives. This honor came .a t the age of twenty-nine yea rs. Jackson served hi.s State well by securing compensation for ever y man who


:

'

THE D. M. L. O. MESSENGER

had fought or lost property in the Indian war. It was not strange, therefore, that, when a vacancy occurred in the United States Senate, Jackson was chosen to fill the place, in the autumn of 1797. Only thirty years old! But the following year he resigned his position, glad to be, as he supposed, out of official life. He was, however, too prominent to remain in private life, and was elected to a judgeship of the Supreme Court of Tennessee. Many other men in the State were more learned than Jackson, yet the people believed in his honesty and integrity, and therefore he was chosen. Quick to decide and slow to change his mind, in fifteen days he had disposed of fifty cases. After six years Jackson resigned his position and was made major general of the militia of the State. His office was in accordance with his natural tastes. Since boyhood he had loved the stir and command of battle, and believed he should like to conquer an enemy as he had conquered every obstacle that lay in his path. As there was no war in progress, he continued his law practice. Not satisfied with this he became a merchant and traded with the Indians. During the panic of 1798 Jackson sold twenty-five acres of land, sold his house, to pay his debts, and moved into a log house at the Hermitage. Eighteen years had gone since Jackson's marriage. He had received distinguished honors, but one joy was wanting. No

5

children had been born in the home. In 1809, twins were born to Mrs. Jackson's brother. One of these was adopted by Jackson, when only a few days old. Jackson was the friend of young men and especially was he loyal to any who were near his heart. He .was like another great man, in a great war, the hero of 1812 and the hero of 1861. Jackson and Grant were true to those who were true to them. Only a man of small soul forgets the ladder by which he climbs. In the war with Great Britain (1812), Jackson offered to the Government of Louisiana, for the defense of New Orleans, three thousand soldiers. This offer was accepted, and he started for Natchez, to await orders. The men were in the best of spirits, kept hopeful and enthusiastic by their commander. After a time the "orders" came, but to the astonishmnet of both officers and men to hear that their services were not needed, because the British did not intend to attack New Orleans; that they were to return to Tennessee. One hundred and fifty of his men were ill. He put those that could ride on horses, and then, walking at their head, led the gallant company toward home . Later Jackson was needed in th e Indian wars in Florida anr1 other southern states. When people heard that the Indians were going to war, they all hastened to Fort Mims. On the 30th of Augu:;it, 1813, a thousand Creek warriors rushed into the fort, killing the women men and children with their tomahawks. The Tennesseans sent


(j

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

General Jackson against the Creeks. Jackson had been wounded on the arm 路 in a quarrel, but he put his left arm in a sling, and led his army into the Indians' country. Jackson fought many battles with the Creeks, in which he was victorious. Weathersford, their most heroic chief, came to General Jackson and told him that he had finished fighting. But he asked Jackson to care for the women and children of the Indians. Jackson granted Weatherford's request, and the women and children were provided for. The Creek war over, Jackson returned to Tennessee, a successful soldier. Jackson now was made major-general in the United States army, having in charge the department of the . South. He was now forty-seven and had indeed reached a high position. Soon after this he established his headquarters at Mobile, Ala., and prepared to def end the coast from the British. The English had attacked Mobile Point, been defeated, and retired to Pensacola, Florida. Spain owned Florida, and was supposed to be neutral, but she helped the British. Jackson wrote to Washington asking leave to attack Pensacola. The answer did n0t come till the war of 1812 was over. He did not wait for an answer, but attacked Pensacola, captured it, and then hastened to defend New Orleans. The city was put under martial law. All lights were extinguished at 9 o'clock. Any person caught on the street after this hour without a per-

mit was apprehended as a spy and held for examination. Jackson had about two thousand troops and four thousand more within ten or fifteen days' march. Against these a British force of twenty thousand men was coming, with a fleet of fifty ships, carrying one thousand guns. So certain were the British of conquest路 that several families were with the fleet, husbands and brothers having been appointed already to civil offices. The English fleet entered Lake Borgne, sixty miles northeast from New Orleans, on December 10, 1814. Twelve miles below the city. The next day, when Jackson was informed of their approach, he clenched his fist down upon the table, saying: "By the Eternal, they shall not sleep on our soil." Immediately he sent word to the various regiments to meet him at three o'clock at a specified place. At 3 o'clock Jackson led his men to attack the "Red Coats." At half-past seven the first gun was fired, and the word was given-Forward. And forward they went, with quick steps and eager hearts. Men fought hand to hand in the smoke and darkness. Prisoners were taken and retaken. Till ten o'clock the battle raged; when our men fell back to the Roderiquez canal to await till the morning sun should show where to begin the deadly fire. The canal was now strongly fortified. The canal was deepened and earth thrown upon the sides. While the preparations were going on, food was


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

brought to General Jackson, which he ate in the saddle. The days went by slowly under dreadful suspense. On New Year's day, General Packenham cannonaded the Americans but was driven back. On January 8th the final battle began. Early in the morning the British moved against the Americans. Jackson walked along the lines, cheering the men, "Stand to your guns !" At nine o 'clock the battle was over. Seven hundred of the English were killed. fourteen hundred wounded, and five hundred taken prisoners; while but eight of the American were killed and thirteen wounded . The news of this victory at New Orleans astonished the North, and made Jackson the hero of his time. The whole country was proud of a man who could win such a battle, losing the lives of so few of his men. Nearly every state passed resolutions in his praise. Four months later, General J ackson went to Washington, to arrange about the stations of t he army in the South. In 1817, the Seminole Indians became hostile. Jackson was the man to conquer them. He immediately marched into the Indians' country with one thousand eight hundred whites and fifteen hundred friendly Indians and in five months subjugated them. In 1823, Jackson was elected to the United States Senate. He was now prominently mentioned as a candidate for the presidency. While he had many ardent friends, he had strong oppo-

7

nent s. Daniel Webster said: "If Jackson is elected the Government of our country will be overthrown." The candidates for the presidency in 1824 were Jackson, John Quincy Adams, William H. Crawford and Henry Clay. While Jackson received the lar gest popular vote, the House of Representatives, balloting by States, elected John Quincy Adams. F our years later, in 1828, the people made their voices heard at the ballot-box, and Jackson was elected by a large majority. Andrew Jackson went to Washington, having grown "20 years older in a night," his friends said. The inauguration seemed to have drawn the whole country together. After the ceremony, crowds completely filled the White House. During the first year of his presidency, Jackson introduced t he "spoils system." It is said that Jackson removed more men from office than all presidents before him taken together. In his first message to Congress, he took strong ground against the rechartering of the Unit ed States Bank. This caused much alarm, for the influence of the bank was very great. When the bill to recharter the bank passed Congress, Jackson promptly vetoed it. A few years later he determined to put an end to the bank by removing all surplus funds and placing them in certain State banks. When Mr. Duane, Secretary of the Treasury, would not remove the deposits Jack: .i on immediately removed him '


8

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

by putting Roger B. Taney in his place. Congress passed a vote of censure on the president, but it was afterward expunged from the records. Speculation resulted from the distribution of money; the panic of 1837 followed, which the Whigs said was caused by the destruction of the bank, and the Democrats by the bank itself. The tariff, which was advantageous to the manfuacturers of the North, was considered disadvantageous to the agricultural interests of the South. Bitter feeling was engendered by the discussion, till South Carolina, under the leadership of John C. Calhoun, declared that the acts of Congress on the tariff were null and void. Then came the great dispute between Webster and Hayne. Still, South Carolina was not to be deterred with the eloquent Calhoun as their leader, and the Nullification Ordinance was passed November 24, 1832. Medals were struck bearing the words, "John C. Calhoun, First Presi路 dent of the Southern Confeder路 acy." By the time Carolina was ready to break the laws; another person was ready to enforce them. Jackson at once sent General Scott to Charleston, to restore order. When Jackson was asked, years afterward, what he would have done with Calhoun and the nullifiers if they had continued, he replied: "Hung them as high as Haman." When his eight years of presidential life were over, Jackson

sent his farewell address to the people of the country, who had idolized him, and whom he had loved, he said, "with the affection of a son," and retired to the Hermitage. The May of 1845 found General Jackson feeble and emaciated, but still deeply interested in his country, writing letters to President Polk and other Statesmen about Texas, hoping ever to avert war if possible. He made his will bequeathing all his property to his adopted son. On Sunday, June 8, 1845, the family and servants gathered about the great man, who was dying at the age of seventyeight, having fought against wounds and disease all his life. "My dear children," he said, "do not grieve for me; it is true I am going to leave you. I am well aware of my situation. I have suffered much bodily pain, but my sufferings are but as nothing, compared with that which our blessed Saviour endured upon that accursed cross, that all might be saved who trust in him. * * * I hope to meet you all in Heaven, both white and black-both white and black." Then he kissed each one and died. The lawn of the Hermitage was crowded with the thousands who came to attend the funeral. All over the country public meetings were held in honor of the illustrious dead; the man who had said repeatedly, "I care nothing about clamors, I do precisely what I think just and right." E.T., '16.


THE D. M.L. C. MESSENGER

w~r

11

i. S. I.路 Qt. :!lt1latngtr 拢bitorial &tatr

Leo Luedtke, George Meyer, Business Manager M. Dommer, Exchange Editor C. Hinz, Local Editor E. Koenig, Athletic Editor

Editor-In-chief E. Trettin, Asst. Business Manager C. Koch, College Notes Editor J. Wirth, Alumni Editor A. Falde, Per Jocum Editor

HE "D. M. L. C. MESSENGER" Is published quarterly during the achoo! year by the student& of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subacriptlon price is fifty cents per annum. Single copies fifteen centa. Stamps not accepted. We request payment In advance. if The "Messenger" la continued after time of subscription haa expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arreages are paid. if All business communication should be addr essed to tbe Business Manager; an llterary contributions to the Editor-In-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. 11 Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from an alumni, undergraduates and friends.

T

"' Entered as second class matter at the Postoftlce of New Ulm, l\linuesota.

EDITORIAL On the opposite page is the picture of this year's editorial staff. Reading from left to .路 right: standing, E. Trettin, J. Wirth, C. Hinz, E. Koenig, C. Koch. Seated, G. Meyer, M. Dommer, L. Luedke and 0. Falde.

The school-year has begun again and we are all back for another year of strenuous work, so that by the end of the year, we can .say that we have done all that was within our ability. In our work for this year we must not forget the editing of the D. M. L. C. Messenger, for


12

'!'HE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

which we must work with great ardor. We shall not publish the D. M. L. C. Messenger for the sake of keeping it in existence, but to improve it with every new issue. The last year's staff has given us a good example and we shall try to follow it. We are not able to compete with so many other college papers, for our paper is still in its childhood days, while others have been published for many years already. All readers of the D.1 M. L. C. Messenger ought to get their friends interested in our paper, for that is the way to promote the growth of a publication. If anything is to be accomplished we must one and all lend a helping hand. Dear readers, we thank you all for your past favors. A TRUE FRIEND.

It was at the time of the Civil war that two young men, Robert and Harry by name, had enlisted in the Confederate army. Both men had made the resolution that they would stand by each other thru all dangers. On May 12th, 1861, both armies came face to face on the field of battle. As the Blues and Grays drew closer and closer, the Grays suddenly charged, but were met with deadly fire from thousands of guns of the Blues. Harry was struck with terror at seeing so many of his comrades fall. As Robert turned around, he saw his friend dashing back across the field heading for a small grove. Robert knew that if his friend should be found hiding he would be shot.

In order to save his comrade from a disgraceful death, Robert ran after him to summon him back. Robert had but gone about twenty feet when he was shot by the captain of his company. Robert felt a pain in his leg as he lay on the ground, but after a few minutes he gathered enough strength, so that he could again follow up his friend. Having reached the grove, it didn't take long to locate his friend, who was crouching behind a large stone. Our hero reprimanded Harry, then told him to take his gun and go back to the field, if he wished to be a friend of his. Harry did as he was told. After the battle was over the wounded soldiers were searched for, so _that they could be taken care of. As the search was on one of the soldiers found Robert lying behind the stone, where Harry had before been hiding. Robert, being asked how he had got there, said that he had run away from the battlefield. "Where is the other fell ow that ran here before you?" "There is no one else here besides myself." "Yes, there must be another traitor here somewhere.;' "No sir, I am the only one that didn't do my duty." "Yes, and you shall pay dearly." The soldier then ordered Robert to march toward camp, where he was kept under heavy guard until next day, when he was tried and sentenced to be shot. When Harry heard what his friend's fate was, he went to


THE D. M. L. C.

the commander and obtained permission to have a few last words with his doomed friend. When Harry entered the tent where路 Robert was kept under guard, he, falling to Robert's feet, asked him for forgiveness. "You haven't done anything that I should forgive you for. Never mind that little incident that you are referring to. Did you forget our resolution?" Harry left Robert with a heavy heart, for he knew that he was the fault of all that was to happen to his friend. He felt that he was the one that deserved to die a disgraceful death.

MESSENG:~Jt

13

again. Therefore, every student ought to use his moments to his greatest advantage and not say, "There is sufficient time till then," because every student will wish later in life that he could ha-ve the lost moments which he probably wasted during school and college days. E. K.-15

THE DESTINY OF GEORGE. Jack and George were close friends. Both attended the same school and both were in the same class. Jack was the son of a section hand, working for the Iowa CenL . L.-14 tral. George was the son of a grainbroker in Hillton. When both boys were about SENIOR CLASS OF 1913. to enter the eighth grade, they The graduates of last year were joined by Benjamin, the son of a carpenter, who had are located as follows: 0. Albrecht, Hortonville, Wis. just moved to Hill ton. George was well supplied with A. Faubel, Kenosha, Wis. money, clothes, spare time and J. Gawrisch, La Crosse, Wis. pleasures without making any F. Meyer, Green Bay, Wis. G. Wachter, Stevensville, Mich. effort to possess them. "For," t hought his father, "let George A. Windland, St. Peter, Minn. have that now, for later on he may not have it." His father LOST MOMENTS. also took great care that Geoge Nothing in this world is as did not mingle very much with precious as time. Therefore, other boys. ought not every person to make Jack and Ben, on the other use of it? Should he waste it hand, got only one suit of new and say, there is plenty of time? clothes every year, which he No, indeed, he should make use was enjoined to wear on Sundays of every hour, minute, second, only. For week-days they wore yes, even every moment. A mo- clothes bought at a Misfit Clothment once spent in idleness can ing Store. never be made up for. A moSince the strength of mind ment is worth more than any- and character greatly depends thing in this world, because if on adversities that must be you lose anything in this uni- overcome, we can easily explain verse you can find it again, but why the conversation that folif you lose a moment of your lows was as it is cited. time, you can never find t hat "Good morning, Jack and Ben.


14

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Do you want a stick of gum? I got a book yesterday after school. It is a key to our arithmetic. I'll just always copy my problems out of it now. I won't kill myself working those problems, when I can use that time to go down to the Schuberth and then take Bessie Freeland out riding in my car." Ben immediately saw what that dangerous practice of copying the problems would lead to. And right he was for, when results of the examination came from the superintendent it read: George, 50%; Ben, 98%; Jack, 93%. So G2orge had to take a rithmet ic with the same class the next year. Aft er the boys had finished High School, all thr ee selected their vocation. Ben wanted to be a lawyer; Jack, a t elegraph operator; and George, a doctor . Ben immediately after vacat ion left for a law school in Pennsylvania, and although his fat her could not support him at the U., he worked hard. He had earned enough money to pay his way th r u school for one year . The next summer vacation he worked as collector f or a large Chicago house. At the end of the course he was a capable lawyer and was placed beh ind a bench in Chicago. He worked many years with great success. Jack took a correspondence course in telegraphy and soon became operat or in a small station house in central Iowa. Although his wages were not very high, he made good, always impr oved and at last t here wa s a grea t demand at several places for his services.

George was to be sent to Germany as soon as he wanted to go. But George did not study much because his father sent him enough money to have a private car and, because he was not used to work when he was young, he never worked now. When he had finished his course he came to Chicago to pract ice. His business grew and flourished. But as last he grew to be negligent to such a degree that he once gave a patient a deadly poison in place of a cathartic. He was arraigned before court, brought to trial, and several witnesses heard. Then the jur y was suspended. The father of t he doctor got busy and bought out all of the lawyers, which cost him one hundred thousand dollars. Then the man was "broke." But what did he care? The boy was free. That poor specimen of humanity, which had no backbone, character or mind, was released. But he could not stay at home very long to enjoy any pleasures. His father had to move from one house to anot her, sell one thing after another, and at last landed in the county poor house. All this, no doubt, was the fault of the fat her. The boy was trained along the lines of least resistance. His path was made smooth and easy for him, when he was young, so that there was no .effort on his part, and, where no effort is involved, ther e is no true headway. It is unfortunate for any . boy not to have a struggle during the for mation period of life, and a boy with a resolution to make


THE D. M. L . C. ME SSE N GER

15

Is that not our own egoism, who call for it? And is it not the temper which gives a lot of trouble? We say, "Yes." On the other hand: what is Altruism? It is "brotherly kindness," which everybody should have and practice. We want others to show their kindness to us. We should also show our kindness to others. But it is often neglected. We feel as though they are not worthy of it. There again it appears that we are under the influence of EGOISM AND ALTRUISM. "Egoism." We should show Egoism and Altruism are two brotherly kindness. .For this a opposed characteristics. Where student, as well as anybody else, one is the other one cannot be. has an opportunity. At school You cannot serve two masters you are with your schoolmates and classmates and many other at the same time. Did you ever stop to think friends. You should always be which of these two characteris- friendly to the persons, give tics you possess ? Are you an him information if you can. And "Egoist" or an "Altruist?" if he perhaps is unacquainted Everybody can form his own with the different customs, tell him what is good for him. He answer. Why is it that we require a will accept your kjnd help, just government wherever we go; in 路 as you would his. school as well as out of school? G. M., '15.

his way is far better off than the boy who has. the money to buy it. Just mark it down, oh, rich and loving parent, that your boy, raised in ease and comfort and with every advantage ready at hand, provided by your bounty, will not amount to a hill of beans out in the world, where heroism is in demand and true worth is the test of manhood. M. L. D., '14.

EXCHANGES As this issue goes to press no September or autumn numbers of our exchanges have as yet arrived. So a review cannot be

written; but we hope that all of last year's exchanges will regularly arrive here. ' Exchange Editor.


16

THE D. M.L. C. MESSENGER

COLLEGE NOTES The members elected for the reading-room committee are as follows: L. Luedtke-president. E. Janke-vice president. A. Falde-treasurer. P. Naumann-secretary. Ou September 7th, Prof. Mosel was presented a handsome meerschaum pipe by the student body, the occasion being the fifty-fourth anniversary of his birthday. Our brass band, which Prof. Mosel has organized last spring, was reorganized by him this

fall with the following new members: Paul Naumann, Louis W. Meyer, Henry Luehring, Henry Sprengler, William Boettcher and Leonard Sauer. One of our pipe organs, which was in bad condition, has been repaired by the skillful hand of Prof. Reuter assisted by several students of the upper class. The military company of the D. M. L. C. is again "called to life" under the able leadership of Prof. Mosel. Every Tuesday and Friday the company is formed into ranks for drilling.

ATHLETICS With a new school-year ahead of us, a new year of base ball has also commenced. Though the regular base ball season is nearly closed, we hope to play a few games. The boys, with ardent practfce, hope to have another team this year. Four of our players graduated last year, which circumstance is a heavy loss for us. Nevertheless, we have filled the vacancy with new material. In a meeting held at the beginning of this schoolyear, L. Luedtke was elected Captain, E. Janke, manager and E. Koenig, treasurer. Captain Luedtke will appear in the box for us and E. Janke back of the

bat. _The following will help them def end the honors of the "Maroon and White:" W. Tessmann, first base. 0. Grabow, second base. E. Pankow, third base. E. Koenig, shortstop. W. Muesing, center field. P. Westerkamp, left field. D. Verenkamp, right field. TENNIS. Where are the tennis sports? Don't let the courts lie idle and the weeds take the place of you. No, but get busy. A few hours' work would make the courts look pleasing to the eyes of all the boys.


THE D. M. L . C. MESSENGER

. 17

LOCALS

Following are the names of '8lieftritidJt•ec1Jca4'tfca1Jm. the new schol~rs _wh? have enjJrl. llt)bia !lliofa ®dJapefaf)m unb rolled at our mshtution :· m f "' m m1 · f '..r.t r. 'b b f.' "rf M" ;pro . ~- :.i•. <.i te etm"I , uet e ayter D. Albrecht, Fa1 ax, mn.. ~ ~ woijnijaft. rourbrn am ~ienstagabenb A. Arndt, Redwood Falls, Mmn. v . . W. Boettcher, Lismore, Minn . am 24 · ~um, um 8 Uijt tm ~~uf e uon A . Dierks, Fulda, Minn. ~errn unb \Jrau ~mn. maabe (i:?dJroager A. Falk, New. Ulm, Minn. unb ®d!tuefter bet 'Brant) t>urdJ ~aftor M. Garbrecht, New Ulm, M inn. 3 . fill6redJt efJel idJ betbunben. ,t;erm. W. Garmitz, Verdi, Minn. filufberijeibe unb jJtl. !Bertfia ~uemfe W. Ge~ger, Ann Arbor, Mich. fungierten alS '.trau3eugen. 91aclj bem E. Hinderer, Soutb Shore, S. D.v 1:'.rauaft fanb ein feietlid)er ~:npfang A. Kachel, New Ulm, Minn. ftatt, tuobei nur bie nudJften !ller1t1anbte A. Kiecker, Fairfax, M inn . . augegen roaren, unb eine .t>odJ3eit£l maijl W. Kohlhoff, Lakefield, ~mn. Y rourbe fetbiert. A. Kuester, New Ul~, Mmn. ~ie !Braut ift eine 1:od!ter ber jJrau T . Metz, Truman, Mmn. .,. ""'"' f "' m Ul ""- b P. Muske, New Ulm, Minn. .,,,. \;J"j.?tie. a.,m b~n :i•eltl m, roa.,re~ Emma Oppenheimer- Krandon ber !Brautigam fe1t 5 3aijren al5 filht: W is. ' ' dlieb bet tvafultut bes ~t. 9.Tlattin £\utf)er L. Sauer, Comistota, S. D. ~ollege baijier fungiert. ~ie 91euber: H. Schmidt, Fulda, Minn. muf)lten ttaten eine ausgebef)nte .t;odJ: H. Sitz,_ New York Mills., Minn.1 3eitsrehe an, bie fief) nad) !ffiatertoltln, E. StellJeS, N ew Ulm, Mmn. 9.Tltlltlaufee, 9.Tlabifon unbanberen ~unf: 0. Weissenborn, N ew Ulm , Minn. ten in !ffii5. erffredte. ~ie ~!tern bes W. W ielke, Lewis ville , Min n . f8riiutigams, .t)err unl> ijrau f8liefernidJt I. Abelmann left for his home rooijnen in !lliatertotun, !lliis. ~as gliid: at Elgin, Minn., Saturday, Sep- lid)e ~ijepaar . ift im filuguft nad) 91eltl tember 13th, to attend the wed- Ulm 3uriicfgefeijrt unb ijat fief) an ber ding of his brother. ~aiineft r a fle ~ausfid) niebergelaff en .

v

v<r.


.1 8

THE D. M. L . Q. MESSENGER

AL U M N I N O TES WEDDING BELLS. During our summer vacation the wedding of one of our former collegemates took place. The bridegroom, Carl H. Aufderheide, is a graduate of the class of '08, and the bride, Miss Clara T. Weddendorf, both of New Ulm. The wedding ceremony was performed by Rev. C. J. 路Albrecht of the Lut heran church of this place. The groom was attended by Herman Aufderheide, Gustave Aufderheide and Geo. Gieseke, .Jr., and the bride by Miss Hertha Huhn, Miss Hertha Aufderheide and Miss Esther Sannwald. After the ceremony a reception was held at the bride's home, where a sumptuous dinner was served. Among the outside guests were Wm. Wiethof, Miss Bertha Aufderheide, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Peterson of Minneapolis, and Gustave and Herbert Aufderheide of Wanda. The newly married couple is well known in this city. The groom is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Fr. Aufderheide and manager of his father's brick and tile yard.-New Ulm Volksblatt.

A wedding at St. Paul's Lutheran church occurred yesterday at high noon, when Miss Sophie Kogge and Mr. Frederick U. Schweppe, of St. James, were united in marriage by Rev. C. J. Albrecht, who had also confirmed both the young people and had known them most of their lives. The bride is the oldest d~ugh-

ter of Mrs. Ida B. Kogge of this city, and the groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Schweppe of St. James, and has always lived in or near St. James. He is well known here, having graduated from D. M. Luther college later acting as instructor for ~ year in the college, after completing his studies at Northwestern college at Watertown Wis. Miss Kogge has lived i~ New Ulm for the greater part of twelve years and since leaving school she has been employed for three years of the time as stenographer at the Eagle Roller Mill. The ceremony was the first performed in the church since it was re-decorated and the affair was a very pretty one. The bride entered alone preceded by her maid of honor, Miss Emma Schweppe, and the bridesmaids Miss Henrietta Kogge and Mis~ Alma Schweppe. The groom met her at the altar. Pr of . Burk of the college, played the wedding march . Carl Schweppe acted as best man for his cousin and Alfred and Edmund Reim served as ushers. Only the immediate relatives and a few close friends of the contracting parties were present. After the marriage a wedding breakfast was served at the Kogge home on North Washington Street. The bridal gown was of crene meteor trimmed with shadow lace and brocaded meteor. She wore a veil and carr ied a shower bouquet of valley lilies and bride roses. . Mr. and Mrs. Schweppe left rn the afternoon for a short


TREl_.. D_;:. M:il L : C. MESSENGER.

stay ·. at one of· the ' lakes and will go to Ringsted," Ia:, where Mr. Schweppe is employed during the summer as manager of a ditching outfit owned by his father. They expect to make

19.

their home in SL .James later.

Out of town -guests who were present at the wedding were1 Mrs. W. Me~er, Mrs. C. Ulhorn and Mrs. C. Schweppe of ·st. James; Mrs. W. Sonnabend ·of Good Thunder, ' and Mrs. L. Mueller of Arlington.-New Ulm Review.

jhill ~r (Reading in David Copperfield)! I lay in my basket, and my brother lay in her bed.

Fri1.zke, reading in class: (instead of pretty little widow) Pretty little window.

\l!rof:· !mas ~eiflt ,,2lmanbus" ? !ffieinborf: ®ie mufl gelielit tt>erben.

" What's the matter; got caught in a torn.ado?" "Naw, I tried to put on my coat without stopping the car. "

ile~m (in ber @emeinbe ®cf)ule) : !Bilbe einen '5at3 mit bem ®orte ,,Sfaffer" ®d)iiler: ~er $faff er tt>irb getrunfen.

1. ®tubent: !mas ift ein .ltaffet ? 2. ®tubent: ~in Staffer ift einer bet tiiel Sfaffer trinfen fann.

What is an engine boiler? "And why do they boil engines" she asked again? "To make the engine tender," replied the guide.

Teacher-Willie, did yourfather whip you for what you did in school yesterday. Willie-No ma'am, he said the licking would hurt him more than me. Teacher - What nonsense! Your father is too sympathetic. Willie-No ma'am, but he's got rheumatism in both arms.


20

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

A steam roller rolled on a stray canine, And flattened him east and west, He hadn't a chance to utter a whine, · But his pants, no doubt were pressed.

Doc smokes his pipe in peace, although it is no peace-pipe. Prof: Was war der Olymp? Shorty: Es war die Unterwelt der Gricchen.

~iner bet !!Berber ~riebticf} 2!3il~., II. bon !l3reusen, bes ?Sater ~tiebticf}'s bes "Did you ever play polo" ? @ro[len, ijatte einen fielien ljufi Iangen "No, but I fell off the top of a 3rllinber entbecft, ben er unter bie ,,Ian• clothes horse once with a ham- gen .lterle" einreiijen tt>ollte. ilas ,t;anb: mer in my hand while trying to gelb lieijagte bem 6oijn ~tins unb bas fix a gas jet. einaige ~ebenfen lilieli, baa er nicf}t beutf dJ fi>radJ unb aud} erfllirte er tt>ilroe Shopkeeper (to new boy): es nie Iernen. When you've finished sweeping ,,~s tt>irb f d)liefllicf} nicf}t bi el aus• the shop and put things straight, mad)en" triiftete i~n ber Offiaier. ~ei don't hang about wasting your ber n/idjften IDlufterung tt>irb ber Riinig time. You can be catching flies nur brei ~ragen an bid} fte!len : ,,!IBie and putting them in our new fly- lange im ilienft"? i:lann anttt>orteft bu : trap, so that it will be ready to ,,brei !IBodlen". ,,!IBie alt"? 3a tt>ie alt liift bu eigentlid) ? ,/ttt>intt) 6ellen ". put in the window . ,,2Ul tigijt. i:lann anttt>orteft bu alf o "I should like to get an en- 6ielienunba111an~ig ~aijre" . e>cliliealicf} gagement with my circus of fragt bid} ber Riinig: ,,l!obn unb !Ulon• tierung erbalten" ? unb bu anttuorteft : trained flea s ,'' remarked the ,,~eibe IDlaieftiit". !lJat liemeifterte bie vaudevillian. !IBorte nad) einiger !Ulilije, i:ler i:ag ber "You'll have to try it on the !Rellue fam unb ber Sfiinig bem ber lange dog first " , replied the booking Sferl ungemein gefiel, fragte : agent. ,,!IBie alt mein 6oijn?" ,, ~rei !IBodjen". Netzke, when the big bell was ,,!IBie lange im ilienft ?" ringing at 7 P. M.: Hey, you ,,6iebenunbatt>anaig 3aijre' ' . know what tha t bell is saying ? 11 ~ift bu ober liin id) llenilcft" ? " Buck, boy s; buck, boy s! " ,,~eibe fillajeftlit". Honest, cow bought a sa ck of ,,6d)meiflt ben Rerl in ' s ilod)", lie= Durham yesterday. faijl ber .Riinig. 2llier-!l3attl} lilieli ntd)t lange brin . ~ie 6ad}e tt>urbe bem Elsie-Say kids, I pa ssed a .!tiinig erfllirt, er lad)te, unb ber Iange peach of a g irl t oday . All she 3 rllinber, bet aud} ein ftrammer Red said w as "Hello". Th a t's a ll. Illar, lirad)te es f0 tt>eit &iS aum .ff'orporal.


HENRY SINKEL PHOTOGRAPHER

The Best Located Studio in Your Town Once Your Photographer, Always Your Photographer. COME AND SEE ME

PATRONIZE

Come in and let us play for you on the Hamilton Piano. Its tone is of the sweetest. Our terms are of the easiest.

"Messenger"

W.J. Winkelmann

ADVERTISERS

New Ulm, Minn.

THE BEST DRUG STORE Buy Your

Drugs, Medicines, Toilet Articles, Books, Stationery, and School Supplies. at

Olsen's Model Drug Stor'e Kodaks, Cameras and Photographic Supplies Fine Cigars and Tobaccos. Physician's Prescriptions carefully prepared from fresh and pure drugs by Registered Pharmacists.

0. M. OLSEN, Druggist. Olsen Block

Phone 79

New Ulm, Minn.


FOR THE BES'" LINE OF

路.

FOOT - ;:WEAR ..":1~;.

in the city go to

P. W. HACKBARTH THE SHOE MAN All kinds of repairing neatly executed.

225 N. Minn . St.

THEO. MUELLER Manufacturer of and D ealer in

Fine Cigars and Smoker's Articles Largest assortment of Pipes, Cigar Holders and Tobaccos, etc. west of the Twin Cities New Ulm, Minn.

Both Phones

Ruemke Bros. We Carry a Complete Line of Fancy and Staple Groceries, Dry Goods and Notions which we offer for sale at Lowest Prices If your

advertisemen~

were here IT Would Be Read! 1-------------I

EVERLING ELECTRIC CO. Electric Supplies of all Kinds S. Minn. St.

Phone 646

W eilandt & Stegeman CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS Correspondence Solicited Work done in any section of this Community. Plans and Spedfications Furnished Estimates Cheerfully Given Office 1100 Center St. Both Phones 57J.


Pioneer W. G. Alwin, Manager.

E.

, Prop.

A. Henle, Assistant.

E sell the HOUSTON T AIN PEN. The most perfect pen in the world. An indisprnsable a rticle for a student and bookkeeper. Non-leakable, self-filling, and one that you can't lose. Come and see us. We be pleased to show it to you.

W

""ill

PIONEER DRUG STORE

The Bee Hive Up-to-Date Dry Goods House Is offering some remarkable bar gains in

FALL AND WINTER GOODS E verything lo be had in a first-class dry goods atore, prices 11lway1 the lowest

J. A. 0 CHS, The Bee Hive T he o riginator of low p rices o n good uoods

NEW ULM GREENHOUSES CHRIST. BOOCK, Propr. 11,000 ft. of Glass

Growers of ROSES, CARN A TIO NS and Other Choice Cutflowers, as well as ornamental and bedding plants. We furnish first class, fresh stock, and all orders entrusted to us receive our most careful attention. BETTER SUITS, OVERCOATS and FURNISHINGS Ministers, Professors and Students

Special Discounts to F. P . ZSCHUNKE, T r eas .

Our four store purchasing power is your gain S to res at:

N ew Ulm , Minn .

Brookings, S . 0 .

Howard, S. O.

Harvey, N. O .


E herewith to solicit the College Trade. P come in and get acquainted. things in our line, of interest to yo , are musical instruments, violin strings, fountain pens, watches, jewelry, etc. When your watch or your glasses need looking after call on us. We will give you a fair deal at all times. c. G. REIM, TheLeadingJeweler

W

TAKE N O CHANCES USE

COMPASS or ANGELINA FLOUR to get the best results We have a new up to date mill and guarantee every sack

NEW ULM ROLLER MILL CO.

J.M. Meyer

EUGENE KOEHLER'S Barber Shop and Bath Rooms Respectfully 5olicitâ&#x20AC;˘ your patronage

20 N. Minn. St. LEADING JEWELER

New Ulm, Minn.

G. A. OTTOMEYER Headquarters for

New Ulm,

Minn.

LADIES' READY - TO - WEAR and FINE DRY GOODS

OUNG men ought to see the smart new models in suits we have ready for them; patch pockets are quite a feature, and there's a very snappy Norfolk vest that will "get you." Hart Schaffner & Marx made it; one of the best of the new fall styles. 'I See what we'll show you in suits at $20. We have other makes as low as $12 and up to $40.

Y

Emil Metzinger This store is the home of Hart Schaffner & Marx clotl;ies


Do you

all

Priceless beyond possessions is the eye sight, deserving ·o f your highest consideration. WE FIT YOUR EYES CORRECTLY '

H.- 0. SCHLEUDER Beussmann Block

·

Optometrist and Optician · New ,Ulm

~elephone

87

HE READ.ERS OF "THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER" willcon{er a gr;at' t~vor up~n the publi~~ers by carefully reading. the advertising columns of this magazine and by patronizing the merchant~ who so liberally and cheerfully responded to our solicitations. It is largely due td the assistance of our business men that we -are enabled to publish "The Messenger."

T

• GI

THE PUBLISHERS El of'

m

NOTHING is more soothing than a COOL SHAMPOO and MASSAGE

8

m

Furniture, Carpets, Rugs, and Wall Paper

8 your BARBER always your BARBER

13

m· .

· Win. E. ARNDT

'" Minn.

New Uhri, 8

GI

GI

e

m

GI

GI

m


:On 'C ollege Supplies

. .:

can save .you- n1oney on

you need in

Our stock inplrldes ~e'路.ery college site, and

by

bnyi\lg here )' QlJr ch.oice. is

:wide on 路 different item8.. We.a re,a!wa.ys on the looko11t for h:,;i,ve everything ne''" o.nd up-to-clat.e, a nd . ns <'m r

sto~k k eeps pace

wi t h 路the 路 ad va11c-'


For the finest line of

MEN'S CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS

Call on

Crone -~Bros. No store anywhere ~an show a more thoroughly representative line of Merchandise Telephone No. 7

Established 1875

New Ulm Brick & ,..file Y ds. New Ulm, Minn.

FR. AUFDERHEIDE, Propr. Common Brick-40,000 daily Curved Well Brick Pressed Bi:ick Fire Brick and Fire Clay

Cement Drain Tile-4 to 36 in. Cement Silo Blocks Cement Fence Posts Cement Brick and Blocks

EVERYTHING NEW

MEET

Am now open for business路 in the vVinkelmann Block, Cor. Minn. and Center Streets.

Your Friends

GASTLER, the Photographer

1

AT

Pfefferle's Reliable Drug Store

'


Established 1883

Telephone 128

fEakery,

See

r3ream. and <!onl'ectlanery

WHOLESALE and RETAIL

108 N. Minnesota St.

New Ulm, Minn.

EVERYTHING that he or you will wish to wear this season from Hat to Hose, from Suits to Overcoats. Anything in the line of dress we don't have our New York Buyer will get for you.

Hummel Brothers 14 No. Minnesota St.

New Ulm, Minn.

Weneeda Bakery and Restaurant Op posi t e Gr a nd H ot el

F. W. EIBNER, Propr. I have recently added material improvements to my establis hment, making it one of the most up-to-date in this section of the state, and am now in a position to give my many patrons the very best of service. We la) particular stress upon cleanliness a d quality. You are cordially invited to make my establishment your headquarters at any time when you are in New Ulm


When in need of

Furniture, Carpets, Rugs, Linoleum, Window Shades or Wall Paper Don't hesitate

to come to our store and get our prices before buying. Our aim is to please our customers and the prices are right.

Emil F. Buenger Undertaking attended to at all times

H.GOEDE

Andrew Saffert

PHOTOGRAPHER Dealer in

fRESH and SALT MEATS of all kinds

Both Phones No.144

NcwUlm,Minn.

High Grade and Latest Styles is our aim SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS

N e-w Ullll Publishing Co. PUBLISHERS and PRINTERS

"New Ulm Review"

"New Ulm Post"

Two Independent Weeklies

Artistic Printing at Moderate Prices German and

En~

ish Printing


HENRY SINKEL PHOTOGRAPHER .

The Best Located Studio in Your Town O nce Your Photographer, Always Your Photographer. COME AND S EE ME

PATRONIZE

Come in and let us play for you on the Hamilton Piano. Its tone is of the sweetest. Our terms are of the easiest.

"Messenger"

W.J. Winkelmann

ADVERTISERS

New Ulm, 路Minn.

THE BEST DRUG STORE Buy Your

Drugs, Medicines, T oilet Articles, Books, Stationery, and School Supplies. at

Olsen's Model Drug Store Kodaks, Cameras and Photographic Supplies Fine Cigars and Tobaccos. Physician's Prescriptions carefully prepared from fre sh and pure drugs by Registered Pharmacists.

0 . M. OLSEN, Druggist. Olseu Block

Phone 79

New Ulm, Minn.


THE D. M. L . C. MESSENGER

gen !tiinigs ®iegmunb unb beff en @e• maf)lin ®iegelinb, bes ~iinigs1>aares 3u ®anten im ~iinigreidl 91iebcrlanb. .l)ier ltlurbe ®iegfrieb bon einem ltleif en 2ll&, !Regino erao11en. ®iegfrieb tuud)s u einem friiftii:ien Silngling f)eran. ~einer feiner @enoffen ram if)m an ®d)iinf)eit, ,8ud)t unb ®itte gleid). Sa fel&ft an {Jo[) em 9Jlut un b ~a1>ferfeit il&ertraf er alle feine .ft'ameraben. JRand)e .l)elben• tat berrid)tete ber Silni:ilini:i in feiner SugenbAeit. Sn allett iliinbern ltJurben feine ~aten rud)&ar. !Jtegino, ®ieg• friebs ~qief1er, ga& bem .l)e!beniilngling ein !f,Herb unb augleidl ein fc.fiarfes ®d)ltlert, mit tueld)em ®iegfrieb einen · 2lm&ofl in ®tilcfe au f1>a!ten bermod)te. 2lud) ftad)e!te !Regino ®iegfrieb an, ben 91ibelungenid)~~ au erltJer&en. ~in mnbbrad)e &etuac.fite bieje-S @o!b. ®ieg: frieb tiitete bas Unge[)euer mit feinem ®d)tuerte. ~et .l)elb &abete fid) in bem ~fut bes £inbtuurme5. ~aburd) tuar fein £ei& bor Wunben gef d)il~t. ®iegfrieb [)iirte bon ~riemf)i!b, ber ~od)ter bes ~urgunbenfiinigs au Worms. ~s tuurbe i[)m eqiif)It, tuie fie burd) ®d)iin~eit, R'eufd)f)eit unb ®itte aUe ~rauen ber 1Janaen ~rbe ilberrai}te. ®o fallte ®iegfrieb ben ~ntf d)lufi gen Worms AU aief)en, um bie R'iinigstod)ter ~riemf)ilb au tuerben. ®eine <Wern tuaren entf e~t, al5 er if)nen fein !Bor• [)aben mitteilte. ®iegmunb filrd)tete, bafi feinem ®of)ne ein ileib im ilanbe ber ~urgunben gef d)e~en ltJilrbe; besf)alb riet ®iegmunb bem ®iegfrieb, nid)t ba: [)in au aief)en. 2lud) bie 9J?utter ®iege: linb tuar um if)ren ®of)n Mr &ef orgt. 2lber ®iegfrieb rilftete fief) eine @efo!ge bO:l 31tJii!f ~egen unb trai bie me if e nad) ber ®tabt Worms an. 91ad) fed)s ~agen gelangten bie .t)e!ben bon bem 91ieberr[)ein in bie .l)auptftabt ber ~ur• gunben. ®o!d)e anf ef)nlid)en !Reef en,

23

priid)tigen ~[eiber unb fcf}iinen !Roffe [)at• ten bie ~urgunben nodj nidjt gef ef)en . ~ie Waffen unb ben .t)arnif dj ber .t)elben &etrad)teten fie 11enau. ~er burgunbi• fdle R'iinig @untf)er ltJar ebenfalls bar• il&er bertuunbert, ba er bie ftattlid)en ~iimt>en faf). ~in !Ritter @untf)ers mit ITTamen .l)agen ga& bem R'iinige ~ef cl)eib, bali bi es ®iegfrieb, ber Sfiinigsf of)n bon 6anten fei, ber frilf)er einen ~radjen er: fd)lagen f)iille. @untf)er nafJm fief) if)m freunblid) an unb beltJirtete fie ·. auf5 &efte. 2lus allen fillettfiimpfen unb rft terlid)en ®pielen, bie am .t)ofe @un• tf)ers ftattfanben, i:iing ®iegfrieb immer alS ®ieger f)erbor. \Berei!S ein ganaes Saf)r ltJaren er unb feine 9Jlannen @iifte bes ~urgunbenfiinigs. Unterbeff en fanbten ber 6ad)fenfiinis iliibeger unb beff rn ~ruber 2ilbegaft, ber SfiinilJ ber ~iinen, einen ~oten au @untf)er, um if)m ben Shieg au erflilren. 2llS bief e 91ad)rid)t au ben :Of)ren ®ieg• friebs ge!angte, tuar er fofort &ereit, an bem .ft'ampfe teilaune[)men. R'iinig @untf)er ftellte ®iegfrieb an bie ®pi~e eines groflen .t)eere5. ~ie &urgunbifdien 9Jlannen ftritten tapfer unter 6iegfrieb5 ~iif)rung unb gin11en a[S @:iieger f)erbor. ~er ~iinenfiinig ltlurbe f d)tuer bertuun• bet. ~r fief)te um fein ile&en. 2ilbeger fiif)rte ben R'ampf fort, alS er bernaf)m, bafi fein ~rub er bon ben ~urgunben ge• fan11en genommen ltJar. ~er 15ad)fen• fiinigtuiltete ltlie ein i!iiltle. ,8u!e~t traf 2ilbeger mit bem .t)elben bon 91ieber• !anb aufammen im .ft'ampfe. ~er 6ad)jenfiinilJ a&er ftritt um fo me[)r, alS er ®iegfriebS ,6eCm unb 15d)ilb fa[)e. !Berge&lid) ltJaren feine ®treid)e. iliibe• !Jer mufite &alb unter!iegen. ®iegfrieb fef)rte nun mit ben R'iinigen famt if)ren 9Jlannen als @efangenen nadj Worms aurilcf. 2llS ber ®iegesaui:i an @unt[)ers ,(l of aurilcfgefef)rt tuar, ltJUrbe bem


24

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

<5iegfrieb unb feiuen Sfriegsleuten au ~f)ren ein ®iegeefeft gefeiert; bies bauerte atuii[f ~age Iang. Sfiinig @unHJer tuollte auf 9tat feiner jyreunbe ficfJ bermnljCen. · ~ie fillaCfilre ~runljtlb bon ~sianb tuollte er au feinem filleibe tuerfJer.. ~in 'Bur 11unber riet, bafl ®iegfrieb aHl @ef(if)rte nad) 3fenftein in 3sfonb mitgeljen follte, tueil er bie Sfiinigin bon 3sf anb ia fenne. ®iegfrieb to at f ogleicf) fJereit. %1r unter ber SSebingung, bafl @untljer iljm f eine ®cf)toefter S?riemljiCb aum filleifJe giifJe, gin!l er mit. ~ies berfprac4,. @untf)er aud). 91ad) einer jJaljrt llon atoiilf :l:a1:1en Ianbeten fie in 18runfj1IbS ilanb. ~ie .l'fiinigin llon 3sianb nafjm ®iegfrieb unb feine @en off en freunblicf) auf. Um !Brun!jilb fu feinem ®eilie ;u toerf>en, muflte ber SSurgunbenfiinig bie st am pf 1piele fJefteljen, bie bie .fi'o 11 igin beftimmte. 2Us @untfjer unb SSrunfjiCb fie!) 0um .~am)lfe borfJereitelen, f)olte ®iegfrieb bon feinem ®cf)iffe feine '.!arn~ fappe, bie ifjn unfid)tf>ar .mad)te. ~r toarf biefen ID?anteI um fid) uni> !rat nef>en @untf)er. ®o getuann ®iegfrieb ben Sfampf fiir @untf)er. ITTad)bem bas RampffpieI boriif>er tuar, trug ®iegfrieb feine :l:arnfappe auriicf ins ®d)iff unb berftecfte fie. !Brunljilb toar betrogen. ®ie bad)te, @untljer fjiitte fie im Sfampf: f)liele Iiefiegt. ~alb barauf berliefl bie Sfiinigin mit @untf)er unll ®iegfrieb if)r lneid), um mit @untf1er ,Pocfneit in fillorms au feiern. @(etd) nad) ber 9tiicf> fef)r uon 3f enftein fanb bie iBeriofJung ®iegfriebS mit Sfriemf)i!b ftatt. ~ie ,f'lodiaeit @untfjers mit ~runljilb unb bie bes .®iegfriebs mit .fi'riemljilb tourbe nun gefeiert. 2Hs bie ,f'lod) 0eit boriif>er ttlar, fef)nte fid) bet .l)eib bon \JHeberianb nad) feiner ,t>eimat unb feinen ~Item. 2ll!3 bie iBorbereitunoen 3ur 9teif e netroffen

toaren, !rat ®ie!lfrieb mit feiner @attin Sfri emf)ilb bie ITTeif e nacf) bem ITTieber: Ianbe an. Wlit grofler jJreube tuurbe bas neue \l.laar bon ®ienfriebs ~[tern auf~enommen. ®iegfrieb tourbe nun Sfonig bes ITTieberlanbes unb ber 91ibe: lungen. 9lad) bem illerlauf bon 3eljn 3af)ren tuurbe .fi'riemfji!b unb ®iegfrieb eht ®o gn geboren, ben fie @unt!ier f)ieflen. fillieberum toaren aef)n 3af)re bet: floffen. 91acf) ~run!jiibS 2lnfid)t foll!e ber Sfiinig bom 91ieberlanbe am iBafall an @untf)ers ,Pofe bienen. ®ie gafJ ben 2!11Iafl 1 bafl @untf)er e'ine @efanbt: f cf)aft mit bem @rafen @ern an ber ®pii;e 3u '5iegfrieb nacf) ®anten fcf)icfte. ~ie 1 ~oten follten auf @untljers fDefeljl ®iegfrieb unb .!hiemf)ilb famt feinen ~i e nftmannen 3u cinem jJeftgelage ein: !aben. Wis bies bem .fi'iinige am 9'lie: berrljein . funb ge1oorben toar, tuar er f ogleicf) liereit, ber (gin Ia bung jJolgc 3u leiftrn. 2luf5 freunblid)fte tourben bie @iifte bon 9'libeluni:tenlanbe in fillorms bon @untf)er unb ~runlji!b empfangen. ®iegfriebS elff)unbert ~egen aus feinem lReicfJe naljmen teif an bcn ritterlid)en Sfom1>ff1>ielen. jJi\r bie jJeftmafJlAeiten forglen bie :5cfjenfen unb bie !Biicfer bes ~urgunbenfiinig5. ~a3u feljlte es aud) nid)t an Wlufif. ~en jJeftturnieren ber .t>elben ialien Sfriemljilb unb ~runljilb au. ~runf)ilb riiljmte iicfJ iljres f)elben• miitinen @atten, bem ®iegfrieb ljiitte tueicf)en miifien. Sfriem()ilb entbecfte ber ~urgunbenfiinigin ben IBetrug; fie 3eigle einen !Ring unb einen @iirtv( ben ®iegfrieb im Sfam).Jfe mit ~runf)ilb oe: toonnen f)abe. ~a entbrannle ein ljef: tiger ®Ire it ato if d)en beiben Sfiiniginnen. ®iegfrieb riet, baj3 bem Banf etn ~nbe gemad)t ttlerbe. ~runljitb trug afJer !Racfje in ifjrem ,Peraen. filleinenb teilte bie ~iinigin


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER bem ~agen mit, tuas fiir cine 15djanbe ibr angetan tuorben fei. ,tlagen gab iBrunfjilb bas !Berfpredjen, 15iegfrirb tuegen biefe5 15djimpfes au ermorben unb befriiftigte bief es @eliibnis mit einem 15djtuur. ~ie iBriiber ~riemf)ilbs famt bem grimmigen .\')agen &ef djloff en, bafi man 15iegfrieb erfdjlagen folle. .t>agen gab ben !Rat, @untfjer f ollte iBoten fortf djicfen; bie f oUten nad)l)er 3u bem ~iinige 3uriicffef)ren unb if)m fa gen, bafi fie non bem 15ad)fenfiinige i\iibeger unb bem ~iinenfiinige i\iibegaft nadJ ®orms gefanbt tuiiren, ben iBurgunben ben ~rieg 3u erfliiren. ~onig 15ieg• frieb tuiirbe getuifi mit feinen !JJlannen ben .lfriegern ben !Burgunben f)e[fen . 2luf bem ®ege nadj bem ~amµ f plaue fiinnte man 15iegfrieb bann erf djlagen . ~ i e .!tunbe, bafi ein .!l'rieg @untf)ers i\anb bebrof)e, fam au ben Of)ren 15ieg• frieb s. 15ogleidj 3og er mit feinem ,t;eer nadj iBurgunbenlanb. ~er arg= liftige .t)agen ging au .Rriemf)ilb unb er: funbigte fidj be i ifjr, tuie er am beften 15ie(lfrieb llot ben feittblidjen ®affett fdjiiuen fiinnte. .!hiemfJilb nfjnte nidjtS non bem, tuas ,t;agen llorfjatte. Sie er• 3iil)Ite il)m, bafl nur 3tuifdJen ben 15d)ultern ifjres @atten eitte bertuunbbare e.telle fei. .!triemfjilb gelobt e ,tlagen, bafi fie ein .!treu3 auf ben .R riegsrocf ifjre s @emaf)IS niifjen lt>ollte, fo bafi ,tlagen ben !l!lab fefjen fiinnte, ben er bor einen feinblidlen @er fdjiiben follte. 2luf bem ®ege nadj bem Ed)ladjtfelbe 3og ber Untreue neben eiegfrieb unb fafje bas ,8eidjen, bas .\Membilb auf ben !Rocf ge: niifjt fjatte . 91un tuar ber .!l'rieg ilber= flilffig. iBalb barauf famen bie an• geblidjen @ef anbte bott ben Jtonigen ber ead}f en unb ~iinen mit bem 2luftrag, bafi ber .!trieg nidjt ftattfinben tuerbe, roeil es ben .ffiinigen leib geroorben f ei. !Jladj bent !Riicf3uge nadj ber ,tlauptftabt

25

ber !Burgunben beranftaltete @untber eine 3agb in ben Obentualb. € iegfrieb tuar tuieberum bereit mit3u3iefjen. Ch naf)m 2lbfdjieb non .!trieml)ilb. Sie riet ifjm nidjt nadj bem Obentualb 3u reiten ; fie f)atte in ber 91adjt einen ~raum bon ~iegfrieb. ~ie glaubte, fjeimlidje ijeinbe tuilrben ifjren @atten grofiE!:l Ungliicf bereiten. '5iegfrieb bagegen licfi fidj nidjt iiberreben, fonbern ritt mit ben !Recfen in ben ®alb 3ur 3agb. Rein ®ilb Illar Eiegfrieb 3u fdjneII, nocij 3u ftarf . 2ll5 bas 2agen lloriiber tuar, batte 5iegfrieb bie reid)fte iBeute. ~r f)atte ein ®ilbf djtuein, einen iBiiffel, fiinf 2luerodjfen unb biele .t)irfdje. ~ie 3iiger tuurben 3um e'ammelplaue ge• rufen, um fidj mit epeife 3u erfrif djen. 2lf>er ber befte 1'.ranf, ber ®ein, fefjlte ifjnen. .t}agen befam bie €djulb, bafi er ben ®ein in ben Stieff art gefdjicft f)iitte . ~a tuurbe ber !Rat gegeben, nadj einem fleinen iBrunnen au gefjen unb bort fidj mit ®affer 3u erquicfen. W'lan follte 3ur ®ette Iaufen, tuer an Stiirfe unb <5djnelligfeit aUe an~eren ,t;elben iiber• treffen tuiirbe. feiegfrieb Illar bamit einllerftanben. ~r bebielt fogar feine ®affenriiftung an, tuiifjrenb bie anberen 3agbgenoff en iljre meiber ablegten . eiegfrieb iibertraf aUe 3iiger an Sdjnel: li11feit. 2ll5 er ben iBrunnen erreid)t fjatte, ftillte er feinen ~urft nidjt gleid), fonbem Iiefi @untfjer 3uerft trinfen. eeine ®aff en ftellte eiegfrieb fjinter einen !Baum. ~amadj Iabte <6iegfrieb fidj mit einem 1'.runf llon ber fiif)len O.uelle. ,tlagen berftecfte inbeff en 6ieg: friebt\ ®aff en , naf)m ben ®urffpiefi eiegfriebS in feine ,t;anb unb bmdJ• bof)rte ben ,tlelbett an ber llertuunbbaren Stelle. iBlut fprang aus ber ®unbe bis auf ,t;agens ,t;emb. ,tlagen liefl ben <6peer im lRiicfen 16iegfriebs unb flof). W'lit tuilbem <6cl)recfen fprang ber


26

THE D. M. L, C. MESSENGER

:tobtnunbe \lon bem !Brunnen auf unD f ud)te nad) feinen @a ff en, bie er nelien einen !Baum gefte!It 6atte; ba t5iegfrieb fie nid)t fanb, raffte er feinen ~ dJilb auf unb lief auf ,t)agen 3u. i:liefer fonnte bem berttJunbeten ,t)elben nicl)t entrin: nen. 16iegfrieb fd)lug fo 9efti!l auf brn IDleud)elmiirber ein, bafJ bic eblen eteine au5 feinem <5dJilbe fidJ Iiiften. mon ll5iegfrieb5 gettJaltiger fillud)t fiel ,t)agen au !Boben. mlier &alb ttJidJen ~ ieg: friebs .ftriifte. i:las ilauli unb bie ff riiu: ter, in bie er nieberfanf, tnurben mil ~llut aus f einer tiefen fillunbe rot 11e:.. fiirlit. @unt9cr unb l!lafallen &eflagten bie ungliicff elige :tat. eiegfrieb ftraftc ben .Riinio, bafl er fellier bief en IDleucl)el: morb aubor erf onnen 6iitte. ,Pa gen ba: gegen freute fidJ, bafl alle i6re 2lngft unb <5oroe ein ~nbe genommen 9iitte, unb bafl nur nod) tnenige AU finben tuiiren, bie bie !Burgunben9errf dlilft an: fed)ten fiinnten. i:larauf liat ber :tobes: ltlunbe boll ~ammers @unt6er, bafl er .Rriem9ilb :treue unb @iite erltleif en unb

ficf,J feiner !ijrau au aII en .8eiten an: ne6men fo!Itc. ~arauf ftarb er. 2115 SieAfrieb berf cl)ie~en ttJar, Iegten bie ile9usleute @uut9ers ben :toten auf eine !lla9re. i:lie ileicf)e tnurbe bor .ffriem9il'Ds ,8immer ge[egt. 2lm IDlorgen fiinbigte ein i:liener .lfriem6ilbs an, bafl ein ileicf)nam bor ber .!femnate fief) be: finbe. i)a bacf)te .ffriem9ilb an ,t)agens !ijraQe. i:lie .!fiinigin fanf aur ~rbe nieber. i:lann liefl .Rriem9ilb fidJ au i6rem erf dJiagenen @atten filqren, unb alS fie i6n fa9e, rief: ,,0 ttJe6 mir biefes ileibesl ~un ift bir bocfj bein ~dJilb IDlit ScfjttJertern nidJt 3er6auen.l i:lu fielft burcfj IDleud)elmorb I fillilflt' icfj, Iller tien boUl>rad)te, ~d) fiiun auf :tob i9m immerfort!" fill as fie gelo&t 6atte,,foIIte auf grauen: 9路afte filleif e am ,Pofe ~taels boll3ogen tnerben. i:lort fanllen a!Ie !llurgunben ein fd}recflid}es ~nbe tlon .Rriem6ilbs .tianb . ~. fill. e. '15.


TBE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

27

拢bitorta1 &tatf Leo Luedtke, George Meyer, Business Manager M. Dommer, . Exchange Editor C. Hinz, Local Editor E. Koenig, Athletic Editor

Editor-In-chief E. Trettin, Asst. Business Manager C. Koch, College Notes Editor J. Wirth, Alumni Editor A. Falde, Per Jocum Editor

HE "D. M. L. C. MESSENGER" Is published quarterly during the 1chool year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. The subscription price ls fifty cents per annum. Single copies fifteen cents. Stam pa not accepted. We request payment In advance. 'IT The "M,essenger" la continued after 路tlme of subscription baa expired, unless we are notified to discontinue and all arreages are pald. 'IT All business communication should be addreued to the Buslne&1 Manager ; all literary contributions to the Editor-In-chief. Ad路 vertlalng rates will be furnished on request. 'IT Contributions to our Literary Department are requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friend&.

T

Entered as second class matter at the Poatoffice of New Ulin, Minnesota.

EDITORIAL With the approach of Christmastide, and all its holy memories, new feelings of hope begin to dwell in every heart. Especially students are glad when Christmas nears, for they may go home and rest up from their work in school. When

December draws nearer, there is a yearning for that day which marks the beginning of Christmas vacation. A few days before the longed-for period, you can hear the students telling each other where they'll be and what they will be doing in a


28

THE D. M.L.C. MESSENGER

number of days. The last few days before vacation pass exceedingly slowly. One seems to pass more slowly than the other. Hurrah! At last the wished-for day has dawned. Now there is a running an,d a looking for different articles that each one wants to take along. The air is filled witlr Christmas and New Year's greetings as the students depart for their respect ive homes. While they are at home enjoying the vacation, some areâ&#x20AC;˘ r eading good literature, while others are getting all the fresh air they can by going hunting, skating, sleigh-riding, etc. Now the t ime passes altogether too quickly. On Christmas eve. dear old Santa Claus also remembers us wit h a few gifts . But soon the time will be at hand again when we must resume our school duties. VI e ar e not so eager to return as we were to leave, but all the same we are glad to work again, for we have had our recreation and are ready for hard mental work. On return to school the suit cases are considerably heavier, the reason being, that they are now partly filled with jams, cakes and Christmas candies. This being our last copy of the "Messenger" before Christmas, we take the oppor tunity to wish you all A Merry Christmas and A Happy New Year.

MAKE HAY WHILE THE SUN SHINES. This is a proverb which you probably have heard and used many times. But did you ever

st op to think what really is the fundamental thought of this saying? You often hear a person say, "O, I wish I could recalj my school days. There is so much which I could have done better ." But it is not too late for him to make up for what he neglected during his days of study. Vl e can never study too much of good literature. Times may come when we can make good use of that which we now think of minor importance. The world has no use of superficial men. It wants well educated men, men on whom it can depend. As a model of an energetic worker we have Abraham Lincoln. How eager wasn't he to supply himself with good literature. Indeed, in th~ course of his life, he gathered the fruits of his labor. This is also important for us. We are now in the prime of our life, when we fi nd it very easy to learn. Let us not satisfy ourselves in thinking that we have a sufficient space of time for our study ahead of us. No, but let us improve tlie occasion while we are young. -C. K. THE PHILIPPINE INDEPEN â&#x20AC;˘ DENCE QUESTION. In the appointment of Francis Burton Harrison as Governor General of the Philippine Islands, and in the introduction into Congr ess of the Jones bill, which provides for Philippine independence after the expiration of eight years, the question of our Philippine policy


THE D. M L. C. MESSENGER

again comes conscipuously to the front. The Jones bill has al~ ready passed the House of Representatives; and altho the president has not as yet expressed himself in regard to it, its supporters claim that it is the approved Democratic policy. As a result of all this agitation, the question arises: Are the Filipinos ready for self-government? In order to answer this question it is necessary for us to study the people and existing conditions in our dependencies more closely. The people can be roughly divided into three classes: foreigners, Spaniards and Spanish descendants, and natives. The foreigners are the principal tradespeople, .in fact, they control almost all of the commercial activities upon the Islands. The majority of these are Chinese and Japanese, who are not fit fo:i; self-government. The Spaniards from the so-called Christian class and are, indeed, fit for self-gov,ernment, but they form only about three per cent of the total population. The natives are by far the largest class, comprising about ninety per cent of the inhabitants. Through the schools established by the United States government these people have become somewhat civilized, not enough, however, to take up self-government. Among this class are several tribes such as the Sulus and Nigroites, whom it has been impossible as yet to reach with civilization. These people are practically in a savage or at least semi-barbaric state, and could and would be nothing but enemies to any

29

government, and if this be a weak government, such as the self-government of the Philippines is bound io be, they will soon work a great evil upon it. The reader can see that, if not at first, at least eventually, the power will fall into the hands of the Spanish class, which would change the independence of the Islands into an oligarchy. This would practically take us back to the time of 1898. Under such influences â&#x20AC;˘the process of civilization would be retarded if not completely halted when in full glow, and would make the work of our government in civilizing these people of little lasting value. The Spaniards have not shown themselves as a very progressive people and there is little hope that they would do so in this case. It is in the younger generation that hope of self-government lies. This generation is growing up in American schools under American influences. If the great influence of American civilization were to be withdrawn now, probably most of the good accomplished so far, would be overthrown. Even the educated and better class of Filipinos themselves believe that independence within the next twenty-five years would be a . mistake. One prominent Filipino writes in "World's Work" as follows : "Foreigners have done everything to develop art and literature here and to give us a standard of ideals, and they must continue to do so, for some time at least, if we are to continue to make progress in civilization." -H. A. S., '16.


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TBE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

TO PRESERVE IS TO, WIN.

If a task is once begun, never leave it until it is路 done. This proverb is, probably ,universally known. It was known by the people of ancient times and it deserves to be heeded by those of the present time. It should be one worthy of praise. But there are many other proverbs that deserve praise, among which let me choose this: To persevere is to win. Perseverance is a quality that, we all need, if we wish to make a success in any undertaking. Success is one thing which we all wish to obtain. If we want to be successful, we must be diligent and persevering. We must face and overcome all obstacles which obstruct our way to the goal we have set. Perserverance is the one quality which, in most cases, will bring success. If we are defeated in one way, we must seek to make the obstacles stepping stones to final victory. That is what the Union generals did in the Civil war. The many defeats that the Union army suffered in the beginning of the war were but stepping stones to final success. Abraham Lincoln, the president, who guided the ship of state safely through the f~:mr years of terrible strife owed his SUf!Cess, mainly, to perseverance. Although he was the son of a poor pioneer, still he rose to be one of the greatest and most successful men this country has ever known. Perseverance is the quality that brought him success. While still a very

young boy, he would sit up late to master problems in arithmetic, or study reading. He would walk many miles after a hard day's work to borrow a book, that he might have something to read. He did not give up but worked very hard all the time. Soon he became a lawyer in a small town in Illinois. Before the outbreak of the Civil war he debated very much on the slavery question. He defeated his opponent, Douglas, at every turn. Through perseverance he attained success as a speaker, and later as president. We should not be satisfied with our standing in our present vocation, we should strive to become more successful. The humble workman who does his work well, and who ever tries to do better, is a persevering and successful man. He can work cheerfully from morning till night, because he knows he is doing his duty. Many of us do not have success in life, because we become too easily discouraged and give up too soon. When our work does not go on as it should, then is the time we should go on with it with renewed energy, and we shall win. This cannot be done unless we persevere. Perseverance is the quality that will take us over the rough and rocky way to success. The one who perseveres, always looks on the bright side of life. He is not forever brooding over his troubles. Whenever he has a task to perform, he goes at it with a will, and does it cheerfully. He does not turn back at the first unpleas.:.


THE D . M. L . C. MESSENGER

ant thing in his work. He overlooks all unpleasant things, thereby making his work a pleasu~ instead of a drudgery. In uur calling we should always work with a will, never shirking a duty, even if it is difficult or unpleasant. We cannot be persevering, neither can we win, if we shirk our duty. Look into the biographies of any great and succesful men, and you will find that they have done their duty at all times. Those that never do their duty cannot expect to win. They do not persevere, and, therefore, they cannot hope for success. Those that slight their duties are ·always in trouble, while on the other hand, those that persevere are, usually, successful. Let us all persevere, and we can and shall win. Only through hard work and perseverance can we reach the top of the ladder of success. Therefore always remember that "To persevere is to win." · -W. G., '16.

<fbtlidt wiUrrt Am lAnorteu. Ueber bi•fes ~lJemn ift f cf)on lliel ge• fd)ri eben tol'rben. !!Ilie toir aher lu iff en, muil bie !!Ileit ofter an einen 2c~rinti er• innert am iilier einen belelirt tuerben. ile!Jfialb foil biefer <Sati an einem !Bei• fpiel flar gcnrncbt ltl.(rben. ,Sn ber \Sd)ule an '5tral3e !B. fan in ber le5ten !Banf ein toolilbegabtes 9Jliibd)en uon ettoa Atuiilf 3nf)ren. .\)cute nrnr fie befonberti aufmerffnm. 3n bem !Bud)e ber 2ef)rerin ftanb fd)on eine .fiunbert in maturfunbe, in ber @eogra• )lf)ie .ftlnff e Illar bie Sfleine bie .fioc!Jfte. mm nm mbenb bie mbf cf)ii8ungen ber lleri d)iebenen <Sd)iiler an bie Xafel ge•

3l

fcf)riebcn tourben unb unfere f!eine ~Un, tuie tuir fie llon je§t ab nennen toerben , in nllen \Jiidiern oben an ftanb, freutc fie fief) aufs iiuflerfte, bcnn ber mater f)atte t>erf)lrocf)en, er toiirbe ein fleines <Stiid• cf)en @el bes in if) re ®1>ar&iid)f e leg en unb bie \TR utter f)atte uerf procf)en fie · toiirbe ber ~([a erlau&en ilire \Jreunbin• nen aum @eburtstage einau!aben, toenn fie obenan ftiinbe . ~!la ging nun friif)Iicf)en IDluts nacf) ~aufe. ilen toeiten !!Ileg muate fie allein Allriicf!egen. fil!S fie am 91acf)• n~ ittag biefes fieiaen 3unitages if)ren ®eg burcf) einen lj3arf fcf)lenberte, fali fie auf bent @rafe etmas !!Ileiges liegen. <Sie naf)m bai3 q3afet auf, nafim ben erften Umf rfllaR ab, ofinete bie ®cfladjtd unb iaf) eine fleine goli'tene Uf)r in ber• felben. !Boller ijreube eilte fie ins ~lternliaus, um ber IDlutter biefes @e• fcl)enf 3u ilberreidjen. ilie fleine fagte: ,,~s ift fieute ein toaf)rer @liicfstag. · 3n @eograpfiie, liat bie 2efirerin gef agt, to ii re idj bcf onbers gut getoefen. Unb in ben anbern ijiicf)ern f)abe icf) bie f)iicf)fte mummer gefriegt." <Sie er3iifilte nun, toie fie bie <Sdiadjtel gefunbeit liabe, unb loas fie bamit tun IUolle. i)ie lJlutter aber riet, man folle bie 2!n3eigen in ben ,8dtungen lefen, ob fief) bort nid)t ber recf)te ~iRentiimer finben laffe. m!S ber mater fam, befam &Ua ba~ berfprod)ene @elbftiicfd)en, bie ID!utter beftiitigte ibr merh>redlen. mrn um fiinf Ubr ber lj3oftbote fam, falien bie 2eute, baa in ber .8eitung brei mnaeigen ange• geben toaren. 2!Ue brei 5eigten an, baf! iemanb eine fleine golbcne llbr in einer <Sd)ad)tel llerloren fiatte. ~5 toar ben ~ltern eine groae ~rbeit, bie Xod)ter au betoegen, ben rid)tigen ~igentiimer ber Uf)r aufaud)en. ~lla fa~ 3ule§t if) re '.torf)eit ein unb ei: 1 ~ nun, bie ~erf on au finben, ber fie


32

TRE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

bie CSd)ad)td 3uriicl3uerftatten ljatte. 3ulebt Illar ber rid)tige !Plab gefunben. ~r Illar ber Cebte uon ben breien. !Bon fiinf Uljr bis ad)t Ugr Illar ~lla in einem fort gelaufen. ~rmiibet fam fie nad) .t>auf e auriicl. ~ie ~Item unb bie CSdjtuefter, IDlarie, ijatten fd)on lan1Jft auf fie gelVartet. IDlarie war in einem @ef d)iiftaljaufe in ber CStabt, '5teno1Jrap!jin. 2llS biefe ljorte, lt>es!jalb ~((a fo IanlJe ausgeblieben !Var, eqii!jlte fie bon einem ~rei1Jnis, bas fief) int @ef d)iiftSlofale au• getragen gatte, folgenbes : ,,!lliie i!j"r lt>if;t, gat ~etr ~afer mir bor einer ®od)e ben CSd)lilff el ber stafie antler: traut. 3ogn ®ilfins, ein CStenograp!j, ijatte fcf)on Cange nad) ber !lliiirbe ge• trad)tet, ben Sd)lilff el ber Sfaff e fiiljren au biirfen. ~a idj nun ben ®d)liiif el !jatte, aeigte er fief) mir ge11eniiber biel freunblid)er alS ionft. Oft ftanb er an meinem ~if dj unb p(auberte. !Bor einigen ~agen aber fdJien er mir ben• nod) fe!jr fonberbar unb finfter. ,t>eute morgen toollte .!)err \Ba fer nadj ~l1icago gegen. ~r iiberliefl mir bas @ef dJiift. ~r berfe!jlte ab er feinen ,Bug unb fam besfjalb nadj bem Sfontor JUriicf ebe id) t>on bem IDlittagefi en ~nriilf11efeljrt Illar. ~15 er bie ~aff e offnen toollte fa!j er, bafl bas ®d)lilff ellod) mit !lliad)s be• fd)miert ttJat. ~r ofinete bie erfte ~iir, bie 3toeite ~iir unb falj bafl ettoa fiinf ijnnbert ~ollars !Uapiergelb berf d)toun: ben Illar. !Bier q30Ii3iften lt>urben iofort gerufen. 91iemanb auflcr ic{J lt>urbe ins @ebiiube !jinein unb 91iemanb au s bem @ebiiube !jerausgelaff en. 3d) muf;te meinen '5d)lilff el !jergeben unb a!S er unterfudjt tourbe, ftellte es fidJ !jeraus, bafl an meinem CSd!liiff el ®ad!s toar. 3dJ ttJurbe rofort tler!jaftet. ~a lie fl 3o6n !lliilfins uon fief) !joren. ~r !jolte einen CSd)lilffeI ljerbor, ber fo ausfalj

lt>ie meiner. ~r fagte: ,,3d) !jaf>e i!jn ljier auf bem ~uflboben gefunben. ~as fann aud) .l)einrid) ilodjt be3eugen." 2115 aber ben 5Beiben ein3eln nad) ben 91ebenfad)en gefragt tourbe, ftimmten fie nid)t iiberein unb fie tourben berljaftet, idj aber los1Jelaff en. ®piiterfjin IVurben in 3o[)n's .Simmer eine '5d)lilffelfiige unb eine '5d)lilff dfeile aufgefunben. 2lud) fanb man in feinem .Simmer eine fle ine [J(ebiAinidindjtel mit !lliad)s, lt>eC: d)es eine !Bertiefung bon einem ®dJlilff d trug . ~eim 2lpot[)efer lt>urbe nad)ge: fragt fiir lt>en bas 9te3ept, bas bie !Rummer ber ®cbad)tel trug, beftimmt Illar. ~5 ftellte ficb ljeraus, bafl es fiir 3. !lliilfins lt>ar. 3ofin tourbe berur: teilt unb aule~t ins @efiingnis abge: fiif)rt. ,t>err ~nfer fagte: ,,Sd)abe, fcf,ubel ~r toar immer ein treuer filr: beiter unb fa!j fo efJrlicb aus. .\)iitte er mir gleidi bie !lliafjr[)eit gefagt, [)iitte idJ i[)m nod) eine @ele11en!jeit gegeben, aber einen iliigner fann id) in meinem @e: ldJ liit nid)t braudien." filadJbem nun bie ~Item unb bas SdJn>eftmf)en bief es all es gefjiirt !jatten, flirad) bie muttee: ,,!nun fie{Jft bu, <Hi n, e[)rlid) tnii~rt am liingften. ,Diitteft bu bie Ubr be[)alten o[)ne lllerfud)e ange ; ft ellt 31t [)ab en, fie auriicf au geftatten, f0 ljiitteft bu bid) eines 11roflen !Berge[)ens gegen @ott unb menfdj teil[)aftig ge: macbt. 2lucfJ ljiitteft bu nid)t mit fro!j• lid)em @eficbte unb mit offnem .l)eraen beine:i jJreunbinnen auf bie jyragen , bie fie getuifllid) iiber rte U~r geftellt !jaben to iirben , anttuort 11eben fiinnen. !llienn ber ~ igcntiim er fidJ unt>er!jofit gefunben !jab en IViirbe ('illcld) eine Sd)mad) !) ~at1eft bu fie i!jm bodJ auriicf geben miiif en. Um biefe ®d)mad) nicbt an beine jyreunbinnen fommen au lnff en, ~litteft bu fie tnieberum anliigen milff en. !llienn bein @etoiif en bann fpiiter~in auf:


.THE D. M. L. C. MESSE NGER

getnaifJt tniire, 6iitt e er bid) fo rlltJiifJrenb angeflagt. !lBenn bu bie U6r bann 6iit teft 3uriicf11eben tnollen unb bie ~ame um \Beqei~ung bitten, fo llliire es bann bielleid)t f dion au f~iit getnt fen

33

unb bu fJ iitteft bann bei ne 速cf)ulb Iii !!! in s (5lra6 trngen miiffen." ,, ~ a, e6r lidJ tnii6rt am lii1111ften," fagte ber mater 3um nbfcfi!uf) biefer Unterrebung. \!Jl. ~.ommer, '14.

EXCHANGES It is not our object to "knock" other papers, but it is our object to give our opinions of other papers and to render such criticisms as are useful to us and to others. May the few words in this column be taken in a friendly way. -M. L. D., '14. The October issue of the "Bethany Echo,'' of Mankato, Minn., is somewhat deficient in its German, the language as well as the construction. The composition, "How I came to Bethany College," could probably have better been headed: "My Trip to Bethany College." The author of the article: "When Peggy Left for College,'' has tried to depict vividly t he scenes to be witnessed at the departure of a young lady who is to leave for college. "And, wonderful to say, nothing seemed to have been forgotten." The editorials are such as may be found in many other college papers. "In the classroom" and "Exchanges" could have been carried out a little more compared with the space the other departments occupy. "News" would have been more interesting if they had been inter-woven with epigrams, proverbs, or a bit of or iginal wit. Your arr angement of departments is good, your cuts are appropriate,

and your cover design has been well chosen. The Crucible of Greeley, Colo. -The editorials in your November issue are good. "The continued recurrence of "O, I'm so tired! How can I live thru this t erm! "does more to tire us out than our study and social life, together,'' are very true words. "The Spenserian Stanza" and "Thanksgiving in Navajo Land" are instructive little contributions. "Hats" interest many r eads, male and female. "Under a Snowdrift" is a bold att ept at fiction. Your notes on current topics are important. The few hints as to the proper method of preparing a turkey for the Thankisgiving dinner are very interesting. "Crucible Sweets," enough said. The cuts give the paper a neat appearance. If "Mince Pie" stands for anything or particularly the mixture put into a mince pie crust, we think this heading appropriate; but if it does not stand for such mixture, we would r ecommend a better arrangement of the subjects treated in this department. If simplified spelling is used, it should be used exclusively or not at all, either one. On one page may be found "know,'' on another, "kno." This is only one exanip!e. When poets or writers of


34

THE D. M.L. C. MESSENGER

prose are quoted, we do not think it proper to quote such in 路 any other form than the original. The Black and Red, of Watertow, Wis.-Your cover design is very appropriate, your short stories make your paper interesting and your arrangement of departments could not be better. Your "Athletics" fills too much space if compared with the space occupied by "De Rebus Omnibus" and "Locals." "The chanbes in cover designs make your 路 paper doubly attractive. The Gates Index of Neleigh, Neb.-The editorials "One Hundred Percent Man" and "The College Man's Debt" carry their points. The short biographical sketches of Washington, Penn, and Franklin deserve to be read, since they give one a concise view of the whole life of these great colonial men. The exchange editor is somewhat laconic about her comments. The "List of Contents"' on the front cover could probably be supplemented by an appropriate cut or design. 路 The November number of the Alma Mater of St. Louis, contains much instructive matter. A few more pages could advantageously be used for short stories. The cut on the first page serves well to give a general idea of the size of that building at River Forest. An exchange department would greatly improve your paper. The Editorials of "Augsburg Echo of Minneapolis," breathe an air of freshness combined with the fullness in which the topics are treated. The other departments, with exception of

the exchange department, have been neglected. College Breezes, St. Peter, Minn.-Your November issue shows a marked improvement over the October issue. It has some very good contributions and instructive editorials. "Local Notes," "Academy," "School of Commerce," "Conservatory," "Some Wit," "Alumni Notes," "Exchanges," "Societies" and "Athletics" well balance each other. Your cover design is neat. Editorials have been woefully neglected in "The Lawrention," Appleton, Wis., while most of the valuable space is used for uninteresting school notes and foot ball news. The new exchange at our table is "The Laconian," of Laconia, N. H., published by the students of the Laconia high school. The November issue being Vol. 2, No. 3-a perfect paper cannot be expected. Improvements, although, may be . made bye and bye. A few of them we suggest here: A better arrangement of the ads; a few more short stories ; and a better arrangement of the departments. It seems as though debates are being nursed in your institution. That is very valuable practice work; it cannot be overestimated when we take into consideration that success in life lies mostly in strong arguments and the taking of a positive stand on a topic under discussion. "The value of the study of Modern Languages" is very well written and contains many strong points. Why not write a short editorial in French or German? -M. L. D., '14.


TH:E D. M. L C. MES"SENGER

35

C 0 L L E GE N 0 T E ,S Our double quartet has been we may look forward to a sucreorganize! by Prof. Reuter. A cessful year. promising field and season arc The choir numbers· about 46. open to it. The different voices are' divided The members of the band had as follows: first tenors, 7; sec-· a meeting on the 12th of Octo- ond tenors, 11; first b!i:Ss1 15.; ber. The practice hours were second bass, 13. The mixed choir may also distributed and the matter of look forward to a successful buying uniforms was talked year, although it has quite a over. few new comers; but after they On the 18th of October, the ar~ trained, Prof. Reuter may lOOth anniversary of the battle accomplish even more than in at Leipsic, where Napoleon was the foregoing years. The choir defeated by the. combined ar- numbers about 50. mies of the Austrians, Russians, Saturday evening, Oct. 29th, and Germans, was observed here the Literary society met. J. in the Aula. This celebration Wirth was elected vice-presiwas well attended. On this oc- dent. Then a short program casion our brass band played was carried out. The most im.. for the first time before the portant number in the program public. was a debate. The debate was: 7 to 9 p. m., Sept. 27; 1913, "Resolved, that 'Country Life,' brought into existence our Ger- ·is better than 'City Life.'" The man Literary Society, "Der members for the affirmative Deutsch.e Verein." M. Dommer side were: L. Luedtke, E. Koewas elected president. A pro- nig, and P. Naumann; those for gram committee has been chos- the negative were: A. Falde, G. en to have a program ready for Meyer, and C. Hinz. the celebration, (which took place in the Aula on Oct. 18), STUDENT ACTING AS VICAR that commemorated the All Nations' Battle, Leipsic, Oct. 18, Otto N etzke, a member of the ' 1813. Tutia class, left for Wood Lake on the 10th of October, where he will teach school for the rest OUR MALE CHOIR. of the year. He will then probably continue his · study at Since a number of good voic- Springfield, Ill. • es, especially from second bass, left us last year, the prospects for a good male choir looked THANKSGIVING DAY. rather dark this year. But as quite a number of voices from On this day a bounteous dinthe first bass and. second tenor were graduated to second bass, ner was served to the students


36

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

by the members of the local Lutheran congregation. We wish to give our hearty thanks to those who helped to contribute to this feast, and we kindly invite them to show their liberality towards the students again when the next Thanksgiving day returns. 2lm ~anff a11ungstag , IDonnerstag, ben 27. !Jlou. um 8 Ufjr abcnbs, rout be fjicr in bcr IDlufiffja!Ic cin Sf on3ert IJCllC• ben t>on ben IEfjiircn unb bcm :OrdJcftf;( unfcrer 2tnftalt. ~icf cs .fi' on 3crt roar gut bcf ud)t. i)as \f,lrogramm ift fol• gen bes: 1. Xeil. I. @ranb [)'lard) :Ord)eftra IE. 3 fenmann 2. :Out>ertiire 3u ,,~ie .\)ugenotten, /1 .ltlauier 3u 8 ,\>iinben @ . ID'lel)erbeer (mlefterfamp, .lfoefj[er, !Reblaff, .fi'iinig. ) 3. @emif dlter IEfjor : a) ~em in ber ~inftemis roanbeln • ben mom •. . . .. .. . . . .. 2l. IE @re!I. b) ~u ,t;irte 3 frael5 . ~ .. ~ortnian5f~ C) mlie fd)iin leud)t' un5 ber fillor< genftem . . . . . .... 3ofj. Sub. mad). 4. l!Bir marten in ~emut, 2lrie ( ~ e tl• laff, IE • .lfod) mit <Streid)ord)efter unb obligaten .fi'Iat>ier (mlefter• famp) . . ... ..... !R. !Bolfmann. 5. 2l!Imad)t, 4 ftimm. [)'liinnerd)or unb Sobran mit Rlat>ier (.!tiinig) ... . ... . . . . .. . •~r . <Sd)uberHlifll 2. Xe i I. 6. 3n ber

<Spinnftube, .fi'lat>ier 4 fjdnbig . . ... .. ... . ..... 2l ~t>oraf. (!Bader unb ~rl. 2eon. <Stepfjan.) 7. !Barcarola !Jlapolitana ,,Santa 2ucia, /1 bouble Duarte! .. . . .... . . . . ......... . .. fj_arm . b~ ml. !Ree!!.

8. <Sii§e fiir 31Dei .R'lauim 3u 4 fj iin• ben , op. 86 . .. . . . .. . . IEfj • .fi'ird)ner. (\l!uif. !Reuter, 1l3rof. 1Sliefmtid)t. ) 9. ID'liinnerd)or: , a) <Sdirocrtlieb .. . . .. . fill. t>. mleber b) :O!b ~(ad ~oe . ••. St. IE. jyofter c) mler fjat bidJ, bu f dJoner mlalb . . .. . . ... .. . . . jy. [)'lenbelsf ofjn-~ . 10. :OrdJef\ra : <Selections from ,, ~ auft" .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . :Ounolb unb ,,un artfl" . . .. . ...... .. jylotottJ

On Oct. 3rd occurred the thirty-first return of Prof. Bliefernicht's birthday. He remembered the student body by giving them an extra treat. Many happy returns of the day. On the 18th of October our smoking club was organized. E . Janke was elected president; E. Hinz, secretary ; L. Luedke, judge; M. Dommer, lawyer; A. Falde and A. Gerlach, policemen. A committee was also elected to work out a suitable constitution. ~ic .Seit ift enblid) fjeriiei gefommen, ba roir unfere neue \l3feifenorgel erttJar• ten fonncn . ~er st'ontraft rourbc ge • mad)t, baa bie Orgel fpiiteften!I bis 3um 1. ~ eb r. fj ier in ber ID'lu fiffja!Ie aufge• ftcllt fei n follt c.

3n bem .fi'on3ert, bas am 27. !Jlot>. gcgcben rourbe, Waren nod) 31Dei Eu• gaben. ,, )[)as 2ieb ofjne mlorte in e. [)'loll 11 • • ••• . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . 9Jlenbel£lf ofjn (iYrl. 2. <Stepfjan .) ,,~er jylatterer 11 • • • • •• .- • • • • IEfjaminabe (~. !Bader.)


THE D. M. L . C . MESSENGER

CATHECHE.S ES. Delivered to the upper class of the local Lutheran Parochial school, by members of "A" class. Oct. 22. M. Dommer, "The birth of Moses;" E. Backer, "The hen;" L.- Luedke, "The combining of vowels." Oct. 29. Miss Stephan, "The latter part of the life of Moses;" M. Dommer, "The rabbit;" E. D. Backer, "The sound of the letter 'K.' " 路 Nov. 5. L. Luedke, "The vocation of Moses;" M. Dommer, "The sound of the letter 'Z ;' " Miss Stephan, "The squirrel."

37

Nov. 12. E. Backer, "The plague of Egypt;" L. Luedke, "The school ;" Miss Stephan, "The sound of the letters 'Sch.' " Nov. 19. M. Dommer, "The emigration of the Israelites out of Egypt;" E. Backer, "The church." Nov. 26. M. Dommer, "The emigration of the Israelites out of Egypt" (continuation); Miss Stephan, "What occurs in the morning." Dec. 3. E. Backer, "The Israelites in the desert;" M. Dommer, "What occurs in the evening;" L. Luedke, "Arithmetic."

ALUMNI NOTES WEDDING BELLS. Albrecht-Boerneke. On the evening of June 19th, at 7 :30 o'clock, the wedding of :JVIiss Tabea Albrecht, daughter of the Rev. G. Albrecht, of Emmet, Minn., and Mr. Otto Boerneke, son of the late Rev. C. Boerneke, and instructor at the Ev. Lq_th. school at Fairfax, Minn., took place at the Ev. Lutheran church at Emmet, Minn. The bride was dressed in white silk, and she carried a bouquet of bridal roses. Her veil was entwined with lilies of the valley. The groom wore the conventional black. Miss Emma Albrecht, a sister pf the bride, was maid of

honor. Oscar Albrecht, of Hortonville, 路 Wis., acted as best man. The Misses Tabea Quehl, Hutchinson, Minn., Agnes Albrecht, Rogers, Minn., and Lydia Albrecht were bridesmaids. The Messrs. Carl F. Pape, 1viilwaukee,, Wis., Ernst Quehl, St. Louis, Mo., and Immanuel Albrecht were groomsmen; the Messrs. Ai-min Retzlaff, New Ulm, Minn., and H. Albrecht, Springfield, Ill., acted as ushers. The bride was given away in marriage by her father. The Rev. Theo. Albrecht, of Akaska, South Dakota, a brother of the bride, delivered the sermon, basing his words on the text of Holy Scripture, Psalm 37,5. After the ceremony a wedding dinner was served at the h c~ne of the bride's parents.

....


38

THE D. M.- L. C. MESSENGER

Numerous toasts, declamations, and dialogues were rendered for amusement. The 路 bride received many beautiful and serviceable presents, among which was a gift from the local congregation. Out of town guests were Mrs. C. Boerneke and daughter, Mrs. H. C. Mackdanz, of Hutchinson, Minn., the former being the mother of the groom; the Rev. and Mrs. H. Hupf er and daughter, Frida, of Olivia, Minn. ; the 路 Rev. Im. F. Albrecht, of Fairfax, Minn.; the Rev. M. Schuetze and family of Litchfield, Minn.; Mr. G. Weindorf and daughter, and Mrs Schmied of Stewart, Minn.; the Rev. Wm. C. Albrecht, of Sleepy Eye, Minn.; the Rev. and Mrs. Theo. Albrecht, of Akaska, So. Dak.; the Misses Tabea Quehl and Agnes Albrecht, of Hutchinson, Minn., and Rogers, Minn., respectively; the Messrs. Ernest Quehl, Hutchinson, Minn. ; Carl F. Pape, Milwaukee, Wis. 路; Occar Albrecht, Hortonville, Wis.: and Armin Retzlaff, New Ulm, Minnesota. A few days later Mr. and Mrs. Otto Boerneke left for an extensive wedding trip. They returned Sept. 15th to their nev.路 home at Fairfax, Minn.

NOTICE. What has become of the Alumni Association? We haven't heard of any of its proceedings since the appearance of the first issue of this paper. Why does not each Alumnus contribute material for the "Alumni" column? If each one would do his part, we would not need to publish the Messenger with so little Alumni news. Only very few have, up to now, obliged us by sending in items to the Messenger. We wish to thank these, and hope that the rest will follow their example. This would not only help make the "Alumni" column a brighter and more interesting one, but it would also encourage the editor in his work. Very truly yours, The Alumni Editor. Fred Meyer, parochial school teacher at Green Bay, Wis., wishes to announce his engagement to Miss Lydia Koepke, of New Ulm, Minn. G. Wachter, instructor at the Lutheran parochial school at Stevensville, Mich., announces his engagement to Miss Lydia Dahms of New Ulm, Minn.


THE D. M:. L . C. MESSENGER

3\f

ATHLETICS FOOTBALL. Football was the predominat-" ing sport this fall. Although we are not allowed to clash with any outside teams, the boys, nevertheless, showed great interest in this pastime. Quite a few interesting .games were played among ourselves. On Oct. 25, the team representing Minnesota opposed the team representing the other states. The game was called 2:15. In the first quarter Minnesota carried the oval across the line for a touchdown, in spite of the defensive playing of their opponents. In the second quarter the other states made a touchdown and held Minnesota scoreless throughout that quarter. After this the Minnesota players tightened up. They worked the forward pass successfully, which helped much in getting two touchdowns. During the fourth quarter neither side scored. The final score was 18-6 in favor of Minnesota. On Oct. 31st, two pick-up teams, representing the Gophers and the Badgers, played an exciting game. The sides were so ev~nly matched that neither side scored till the last quarter. In that quarter both sides scored two touchdowns, the Badgers getting their Ia.st touchdown

about three seconds before the whistle blew. The final score was 12-12. It was, indeed, the best game played this season. BASKET BALL. The basket ball season is always welcome to D. M. L. C. During the last month the hoys have been practicing very hard. A few practice games were played, which proved there is still good material to pick from, in spite of the fact that only one member of last year's team remained with us. Nevertheless, we hope to have a winning team this season. A meeting was held at the beginning of the season to discuss certain questions relating to basket ball. In this meeting E. Janke was elected captain; E. Koenig, manager; and L. Luedke, treasurer. The vacancies have been filled by new players, who have shown their skill in the practice games. The following will undoubtedly defend. the laurels for D. M. L. C. at present: P. Westerkamp ____ left forward E. Koenig _______ right forward E. Janke ___________ ____ center L. Luedke __________ left guard W. Tessmann _____ right guard P. Naumann ________ substitute


40

THE D. M L. C. MESSENGER

LO

Those of our institution who were present at the dedication of the St. Bethany Seminary at Mankato, were: W. Geiger, 0. Fritzke, A. Ziegler, A. Moskop, H. Sitz, and W. Meier. Professors Ackermann, Blief ernicht, and Meyer attended the conference at Sleepy Eye, Oct. 8th. 0. Netzke visited his home, Sunday, Oct. 5th. Prof. Bliefernicht preached at Winona, Minn., Sunday, Oct 5th. Otto N etzke is acting as vicar at the parochial school at Wood Lake. 1. Student: What makes it that they charged 16c postage when I sent my wash home, and when they sent it back 路only 15c? 2. Student: I suppose it was washed when they sent it back. E. Pankow left for his home, Friday, Oct. 30th, and returned on Monday.

s. Prof. Ackermann journeyed to River Forest, Oct. 11th, where he delivered a sermon at the dedication of the Concordia Seminary. Wm. Fuhlbrigge, 路 a graduate of last year, stopped off on his way from Watertown to Dempster, S. D., at our college, from where his brother, Frank, accompanied him. Prof in der Grammatikstunde: N enne etliche konkrete und abstrakte Substantiva. Grabow: Fisch ist konkret; Stuhl ist konkret; Luft ist abstrakt ; Ungleuck ist abstrakt; Liebe ist aber konkret. Prof. Ackermann attended the conference at Racine, Wis., Nov. 6th and 7th. Prof. Ackermann delivered an evening sermon at the dedication of the Zion's church at Springfield, Minn., Nov. 16th, Paul Westercamp of College, acted as organist.


THE D. M.L. C. MESSENGER

Prof. Ackermann aelivered a sermon at Sanborn, Sunday, Oct. 26th. Otto Grabow attended the marriage of his sister, Thurs~ day, Nov. 20th. Anzeige: Freiwillige, die waehrend der Weihnachtsferien die Goldfische fuettern wollen. H. Wildnug was called to his home, Nov. 2nd, to be present at the funeral of his father. He returned, Nov. 17th. Frank W eindorf returned to ·· school, Sunday, Nov. 2nd, ·after having assisted his father a · few weeks with work. D-mm-r, in der Gemeindesschule : Wie viele Beine braucht die Kuh beim Laufen? Schueler: Vier. D-mm-r: Nun, wie viele, wenn sie schnell laufen will? Schueler: Dr ei.

41

Claus Falde, a . former student of our institution, visited his brother, . Audel, friends, and classmates, Nov. 2nd. Otto Netzke came up from Wood Lake to hear the D. M. L. C. concert, Thanksgiving evening. Th. and Chrst. Kock went home on the 21st of October to be present at .the celebration of the 25th anniversary of their father's ministry. Seminarist, der eine Arbeit im Anschauungsunterricht lie:(ern · soll: Sem: Professor, haben Sie ein Model von einem Hasen? Prof: Nein, das habe ich nicht. Sem: Ja, ich muss aber den Kindern die Zaehne zeigen. Prof: Nun, das koennen sie ja tun, wenn Sie die Kinder nur nicht erschrecken.

PER JOCUM Mops has acc.e pted a call to Hubbleton, Wis. He expects to leave for that place in. the near future.

Fritzkr (Reading in David Copperfield.) "Come Steerforth, let's explore the parlor (polar) regions.

Herr Falde hat das Kapital der M usiklehre vergroessert, ind em er eine neue Tonleiter hinzugefuegt hat. Die Tonleiter wird aufwaerts in Moll, aber abwaerts in Dur gespielt.

Paul NaurJJ.ann gave a drum solo with accompaniment by the band the other night.

Kol: Can't you say 18 times x t y?

Prof: You can say it, but it's wrong.

Durham: I dont know what the matter is with my razor it don't cut! Geck: What did you do with it? Durham: Well, I only sharpened my pencil with it.


42

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

Lui: Say, Durham, you eat Prof: "Ist cs denn moeglich, dass ein Kameel durch ein Nadel- too much. Durham: Well, I guess I pay oehr gehen kann?" Rex: "Beinahe nicht moeg- for it. lich." Rat: Say I heard that you didn't know your poem today. Prof: Wer besorgt das PfeiDurham: 0, come on uow! I fen? guess I know better when I tell Stelljes: Der Mund. it. Klaudike: \'\'ennesein "Wenn" Prof: Wie verhaelt es sich mit gaebe, waere vieles wahr. Zeus: Ja, wenn es nicht ei.'n der Deklination der Ortsnamen "Wenn" gaebe, wuerde meine of S, SS, z. Blink: Sie werden durch ein Grossmutter noch leben. Preposition ausgedrueckt. Prof: Wie nennen wir die Go find the distance from the L ~1st, als das Weib (Eva) sahe, dass von dem Baume gut zu Equator to the North Pole, tie a stone on a string, throw it over essen waere? Sweetheart: Die Geniesslust. the North Star and measure it's angle. Sweetheart in Gemeinde Schule: Wie hiess der Priester bei Prof: Our money is so easy to dem Moses blieb? figure in (then starting to recite Ein kleiner Junge he bt seine the table) Ten mills one cent, ten hand auf und sagt: "Ich weiss cents one dollar. nicht." Prof. (In Ivanhoe). How much Bryan in Gemeinde Sehule: did the hermit drink with one Wer kann dieses nun lesen? draught? (Nach kurzer Zeit) Ich will 'mal Doc : Four quarts. ein Maedcben haben. Prof: W elchen Kasus regiert Schluck is quite anxious to find das wort "waehrend"? out who ate his fish food. He Fish: W aehrend regiert de.n said he only feeds bis fish a very Imperfectum. small amount and he himself Doc, Spaude has enlarged Webdidn't eat much either and it is ster's dictionary by adding "paover half gone already. cific" words (specific.) Cbickee'-Dock SpaudepreachProf: What is below your es, Wirth plays the organ, and seat there? Cherry goes around with the Bulldog: My feet. Klingclbeutel.


TSE D. M. L C. MESSENGER

Dommer is using words from his vocabulary which he claims are not to be found in Webster's dictionary. â&#x20AC;˘ Prof: Der Deutsche Name fuer "Zins" ist gerade so wie im Englischen. Also wie heist es. Miss Fritz: Gerade so. Prof: S. R. Who ~as Cynthia? S. R. Cynthia was a small girl, a little overtwelve feet high. Burk reading: I looked wonderfully pretty, ("instead of she") Edda, (Reading in David Copperfield} "I wish it was mooney (money). Prof: Beschreibe Karl den Grossen. Bulldog: Karl hat eine flache Nase. Prof: (Scolding a Student) What you think of two farmers that worked their farm with one " cow"? Prof: Was ist eine "Tauber"? Irish: Eine "Taube" \st eine Art Vogel. Prof: Die Zeit ist um. Ich muss mich kuerzen. Bryan. Sie sind schon kurz genug. Burk translating latin: Tarquinius der Stolze starb in Cum a. Tarquinius Superbus in Cumish (cunics) mortuw sestti.

!3

The very latest: Prof. Abts patent neck-wiggler for singing. Weindorfus noster behauptet, dass ¡ es einen praepositionalen Nebesatz gibt. Elsie, Herr Kapellmeister von Oben lately received a fine cornet. He blew on it so hard that he got the "Ziegenpeter." Mops, the Mark Twain of the 20 h century, amuses his roommates all day lopg by his inexhaustible supply of Humor. Der Lehrer fragte in der Gemeinde Schule. Warum erkannte Isaac seinen Sohn Jacob nicht? . S::hueler: Isaac hatte seine Brille nicht auf. Prof: Was zeigen Wunden im Ruecken des Soldat? Klondike: Das zeigt, <lass der Soldat im Ruecken verwundet wordenist. Prof: Wenn der Farmer von der Scheune kommt und sieht die Hasen bei seinem Obstbaeumen, was tut er dann? Schueler: Dann laeuft er fort, Mops hat uns mit einem ~olo beehrt, leider konnten einige der Zuhoerer seine Sprache nicht verstehen, und einer wollte behaupten, dass es griechisch sei, ein anderer meinte es sei hebraeisch.

A.M.F.


Statement of the Ownership and Management of the

c.路路Messenger"

"D. M. L.

Published quarterly at New Ulm, Minn., required by the Act of August 24, 1912.

..

Editor: Leo Luedtke, New Ulm Mrnn, Business Manager: George Meyer, New Ulm, Minn. Publishers: Students, Dr. M. Luther College, New Ulm, Minn. Qwners: Students, Dr. M. Luther College, New Ulm, Minn. Known bondholders, mortgages, and other security holders, holding 1 percent or more of total amount of bond, mortgages, or other securities: None. George Meyer Business Manager.

Subscribed and Sworn to before me this 19th day of September, 1913.

JOHN H. WEDDE:NDORF, Notary Public, Brown Co., Minn. (SEAL)

My Commission expires May 11, 1915.


ECONOMY is nothing more than getting your money's worth You get more than your money's worth when you buy

Daniel Webster Flour EAGLE ROLLER MILL CO.

F.H.RETZLAFF A complete line of

Hardware Cutlery

The Fair Store Appreciates your patronage Fair Prices Fair Treatment

}

OUR Motto

and Saf d y R azors

THEO. B. MELZER

MODEL GROCERY PHONE 72

Fancy and Staple Groceries, Delicatessen of all kinds, Exclusive agent for Chase & Sanborn Coffees It pays to advertise; that is why we do it.

W. H. BIERBAUM,

Proprietor


FOR THE BEST LINE OF

FOOT

WEAR

in the city go to

P. W . .HACKBARTH THE SHOE MAN All kinds of repairing neatly executed.

225 N. Minn. St.

THEO. MUELLER Manufactur&r of and Dealer in

Fine Cigars and Smoker's Articles â&#x20AC;˘ Largest assortment of Pipes, Cigar Holders and Tobaccos, etc. west of the Twin Cities.

New Ulm, Minn.

Both Phones

Ruemke Bros. We Carry a Complete Line of Fancy and Staple Groceries, Dry Goods and Notions which we offer for sale at Lowest Prices

N. U. Steam Laundry Weilandt & Stegeman Nagel & Leary, Props.

CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS

Launderers and Dry Cleaners

Correspondence Solicited

New Ulm, Minn. I-~~~~~~~~~~~~~

EVERLING ELECTR;IC CO. Electric Supplies of all Kinds S. Minn.St.

Phone 646

Work done in any section of this Community. Plans and Specifications Furnished Estimates Cheerfully Given Office 1100 Center St. Both Phones 571


Pioneer Drug Store W. G. Alwin, Manager.

E. G. Hage, Prop.

A. Henle, Assistant.

E sell the HOUSTON FOUNTAIN PEN. The most perfect pen in the world. An indispensable article for a student and bookkeeper. Non-leakable, self-filling, and one that you can't lose. Come and see us. We will be pleased to show it to you.

W

PIONEER DRUG STORE

The Bee Hive Up-to-Date Dry Goods House Is offering some f emarkable bargains in

FALL AND WINTER GOODS Everything to be had in a first-class dry goods store, prices always the lowest

J. A. 0 CHS, The Bee Hive The originator of low prices on stood g oods

NEW ULM GREENHOUSES CHRIST. BOOCK, Propr. 11,000 ft. of Glass

Growers of ROSES, CARNATIONS and Other Choice Cutfl owers, as well as ornamental and bedding plants. We furnish first class, fresh stock, and all orders entrusted to us receive m1 r most careful attention. BETTER SUITS, OVER CO A TS and FURNISHINGS Ministers, Professors and Students

Special Discounts to F . P . ZSCHUNKE, Treas. Stores at:

Our four store purchasing power is your gain N e w Ulm. Minn. Brooking;,::> .:> . Howard, S . D . Harvey, N . D .


E herewith beg to solicit the College , Trade. Please come in and 'get acquainted. The things in our line, of Ii interest . to you, are musical 路 instru1路 ments, violin strings, fountain pens, watches, jewelry, etc. When youf watch or your. glasses need looking after call on us. We will give you a fair deal at all times. C. G. REIM, TheLeadingJeweler

W

TAKE NO CHANCES USE

COMPASS or ANGELINA FLOUR to get the best results vVe have a new up to date mill and guarantee every sack

NE'V ULM ROLLER MILL CO.

J. M. Meyer

EUGENE KOEHLER'S B:uber Shop and Bath Rooms R espectfully S.:,licit.s your p a trm~ agc

20 N. Minn. St. LEADING JEWELER

New Ulm, Minn.

G.A. OTTOMEYER Headquarters for

New Ulm,

Minn.

LADI E S' READY - TO - WEAR . and FINE DRY GOODS

OUNG men ought to see the smart n ew n~odels in suits we have ready for them; patch pockets are quite a feature, and there's a very snappy Norfolk vest that will "get you." Hart Schaffner & Marx made it; one of the best of the new fall styles. g See what we'll show you in suits at $20. We have other makes as low as $12 and. up to $40.

Y

Emil Metzinger This store is the home o f Hart Schaffner & Marx clothes


Do you realize the serious .consequences of contim,1ed eye~train?

· Priceless beyond alJ possessions is the· eye sight, deservi~g of your highest consideration. .

.

WE FIT YOUR ·E YES CORRECTLY . .

H. 0. SCHLEUDER Beussmann Block .

8

Optometrist an~ Optician · New Ulm

\

· · Telephone 87

IF YOU PLEASE

. • T

HE RE'A DERS OF "THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER" will ~onfe('~ great favor upon 'the publishers by carefully readinr: the advertising columns of this inagtlzine and by patronizing the merchants who so JiberaUy and cheerfully responded to our solicitations. It is largely due to th~ assistance of our business men that we are enabled . publish "The Messenger."

to

8

THE PUBLISHERS 8

a

J. H. FORSTER

NOTHING is more soothing than a COOL SHAMPOO and MASSAGE - .....___.,...... " your BARBER always yourBARDER

New Ulm, .

13

Wm. E. ARNDT m

m

El

GI

m m 8

m


I . IL


Save Your Mo11ey On College Supplies

At The Rexall Store ' We can save you money on everything you need in

COLLEGE SUPPLIES Our stock incltlcles eye1·y college rcqui.

site, and by buying here )'Our cl1 ke L wide on different item , We are ahvays on the look.ont for and 11e.ve everything new nnd up-to-elate, and as ~ur stock k1-•e1Js pace :with the advanc"'S maue iu eclucatinna.I needs you moy depeud an this store having all the very latest in college supplies.

ARBES BROS. Leading .D ruggists.

The Rexall Store


For the finest line of

MEN'S CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS

Call on

J

Crone Bros. 路 No store anywhere can show a more thoroughly representative line of Merchandise Established 1875

Telephone No. 7

New Ulm Brick & Tile Y ds. New Ulm, Minn.

FR. AUFDERHEIDE, Propr. Common Brick-40,000 daily Curved Well Brick Pressed Brick Fire Brick and Fire Clay

Cement Drain Tile-4 to 36 in. Cement Silo Blocks Cement Fence Posts Cement Brick and Blocks

EVERYTHING NEW

MEET

Am now open for business in the Winkelmann Block, Cor. Minn.and Center Streets.

Your Friends AT

Pfefferle's

GASTLER, the Photographer . Reliable Drug Store


Telephone 128

Established 1883

!IJakePy,

See (!,,eam

m7.d <!onf'eclioneP!J

WHOLESALE and RETAIL

108 N. Minnesota St.

New Ulm, Minn.

EVERYTHING that he or you will wish to wear this season from Hat to Hose, from Suits to Overcoats. Anything in the line of dress we don't have our New York Buyer will get for you.

Hummel Brothers 14 No. Minnesota St.

New Ulm, Minn.

Weneeda Bakery and路Restaurant Opp osite Grand Hotel

F. W. EIBNER, Propr. I have recently added' material improvements to my establishment, making it one of the most up-to-date in this section of the state, and am now in a p~sition to give my many patrons the very best of service. We la} particular stress upon cleanliness and quality. You are cordially invited to make my establishment your headquarters at any time when you are in New Ulm


ECONOMY is nothing more than getting your money's worth You get more than your money's worth when you buy

Daniel '"ebster Flour EAGLE ROLLER MILL CO.

F.H.RETZLAFF A complete line of

Hardware Cutlery

The Fair Store Appreciates your patronage Fair Prices Fair Treatment

} . OUR Motto

and Safety Razors

THEO. B. MELZER

MODEL GROCERY PHONE 72

Fancy and Staple Groceries, Delicatessen of all kinds, Exclusive agent for Chase & Sanborn Coffees It pays to advertise; that is why we do it.

W. H. BIERBAUM,

Proprietor


FOR THE BEST LINE OF

FOOT

WEAR

in the city go to

P~

W. HACKBARTH THE SHOE MAN

All kinds of repairing neatly executed.

225 N. Minn. St.

THEO. MU.ELLER Manufacturer of and Dealer in

Fine Cigars arid Smoker's Articles Largest assortment of Pipes, Cigar Holders and Tobaccos, etc. west of the Twin Cities Both Phones

New Ulm, Minn.

Ruemke Bros. We Carry a Complete Line of Fancy and Staple Groceries, Dry Goods and Notions which we offer for sale at Lowest Prices

N. U. Steam Laundry Weilandt & Stegeman Nagel & Leary, Props.

CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS

Launderers and Dry Cleaners

Correspondence Solicited

New Ulm, Minn.

- - - - - - - - - - - - -i EVERLING ELECTRIC CO. Electric Supplies of all Kinds S. Minn. St.

Phone 646

Work done in any section of this Community. 路 路 Plans and Specifications Furnished Estimates Cheerfully Given Office 1100 Center St. Both Phones 571

I


.

"

LITERARY

NEW ULM, MINN., MARCH 1914

VOLUME .J

9lero. IJ:ero, bet -So{Jn bes Glniius momitius SU{Jcnobarbus, rourbe 3u SUntium am 15. '.lle3. 37 n. <1{Jt. geborm. <Seine ~utter roar SUgripp111a, bie '.toc{Jtet bes Glennon icus. \!'is i.u feinem bret3eljnten ~a!ire oetroeilte et in (eines '3aters .f)aus ~amt abet routbe er oou bem Staifer <Haubius, bet bie SU!jtip' pina gelJeiratet {Jatte, aufgenommen unb (piiter mit bejjm '.toc{Jter Dftauia uetmii(Jlt. ~foubius '(Jutte einen ®o'(Jn, namens \t1ntannicus. l!;ie[en f)atte et 3u femem Choen unb 9~adifolger beftimmt. SUgrippina abet niiunte bem 1Br1ta11wcus bie ,Pen[dJaft nidJt. ~\Ot ganJes ®treben ginn barnui (Jiu, ifjrem ®o~ne IJleto bie .);>err[dJait 3u uer' fdJafim ~amit er abet bes ITTegierens iiif)ig roer'oe, iil>ttltefJ jie [eine c:rr3ieliuug 'oetll l\Sl)ifofopljen ®enecn, einem bet gefefJtte~en ~iiuner jener .8eit. ~((s maubins liemerfte, bafJ ~lgrippi11a foldje \!lorbereitungeu trni, bas 'Cr tannirns baburdJ in ben ,Pi11ter• grun'o !Jl'\dJoben rourbe, naljm er (idj nor, fidJ be .. €treben ieinet @attin 311 roiber. fe~eu. ~lanbins fonute abet feinen lj}lan nidJt ausiiiIJten. \h m11rb! bulb barauf auf ~(nfttften (einer Glattin getiitet. ~uu rombe ber erft fieb3el)nii'il)rige 91ero 3um riimi(dJett .lt'aifer gemii'(Jlt. '.lloc{J mie fonute eiu [o unerfa{Jrener 3iingling bem

NUMBER 3

miic{Jtigen riimi(c{Jen ®!ante uorfteljen? CS:r '(Jatte beslja!b 3uer~ 3mei ITTatgeber, feinem ~eljrer ®eneca unb 'om Glar'oepriifeften <Sert. SUiranius \f\urrns. WW ~ieien .;n• fammm leitete er ben ®taat bi~ erfteu Saljre aui tii!Jmlicljer m.leife. l.S:r mar freunblic{J uub moljltiitit; riegen jebermann, unb (ei11e Untertane11 lJofften, unt, r feiner megierung beff m .8' ilm ars bisljequ {Jaben. ®ie tiiufdJtm fidj jeboc{J; betm er fieI gar val'o nut [emen ITTatgebem in <Streit un'o bega11n bann ein miijtes unb fc{Jruelgeri(clJes £eben. ~it lei(9tiertigen (\lcnofien burc{J' ~og er bas £anb, raubte ttn'o pliin'oerte unter feiuen eigenen Untertanen, Um (ic'(J ~{Jre unb %1{Jm 0u ermerben, uer• anftaltete er ®c{Jan[piele unb \\eite, bei benen er felbft al!3 isiinger ober .8itrier[pieler auftiat. 'tlurc{J bie[e, mie auc{J bnrc{J 3alj[, lo(e anbm IBolrnbeluftigungen, uerlirac{Jte er gar b!llb bie Q:infiinfte bes ®taatS, un'o bi? natiidtc{Jen ~olgen maren fdjmere Q'r, preffungen unter bem \!lolfe. .8mei (;rreigniffe, burc'(J bie mir ben ~lja• rarter IJCeros niil)er fennen lemen, fin'o bie (;rrmorbung feines ®tieflirubers ~ritaunicns un'o feiner ~utter SUgrippina. £e~tere, iiber (em milf!es l!eben, roie and} iiber [eine £iebjcl)aft 3u einer ~1mgfratt uon niebmm ®tan'oe, erbittert, '(Jatte gebtof)t, iljn oom


4(i

THE D. M.L. C MESSENGER

'tfjron 3n ftoj1en nnb 'Britannicns bie .\)err' fdJaft 3n uerfdJnfien. ;r"irs rei~te 'Jler;s ,8orn unb uernnlajJte ifJn, gegen jebennann ~n miiten, 'oer i{Jm anc{J nur in1 geri gflm 3nruiber 311 fein fdJien 3nerft manbte er [id) gegen l(\ritannicus. %1dJ'oen1 er biefen bnrdJ \liift f1el1itct l)atte, l>emii!Jte er fidJ, a 1tdJ 9lnriµµina ans bem '.Wene 3n fdJaiien. .~nerft uer[udJte rr es bnrdJ (Slift; bod) ofjne jeben erfoln. ~lf]rippina, bie 'oies fcl)on a(iute, nafim tii\]lidj eill 0>egenmitrel, nnb fo uerfdJlte bail <i'iit bei tf)t feine Wirfung. ~od) 1Jlero fnn'o bilo ein anbcres White!. lh· !iefl ein €3dJiii b1rnen, bns fo eingerid)tet marb, bafi man cs mit \leiclJti\jfeit uerfenfen fonnte '.t'ies ®dJiii follte ~lgnpµina be, treten unb bann in ber l(\ud)t uon '.l'ajil er' triinft merben. ~te 13roiJte ®d)1tJierigfeit la .1 nnr barin, iie aui bas ®dJifi ~n locfen. 91bcr and) bies gelan!J bem [Jend)elllben ~iero. ~a, er fe!bit !1egleitete fie' bill 311m GdJiiie nn'o uernbfd)iebete fief) fd)einbar fef)r frenn'olidJ uon if)r IJJ?tl fµanllen'oem .~)cqen ermartcte 1llero nun bie IJiadJrtd)t uon bem 'lobe [einer mutter. 'iH1i~; lidj erfdJien ein !Sflaue uor i[Jm un'o me(oete, bniJ 9lgrippina ein grofies llnglM be'otof)t (Jibe, aber bnrdJ i!)l'e \lle[d)t1Jin'oif]feit IJii tte fie [idJ gerettet. 91ero, iiber bas ffi?t\llingen feines ~lanes ent,\ · mt, liefl nun 'oer nngUicflidJen 9lgripµi' ua :Uliirbcr uad)[dJi<fen Hilb fie bnrd) 'oiefe tiiten. ~I.lei! nriiilere ®d)anbt 1ten am b"e bis[Jer !Je"annten finb je'ood) bie (£(ir1ftenuerfolgnn' gen miter 91ero. ~Ill ;_jaf)re 64 11. l£l.>r. murbe ITTom bnrcl) eine nngefJeure iieueri3' brunft l)eimnef ud)t 15ed)s 'ta13e nub iicben IJliid)te miiteten 'oie ;uammen unb legten 'oeu groiiten 'lei! 'oer 15 abt in ®dJntt Hilb 21\dJe. ?Zl.:agrenb bes \llrnnbes befaug iRero uon ben ,8mnen jeinei3 13nlaites fJernb ben 'Brnnb uon 1r jn nub ergii~te fid) an ben Ji'lammen. Vl!s bas ~ olf bies erfn{Jt, befdju!bigte es •l.>n bei.1 l1nf)eil!3. 'Vaii bie ®tabr nidJI bnrd) 3nfaU, [onbern ncidJ einem rool)liiberlegtm 1 .i:1nn an~e,iinbet morben JtJar, mnflte jeber einf e!jen ~eb . cl} ijt es 3meife!fjaft, ob 9?m ber ~l n fti iter res 'I'rnnbes ge11Jejen ijt, Um bcn .~~an bei.1 ~~ o(fei3 uon jiC:J ab\ulcnfen

roiif3te er ben -i.:ertiad)t a11f bie (Sf)rijten, bie l>ei bem riimi[c'f)en ~olfe fe'f)r uerf)aflt roaren, unb llllll l>egann eine grnu[ame lll erfolgnng lmfelben. ~a attd) i{Jre ® of)nnngen Dpfer bes ~euer5 ne1uorben maren , f)attett fie fief) Ill einen E>teinbntcf) an iJerf)a!b moms ge' ~iid)tct. iffiil'f)renb fie 'f)ier ung ft1irt il)re 9lnbadJt f)ielten, bemegte [id) ein J.~auje be' maifneter 15olbaten bief em Drte ,u. Cl's roa·en (\lef anbte 91ero5, bie bie l£l)rijten auf' fncf) ·n unb nacl) mom iiil)ren follteu, bamit ~lero [einen 'l:J(utburft an tl}nen fltllen fiinne. D{Jne Hgenb mefcf)e 15dJruier' gfeit entbecften bi! 15olbaten bas £a13er, Iegten bie roe!Jr~ io[en <HJri)1en in ;\effeht nnb fiibrten fie ber ®cf)ladjtbanf 91eros 0tt. 3n bie[ er ,8e t uer' anjta(tete 91ero 1in grofles 15;eft. llngefilfjr 80,000 lR1imer rool)nten bi cf em bei. llm bieien nun ein groiies @'icl)anfµiel bar0nbie· ten, ltefJ er bie 1£{J1 iften uorfiil)ren nnb auf bie grnufamften lffieifen uor ben ~!ugen ber mo.bluitigen ITT1imer 0u '.tobe martern. WCel)r a(5 breilJnnbert uon iljnen !ieiJ er mit \!\.lerg nnb Qlecl) u1111uicfe111 unb ban'.t on lJocf) in bie £luft ragenbe i.J_lfill)le b111ben. 2!!!3 bie :Dunfel{Jeit einf]etreten ma.t, liefJ er biefe an, 3ii11be11, tamit fie flatt !Sacfeln bas ®djan, fptel be!eud)ten ioUten. WilfJrettb f o bie lS(Jnjten in nnbef djmb!tdJent l5dj111er3 bafjin, ftarben, flat[djte bas '!Jolf uoU 15d)aben' frenbe in bte J)ilnbe. ~1ero jelbit juf)r t'it einem ')3rncl)truagen an il)nen uorbei unb er, g1i~te fidJ an if)rett Cnalen. 9lbcr nidJl atfe ronrben auf bief e ®eif e fJin~1fridjtet ~as mare bem 91ero unb [einen 'l.)iiagern oll (all!J' mei!ig gemejen !Sie moUten <lltd) I ier' f)e~ n fef)en. 'Vie erjte 9frt btef es e>d)au, fpiels mar ber .ltampf mit e111e111 £loiuen. ~ ier3 n wmbe ber @ms ;_j ulius, ein trener u11b anfridJtiger 'Vefenner bes !J'oan3elin111s, umuenbet ~ngefid)t5 bes -r, bes [anf er auf bie .ltni ee nnb le!Jle e111 trene~ n11b oijenes \Befenllt111!3 bes ~ oange!iums uor · aUem lllo lfe ab . ID.inn ltJUrbe er uon bei· \l3eftie 0mnafmt. !J'ine anbere 2!rt ber j)ttv ridJtnng bcr ~fJtiiten mar, bafl bie Dpfer ani ben lRiiden iuil'oet 't iere gebnnben un'o banq uon ben ,Qnllbcn 3erfleifdjt nmrbe •. ~l nbere 1uur'oen in '.lierfelle genil!Jt unb bann


THE D. M. L. U. M E SSENGEH

ou 11 ben ,Pnnbm 3nie1?t. IJ1ocl) anbere et, litten ben ftre113eil'ob. filn aUen biejen Jjin, ricl)'hm ,en (jatte 91ero, roie and) bail uer' fo111me11e unb fittenlo[e monmoolf, bas grliiJte ®o(Jlgcj,111e 1. ~a, iie flatf d)ten in bie ,Piinbe, jo oft ein r uon ben m?iirtt)rem uernicl)tet mnrb. 1111b mtt\iten fidJ uor m?orb' lnft garnic!)t 3u injjen. '.IJ1e \H)riiten jebo.:l) fnf)en, tro1? ben unbef djretblid)en IJunlen, bem '.lPbe fiign entgegen uttb lobten nnb prie[ en Qiott uo1· bem gnn3en l!lolfe: . IJ1ndJbcm IJ1ero jeinen \Bl11tbur1! gejt1Ut gatte, lieu er ffiom mieber uon neuem nuf' batten unb nUerbings uiel fdjliner ttnb priid)' tiger, a!S es je gemcf en mar. ~i\r [id) battle ei- einen 'j3a1nft, batl go'.bene .l)an!l genannt, ber felbft einm grojien ri25tabttei( emnagm unb unerme&ficl)e ®11111111en foftete. '.I:as Qielb ji\r biefen ;n.iu uerfd)n '1te er \id) inbem er ungegeure ®tenem uon jeinen \Biirgem erpreflte ~ aburd) 3og er ficl) gar bnlb groflen .pafl 3u. ®d)on im ~a(jre 68 n. mJr. mnrbe in ffiom eine biirgerlidJe ITTeooln' lion ange \ettelt 'I:er Sfoi[er befanb fidJ_ in grojie;. Oief a'f)r. %Illes le'f)nte [id) gegen 1lJ11 ani, jelb(I jeine (.ilnrbe uerliefl 1gn. '.jn einer ftiinnijd)en 1Jlad1t fHJ er, nur uon men'gen CIJetreuen begleitet, nut ein ilun'lgnt, um fidJ bort 3n uer!mgen. 2'!!5 er f)ier bie IJfod)ridJt crg 'e!t, bnfJ ber ®enat ilJn jeine5 %!mte} ent\e\1 t 1mb 311111 'lobe uerurtei't gatte, He il er fidJ burdJ einen i\reigelajjenen ben '.lobe!lftoil geben, bn er jelber brn 9J(ut ba3n nidJt ljatte. ®o enbete ber emit fo miidJtige ri:imifd)e Sl'ntf er. IJJ1it ~cl)nubern benfen mir nn bie ,8eit jeiner ITTegierung. ®eine be\onbe e !.\irnujamfeit an ben ~f)riften liifJt iljn iort' an a!S bm11 grofJen ~einb in ber ®eltge, jd)idJ!C erfdJeinen.

m. Q'. . 'HJ.

DANIEL BOONE. Daniel Boone, one of America's greatest pioneers, was born in Exeter township, Bucks county, Penn., Feb. 11th, 1735. He

47

was the son of Squire and Sarah Boone, the fourth child of a family of seven. Daniel"~~ grandfather, George Boone, emigrated from England to America with his wife Mary and settled at Philadelphia, on the 10th of October, 1717. Here he purchased a large tract of land, which he settled. He called it Exeter, after the place near whlch he was born. At the time of Daniel's birth, Exeter was a small settlement, consisting of log houses and surrounded with forests, in which various kinds of game abounded. In his earliest boyhood he showed a great desire for hunting. He would either pursue the wild animals in the forest or study the beauties of Nature. His education was very scanty. In those days there were not good schools scattered over the country, nor were there many teachers competent to fill their position. Daniel's teacher was an Irish schoolmaster, who accidentally came to the settlement. Upon the request of Squire Boone and other parents, he opened a school in the neighborhood. The school house was a log cabin erected in the woods. The schoolmaster was of a peculiar character; for, once, while good-humored, he was too lenient, and at other times, while ill-natured, he would punish the children severely. For a little offense Daniel was one day punished very severely. Not able to bear the punishment any longer, he extricated himself from the master's grasp and ran home. He was rebuk-


48

THE D. M.L. C. MESSENGER

ed by his parents, but the schoolmaster was dismissed and 1 1.he boy's schooldays had an end. In his eighteenth year his parents moved to North CaroLna. Here he became acquainted with Rebecca Bryan, whom he afterwmds married. His next five years he spent in farming. Anxious to explore new 1:-md in the West, he set out with five others for Kentucky. Having arrived at the foot of a mountain range, they ascended it, where beautiful scenery presented itself to them. Before them lay rich and beautiful vales watered by the Kentucky river; in the distance the large forests, in which the deer, the buffalo, and other wild animals roamed unmolested. While hunting one day, Boone and John Stuart, one of his companions, were suddenly surprised by Indians. They were captured and made prisoners. They managed to escape the Indians and to return to their camp, which, on arriving, they found plundered and deserted. What had become of their companions, Boone never knew. In 1771 Boone returned home with his spoils. Two years later he sold his farm, and with his family, two brothers and five other families set out for Kentucky. They were driven back by the Indians and settled in the southwestern part of Virginia. Later, Boone was appointed by Governor Dunmore of Virgfoia, as a captain to command three garrisons on the Ohio to keep back the host!le Indians. After this cam-

paign he erected a fort on the Kentucky river, which he named Boonesborough, and whither he moved his family. (It is claimed that Mrs. Boone and her daughter were the first white women that set their feet on the banks of the beautiful Kentucky.) In 17'i8 the people of Boonesborough were suffering for want of salt. Thii:; could be obtained at a place called the Blue Licks. Thither Boone went, accompanied by thirty men, to make salt for the different settlements. While out hunting, one day, he fell into the hands of a band of Indian warirors, and was made prisoner a second time. He was taken to the Blue Licks, where his party was still encamped. Boone, well knowing the Indian character, surrendered his men, upon the promise of the Indians that they would spare their lives and treat them kindly. Both of these promises the Indians faithfully kept. The reason for Boone's surrendering his men without an attempt to battle was because he well knew that by so doing, the Indians would return home with their spoils and not attack Boonesborough. For had the Indians followed their intentions to assail Boonesborough they would have, no doubt, met with results. Greatly pleased with their success, the Indians returned to their home. From there Boone and ten of his men were led to Detroit, which was at that time a British garrison, and all except Boone presented to the commandant. Although the commandant offered a large


T!IB D

M. L

entered the Hills during the following yrnr and after several combats the Indians were finally driven out. The Black Hills have an exceptionally mild climate which is scarcely excelled in the U. S. Rainfall is not very heavy and on an average there are 332 days of sunshine during the year. Extreme heat and extreme cold are exceptional and of short duration. Winter temperatures are frequently ameliorated by Chinook winds. The Black Hills region is noted particularly for its mineral products. During the brief history of the section, mineral production amounts to more than $200,000,000. In fact one eightieth of the total production of gold of the world since the discovery of America has been produced in the Black Hills amounting to a total of $172,000,000. Gold is the chief mineral product and quite a number of mines are to be found, the largest and most important being the Homestake mine at Lead City, the Golden Reward mine in the Ruby Basin and the Holy Terror mine at Keystone. Aside from gold ore others of importance are silver, lead, copper, iron, tin, tungsten, mica,

etc.

Next to the mining industry the lumber business is of imporb-'c3. Usually the Easterner ;i11 ;-i,-:路:~nes that South Dakota is nofaing but one large prairie where the grass grows lang and uncut. The Black Hills region, however, would no doubt change his mind because it is 路thickly forested and much of the coun-

C . MESSBNGEB

.?l

try is included within the national forest reserve. Consequently quite a number of saw mills have been erected. At present there are twenty-three in operation, the largest of them, located at Rapid City, having a capacity of 1,500,000 feet of lumber a month. For many years the most important industry of the plains surrounding the Hills has been the grazing of range cattle, sheep, and horses on the public Recent patenting of lands. much of the land has tended to break up the open range, but grazing over restricted areas now occupies the attention of the newcomer. An abundance of wild animals and game are to be found. Many of them, however, have become extinct. The buffalo and the elk for instance, have disappeared, and apparently also the grizzly bear. The antelope is found in scarce numbers. Only an occasional mountain lion is seen. Bobcats are no longer abundant and the beaver and raccoon are disappearing fast. Deer are fairly plentiful. Elk have recently been reintroduced, and buffalo will be placed into the new state game preserves. Among the more abundant found are the mountain sheep, gray wolf, coyote, porcupine, mountain rat, woodchuck, prairie dog, muskrat, mink, badger, etc. There is much good hunting although most of the large game animals, suitable for food, are protected by law. Small game, such as grouse, jack rabbits, cottontails, red squirrels, etc., is abundant.


TH~

D. M. L. C.

l'ishing is also good in the Hills. 'rout is abundant and we are 1roud to say that we have some 1f the best trout streams in \.merica. It is extremely interesting to ravel in the Black Hills, be:ause every part of them has ts partir:ular features of beau,y and interest. It does not natter where you go,, any city, rillage, r a n c h or camping ~round may serve as a suitable ioint from which to make ob>ervational trips. We are of.en told by strangers, who have :raveled extensively, who have ;een the beauties of the Rockes and of the Southwest, that :he short trips of thirty mile:;; 'rom Rapid City to Mystic on :he Crouch Line offers scenery ~han cannot be equaled anywhere in the United States. rhere are so many interesting places that it is difficult to outline a trip, but some of the plac~s that ought to be visited by :ill means may be mentioned. There are the many canyons, all of which are worth seeing. Rapid Canyon and Dark Canyon are beautiful, but Spearfish Canyon arid Falls is by far the most beautiful. By all means one should visit the caves which are quite numerous. As the three principal ones may be mentioned: Wind Cave near Hot Springs: Jewel Cave near Custer, and Crystal Cave near Piedmont. These three are among the most beautiful and interesting caves known. Wind cave is beautiful because of its glittering argonite frostwork, its popcorn coating, and its brownish and bluish

M~SS~NG~R

calsite work. It consists of innumerable rooms and hallways, all of which have not been explored and possibly never will be explored. But one thing will astonish every visitor, i. e., the strong inflow and outflow of air currents. The direction of the current depends upon the changing barometric pressure of the locality. Four entrances lead into the cave. The Garden of Eden, the Fairgrounds, the Pearly Gates and the Blue Grotto. This cave and its immediate vicinity have been set aside by our government as national monuments. Wind cave Park contains an area of sixteen and one-half square miles. J ewel Cave is also a national monument. It contains two caverns, Jewel Cave and Jasper Cave. Passages one and onehalf mile in length and six hundred feet deep have been traversed in Jewel Cave. In both caves the wind blows inward and outward as in 路wind Cave. They are beautiful because of their crystals, irregular coatings, and stalachtitic growths. Crystal Cave is beautiful because of its brilliant walls of facetted white calcite crystals. Another place of interest is the Harney Peak region, located in the Southern Hills. Through many thickets and gulches the way leads to Haney Peach. The base of this mountain is forested and out of its forest-clad surface towering pinnacles and huge formations of bare granite rise to an enormous height. Upon arriving here th2 traveler w;il not b2 satisfied until he has asc::mded Harney Pc:ak. He can


T ll B D M. L. C. MESSBNGBU

eit her walk the distance or engage a donkey. Although a t iresome journey is before him, it is well worth the hardship to see the beautiful and pict uresque panorama which the summit of this mountain presents. Harney Peak is the highest point in the Hills and also the highest point east of the Rockies, reaching a height of 7,244 feet. The Devils Tower also rises from a forest-clad base which comprises about twenty acres. From this base it r ises almost perpendicularly to an enormous height standing as it were, above the surrounding hills as a monarch above his subjects. Others that may be mentioned are: Terry Peak, Inyan Kara, Bear L odge Range, Sylvan Lake, Sundance Mountain, Custer Peak, etc. A few canyons may be mentioned in addition to those named above: Stockade Beaver Canyon, Geology Canyon, Elk Canyon, Castle Creek Canyon, etc. These step-walled canyons are among the most picturesque America can show. Also a visit to the various mines and mills will prove very interesting and instructing. The Black Hills region is therefore one of the richest a,nas of our country, noted for its wealth as well as for its scenery. It is indeed the gem of th ; Northwest, a mountainous coâ&#x20AC;˘m try whose rocks give fort h the riches of mineral wealth and whose surface . is cloth ed with a vegetation with fruit s and flowers that proclaim the name and the wonderf ul works of the Cr rntor. W. N. '08.

53

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH. Johann Sebastion Bach was born at Eisenach, March 21, 1685. He was the youngest son of Johann Ambrosius Bach, (who was at that time a court and city musician at Eisenach), and Elizabeth with the maiclenname Laemmerhirt. Johann Ambrosius soon r ecognized the talent of his son and did his utmost to give him a good education. When Sebastian was about nine year of age, his mother died, and hardly a year later his father also died. Now a huge veil hung before the litt le boy's eyes. Johann Christian, an elder brother, who was a scholar of the famous music teacher, Pachelbel, and organist in Ohrdruff, took the orphan under his care. Very much attention was paid to the young lad. His brother gave him piano lessons. At the same time he attended the lyceum in that town. Music was not his only study. He also studied religion and choral songs. The young musician could not pacify his hunger for music. His brother did not realize the little fellow's ability, and Sebastian soon grew impatient. He was striving for higher things. He was then accepted in the Michaelschool as a soprano singer at Lueneburg. Here he received a fair education in playing organ, his teacher being George Boehm. In this way he had the occasion to hear the best models. At the age of eighteen years, he journeyed to Weimar, where he entered the service of the


THE D. M.L. C,

M~SS~NGER

court there as a violinist. At After having been in Muehlthis time he also was the organ- hausen for about a year, he acist in the church of Arnstadt. cepted a call to Weimar. Many The energetic young man work- people, who understood him and ed very hard, practicing at the who had a more aesthetical spircost of sleep, the piano, organ, it, were very fond of his works. or violin. It was at this time 路Here especially he was compellthat he heard very much of the ed to show his skill; as the organ artist Buxtehude at Lue- people were of a higher rank beck. His wish was to hear and appreciated his playing. him play. As his money supply Nine years of his life were was but scanty, he saved till he spent here. had sufficient to visit this great The virtuoso, which he now artist. He, accordingly, asked was, made many concert jourthe consistorium for leave of neys. At every place he obtained absence for about four weeks. glory and admiration. Although Having obtained permission, he Bach looked upon that as of minor walked sixty miles to be enabled importance, he strove to occupy to add a little more to his musi- positions of which he was worcal education. Four weeks did thy. For many years he had not fill his desire. So, without played for Drese, an old music the consent of the consistorium, director of an orchestra. Very he stayed with Buxtehude for often Bach had taken this man's four months. When he return- place in case of vacancy. After ed, he was reprimanded for not Drese's death, Bach hoped to paying more attention to the take his place. They did not promise he had given. elect Bach, but the son of the Bach had till now composed former, who was not at all able many chorals. But the consis- and was unworthy of the positorium found it convenient to tion. bring another offense against This last incident made a very him. They said that he had deep impression in the heart of strewn so many strange tones the skilled artist, and in 1717 路 in the chorals. It seemed to he resigned. th em that Bach had committed Then he received a call to a very serious musical crime. Koethen as music director. Thi In July, in the year 1707, was only a small place. He h ad Bach commenced his work in no organ, no church service. He another field, i. e., at Muehlhau- devoted most of his time to chamber music, with this the sen. On the seventeenth of Octo- period of chamber music was ber he was married to Maria opened. He wrote solos for the violin. He wrote most frequentBarbara Bach. His compositions show that ly for the piano and also enthe masters of whom he had deavored to improve the instru路 learned, did not influence him ment. After having atte!1ded to his anymore. He created new things work here for about three year:;;, in the world of music.


Tll

l~

D. M. L. C. MESSENGEH

a very sad event took place. As he came back from a journey with the principal Leopold, he found his home and children without a mother. He mourned the death of his wife very deeply. On the third day of December, 1721, he married Anna Magdalena, who became a very prosperous wife and mother. She vv-as a helper to him in every respect. She W~<S also the singer of the court. Bach now planned to "!"cform the Protestant church musi.c. He had hopes tu receive a call to the Jacobs Church, but another musician had been call.ed. who wn s not a very noterl mu sician, but, who, considering the financial standpoint, surpas;;;ed Bach. He had promised to pay the sum of 4000 marks to the church. In 1723 he was called to the prEcentorship of the Thomasschule at Leipsig. Here Bach had a difficult task. But he was not a man that ever felt over-loaded with work. At this place he wor ked the last twentyseven years of his life. Frederick II, King of Prussia, had very much confidence in the rr,enius of Bach. Although Bach had not appeared before the public very often any more, he was called to play before Frederick. The King stationed himself b -hind the old precentor and G'Jggested a theme. Fredericl: was so astonished that he called out, "There is only one Bach ! There is only one Bach !" His children, twenty in number, also had received an excessive musical gift, at which

55

the father felt delighted. B ut only ten children survived the father. The people, with some exceDti.ons, did not realize the great musician. At this time only a few of his works had been printed. His works are so gl'eat that Beethoven says: "Bach's works ca n be compared with the sea. Who can find the definite border? Who can dive down far enough to get the last pearl?" Up to this day th~ world has not had a greater church music composer and curator. As energetic as he was in his manhood, so he also was as an old man. He unfortunately 10s.t his eyesight, which was the result of an operation. But it did not keep him from work. He could not see what was g0ing on in this world, but the mo1'e plainly he could see his Saviotw. He dictated his last song "Wenn wir in hoechsten Noeten sein.'~ Shortly before his death, his eyes were again opened and he could see the beautiful wod d once more. On the twenty-eighth of July he bade his fa_mily farewell and died. As was said before, the pe0ple did not appreciate the g,reat man. Not even a stone marked his grave. Many years after his death his remains were found again. The later musicians first introduced Bach. For in.staEce, in 1827 Mendelssohn foa n rleel a chorus of sixteen voiees wh ich met at his home on Saturday nights for the purpose of stud~足 ing the choral works of J.0}laru1 Sebastian Bach. With this fo'r -


ifl

THE D. M. L. C.

nation the date of the great rerival of interest in the works >f Bach may be set, after about t century of neglect. One of iis great works is for instance, :he "Matthew Passion," which

â&#x20AC;˘"

Ml~SSENGER

was for the firnt time rendered to the public, on March 11, 1829, under the direction of Mendelssohn. G. M.-15.


57

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGEg

1Ehitnrial Leo Luedtke, George Meyer, Business Manager M. Dommer, Exchange Editor C. Hinz, Local Editor E. Koenig, Athletic Editor

~tall

Editor-In-chief E. Trettin, Asst. Business Manager C. Koch, College Notes Editor J. Wirth, Alumni Editor A. Falde, Per Jocum Editor

.路

HE "D. M. L. C. MESSENGER" is published quarterly during tbe scbool year by the students of Dr. Martin Luther College. 'l'he subscription price is fifty cents per annum. Single copies fifteen cents. Stamps not accepted. 'Ye request payment in advance. 'II 'l'he "Messenger" is continued afler time of subscription has expired, unless we are notified to discontinue ar.d all arreages are paid. 'II All business communication should be addressed to the Business Manage r; all literary contributions to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. 'II Contributions to our Literary Departm ent a re requested from all alumni, undergraduates and friends.

T

Entered as second class matter at the Postotticc of New Ulm, Minnesota.

ED IT 0 RIAL WHAT WE GO TO SCHOOL FOR.

Pupils, as a rule, spend their prime of life attending school to learn and to be trained to be of some use in later路 life. Do all you pupils realize this? Do

they stop to think what they go to school for? Many do not. Pupils may, therefore be divided into three groups or classes. First, there are those who go to school, not to get an education, but merely to have a good time; just so they get a passing

..


8

THE D. M. L. ('.

nark. Or if they do not get 1:rnmotcd, so much the better, ,r; th:s g:v.os them another year ,f a good t!J11e. Such scholars !on't think for a moment that h路 y are dec::iving therr~selves \;1cl wasting precious times. l'hi8 i8 c::rhinly not the right vay ro c!o. To tlw :;2r.ond class belong hose scholars \Vho come to !chool with a good enough in.::.nCon of learning something, mt, on the other hand, of also iaving a good time. In other vords, th2y want to do two hings at the same time. They Lre dissatisfied with low standngs. Their sense of honor tells hem they could do better. In irder to get a higher percenage, they chrat whenever they :an possibly do it. That is 10thing but deceit and fraud, vhich any conscientious scholLr ought not and would not do. The third group or class con:ists of those pupils that have irmly resolved to learn. They JrEpare their lessons diligently, rnd thev are well repaid for heir diligence. At these the a".y ones hiss, and slander them vhenever they see them. Temp,. ation is great for these studi>US ones. But they know what l school is for and they see the 路esults already while attending t. Those are the ones the :01mtry can make use of. These viJl b~ honored later in life and ,-,m never regret having made rood use of the time during :heir school days. Let us all :trive to belong to the last nam~d class, for in school we lay .he foundation of our路 future ife. . -Kg.

M~SS!~NGER

THE CRIMES OF THE TONGUE. The second most deadly instrument of destruction is the gun-the first is the human tongue. The gun only kills bodies, while the tongue kills reputations and, often, .even ruins character. The destruction caused by the gun is visible at once. The evils of the tongue live throughout all the years. The crimes of the tongue are words of unkindness, of anger, of envy, of harsh criticism, gossip, scandal, and lying. Theft and murder are awful crimes, yet the pain and suffering they cause is microscopic when compared with the sorrows that come from the crimes of the tongue. Were we to place both crimes in the scalepans of justice, placing the evils resulting from criminal acts in one pan, and the evils proceeding from the tongue in the other, we would be greatly surprised to see the pan we thought the heaviest ascend high into the aid. At the hands of a thief or murdered few of us may suffer, even indirectly. But who is free from the careless tongue of a friend or the cruel tongue of an enemy. No human being can live a life so true and pure as to be beyond the reach of malice. The acts of the tongue are so insignificant that a person is not on guard against them. Scandal is one of the crimes of the tongue, but not the only one. Every . individual w~o breathes a word of scandal, is


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

an active stockholder in a society for the spreading of moral poison. For this craze for scandal the newspapers of today are largely responsible. Each newspaper has not one tongue, but a thousand or more, telling the same foul story to the listening ears. The newspapers collect the disgrace and folly of humanity, and show them to the world. There a;re pillows wet by sobs; many noble hearts are broken; there are old time friends separated and walking ~heir lonely ways with hope dead and memory but a pang; there are cruel misunderstandings that make all life look dark. TheRe are only a few of the sorrows that come from the crimes of the tongue. If a rich man give a donation to some charity, they say, "He is doing it to get his name talked about." If he gives it anonymously, they say, "Oh, it's some millionaire who knows that refraining from giving his name will rouse curiosity, but he will see to it that his name is made known later." If he does not give to charity, they say, "Yes, he is stingy just like all millionaires." To the vile tongue of gossip and slander, virtue is ever deemed but a mask, noble ideals but a pretense, generosity a bribe. Beware of the crimes of the to~"'._sue ! -L. L.

59

9Mu Ulm, 9'.Jlinn., b. 8. :De3. 1913.

IDlrint

,\'tintat~ftabt ~ublvig~~

burg. :Dief e ®tabt ttJirb ttJoljl ocn meiften befonnt fein, ba einer ber fJeriiljmteften beutfdJen :Did)ter, ~debridJ ®d)iUer, ljier eine 8eit lann bie foteinif d)e ~d)ule fJefudJte. ~n bief er ®tabt \lerfJrndJte id) bie erften fieben ~aljre meine5 2ebens. 2ubttJigsburn liegt im ttJeft3entralen '.teil be!3 Sfiinigreid)s 2Bilrttemberg, adJt 9'.Jleilen niirblidJ non ®tuttgart. ~s ift eine ®tabt uon unnefiiljr fiiniunb 0ttJan; 0igtauf enb ~inttJof)nern. ~5 if! eine feljr fdJiin nelegene ®tabt. ®iiblid) uon iljr liegt ein fd)iiner 1:annenttJalb, ber ®alon ·genannt. :Die< fer ®a!b ift ungefnljr brei 9'.Jleilen breit unb fedJs 9'.Jleilen rang. 9'.Jlitten im ®alb befinbet fid) ein grofier ®ee, unb an if)m liegen lliele ®ommerljnufer. 2£Ud) befinbel fidJ in ber l.Jlnfje llOn bem §ee eine \l3ffegcanftal1 filr .R'inber; ljier ttJerben arme .R'inber aufgenommen unb nut \lerf orgt. ~5 ift ein ljmlid)er \l3L1~ filr bie mnber. 8tuei 9'.Jldlen iiftlidJ \Jon ber ®tabt lie gt ber 2!fd)berg. :Dief es ift ein 3tuei< bi5 brciljunbert ~ufi f)oljer ~erg. Obrn liegt ein altes ®d)lofi. :Diefes ®d)lofi tuurbe ljauptfndJfirf) am @efiingnifl fJe, nu~t. ~5 ftammt nod) aus ber ,Reit ber mau[Jritter ljer. :Die ®age eqnljl!, bafl bie ISauern uon ben :Rittern ba3u ge: atuungen tiiurben, bief en \Berg auf3u: fd)iilten. :Die lBauern arbeiteten \liele ~aljre lan11 1 bis fie enb!id) f o Ille it tuaren, bafi ber ~erg ben ~Httern ljod) iJenug tuar. 2lud) ttJurbe eine fiinftlid)~ 2Bafferleitunn ben \Berg ljinaufgelegt. :Das ®d)lofl ttJirb ieiH aber nid)t me~r uetuoljnt. :Das 2anb in ber Umgegenb t1on l."lub: . tuiAsburg ift felir fl.'ud)tfJar. ~5 tuerbcu


0

THE D. M.L. C. MRSSENGER

ior tJicle 3ucferriiben angepffo113t, ielcfJe bie '.BauPrn a11f i!Jren groflrn citertuagen in bie <Stnbt fa[Jren unb fiir incn nuten qlreii3 an bie j\'rancf 3icf)o' ienfnbrif tierfnuicn. ~13 tuirb aud) iefir iel Dlift ne1onrn, abcr bas meifte ttJirb 11 9Jloft \Jcrfeltert. ~ie 15tabt fcl!Jft ift nic!Jt, ttJie unfete 3tiibte, fd1iin in Ouabrate ausgelegt, onbern tueil fie a:is bem 17. ~aljrf)uu' •ert ftammt, ift i(Jre 2!nlage unregel' niiflig. ~ie erften .\)iiufer tuurben eoen af)in gcfJnut, tuo es nm fJequemften lllr. ~ie 15trniien finb fJreit, ungefiilir ttJeimal fo fJreit tuie 11nfere <Strnflen in rnferen 15tiibtrn. <Sie finb mit ge: auenen j3'elbfteinen gepffaftert. 15ie Jerben immer fcljr rein gef)nlten unb eljen oft reiner nue am 1111iere 15eiten= Jege. ~In lieiben \Seiten uon ben 3trnf;en finb 15cf)attenbiiume gepf(a113t, neiftens alte Sfaftnnirn. fffiir tucrben cttJifJ ertnarten, bnfJ fidJ nudJ <Strniiei1: 1n()11en in ber 15tabt befinbe11; ab er bi es ft nid1t ber iYnU, cs iinb feiue <Strafien= 1nl)ncn 1Jorf1nnbcn. :Die 15traflen tuer: 1en uidJt nur fiir jyuf)rltlerfe fJenu!Jt, onb2rn es finben auf ifJnen militiirifdJe lcfJu11ne11 ftatt. 3umal, tuenn ein arnbemarf cfJ nbgefJnlten toirb, tuiirbe i~1e '5trnflenfllllin fJinbedid) fein. :Die .\)iiufer finb nad) aft em fiib: 1eutf dJe111 15til gefJaut. <Sie tueif en Yncfituerf unb Ouerbnlfen auf. unb finb 1id)1 f)iif)er n!S 3tuei bis brei <StL1d. <Sie 1afJen {jolje @iefJcl mit fef)r fdJriigem flnd). ®ie finb fefJr na{)e an bie 5trnfle gefJaut, iifJnlidJ tnie unfere l'aufliiben ljiequlanbe. 2lud) fi11b fie iidJt an einanbergereifJt, bafl es fJeinalje niiglicf) ift, 0011 einem .f.>aus in bas 111bere ~II fteigen. 2l&er tuir biirfen tns nidJt nae @cbiiube fo tJorfteUen. ;5n ben lc!ltcn fiinfunb~1ua113io ~af)l'Cn

1tJ11rben feljr olele nene @e&iiube er= rid)tct, 11nb biefe finb nncfJ mobernem <Stll ge&aut. <B finb fiittf groflc lutf)e: riidie .~iid1en in ber <Stabt. ~ine baoon, bie @nrnif ontlfird)e gennnnt, ltlurbe 1903 eingetueiljt. ~ief e .R'ird)e ift ljau\,Jtf iid): licfJ fiir bas IDlilitiir &eftimmt. <Sie f)at fiinf grone :tiirme. auf iebem ~urm ift ein golbenes Sfreu3. ~s filnnen meljrere tauf enb <Solbnten in biefer Sfird)e un' terge&rncfit ltlerben. ~s giot nucfJ nod) meljrere anbere ltircf)en, unter bief en nucfJ 3tuei <StJna11ogen. Sm norb= oftlicf)en ~eil ber <Stab! fJefinbet fidJ ein .l)of\,Jitnl. ~iefei?l .l)of\,Jital ift nur fiir bie '.Burger fJeftimmt; int centrnlett :tell ber ~ tabt liegt ein grofles £n3arett, tueldJes nnljc3u tnufenb Sfranfe aufnefJ= men fonn. ~ieies £n3nrett ift fiir bas 9Jlilitiir oeftimmt. ~5 ift nicfJt nur ein 2.l3nrett fiir Eubtuigsliurn, ionbem fiir bas gnn3e stiinigreidJ ~iirt!emtierg. ITTicfJt tueit 00111 2n.1nrett Iiegt bas @e: fiingnis. fffiir ltliirbcn biefes ein <Stnnl!3= neiiingniS nennen; nfJer ljierljer fommen nur 6triifilllge, bie a!S <Solbaten ein ~erbredJen begangen lJallen. ~111 tueft!icf)en ~eil ber <Stab! liegt ein <Sd)lof;. ~s tuurbe im Snljre 170G 0011 bem .l)er3og ~berfJnrb £11btuig el" baut. :Dief es fScfilofl entfJii[t uierfJun= bert ,Rimmer, tue!dJe fdJiin beforiert finb. :Dns <SdJlrf; ift ga113 tJ·on gelJnnenen iYelbfteinen aufgefJnut. 2!n bcr E>iiboft= feite bes @ebiiubes ragt ein lJolJH, nmber '.lurm empor; a!S .l)er3og £ub1oig nocf) bort toof)nte, biente bief er am )l3ril1 atnef ii ngn is. 9Jlitten in ber <Stab! Iiegt ein grofler <See, ber iYeuerf ee genannt. ~s ift ein fiinftlidJer ®ee. iY.UlJer tourbe bas ®a ff er bief es '5ces [Jen11!Jt, ttJenn ei n ~euer irgenbtoo inber ®tab! ans&rad) . fffinr iYe11er e111ftn11bc11, fo tu11rbe ei 11e @focfe geliiutct, unb ba cB 3u ber Be lt


TllE D. M . L. C. MESSENGEH

nod) feitie ll;euer11.1efJr gab, famen nlle \Biirger beim ![S'euetfee 3ufnm111cn, ein jebet mit feinem <Eimer. 9hm fticgen etlidie 3um fillnff er f)i11nb unb gnben bie uollcn <Eimer nncf) obcn, I.Ion bort tour: ben fie tueiter!jegebett, tlott ffilnntt 3u ffilnnn, bis 3ur IBrnnbftiitte. fillir mii[ien un~ bas fo llorftellen, tole f)ier friif)er bie ,, 'Bucfetbrignbe" es mnd)te. ~n 2ul>tt>igsuurg finb mef)rere megi: menter einquartiert. ~s befinben fidJ bn ein ~nfnnterie<, ein 2trtiUerie~, ein Ulanen: unb ein Tlrngonerregimrnt, bn3u ber l:rnin. ~cl) lebte fieben ~nure unter ben 15o!baten eines 2lrtiUerieregi• mrntes. Tlte .fi'nferne biejes ITTcgimentes lir!Jt un11.1eit bel'l 2n3nrettes. 0:5 ift ein grof3e<5 @ebiiube mit fec!)tl 15todmerfen. ~)inter ber .~aierne liegen bie 15tiille unb bie @efdJil!Jfd)UlJ\Jett. .BrnifdJen ben 15tiillen unb ber Sfnf erne liegt ein grof3er ,\?of, 11.10 bie 15o!l:>atett q;eqierett. Ueber< f)nu)Jt im ®inter, Ulentt es 3u folt ift aus3uriidcn, toirb bier geilbt. ?nor bet ~nferne ftef)t tag unb nnd)t bie E:dJilb• nrndie, bie nlle 3tt>ei 15tunben abgeliift tuirb . Tins 2eben ber 15olbnten in einer Sfaferne fann mit br m l.lebett in unferem ~ntcrnat tlerglidien ltJerbett. O::s finb tlOlt brei3cf)n bii3 31onn3i!l mlann in jebem .3immer. \JJlornens um fed)s Uf)r tt>irl:> mit bet '.rrom)Jete bas !Signal 3lllll 2!niftcf)en negeben. 91ncf)bem fief) a[(e 8o!bnten gefldbet f)nben, gef)en fie in ben 15µeiief nn!, ltJo fief) ein jeber an einem <5dJalter feine \l.lott:on 15).Jeife !Jolt. C£in jeber [Jnt feine ei(!ene fB(ecf): fdJiiiid unl:> @nbel unb ffileffer. 15ie .befommrn nur einc Q3ortion. \Sollte einer mit bief er nod) nid)t fntt fein, fo finbet er llielleid)t einen st'nmeraben, ber il;m ein toenig uon feiner ~ortion gibt. %tdJ bcm 0:ff rn gcf)t cin jcber 3um st'afcrnenbrunnea unb tt>iifdJt feine

() l

\SdJilff d, @abel unb ffileff er. ~nntt tt>irb q;er3iert. fillenn bas fillettcr f c!Jon ift, toirb mit belt .li'nnonen au einettt tta6en ~reqier)Jln!J uor ber 15tnbt nu s: geriicft, ltJo bnnn bis nbenbs fµiit geilbt mirb. :tins ffilittngeif en tt>irb mit11e• nommen. <Es ift fid)erlidi fein grof3es \!lergniigen, ben gn11 3en '.tan au erer: 3ieren! 2!fJenb5, tt>enn jeber miibe ift, mufJ nUe!3 nodJ (le)Ju!Jt ttl'rb en, bamit nlles fiir ben niic!Jften ffilorgen bereit ift. ~as tt>nt 11tei11e ,\?eimn!Sflabt. ;fJief e O::rinnerung bnrcm ift mir licb unb ltJert; benn bie Sttgenb3eit ift eine ,8eit, bie man nie tmgif3t. '.l:ro(ibem tt>ilnfc!Je id) mid) nic!Jt mcf)r aurild.

!Wtiu

erfter mtttfam.,f .tlUJm.,ia.

in

~ie bierte Dfl)m)J iabe tt>nr burd) ein gliin 0enbe!3 ~ nmpfiµiel in D(l)mpia be: enoet. ~c!J l)ntte biefe .li'nm)JfflJiele be: fnc!Jt, nm mit ben Q3er1Jii1tniff en in Dl1J11ttJin uertrnut au tt>erben. \Rnc!J ten 15).Jielen fe6rte icfJ nncf) 2Ctl)en, meinet iBnterftabt, auriid unb begann f onleid) mid) itn @l)mnnfium au iiben. ~ines '.tnges, ali3 id) midi nnd) @e• ltJol)nl)eit im @t1mnafiu111 all 2!tf)en iibte, fam ein ,\?erolb, ber bas ,\?ernnnaf)en bet oltJmvifd)en 15).Jiele tJerfiinbete. Tlief er lub bie gnn3e e tnbt au bief em ~efte ein. ~a id) mir fcft uornenommen f)ntte, an ben .li'nm)JfftJUen teil;nnef)men, f o gin1t id) je!Jt nod) einmnl mit nllem O::rnft ans filled unb iibtc midi im £aufen, benn idJ ltJollte an bem einfad)en 2nuf teilnef): men. 2lli3 id) meiner ffileinung nnd) lnnB genug geiibt f)alte, trat idJ bie 9leif e nad) Dll)m)Jia an. ffilit brei meiner ~reunbe, bie nttdJ an ben <eµielen teilneljmen tt>ollten, 3og id) nun 3u ~ufl tJon 2!tfJen bii3 3ur .\?nfen• ftabt £ec!Jii1111t. man {Jiernu!3 ful)rett ttJir


2

THE D. M.t. C. MESSENGER

un in einem ec{Jifie bis nadJ O!t)mpia . 2115 id) bort angefo111111en Illar, melbete f) mid) iogle~d) uei ben .l)dlanobifen. lor biefen muflte idJ burdJ einen ~ib erfidiern, bali idJ ein Olried)e 11lar; benn !arbaren unb enauen fonnten fidJ nur rn Bufd)auer an ben '.illet1fii111µfen be: :i!i11en. ~i:l burfte auf mir fein \)'rel.le( 1ften; id) muflte bellleiien, bail idJ mid) •eni11ftens 3efJn :J'Jfonate fang ben gl: · ~lid)en moriibungen filr bie Sfiim\,Jfe nter3oflen 6atte; benn ben Buf d)auern t 0lt)mµia follte nic{JIS @ettlOfJnlic{Jes ?usten tuerben. Um meine ~iif)igfeit t beme ifen, muf3te idJ einen 9:Ronat .ng unter ben 2fugen ber ,\?eUanobifen 11 @t)mnafium 3u ~lis ilben unb bie robe mciner fi'amµffiif)igfeit beftef)en. rn ic{J bief e ffirobe beftanben ljatte, ufite id), ba id) lllilrbig befunben mnr• , an bett fillettfiimpfen tei!3unef)111en, 1r bem 2lltar bes 8eus fd)miiren, bafl 1 mid) im fillettfampf feiner Unreblid): .it unb feiner \llerle!Jung ber befte[Jen: 11 stamµfesregeln fc{Julbig marfien ollte. fil!S ber '.rag, bcr ben o[t)m\,Jif dJen 1.>ielen tlorangef)t, f)erangefommen lr, f)atte fidJ bas fo11ft fo iibe unb ein: me Dl~mpia m it einer groflen 9Ren: 1e11111enge angefilUt. ~en filfJenb tJor m i)'efte'fe'.ierten tllir mit Du fern unb bgef iingen 3um ~reife ber @otter. 2!111 dJften \JJ?orgrn bet!annen bi~ ·~ piele. i)cn lt>ii(Jren1' ber 91adJt f)atte fie{) ein of;er ~eil ber 8ufd)auer 3u ben @;i!Jen briingt, um fidJ einen ~la!J 3u fid)era. )I"! foflen fie f)arrenb bis 3um morgen, bie Sµiele begannen. 1)ie ,PeUanooifen, in purµurnen @e: inbern unb mit £orbeerfrn113en ge: milcft, fil(Jrtrn burdJ einrn \Jerbecften mg an ber filleftfeite bes ~tabium£1 bie up\,len bcr .fiiimµfer lierein unb ()men auf if)ren 0'6renfi!lcn in ber

mane bes .l)aupteingannes ~!a(3. ~a erf dJaUte ein 'trompetenftofl, unb ein ,Perolb tierfiinbete ben 2fnfang bes ~ampffpie[es. mun 11lurben a fie Sliimtifer llorgeruien, unb einei: ber ,PeUanobifen rebete uns a!fo an: lffienn if)r euc{J ben URilfJen unteqogen fJabt, lt>ie es fie{) fiir bie 3iemt, bie hen Sfampfpla!J uan D!tJ111pia betreten moUen, tuenn if)r feine pflic{JttJergeff ene unb uneb[e stat began= gen f)abt, lo fommt gutes 9:Rul5; tuer aber tion euc{J fidJ nic{Jt gebilorenb geilbt unb fie{) nic{Jt pflic{Jtmiiflig gef)a!ten f)at, ber gef)e llon f)innen, tuofJin er tuill." 21!6 ber .\)ellanobif bief e illnfpradle ge: f)alten f)atie, traten aUe fillettliiufer 3u ber Urne, bie bem Beus getueif)t tuar, um ))ie £of e 3u 3ivf)en. !nae{) bief em £ofe ttJurben 11lir nun gruppiert. 3ebes: ma[ [iefen uier £iiufer miteinanber. \Bon ben £of en tuar nadJ bem W!pf)abet je ein ~udJffabe uiermal uorf)a'.1ben, unb bie: ientgen £iiufer, bie benfe!ben ~uc{J: ftaben geloft f)atten, liefen miteinanber. film bas £of en beenbet 11lar, rief ein .\)erolb; ,,'Der .~ampf beginnt; ftellt eud) 3ur ~ntfc{Jeibung; bcn ~reis bes eieges tuirb Beus uer!eifJen." ~a idJ ben ~uc{Jftaben ~apua ge!oft f)atte, muflte id) in ber 3efJnten @ruppe mil= laufcn. mun lraten bie tJier erften £crufer vor, auf ein gegebenes BeidJen beginnt ber £auf. @:o lief eine @ruppe nadJ ber anbern. 3n her 3ef)11ten @rupµe tuaren 31t>ei \Jremb[inge nus euarta, etner meiner \Jreunbe nus illtf)en, unb idJ (~ol~farp). @!eidJ nadJbcm bie 11cu111e @ruµpe ge!aufen f)atte, fteUten tllir uier uns auf. illuf ein gegebenes Beic!Jen ftilnnten ttJir unter getlla!tigen E dJreien unb !aute111 Burnfen bem Biele 3u. filu5 biefem lliettlauf ging idJ nun 111it £eidi: t'gflit al5 E>ieger l)c1uor. ~!!5 nun cine jebe @rnpµe 11c!aufcn f)nttc, trnten bie


TH E D. M. L. C. MESSENGER <5ieon in brn ~nticV,eibungsfa111).Jf ein. ~'3 ftdlten fid) uierunb3tuan3ig l!Bellbe• toerfm auf. 2Cuf ein geirbenes ,3eic[Jen ftiir3ten ltlir los. ~n biejem st'am).Jf: ma s cs nid)t fo leid)t 3u fiegen, am in bem erften Sfamiife. %iinf ber l!Bettbe• ltlerbet ltlaren 3u gleidJer 3eit mit mir am Biele angelangt. 60 mujiten tuir breimal lauien, of)ne baii ber \Sieg ent• fd)iebeu 1uurbe. ~eim uierten \Ulale ge< lang es mir enblid), unter 2lufo).Jferung alln mciner .~rnfte, meine \Ulitbeltlerber 3u befiegen. <5obalb bas l!lolf bas rod), baii id) gefiegt f)atte, iubelte es mir laut 3u. mad) einer fleinen l!Bcile gab ber .R'ampfricbtcr einen lffiinf mit ber .Banb, unb bas 8ttrufen bes morres tierfjumme< te. '.Darauf gab mir ber ,\fain).JfridJter rinen \l.lalmitueig unb liefa(J( mir, mid) am folgenben '.J:ag 3ur \l.lreii3uerteihmg ei1131tfinben. ?naf)e am ~ingang ber lllltis ftanb red)ls ber fjeilige Oelbaum. '.Diefer IBanm roar ber <Sage nad) ber iiltefte ~aum bes .Bains. ?!Jon bief em ~au me f dJnitt ein eleif dier st'nabe aus uornefJmen @ef c[Jlecf)t, beff en ~!tern nod) beibe leuten, mit einem golbenen ~Jleffer bie 8tt>eige ab. 2lu s biefen 8roeigen ltlurben nun .fi'rnn3e geffod)ten. '.Die st'run3e tt>urben auf rniem nus @olb unb <Hienuei11 gearbeiteten '.J:ifdJe im '.J:cm).Je{ bes ,8eus uor bem (5tanbbilb bes @ott ~ s ausgrftrllt. .pier bertei(tcn bie .l)eQa, nobifen bie <5iegr 5).Jreife.

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lllm nndJften '.J:age ft ellle id) micf) fjier ein. uon meinen %reunben unb \Ber• ltJanbten unb 'oon ber molfsmenge lieglei< tet. mun ltJurbe burd) ben ,Berolb ber mame unb bas ?!latedano eines jeben <5ieo er5 ausgerufen. 2lud) mein mame ltJurbe ausgmtfen. '.Darauf fe()le ber 9hd)ter mir ben <5iegesfran3 auf. 2Hs icf) meinen <5iegesfran; erfjalten fjatte, 3og ic{J mit me inen %reunben 3u ben 2lltaren ber (~Hitter, um 3u opfern. ~in %eftmal)l, roeld)es bie ~leer ben <5iegern 3u ~f)re tJeranftalteten, lieenbete bes %eft ber oll:)ntpif dien <5piele. mad) bem jyefteff en trat icf) im \l.lurpurgeroanbe auf einem uon roeijien iRoff en gqogenen l!Bag en ben ~ilcf3ug an. \Bon jyreunben unt.- merltlanbten 3u ~ofl unb 3tt l!Bagen uegleitet, ~ og id) unter bem 3aucf)3en bes ~olf5 in bie <Stabt ein. Um meincm l!Bagcn lireite ~aljn 0u macf)en, dii man einen '.teil ber (5tabtmauer ein. ITTun beltlegte fief) ber jyefi3ug burc[J bie .f.)aupt• ftraii< 3u bent :tempel bes S)au).Jtgottes. Sn bief em :tem).Je( legte id} meinen St'ran3 a!5 lffiei6gef cf)enf nieber. .Bier;. auf ttJurbe ein <Siegesmaf)l aligefjalten. Iler ~eftimmung eines @ef el3es <So Ions gemiiii erlj ielt id) ein @efd}enf 'oon fiinf• f)unhert '.Dracf)men; ferner tuurhe mir uei allen ofientlicf)en jyeftlid)feiten ein ~6ren).Jla() 3nerfa1111t. sm. \UI. c' ~

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EXCHANGES "Flaygrounds" is the theme Jf the main discussion present-

od to the readers of "The Lin;olnian," of Lincoln, Ill. The ~ ditor of this article states nany important facts about Jlaygrounds for children. We ;annot favor the interspersion )f the literary articles with ad.rertisements.

Alma Mater. E. G. Sihler deserves very iigh praise on his contribution, 'My Acquaintance with the riber." His reflections on the 路acts are of great value. L. B. in t he December copy 1f Alma Mater by the way of nduction comEs to the concluson that "Women are the best etter writers." Next he elucdates clearly and fully the four nain points in letter-writing: t is a n index and exponent of :iv ilization; it is a developer of haracter; it is a medium for nomotion of friendship and af'cct:on; it is a medium for servng God. His. closing remarks LYG of such importance that we hink worth while to cite them 1sre: "Thnefore, let us write :::vilized' letters, not such as tristle with spelling errors, un7rummatical sentences, a cha::rin to the school we have atended, and the teachers who 1ave labored to perfect us. If i letter emphasizes character, ~t it display character, not fibrless, silly, insipid trash not ~'orth the ink used. Above all

remember as a Christian that 'whatsoever ye do in word or deed, with tongue or pen, do all to the glory of God." "Earnestness" well carries its point. The writer points out that a successful minister must above all be earnest, then sincere and humble; that these requisites are gifts of God and must be asked of him. G. v. B. says: "The form of a composition should always be and be only, the unseen and unnoticed servant of its masterthe contents." The quality of compositions considered, the Alma Mater is the best college paper on our exchange table. But why not have an exchange column? The Bethany Echo, Mankato, Minn.,-The Story "A Mission Box" lacks purpose. The short review on the Vicar of Wakefield is good. "The Silver Medal" by E. F. is a brave attempt at a short story. Keep alive the interest in short story writing! "The pupil who does not work with hope, ambition or love for her studies is sure to be a failure," are very appropriate words in "Back To The Grind." College Breezes, St. Peter, Minn.-The author of the article "Immigration and Our Country," in the January number, wishes to say that it jS perfectly natural for foreigner to resort to lawlessness taking into consideration the way the~' are treated by the American


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"Dollar Diplomacy." Men and the mode of living they are thereby compelled to lead. Then he goes on saying that it would be a fatal blunder to check the laboring class of immigrants from replenishing our ranks ; that methods resorted to by our lawmakers do not make the foreigners already in the land a better class of men, and states as a remedy "a sympathy on the part of 'Americans' that flows out to every creature of God."-The editorial on "Resolves" is good. He says that even if we fall short of keeping a resolution, it is an endeavor of the soul to lift itself a little higher out of the pit of human weakness, and that thereby we see, to some extent, the range of our faults and weaknesses. -Your efforts in the Oratorical contests are highly laudableThe author of "A Call to Leadership" wishes to see _ a "rural renaissance." He states that this can be achieved by educating the ' boy for a useful life on the farm by dropping the oldtime subjects, such as Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Latin, a course in English, Geography, etc., out of the school program and replacing these by such studies that further the cause of the farm. He even goes one step farther, when he says: "The Public School system is a successful failure." We cannot harbor that idea as yet, we still see some good accompublished by the Public Schools. Alfred Nelson, '14, wishes to solve the problem of Industrial Peace thru the Medium of Arbitration, Negotiation, and Con-

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ciliation. He says, furthermore, that under the present circumstances thru these - mediums Industrial Peace cannot be achieved, but that we must have more enlightened public opinion and public conscience, that the world should be flooded with the light of love, sympathy and understanding. Now we wish to ask: Have not almost all possible means been employed to create such love, sympathy and understanding? It seems to us that under present circumstan. ces the questions concerning In. dustrial Peace under discuss~o,., people must resort to the la31. and most horrid measure-war -before the problem of Industrial Peace is solved just as the slavery question of 1860-63 had to be settled by the same meami. -"It is better to lose a day and learn a lesson than lose a life. time and miss a purpose," are words very well commented upon by the author of "It Might Have Been." The Merit System applied to the election of college paper editors we believe, would greatly aid in getting the most proficient men on the staff.The College Breezes is a much read paper at our institution. Nuf said. The February Crucible of Greeley, Colorado, is mostly devoted to College Spirit. The other departments, however, are not neglected. . The Bethany Echo.-Mankato, Minn. The Silver Medal and Der Knabe Mit dem Affen are splendid beginnings in short story writing. The majority of your editorials are good. "Wit and Humor" take up more space


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than "Exchanges" and "Classroom," wh!.ch, of course, are nore important than the result )f -that speculatory over-subtle 路rnsoning on the part of the joke editor. 'I'he Lawrentian.-Appleton, W'. sconsin.-Your New Year's rnmber ha3 only one editorial rnd a well written sho:rt story. i'he other departments, with ~ xception of "news" and "jokes," . ire missing. The Manitou, Manitowoc, Wis. --Your short stories are good. 'Circles of Influence" teaches :hat cheating-and stealing is wt a great way off-is permit;cd in casr. of necessity. Do rou think that doctrine right? rhen the composition goes to ;how that a teacher has great n:fluence over a community, all rery true; only we think, a lit;le exaggerated in this case.

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Gates Index.-Neleigh, Nebr. -"Our life may be narrow, iard or busy, vision will fill it vith a wealth of glory." "God n Nature breathes much Chrisian spirit." R. G. B?st, '14, wishes to ;how that Woodsworth was the 'ather of romanticism, the Engish literature as Jean Paul Fr. lichter, Fr. v. Hardenberg, Wm. md Fr. Schlegel and Ludwig rieck were of great influence in rpening new avenues of thought o writers in the German langJ.age during the first half of the .9th century. The Black and Red.-Waterown, Wis.-Your January copy -well, let's call it a William F. ~eit~; Black and Red. Were the :hristmas vacations the cause

of not having more contributi.ons? We must compliment Beitz on his work. Your February number contains two very well written short stories. The short Historical Sketch has-as it seems to us-been misappropriated. When the Black and Red was put in its place in our reading room, many of the boys were diligently pouring over the contents. Lo and behold! Before 12 hours had elapsed, 24 of the students had mentioned to the exchange editor that "Stauffer und Braun" had written 99 7-10 per cent of that sketch on Abraham Lincoln and not G. K. '15. On comparison the editor has found that whenever changes were made in the original, they were changes for the worse and not for the better. Never attempt plagiarism; lies are shortlived. "Des Sangers Fluch" is a very interesting account in prose of the posm of the same name. The last issue of the Augsborg Echo, Minneapolis Minn., contains two very well written articlss-"The Kiev Ritual Murder Trial" and "College Education." The Railsplitter, Lincoln, Ill. -Although your paper is still in the days of its nativity, a vr:ry good paper I::es before us. We wish to commend your excellent short stories, your neat arrangement, and, above all, the novel name "The Railsplitter." Contribution for Augsburg, Echo, Minneapolis.-Your literary department of the December and January copies doss not contain enoug:D. English articles.


·TUE D. M. L. U. MESSE:'-!GEH

The contributor of "Transcendental Movement" does not fully state what is meant by such movement. Why is "Athletics" put into the Editorial department? The December copy contains praiseworthy notes on "To what extent is American literature American?" The article entitled "Freedom" shows lack of unity. Contributed by H . S. '16. "Ein Hoehlen bewohner" in

der letzten Alma Mater schlidert in recht drasticher weise, wie er als Sextaner zusammen mit einen Quartan_er und Quintaner sich eine Pfahlbaute errichten und hier "Bull Durham" rauchen. Indianer Geschichten eu;g.ehlen unci lesen und Kartoffeln braten. Das ganze ist in leicht verstaendlichem, wohklingendem und fiieszendem Deutsch g<:.'3chrieben.

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COLLEGE NOTES On the 19th of December, all the students, with the exception of one or two, left to spend their Christmas vacation with their folks at home. Almost all enjoyed themselves at their homes. On January 5th, all had returned with a fresh supply of energy for their work. ...... ~ ........ CONCERT. On January 30th, we had the rare opportunity to hear some classical music, played by the St. Paul Symphony Orchestra. Nrnrly all our students made use of this chance, admiring grrntly the perfection with which the pieces were rendered.

CATHECHESES. Delivered to the upper class of the local Lutheran Parochial school by members of "A" class. Jam\ary 28, 1914, L. Luedke:

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"Heilung des Taubstummen ;" Miss Stephan: "Die Entwickelung des Objekts;" M. Dommer: "Lincoln's Boyhood;" Feb. 4th, W. Hohenstein: "Der Pharisaeer und der Zoellner;" Miss Josephine Vick: "Lincoln and his Public Life;" E. Backer: "First Step in Decimals;" Feb. 11th, M. Dommer: "Jesus der Kinderfreund ;" Miss Helene Vick: "Lincoln as President;" L. Luedke: "Decimals, Addition;" Feb. 18th, E. Backer: "Zachaeus ;" W. Hohenstein: "Washington's Boyhood;" Miss Stephan: "Review in Addition;" Feb. 28th, Miss Helene Vick: "Martha und Maria ;" W. Hohenstein: "Continuation;" M. Dommer: "Subtraction of Decimals;" March 4th, Miss Stephan: "Review of Subtraction of Decimals ;" March 11th, Miss Josephine Vick: "Physical Geography of U. S. ;" W. Hohenstein: "Multiplication of Decimals."


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(2 Str. gem. Chor solo.) Herbei, o ihr Glaeubigen On Feb. 27th, Prof. Meyer Portugis Volkslied 6. Deklamation: Weihnachts:elebrated the forty-first return nacht ____ ___ ____ _Prutz )f his birthday. On this occa(Edna Fritz). ;~on he "treated" the students. 7. Zwiegespraech, Sologesang PROF. ACKERMANN'SBIRTH- (Alma Dahms, Lizabeth Reuter) DAY. 8. Trio ueber Stille Nacht F. Seitz On Jan. 11th, 1914, occurred Violine (Ehlke), Cello (Koehler) .he forty-third anniversary of Klavier (Koenig) ;)rof. Ackermann's birthday. 9. Deklm. Weinachtsfest, (Arndt) _____ R. Reineck :rof. Ackermann "treated" the .tudents to an extra supper. ' und allgm. Gesang: Der llany happy returns of the day. Christbaum G. Eisenbach CHRISTMAS PROGRAM. 10. lVIaennerchor: Zu Bethlehem ein Kindelein In the evening of Dec. 18th, F. Reuter n entertaining program was Es ist ein Ros' entsprungen __ ______ __ 15. Jahrh endered in the aula, as has een the custom of the last few 11. Ansprache -ears. Rev. Koehler of NicolPastor F. Koehler .~t, was so kind as to help us 12. Allgm. Gesang: 0 du mbellish the celebration by defroehliche vering a pleasant speech. A Sicilien-Volksweise 1erry crowd had gathered, and 13. Deklm. W eihnachtssegen, veryone, we think, enjoyed the (H. Naumann) _H. Mosel vening very much. The fol- 14. Gemisch. Chor: GloriaRochlich ____ ___ Reuter )Wing is the program: 1. Allgm. Gesang: Von HimBlasinstrumental u. Klavierbegleitung (Koenig) mel hoch Lied, 117, 1. 2. 3. 6. 15. Orchestra: Christmas Echoes ___________ E. Books Dr. M. Luther 2. Gemischter Chor: Tochter 16. Allgm. Gesang : W ohlan, so Zion ________ G. Haendel will ich nichLK. Ziegler Kommt ihr Hirten Lied 129, 4. Altboehmisch Volkslied 3. Melodrama: Markt und BAND CONCERT. Straszen ______ Raillard (Dommer und Backer) Given in the aula on Feb. 21, 1. Gemischter Chor: Es war- in honor of George Washington, en Hirten __ Prof. Reuter under the leadership of Prof. Hugo Mos el. The program reads (Klavier: Westerkamp und as follows: Koehler.) 1. American Soldier March >. Allgm. Gesang: StilleNacht Fr. My3rs F. Gruber

PROF. MEYER'S BIRTHDAY.


TU E D. M. L. C. MESS E NGER

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Bohemian Girl _____ Balfe Overture: Flotte Bursch Suppe (Westerkamp und Koenig) 4. Holy City-Trombone Solo Laurendean (George Meyer.) 5. Frisch gesungen_F, Silcher (Quartet) 6. National Airs ____ Kapelle 7. Lang, lang ist 's her _Bayly Gemischter Chor, Dirigrert v. ___ ___ _E. Backer 8. Violin Solo: Chr. Koch, Begleitung ____ A. Koehler 9. Declamation-Parodie: Der Erlkoenig. (Muesing u. Naumann) 10. Operatic Pearls-Selection Laurendean (Kapelle) 11. Dichter und Bauer-4 haen dig ________ ____ Suppe (Frl. Stephan u. W. Retzlaff) 12. Waves of the Danube-Walzer ____________ Ivanici (Kapelle) 13. Freundschaft u. Liebe F. F. Fleming (Quartet) 14. The Keep Sake-Serenade Laurendeau (Kapelle)

some excellent players through graduation last June it had sufficient material to fill out the vacancies. If we consider that the greater majority of the band members are "newcomers," we must praise it for the standard it has reached. If we look into the future, the prospects for a good band next year look bright.

MALE CHORUS. Our male chorus this year has probably not reached the standard it had Ia.st year since a considerable number of good voices have left us. Nevertheless, it has been proved capable of rendering some classic selections under the able leadership of Prof. Reuter.

ORCHESTRA.

Our orchestra is in a flourishing condition. It is probably the largest we have had for several years. Under the able leadership of Prof. Reuter our orchestra has reached a standard which is attained by few amateur orchestras. The orchestra In one of our smooking club â&#x20AC;˘ consists of the following pieces: meetings Emil Janke, president Twelve first violins, twelve secof the club, resigned. Dr. Spaude ond violins, one viola, one cello, was elected in his place. ¡ one bass viol, two cornets, one clarinet, one flute, two French horns, two trombones, a snare D. M. L. C. BAND. drum and a bass drum. It w!ll be of some interest to OUR NEW ORGAN. the n aders of our Messenger to hear something of our musical It was mentioned in our last department. Our military band has been organized last year, Messenger that our new pip~ under the leadership of Prof. organ would be here by the first Mosel. Although it has lost of February, as the firm had


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promised. But on account of too much work, it requested one or two months more time. We may now expEct the organ to be here by the first of April. ~Im 14. ~cbntnr \llnb in unferm '.trntidiucrcin cin l,j.\ronramm ftatt. ~'3 batten fid) an bicicn1 \j3roriramm bie 9Jliibd)en ber ~!11ftol1 311111 erften 9Jlnl tege bcteitirit. '.tcr Slnn~unft bes ~ro' grnmm'3 tvar icbod) nid)I bi~ tuofJlborne' b otenen mufifnlif dJrn nodJ literarifdJen 91ummern, fonbrrn bie ':De!Jotte ,,'tlic ~qiefJung in ber @emeinbe\d)ute ift einer foldJen in ber 'ij;reifd)ule uorAU• ~icfJen." ~in fur3er ~lus3ug ber ':De• b111te folgt: ':Die offirmatiue ®eite tier• trnten bie .\)erren ~. evoube unb ~rid) !tirfdJfe u1ill 'ij;rl. £. ®te\llian. '1:ic ncgatiue iifJernafJmen bie .\jerrcn ~. ?illirt!i, .\). ®i!l nnb 9Jl. £. ':Dommer. ,\ )en evaubc eriiffnctc bic ':Debatte, in' bem er auf bic silor!Jilbun11 unb ben IF!jarafter ber £cf)rer, ben Wert ber religii.i'3,fittlidm ~qief)ung in ber @e• 111cinbefdJnlc fJintuie'3 unb iiucr bie oft nidJt iureidJenbe ~us!Jilbung ber £ef)l'er unb £elJrerinnen in ber l)'reifdJule ctlidJe llli11111c11 ,8eit tierlor. .l)el'l' Wirt (ncn.) anttoortete inbem er oie mifJuerftiinbiidJen ®u!Je bes ,Perrn 5vaube erliiuterle unb bann auf bie l3orbilbungsanftalten fiir i.ifirntlidle 5dJullc!Jrer unb £d)l'erinuen l)inmic'3. Dann mad1te er auf .5)au~!jalt5funbc unb DO 11 bier\ t!}fei [~Un letrid)t, \Bu d)f ii !jreJl I Stenogra\l!jie u1ib Sliubcrnarten in ben ifiPn llidJen Ed)ulen aufmerf[am. 0

,Perr SfofdJfe (afi.) ueriudJte borauf Hld)3Utucifen 1 bali bie OOCl1011(leiiifJrlen ~iidJet nid)t in bas ®d)u[toefen nef)i.iren. fr 100Ute nur ITTedinen, £ef.cn, EidJreiben 111b na6euerlvanbte l\·nd1er f>etrieben cf)ell. 6obonn 0-ulierte er eine \Jeifi~

miftifdJe 2!nficfJt iibrr ~r3ief)1111g in ben inbem er jagte, boli in ben \SdJu[ea nur gelef)rt 11.lirb, tuie man am leid)teften ben ~oUar ergrcifen unb {Jalten fiinne. ~reifd111len,

.\)err .I). ®i!l (neg.) tuiberlegte, toa'3 311 toiberlegen 1oar, nnb tuie5 bann anf mor!Jilbungsanftalten (1:ead1ers ~ll' ftitntcs), .£efe3irfc1 (ITTeabing O:irdes), auf bie ftrafie Drnanijation, auf bie 3mecfmufiiqe ~inteilung ber ®d)iiler' gruµven ouf bie \lom ®taate beftimmte ®dJulµfficht, auf bie ll111Aeb1111g unb inneren ~inrid1tungen in ben iifient' tidJen ®cfJulen f)in. ~rl. \Ste)Jf)an fudJte a11s anncfii[Jrlen ®tcUen ber ,Peilinen \SdJrift 11acf)311• toeiien, bali bie i.ifient!id)e ®dJule nor: nidJt er3ief)e11 fi.inne. 9Jl. 'ilommer (nen.) ging na[Jer anf ':Di§3iµlin, llircfte unb i11bi1efte £efw mittel unb £efm1tan cin. G:r !job be• fonbrn3 am cf)arfterbilbenben llnterrid)t ben llnterridJt in ber l!Beftgef dJid)le !jer• uor. ~r tuies fcrner{)in 11ad1, bofl einem jeben £e()rer in ber 'il;reifd)u!e in ':Di'3: 3ipli11or,%iillen and) bas Wort @ottetl 3u @ebote fte!je • ~ie m:libedenunn befeftinte 3u111eift bie 9fnfid)t ber nfiirmatiuen 6eite. ':Die \SdJiebsridJter ftimmten ab: 9lff. 2, 9?e(l. ] • silrof. >Jicfermann am .!fritifer bes a!Jenb'3, fonte 3u111idJft, bafi !Jeibe ~eiten in \Beneiftenmn fiir if)re <SadJen et10ai3 iiber bot> 8ie[ f)inautlgcfdJoffen f)utten, jobann tuie'3 er ans ber @e• fdJidJte ber l!lom\fd)ufe nod), bali, 111e1111 es feine @enteinbefd)ltlen n1·ge!Jcn fJiitte, uieUeidJt nie cine silolfS[d)ltle erridJtet tvorben miire. ~'3 1oies ondJ barnuf [Jin, bafl bie \lrnftiidJcn ~iid)er in ber 'ij;rci• fdJnle nidJ( 3u111 EidJOben feicn. ~m. £. <:D. '14.


THE D. M L C. MESSENGER

H. Mueffelmann, a former student of our institution, visited here Sunday and Monday, Dec. 'ith and 8th. Mrs. Ziegler called on her son, Albert, Monday, Dec. 8th. Prof. Meyer delivered a sermon at Sleepy Eye, Dec 14th. Frank Seibel enlisted in our school, several weeks before Christmas. Walter Hohenstein, who had been acting as vicar in the parochial school at Mazeppa, S. D., during the latter part of the last school year, re-entered hit, class, immediately after Christr:ias.

Rev. Strandt, who has charge of a Lutheran congregation near St. F-tcr, visited his son here J)ln. 27th. who enlisted in our institution after Christmas. The Misses Strandt and Zi.cg-ler, students of the St. Bethauy College, Mankato, spent Saturday, Jan. 30th, with their bi others at our college.

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Prof: It is deeds, not wo.rds, that count. Student: Did you ever send a cablegram? Prof. Ackertnann delivered a sermon in Trinity church at St. Paul, Feb. 1st. Mr. Wielke, of Lewisville, Minn., called on his son, Feb. 10th. Der Yater liest seines Schnes Zeugnis, der 59 Strafzeichen hatte: Was! blos 59 in "demerits?" Der verdolter Lausbub haette sich <loch 70 holen koennen. The Misses Helena and Josephine Vick have enrolled in our college to take up a special course in German, after Christmas. Rev. Naumann was here on business, March 2nd. Gustave Fisher, a graduate of our college, stepped off a few hours, Feb. 21st, while on his journey to Vienna, where he intends to continue his studies in the university of that city.


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Hc:1ry Albrecht v.isited with friends and classmates, Feb. 26th and 27th. Leo Luetke was called home 3at urday, F eb. 21st, to be pres~nt at the funeral of his grandnother. 0. Urban has returned to ;chool. As an operation for ap-

pendicitis had been performed on him, he spent a few weeks at his, home. C. Hinz complied with the invitation to be present at his sister's wedding. He left Feb. 24th, and returned after a few days to continue his studies.


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGEH

Prof.: Wer ist der Oberste in den Vereinigten Staaten. Shine: (Der nicht aufgepasst hat) Der Kaiser. Prof: Was haben die Brueder Joseph's mit seinem Rock getan. Rixe: Sie nahmen ihn und tauch ten ihn in einen Ziegen bock.

A. Is he related to you? B. Yes, distantly. My grandfather and his grandfather used to steal chickens from the same coop. Prof: W o liegt die Stadt Korinth? Kolly: Korinth licgt in Jerusalem in Palaestina. Grams, reading in "Minna von Darnkelm" Du kennst den Prinzen riicht, der in naechster Tage die automatische (attomanische) Pforte einsprengen wird'?

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(Heard in tlie class room): I'll have to excuse myself beca~se r am naemlich: "Der Deutsche Michael." Elsie, Kapellmeister von Oben, intends to discontinue his studies at Dr. M. L. C. and travel for the Humoring Tailoring Company. Emilie, Trettin behauptet, dass Minna von Barnkehn ein "Luft .. spiel" (LustspielJ ist. Schueler: Kann man auch fuer etwas bestraft werden, wenn man etwas nicht getan hat? Lehrer: Nein mein Junge. Schueler: Ich habe meine Lektion nicht studiert. Kiecker and Spaude are not going to get their hair cut any more, because they intend to start a hair dressing parlor 111 the near future in room 62.


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Durham (in bed) That scared ne so, that I nearly fell out of ied . Kiecker: While going to hed ast night heard his gall stones ·a1. tle. Prof: Where is your dictiontry? Student: In my room. Prof: Well pickle it there. Elsie's new Georie (Theorie) ,11 those who don't get "imped" vaccinated) are ''cheap-skates.'' was "imped" in order not to isfigure my facial beauty. Prof: "Was heisst tragisch?" Hack: "Das, was man nie11t ragen kann." 1 the Geography Period. Prof: Wl;at is irrigation? Rex: Artificial rain. M itschueler: Was ist ein J akoiner? Sitz: Ein Kosack. Prof. (In Physics treating bout Sundays.) Ifyou were to , •Ok in a piece of glass, what ould you see? Blink: A Monkey. I wonder who's getting all the nchers. Let's get some! Prof: Wie kommst du in diesen tz hin? Wilbrecht: Zu Fuss.

Geck: Die Griechen haben ein Gedicht schandaliert. Mops didn't have his glasses on when going to bed one night, so he just slept in the hall with his head up against the radiator to serve as a pillow. Doc. Wentzel bucked so hard one night, that smoke issued from the top of his head. Johnson chews the best grade of "Piperiamsick" tobacco on the market. Prof: What are shell-fish? Stra11d: Fish that have copper and tin shells. Pautz plante ein Solo bei einer feierlichen Gelegenheit zu singen; er bedauert es jetzt, dass er sich eine Erkaeltung zugezogen hat, die sich durch das ganze Jahr erstreckte. M. L. D. vom D. M. L. C. war kuerzlich auf der "Falkenjagd." Er hat seine Falkin erheischt; jetzt geht das Hasenjagen besser. Speck and Rex have the opinion that they receive exuberant grace from the "Dominican Order." Who is go!ng 28 blocks or twice that for everv Sunday? • A. M . F.


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Two Independent Weeklies

Artistic Printing at Moderate Prices German and English Printing


HENRY SINKEL PHOTOGRAPHER

The Best Located Studio in Your Town Once Your Photographer, . Always Your Photographer. COME AND SEE ME

PATRONIZE

Come in and let us play for you on the Hamilton Piano. Its tone is of the sweetest. Our terms are of the easiest.

"Messenger"

W.J. Winkelmann

ADVERTISERS

New Ulm, Minn.

THE BEST DRUG STORE

Drugs, Medicines, Toilet Articles, Books, Stationery, and School Supplies. at

Olsen's Model Drug Store Kodaks, Cameras and Photographic Supplies Fine Cigars and Tobaccos. Physician's Prescriptions carefully prepared from fresh and pure drugs by Registered Pharmacists.

0. M. OLSEN, Druggist. Olsen Block

Phone 79

New L'lm, Minn.


Pioneer Drug Store W. G. Alwin, Manager.

E.G. Hage, Prop.

A. Henle, Assistant.

E sell the HOUSTON FOUNTAIN PEN. The most perfect pen in the world. An indisptnf'a ble article for a student and bookkeeper. Non-leakable, self-filling, and one that you can't lose. Come and see us. We will be pleased to show it , to you.

W

PIONEER DRUG STORE

The Bee Hive Up-to-Date Dry Goods House Is offering some remarkable bargains in

SPRING AND SUMMER GOODS Everything to be had in a first-class dry goods store, prices always the lowest

J. A. 0 CHS, The Bee Hive The originator of low prices on good goods

NEW ULM GREENHOUSES CHRIST. BOOCK, Propr. 11,000 ft. of Glass

Growers of ROSES, CARNATIONS and Other Choice Cutflowers, as well as ornamental and bedding plants. We furnish first class, fresh stock, 路 atid all orders entrusted to us receive our most careful attention. BETTER SUITS, OVERCOATS and FURNISHINGS Special Discounts to

Ministers, Professors and Students tN~ORPORATr

D_

_ F. P. ZSCHUNKE, Treas.

Our four store purchasing power is your gain Stoces at:

New Ulm, Min路1.

Bro:>'.dngs, S. D.

Howard, S. D.

Harvey, N. D.

'r


.. herewith beg to solicit the College Trade. Please come in and get acquainted. The things in our line, of interest to you, are musical instruments, violin strings, fountain pens, watches, jewelry, etc. When your watch or your glasses need looking after call on us. We will give you a fair deal at all times. c. G. REIM, The LeadingJeweler

. TAKE NO CHANCES USE

COMPASS or ANGELINA FLOUR to get the best results We have a new up to date mill and gua rant e e every sack

NEW ULM ROLLER MILL CO .

.

J. M. Meyer

EUGENE KOEHLER'S Barber Shop and Ba th Rooms Respectfully Solicits your p atronage

20 N. Minn. St.

LEADING JEWELER

New Ulm, Minn.

- - - - - - - ----

- ~--~~~

G. A. OTTOMEYER H e adqu arters for

New Ulm,

Minn.

LADIES' READY - TO - WEAR and FINE DRY GOODS

OUNG men ought to see the smart new models in suits we have ready for them; patch pockets are quite a feature, and there's a very snappy Norfolk vest that will "get you." Hart Schaffner & Marx made it; one of the best of the new spring styles. See what we'll show you in suits at $20. We have other makes as low as $12 and up to $40.

Y

Emil Metzinger This store is the home of Hart Schaffner & M a rx clothes


. We can save

you money oo

everythi~g

you ' need in

'\

l.:

.

.Our stock includes every college reqnisite, and l:iy buying here your "choice is wide on differen.t items. We are .always. ~n the lookout for and

, have everything new and up-to-date, and .as. our stock keeps pace with the ad'vane-. es ~ade in

\

equcati~nal needs · y~u may

depend 90 this store having· all the very '


For the finest line of

MEN'S CLOTHING AND FURNISHINGS

Call on

Crone Bros. No store anywhere can show a more thoroughly representative line of Merchandise Established 1875

Telephone No. 7

New Ulm Brick & Tile Y ds. New Ulm, Minn.

FR. AUFDERHEIDE, Propr. Common Brick-40,000 daily Curved Well Brick Pressed Brick Fire Brick and Fire Clay

Cement Drain Tile-4 to 36 in. Cement Silo Blocks Cement Fence Posts Cement Brick and Blocks

EVERYTHING NEW

MEET

Am now open for business in the Winkelmann Block, Cor. Minn. and Center Streets.

Your Friends

GASTLER, the Photographer

Reliable Drug Store

AT

Pfefferle's


Telep hone 128

Established 1883

Jtil/i6a/d &i6ner .9.Jake rg,

.J'ce <!!ream a .7d

<!!onf'e ction e ry

WHOLESALE a nd RETAIL

108 N. Minneso ta St.

New Ulm, Minn.

EVERYTHING that he or you will wish to wear this season from Hat to Hose, from Suits to Overcoats. Anything in the line of dress we don't have our New York Buyer will get for you.

Hummel Brothers 14 No. Minnesota St.

New Ulm, Minn .

Weneeda Bakery and Restaurant Opp os ite G rand Ho t e l

F. W. EIBNER, Propr. I h ave recently added m ater ial improvements to my establis hm ent, making it o n e of the most up-to-date in this sec tion of th e state, and am now in a position to give my m any patrons the v:e r y b est of service . We lay particular stress upo n cleanliness a nd quality. Yo u are cord ia ll y inv ited to make m y establishment yo ur h e adqu a rters at a ny time when you are in New Ulm


ECONOMY is nothing more than getting y our money's worth You get more than your money's worth when you buy

Daniel Webster Flour EAGLE ROLLER MILL CO.

F.H.RETZLAFF A complete line of

Hardware Cutlery

The Fair Store Appreciates

y~mr

patronage

Fair Prices Fair Treatment

}

OUR Motto

and Safety Razors

THEO. B. MELZER

MODEL GR .O CERY PHONE 72

Fancy and Staple Groceries, Delicatessen of all kinds , Exclusive agent for Chase & Sanborn Coffees It pays to advertise; that is why we do it.

W. H. BIERBAUM,

Proprietor


FOR THE BEST LINE OF

FOOT

WEAR

in the city go to

P. W. HACKBARTH THE SHOE MAN All kinds of repairing neatly executed.

225 N. Minn. St.

THEO. MUELLER Manufacturer of and D eal e r in

Fine Cigars and Smoker's Articles Largest assortment of Pipes, Cigar Holders and Tobaccos, etc. west of the Twin Cities Both Phones

New Ulm, Minn.

Ruemke Bros. We Carry a Complete Line of Fancy and Staple Groceries, Dry Goods and Notions which we offer for sale at Lowest Prices

New Ulm Steam Laundry Nagel & Leary, Props.

Launderers and Dry Cleaners New U lm, Minn.

W eilandt & Stegeman CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS Correspondence Solicited Work done in any section of this Community. Plans and Specifications Furnished Estimates Cheerfully Given Office 1100 Center St. Doth Phones 571


LITERARY NEW ULM, MINN., ,JU1'iE 1914

VOLUME 4

NUMBER 4

{Jie1t er morfef ungen in 2cip3ig, unb am ®onntag nadj bcn @ottcl3bienften {Jieft ben 27. WCai 1914. er .\Bortriige iiber bibfifdje ~{bfdJnitte. ~ic Qcbcnsbef d1reibunQ ~uguft ~er• ~fl3 er fpiiter auf ben Uniberfitiiten bon mann iJ>ranfes. BmeifeI unb Ungfauben angef odJten ~13 ift cin aITgemein anerfann ter ®a~, ltlurbe, femte er bal3 bamaiige ®c(mI• bafi bci ben WCiinnern, bie elnen qerbo1:. ltlefen fennen, unb er befdJiofi einft cine ragenben ~infTufi auf bie @eftaitung djriftlidje 2Inftaft 3u ftiftcn. Sm Sa{)re bcr Sugcnbcqiequng aul3geiibt qaben, 1690 ltlurbe \)'ranfe aI13 '.Diafon nadJ lqrc cigene 2ebenl3fiiqrung bie fJiidJfte ~rfurt berufen, unb baib barauf befam .\Bebeuhmg oat. ®ofdJe WCiinner ltlaren er cine ®te((e aIa l.j3rofeff or an ber 2!11101'.l (£ommeniul3, ~fouff eau unb an• neugegriinbeten Uniberfitiit 3u ,Pane. bm. ~iner ber ijerborragenbften luar ,Pier unterridJtete er in ber griedJifdjcn ~fuguft ,Permann \)'ranfe. unb ben orientafifdJen ®pradjen. Sebcn 2Iuguft ,Permann IT;ranfe ltlurbe am '.nonnerl3tag famen 2Irme .;u ifJm inl'.l 22. WCiiq 1663 3u 2iibecr geboren. ~r $farr{)aul'.l. ,Pier Iemte er bie Un· fam, afl3 fein mater bon ,Peqog ~rnft hliff en{)cit ber 2Irmen fennen unb mcrfte afl'.l Sufti3rat berufen ltlurbe, nadj bafi bie 2I rmut nur baran ®dJufb fci. @otqa. 2Ifl'.l ber Sl'nabe fieben 3'a{)re ~r Iiefi im Saf)re 1695 cine 2Irmen• aft ltlar, berfor er feinen mater. '.t'ic biidJ[e in felner 5IBofJn[iul:e befcftigcn \))(utter pffegte ifjn unb bie iibrige.1 unb oben briiber fd)rciben 1 Sol). 3, 17: @efdJltliftcr, unb \)'ranfe befudjte bafb ®o jemanb ber 5IBeft Gl iiter {)at unb bie ~{nftaft ber ®tabt. ®piiter [tu• [ieijet felnen 5Bruber barfJen unb fdJkufit bierte er .;u ~rfurt, Sl'icf unb ,Pamburg, fcin ,peq uor iijm 3u, hlie bfeibet bie ltlo er cine griinbiidJe Sl'enntnil3 bcr ~iebe @ottcl3 bci ifJm? unb banmter 2 {)ebriiifdJcn ®pradje befam. ®cit 1685 .l'ror. 9, 7: ~in jegiidjer nadJ ieiner ~etu

urm, 9.J(inn.,


78

THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

m3intiir, nid)t mit Unlnillen ober ,Blnang, benn einen friH1lid1en ®eber f)at ®ott lie.b. Sn biefe 5Bild1fe kgte einft eine 1nol1!tiitige $erfon 7 ®ulben. Wla l)'tanfe biefe faf), fpracf) er: ,,'.t>aa ift ein ef)rlid) Stapital, balJon mufl man etlna0 l)?ed1te0 ftiften; idi lnifl eine Wrmenfd1ule bamit anfangen." Grr fdiritt fogleid) 3um m3etf, faufte 5Biicf)er, befterrte einen armen @5tubierenben, bet untmid1ten fonte, unb balb lnurbe ein ®ebiiube gemietet. ~m niid1ften Saf)r befam bie ~nftalt fd1on ben ITTamen $iibagogium. S m Saf)re 1698 lnurbe bet. ®runbftein 3u einem eignen 5Bau gefegt. @5piiter fam ba3u ein ~ef)rerfeminar, eine 5Budjf)anblting, 5Budjbruderei unb anbere ® ebiiufig ~ feiten. '.t>utd) ben @5egen ®ottee f)atte l)'ranfe @5tiftungen gegriinbet, bie f)eute nodi einen fjof)en %1f)m f)aben. l)'ranfe lnirl'te immer an feinen @5djulen unb genofl grofle Grf)re non Stonig, ~ef)rern unb @5djiilern. m3enige stage \Jot feinem stobe lnurbe er im ®arten bee m3aifenf)aufee umf)ergefaf)ren unb banfte ®ott fiit bie m3of.Jftat, bie er if)m er\uiefen fJatte. ~m 8. Suni 1727 ftarb er fan ft unb felig. m3ie [ein gan~ee ~eben, fo lnar aud) fein ~ebeneenbe, lnie aud) in feiner ~eidjen ~ rebe non Stromer gefagt 1uurbe. '.Dit \nadjridrt non feinem stobe mad1te nid)t allein in ,Paffe, fonbern audJ ttJeit unb breit in ber eoangefi fdjen ~f)riftenf) eit tief en Grinbrud. Grin iebea f)atte baa ®efiif.Jl ,bafl ein lniift.;eug bee ,Penn ge~ ftorben fei. Gr. '.t>. 5!3.14

S)ic

~euto6urgcr

Sd1fod1t

m3ie 1uir 1uiffen, ~Jatte Ctiifar einft gan3 @amen er~bert. '.t>er lnf)ein bUbete bie ®ren.;e 3lnifdJen germanifd)en unb romifdJen ~ilnbern. '.Die ffiomer be~ faflen baf)er oief ~anb . ~bet lnie e0 gelnol)niicfJ ift, .ift man nicfJt 3ufrieben mit bem, baa man f.Jat: man lnilf immer mef.J t. @:Jo lnat'a aUU) mit ben ffio ~ mern. @:lie lnorrten if.Jr ~1eidj immer miid)tiger madjen. @5cf)on Iange f)atten bie lniimer if)r ~ugenmert auf ®er~ manien gerid1tet. Staifer 2(uguftui3, bet na~ ~iifar\'3 stob auf ben 5tfJton fam, fdJidte feinen ®tie ffof.Jn '.Drufua mit einem miidJtigen ,Peete aue, um ®ermanien 3u erobern. Gre geiang if) m audJ, etlidJe Q3olfcr~ fdJaften 3u be.ituingen. ~ber einee stagea f!iiq te er \Jom ll3ferbe unb ftarb aud) balb barnadJ an bet m3unbe. S f.J m folgte [ctn 5Bruber stiberiue. Grr fe~te bie Grrobmmgen fort unb griinbete cine @5tattfJaiter[dJaf t. Griner ber @5tattf)alter fJiefl DuintHhri3 Q3aruo. Grr fo r be rte fcfJll!m 2f6gaben non ben ®ermanen unb fiilJr te romifdJe @5itten ein. '.t>ie ebef[ten Siinglinge Iiefl er nad) ffi om brlngen, bamit fie bort bie romifcfJe Sl'riegefunft lernen fonten. m3egen einee ceringen mergef)ene luu r~ ben bie ®ermanen oft fdJlller bcftraf t. '.Diefe 5Bef.J anb1ung ber ®ermanen \Jon feiten ber ~tiime r mad)te bie @ermanen begeiftert, bae fdJlllm .3'ocfJ ab3utnerfen. '.t>iea forrte aucfJ barb burcfJ einen fiifJnen ,Pelben gefdjef)en. Bu biefcr ,Belt ftanb im romifdJen Striegobienfte ein germani[d;er S ling ~ ling, namen\'3 ,Permann, and) 2f rm in


T£1E D . M L. C. MESSENGER

genmmt. '.tlie[er [al) bie ~d)madj fei< nel'.l Q3olfel'.l unb loartete nur nodj auf cine ®efegenl)eit, [ein Q3olf 3u befreien. \.Had)bcm er aul'.lgebient l)atte, fefJrte er nod) [einer .Peimat 3uriicf. .Pier [am' mdte er cine 0d)ar \Jon tiid)tigen Shiegern. film 9. ®eptembcr bel'.l S'af)rel'.l 9 n. ~l)r. fdJfug bie .\Be' freiunneftunbc her ®ermanen. marttl'.l brad) fcin 0ommerfager an bcr }ffiejer ab, um an ben ml)ein 3uriicf3ufel)ren. '.Da l)tirte er, bafi ein filuf[tanb in feinem ffiiicfen aueaebrodJen 1uar. Um biefen 3u unterbriicfen, fdJfug er ben }ffieg nadJ hem ~eutoburger }ffiafb ein. '.Die rti' mifdJen ~ofbaten 11111fiten burdJ enge ~lifer unb Uber belllafbcte .pugcf 3icl)en. '.Dal'.l .Peer fo1111te nur fangfam \Jorluiirtl'.l fommen. '.Ver 9.J(arfdJ ltlurbc nod) 11111 fo fdJluieriger gemadJt, inbem ein U111uetter eh1trat. ~l'.l regnete in Gtrtimcn. '.i)er . .\Boben ltlurbe bafb in einen ®umpf \Jer1ua11beft.· .Pierauf fdjien ~lrmin geltlartct 3u fJabcn. 9.J(it mifbcm SMegl'.lgefdJrci ftiiqten [idJ hie ®ermnmn auf bie momer. '.tlicfe luerben in grofien 0d)arei1 niebergc' me~dt. .\Bil'.l 3um filbenb gefingt el'.l bod) ben 9li.imern, cine 2fal)OfJC 311 Cr< langen, ltJo fie ein ~ager mtffdJfagen lonntcn. film anbern 9J1orgen \Jer< fud)Cll bie 9li.imer if)relJ }ffieg fort3U< fe~cn; aber bie ®ermancn fhtb ifJnen immer auf bcn ~erfm. '.Ver britte IDCorgm bridJt m1, unb nodJ fJabcn fie feine 9(uf)e \lor bcn @ermanen. ~ O< gar bem tapferften entfinft ber ffi(ut. ~Hl'.l audJ Q3nrul'.l fiel)t, bafi nTTel'.l uer' form i[t, [tliqt er [id) in fein ®dJltlert. 91ur luenige retten [idj burdj bie ~fudjt. Wl'.l bie 91adjridjt uon bem lBerfu[te

7 !)

im ~eutoburger }ffia!b nadj mom tam, 1uurbc ber Si'aifer in tiefe ~rauer tier' fe~t. (fr gfaubte, bafi ie~t bie ®er' manen nadJ S'tafien fommen unb bal'.l ~anb einnel)men luiirbcn, aber bie ®er' mnncn l)atten garnidJt biefe filbfidjt. ®ir l)attm ie~t iTJre ~reil)eit lllieber, unb bal'.l ltlar aTTel'.l , ltlal'.l fie IUoUten. ~. ~. ~

THE PYRAMIDS.

One of the most interesting studies in the line of ancient architecture is that of the pyramid . Pyramid is a geometrical term for any solid contained by a plane polygoral base and other planes meeting in point. This term is also applied to various monumental and temple . structures of several nations . The most famous pyramids are those of the Egyptians. They were mostly used for the tombs of kings. For the first eleven dynasties, or about 3000 B. C., the tombs had the form of a mastaba, or merely rectangular walls looking like unfinished pyramids. The interior was richly decorated with sculptures and paintings. These referred either to the life of the deceased or to the gods of the current religious system. During the middle empire till 1600 B. C., the mastaba was superseded by small pyramids, and by the speos or halla cut into the rock. The gods were seldom represented upon them


so

THE D. M L C MESSENGER

during this period. In the next period, until 340 B. C., excavated tombs were built. The statuary and images of the deceased were replaced by those of a mythological nature. 'fhe pyramids were only enlarged mastaba, and belonged to the first class. Each pyramid was built up over a sepulchral chamber excavated in the rock. During the !ife of the king for whom the structure was intended, the work continued, only a narrow passageway being left open as 路 the stone was added, by which one could enter from the outside to the central chamber. At the death of the ruler the work ceased. The last layers were then finished off and the passageway closed. The piles were built of blocks of red or syentic granite from the quarries of Asswan, a city in upper Egypt. Other stone of a calcareous nature, taken from the quarries of Mokattam and Turah was also used. The stone was of extraordinary dimensions, and their transportation to the pyramids and adjustment into their place show great mechanical skill. Their thickness Yaried from four to two feet. They were arranged one upon the other forming steps. Those near the top of the steps are built of thicker stone, but the blocks are of moderate length, compared with the base. To quarry and move the great blocks to the pyramids and then raise

them to their position, required great engineering skill. The three pyramids of Memphis stand upon a plateau about 137 ft. above the level of the Nile river. The largest of them, known as the pyramid of the Cheops, covers an area of 12 to 13 acres. I ts dimensions have been reduced by the removal of the outer rock to furnish stone for the city of Cairo. By doing this, the walls lost their fine polish, which was given them by their builders. By stripping off the outer casing, the courses of stone appear in the form of steps. These are ragged and unequal, and can be ascended. The horizontal surfaces were finely finished, and the stones were joined together by cement of lime without sand. The only entrance is on the Northern face, 49 ft. above the base. This passageway is very small, so that a child, about 4 ft. high, can enter into it easily. Not far from the passageway is the sepulchral chamber. It is supposed that it was intended to excavate another chamber at the end of this entrance. It was not done, because the monarch did not live long enough. The sepulchral chamber is about 46 ft. long, 27 ft. wide, and 111-2 ft. high. The entrance passage of the sepulchral chamber connects with several other chambers and passages. One of them in the central part of a pyramid is known as the queen's chamber. It seems


-------- ------ ... . -

T11E D M L. C. MESSENGER

to have been intended for a sarcophagus. But only one was found in the king's chamber. This apartment is lined with red granite. Single stones reach from floor to ceiling. The 路ceiling is formed of nine large slabs of polished granite, reaching from wall to wall. Above this a.re five small chambers, evidently built to shelter the larger room beneath. The room contains a wooden coffin with the munimy of a king, which disappeared when the pyramids were opened and plundered. When the pyramids were built, arrangements were made to block up the important passageways with huge masses of granite. This hindered very much in the exploration of them. The second pyramid, King Shafra's, stands on a base 33 ft. above that of the great pyramid, and in an excavation made for it in the rock. The upper portion of it is st ill preserved. It can C!'J ascended, but with great danger .. This pyramid has two entrances. The sepulchral chamber contains a granite sarcophagus. It was reached by Belzoni in 1818. He found an inscription recording the visit of a caliph, and the opening by him of the pyramid. The third pyramid is only 354 1-2 ft. square and 203 ft. high. It was explored by Col. Vyse in 1837. This pyramid, though the smallest, is the best constructed of the three. In the

Bl

same vicinity are severa1 smaller pyramids. These are supposed to have been the tombs of the kings' relatives. Of the other pyramids further south, the largest are of the Dashoor group. - There are five, two of stone and three of rough brick. Abusir has a group of 14 pyramids. Many of t hem are mere heaps of rubbish, not more than 100 ft. high. The Sakkara group is close to that of the former, and contains 17 pyramids. They are more or -less. preserved. The largest and most remarkable one is the pyramid in steps. The The other pyramids of Sakkara are mostly destroyed. Pyramids are mostly found in the upper part of the Nile valley. There are many in Nubia, a part of Egypt. Others are found in the ancient countries of the East. At Birs Nimrud is the step-shaped pyramid, which was built by Nebuchadnezzar. It is known as the temple of seven spheres. The same king built the pyramidal brick structure of Mujellibe at Babylon, of which the ruins are still standing. Ruins of pyramids are also found in India. In ancient times pyramids were tuilt at Peking, and at Suka in Java. One was constructed in Rome about 20 to 30 years B. C. in honor of Cestius. It was furnished with a sepulchre. In Mexico are similar structures, far exceeding those of the pyramids

- -.


THE D . M . L

82

of Egypt in area. The structures in Mexico . are mostly temples, while the Egyptian pyramids are always tombs. E.T. '16 · ~

~ic Ulcue \Sfeifcnorgel.

C MESSENGER

31Uei . Orgelfon3erte, dnl'.! am 9catf1, mittag . unb cinl'.! am ~{tenb. .Perr l)?edJHn erf)ielt ben grofiten 'teil feiner filul'.!bilbung \Jon ben berlifJmten Or~ ganiften . ~He!'.anber @uihnnnt unb ~. ID?. 5.ffiibor in l.j3aril'.!. mon biefen be< fom er '(,Perr ff/edJlin) ein fef)r gtitel'.! Beugnie, ineir fie trnn feinen mufifa, HfdJen ~{nfogen unb tedJnifdJen l)'iif)ig, feiten iibeqeugt luaren. UeberaH, \Uo .Perr l)?edJHn all'.! ~on3ertorganift auf, getreten \Uar, fonnte er nur gute ~rfolge a.uflueifen. '.Dal'.! fofgenbe l,J3rogram luurbe llon biefem ~Unftfet: in unfmr ~{ufa aufnef ilf)rt, ~ u bem 11od1 eitwfne ~f)orfii~e unter 2eitung IJon l,J3rof. 5lfeuter f)i113ufomen: 9?ad)mittag. 1. ~antafie unb l)'.uge in ~. fil(of( 1.)3{). ~m. SBadJ. 2. (a) l.j3rae(ubio . . ...... ... .. ~orem (b) ID?ufette unb monbo .... mameau 3. '.t;ie WlmadJt .... .. . @SdJuberH~ifit ID?iinnen1Jor, ®opran u. Orgel. 4. 3 mprollifation . . . .. . . ~. 9?edJ!in 5. \}antnfie on t1110 ~f)urdJ ,PlJmnl'.! @uilmant. 6. Wcard)ing .. ..... ...~rotere,IJ1c1Jin ID?aie ~fJoir: 7. a) 9coeI. . . . . . . . . .. . . . @uilmant b) ~a price .............. , 91HdJer 8. 2obct unfern @ott . ... l)'r. l}~eutcr. @emifd1ter ~{)or 1mb Orgef. 9. 'toccatn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.ffiib.or.

:Die ~{uffteUung unfercr ncuerr l,J3fci, fcnorget llmrbe . am 14. ID?ai beenbet. (;ta ift ein meifterlJaftea 5.ffierf ber Orgef, baufunft unb im · gan~en \norbl'.ieften ift \Uof)l fein 31Ueitea 5.ffierf, baa biefea ilbertri:fft. ®eit bem 2~: 2lpril \Uaren bie ,Perren SBinber unb @Smit{) llon ber 5.ffiirfdJing Drge( ~o. IJon @Salem, Of)io; mit tier ~luffteffung biefer Drgel befdJiiftigt. ~ine fuqe SBefd)reibung ber l.j3feifenorgel follte gentigen, um bem 2efer ·eine fieinc· Q3orfteUung \Jon berfelben 3u geben. '.!)ie ·Orgel l)at 31Uei ID?anuaie unb 25 l)?egifter, niit einem Umfang in ben · ID?anualen IJom tief en 31UeigeftridJenen .. ~" bla 3um ;,@".· '.i:laa .paupt\Uerf beftef)t au\'.! ·8 l)?egiftem mit 4.88 l.j3feifen. '.!)aa @5dj1ueff1Uerf {)at 12 l)?~gifter mit 142 l.j3feifen. '.i:laa l.j3ebaI, \Uerf beftef)t au\'.! 5 l)?egiftem mit 160 . l.j3feifen. gmwn (Jat bie Orgcl 1490 l.j3feifen. .pieql! fommen nodJ 12 IJerfdJiebene ~oppelungen. Bum BubefJiir gef)ort baa 'tremulo, ber ~re, ~fbcnb. fcenbo 2ln3eiger, . ber 2uftmwlger, bie 1. 1.)3.i:aelubium in .p Wcorr . 3. ®eb SBadJ '.i:loppeffoppelung 2luaiegung, unb ber 2. a) ~onf ofation ...... l)'r. ?)?cuter. eleHrifdje ~otor. '.i:latl gefamte 5.ffierf b) ~anon . ......... .. . 3 abafiof)n foftet $5000. 3. 5.ffiie HebHdJ finb beine 5.ffiof)nungen. 2lm ®onntag, b. 24. ID?ai, gab .Perr ~{)or 91o. 4 au\'.! ,, '.D~utfdJel'.! ffie, quicm" . ....... . . SBraf)ml'.!. <tbuarb 9?edJHn IJon 9ce\U [lorf ~it~

zsm

zs.


TBE D M L. C. MESSENGER

Prof. Reuter Mr. Ed. Rechlin The two R's of the Twentieth Century.


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

81

4. 3 mprobifation ...... ~b. ITTedJfin. 5. ITiiuaic (®t1111pf)onie @otf)ique) lffiibor. 6. lffi(Jell tfJC mirb nip£l .. ~. Sfremfcr. ffiCi!'.eb ~f)oir. 7. a) ~antife11e \j3aftora!e . . @uilmant. b) @5d)eqeu£l @5onate 5 ~ ui!mant. 8. \j3falm 150 ..... . .. . ITir. ITTeuter. ffiCi.innerdJor u. DrgeL 9. 'toccata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . lffiibor. '.Der ®ei(Jeaft toirb mit ber @5dJlufi ~ feier in unfmr Wnftalt berbunben mer.hen, bamit bie @5~nobalen @elegen, fJeit fJaben, biefer jJeier bei3umof)nen. ~erid1t

be\1 S"romiteea 3ur Uebemaf)me ber neuen Drgel im '.Dr. ffiC. 2. ~oHege, ffiem Ulm, 9Jlinnefota.

~1n

ben moarb of 'trufteea ber 2(f(g. @511110Ce ! meauftragt nad) ITiertigfteffung ber uon ber lffiirfdJing Drgan (§:o., ®alem Df)io, fiir unfere 2fnftaft erbauten neuen Drgd ein Urteil ab3ugeben, un, terbreiten bie Unteqeid111eten f)iermit folgenbea: mon einem feparaten @5pieHifdJ ab, gefef)en, ber nadJ reif(id)er Ueberlegung bea Drgeibnu,Q3orfif,}enben bea man, geelnben ITTaumea megen einem ®pie(, tifdJ bireft am @ef)iiufe meidJen mufite, ift ber mnu ber Drgel fontraftgemi.ifi in nllen ~b13elf)eiten auf\1 forgfi.iltigfte bon ber lffiirfd)ing Drgan (fa au age, fiHJrt morben. '.Die @iite be£l berluenbeten 9Jlateriafa, ber .\'i'onftruftion (\j3neumatif unb

'!lie 91cuc Orner.


TflE D M L. C. MESSENGER

85

Wled)anif), ber 3 ntonienmg bef11ebigt, Wnbante religiofo . 0. ffieidjarbt. ia iibertrifft bie gegegten lffiiinfdJe unb 4. '.Doppelquartett: (\trroartungen. a. Sefu, bu mcin ~rliifer 3m%efonbere, roal'.l Sntonierung, 58 . (£orbaul'.I. <:igarafteriftif, Wbrunbung unb Wul'.l• b. Wm Sl'arfreitag .. Wlidj . .s)a~bn. geglid)engeit in ben ein 0elnen @5timmen c. ~llle nerum (beutfdJer '.te~t) betrifft, · finb filnftlerifdje 2eiftungen lffi. W. Wlo3art. 5. @5olo mit Drgel gefdJaffen roorben, bie ben nerroiifmteften Drgelfenner befriebigen unb bal'.l lffietf Dftetgrufi .... Wluellet<.s)artung. oil einem Wlufterroetf ftempeln, bal'.l 6. 1:loppelquartett: jebroeben mergleid) aul'.llJtilt mit ben be< ~tftanben ift bet .s)eilanb geu t riigmteften Orgelroetfen. WI. mulpinl'.l. 1:Jer reidJ, audJ mit neucn @5piel< 7. [Juett: \jrl. @5toefen u. .s)ucfen; poeglet mit Otgel (,Pm 2e9rer gilfen aul'.lgeftattete @5pieltifdj, roie bei \j. \jettinger.) gleidjer @riifie roogl felten einer 0u 3dj garrte bel'.l ,Pettn finben fein roirb, ift ein Wleifterroetf \j. Wlenbell'.lfogn. in feinet ~!nlage. [lie orofie Wlannig· 8. '.triol'.l filt mioline, <:ieHo u. Otgel faltigfeit bet fogenannten freien .fi'om• a. Wnbante . . . . . . . <;£gr. \jinf. binntionen bet Wul'.l• unb ~infdjaltungen unb bmn Ieidjte .s)nnbgabung burdj b) '.trio in 9•moll . <ii. Sfiimmmr c. 2ntgetto . . . . . . . m. 58rofig . .s)anb unb \jufi, fterrten bem {\trfinbungl'.l• 9. @5tteidjordjeftet geifte bel'.l ~rbauerl'.l Wufgaben, bie er Sl'itdJen Wrie ... m. .\Bolfmann. mit fad)mtinnifdjem @5djarffinn gltin3enb . geliift gat, fo bafi bal'.l lffietf in feiner 10. Wliinnetdjo.t \jot tge Wlountainl'.l f9aH bepart @5pielbatfeit unb Wul'.lnuf2ung einem ' \jr. meutet. megrmanualigen Drgelroetfe gletdJ· tommt unb allen 2lnforberungen 0u ge< 11. @5tteidjordJeftet rnit Orgel · 2argo ~ . . . . . . . . . . Sol'.l . .s)a~bn nil gen im ftanbe ift. @e3eidjnet: \jr. ffieuter, 21. Wt'fet· 12. Wliinnerd)ot mit Drgel $falm 150 ... . . ... \jt. \Reuter. mann, \jr . .fi'annenberg. · 13. Orgelfa~ (l.j3rof. l)'r. ffieuter.) 5t'itdJenfon3ert i~ ~rlington. @egeben non bem Wlnennerd)or unb bem @5treidjordJefter bel'.l '.D~. WI. 2. <ii. unter 2eitung non l.j3rof. ffieuter. - 1:lae l.j3rogramm ift folgenbel'.l: 1. Drge{fa~ (l.j3rof. \jr. Weuter.) 2. Wliinnerdjor mit Drgel '.Die Wlfmadjt ... @5djubert·2ifit. 3. @5treidjordjefter mit Drgel

5t'ircricnfon3crt. am 21. Wla\, in ber '.Dreieinigfeitl'.lfirdje 3u ~icollet, _gegeben non ben <i£9oren bel'.l [Jr; m. 2. <ii. untet 2eitung non l.j3rof. 9'Jeutet.' l.j3rogramm. 1. Drgelfa~ (\.13rof. ffieuter.) 2. @ernifdjter <i£gor


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

86

3. 4.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

a) (;!in fefte 5Burg ... .. . 2utf)er. b) '.tlu ,Pirte 3'eraele. 5BortnianeftJ. c) 5lli ie flf)ott IeudJtet her IDCor~ genftern .... '.tonfn!2: @5eb. 5Bad). @5treid)ordJefter: 路 ~nbante religiofo .. 0 . ffieicf)f)arbt. IDCiinnerd)ot unb @5opran: '.Die 2Hf mad1t .. . . @5d1ubert~2 iflt. '.trio fiir 'Bioline, ~eno, u. Orgel 5Brofig. 5Baritonfolo unb @:)treid)otdJefter Sl'ircf)enarie . .. . . .. . . 'Boffmann. IDCannercf)or ll3fnlm 150 .. .. .. . . \}r. meuter. @5treid)ordJefter 2nrgo . .. . ... ... ...... .Pn~bn @emifd)ter ~f)or a) 0 teuree @otteeroort b) @ott, mein ,Peil .. . ,Pauptmann Orgel fa~ (1l3rof. ffieuter.) . @emifd)ter ~f)or 2obet un[ern @ott ..... !neuter.

AN ARTIST'S OPINION.

The renowned concert - organist, Edward Rechlin, of New York City, has the following to say about our new pipe organ :

New Ulm, May 25, 1914. To whom it may concern: It gives me great pleasure to testify to the supreme excellence of the Wirsching organ recently rected under the able supervision of Prof. Reuter at the Dr. M . Luther College at New Ulm, Minn. Too much cannot be said in praise of the intonation, with each stop decidedly characteristic of its purpose, and still the ensemble always blending into a tonal coloring of perfect balance, an achievement which should place the builders in the very first rank in this country. Also the action cannot be praised too highly, it meet ing the most exacting demands of modern technique with a promptness and facility which is most astounding. In addition, the various combinat ion acts present at the same t ime t he greatest possibilities, and are most simple and convenient. Signed: Edward Rechlin.


THE D M L. C. MESSENGER

87

1Ebitnrinl &tntr Leo iuedtke, George Meyer, Business. Manager M. Dommer, Exchange Editor C. Hinz, Local Editor E. Koenig, Athletic Editor

Editor-in-chief E. Trettin, Asst. Business Manager C. Koch, College Notes Editor J. Wirth, Alumni Editor A Falde, Per Jocum Editor

HE " D. M. L. C. MESSENGER" is published quart erly during tbe scb"ool year by the students of Dr. lllartln Luther College. The· subscription ·price is fi fty cents per annum. Single copies fifteen cents. S_tamps not accept ed. We request payment i n advance. ~ The "Messenger" Is con ti nued after time of subscription bas expired, unless \Ve are notified to discontinue ar.d nil. nrr eages a r e paid . . ir All business communi cation should be add r essed to the Business Manager; a ll literary contribution s to the Editor-in-chief. Advertising rates will be furnished on request. ~ Contributions to our Literary De partment are re 1uested from all a lumni , undergraduates a!"d friends.

T

J·:nter ed as second class matter at the Postotliec o f New Ul m, Minnesota.

EDITORIAL A TRIP IN THE EAST.

On the morning of my first day in Boston I was awakened by the rumble of wagons and the shouting of people. I arose and joined my aunt, who told me that the people who were making the

noise were going to , the market ·place to- sell whatever food they had brought with them for sale. . She also told me that I might go ·with her to see what a market place was like. You may be sure I was delighted to go. We therefore started toward Faneuil Hall


88 路

THE D . M. L . C. MESSENGEH

Market. We saw wagon crowded what it was all about, but my to wagon and everyone shouting aunt soon told me that it was out what he had to sell. Queerly cleaning-up time and that only dressed women were hurrying thru fifteen minutes were left to d this the crowds, picking up every- work in. Nothing was left for thing that was discarded from the us to do but to go home, and home wagons. In o:J.e place we saw a we went . The next morning we started fruit merchant selling his fruit at auction. In another place we out again, this time with our saw a traveling meat-market. lunch, because we intended to Here the buyers for the large spend the day in Boston Common hotels and boardir1g houses were We walked on and on through busy liuying meat for ,the day. this beautiful park, stopping now A pleasant, cheerful looking and then to watch the children woman came toward us wit h a at play. We ate our dinner huge basket of wat er-cress. vVe under one of the huge shade trees bought some of this and st arted and then visit ed the golden domed home for dinner time was near at building known as the statehouse. It is in this building that the hand. I was so delight ed with my governor of Massachusetts and morning's wanderings that I per- the s tate congress meet every suaded my aunt to go with me year to make the laws of the again in the afternoon. We state. After going through tl:is walked to the wharves this time building we re turned home. and thought of the celebrated Of course I wanted to see the "Boston Tea Party." We saw Bunker Hill Monument. We boats laden with fish , and others found the monument to be a shaft laden with clams, enter the harbor. of granite, t he corner stone of Some of these fish were placed on which was laid in 1825 by General cars and - taken to the different Lafayette. We climbed the stairs parts of the city, while others th a t lead to t he t op, and got an were sold at auction to the by- excellent view cf the city and tho standers. Near here we saw surrounding c.)u::1t ry. It was'nt what seemed to be a chicken coop quit e such easy work coming on wheels. Here a man was down t he long stairs as it was to selling chickens which were still go up, but we managed t o get alive. While we were watching down. the many strange sights, we heard We t hen started out t o see the the sound of a gong. Everyone, Old orth Church. Upon armerchant and buyer, seemed to riving here we could not help but be in a hurry now. I wondered t!1ink of the lanterns tha t wEre


TnE D. M.L C. MESSENGER

hung in the steeple on the right when the British soldiers star~ ed against the Americans at Lexington and Concord. After viewing the church from both inside and outside, we found we had just time enough to get home in time for supper~ I was anxious to see Harvard University. One morning, therefore, my aunt and I wended our steps toward Cambridge. Having walked along the avenues shaded with elms, we finally came to "Washington Elm," where George Washington first took his command of the American army in 1775. At length we reached Harvard University, which looked like a little city in itself. We visited the botanical gardens, the astronomical observatory, the museums and the large library. Students seemed to be passing us continually; but when we thought of the three thousand four hundred students, we did not wonder that they seemed to be everywhere. We also visited Radcliffe College, an annex for girls which had four hundred fifty students. We now directed our steps homeward well satisfied with our observations. 路 The next morning we left for Fall River. Among the many interesting places I visited I think the cotton mill was the most interesting. We entered t he office of the mill and were given a guide to show us through the mill.

8'J

Having first showed us the raw cotton, he called our attention to the fine hairs of. which it was made up. He said that if a thousand of them were placed one above the other t hey would not reach the t hickness of. an inch and that it took many millions of them to make a spool of thread. This raw cotton was put into a machine that blew out the dust, leaves, sticks, and dirt. We picked up a handful of the cottonnow and found it as soft as swansdown and pure white. The fibers crossed one another this way and that and so had to be put ihto a 路 machine that would straighten them out. This machine was called the carding machine and had many large rollers which were covered with little wire teeth. These teeth brushed and combed the fibers路 as they passed through much as we comb our hair. These teeth were so fine that a hundred of .them could be placed upon a space as big as a cent. We then went to another machine which rolled the fibers over and over so that t hey clung to each other and came out in a thick rope of soft cotton yarn. Our guide told t:s it was now in the proper shape to be twisted for thread. The rope was as large as a broom handle and seemed thick enough to make a dozen fine threads but it wasn't large enough for one. It was twisted and doubled again


90

THE D. M: L. C. MESSENGER

and again by passing through one machine after another, each one twisting it a little tighter until it wasri't any thicker than a fishing line. Then strands just like it were added to it and all were retwisted until they came out as fine cottori yarn. They were then put on spinning frames and spinning mules and brot out as fine threads used for weaving. The 路cotton used for thread was then wound upon spools -or spindles. That intended for warp in the weaying was wound about rollers of the width of the cloth to be made. That intended for the woof was wound upon little bobbins. We then went to the weaving rooms where these little bobbins were put into shuttles and thrown back and forth through the warp at the speed of one hundred fifty times per minute. The great sheets of cotton goods came rolling forth and were folded and baled for shipment. We now returned . home, convinced that it takes a great deal of work to transform the cotton plant into ordinary cotton goods. . From Fall River we went to Springfield, where we visi ted the United States Armory. This is the largest building of its kind in the country. From there we went to Hol.yoke, which is noted for its large paper mills. Here v:e found many things of interest, ~mong路 them the pulp room which

held one thousand pounds of wood pulp which was to be made into paper. At Holyoke my aunt and I parted, she going to her home and I to mine, delighted with the many things we had seen and learned.

J.M.V. RELIGIOUS FESTIVALS OF INDIA.

India, land of caste and sect, has a peculiar interest to us on account of its people, their customs habits, and peculiarities. Following these things up, we strike upon something that plays a great part in the life of the people, namely, religion and religious festivals. India is the land of sects. Hinduism-is not the universal religion that most people imagine it; on the contrary, we find about 2,100 different sects in india, sects that are, in the main, inimical toward one another. Each of these sects has its certain holidays and festivals, and around these festivals the life of the people centers. Preceding each holiday is a period of preparation extending over a space of three or four days. Great quantities of food are prepared, clothing is gat hered together and everything ordered and arranged. The festival itself generally begins with a processic n in which


THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER

the god car is the chief attraction. This is a massive car with gr<!at wooden wheels which are carved with grotesque and fanciful figures. These wheels carry a large platform which is shaded by a broad canopy. In the center of the platform is found the statue of the chief god. Around this are arranged the statues of the le8ser gods in the order of their importance. This car is dragged through the streets by enthusiastic devotees of the gods, and it is considered a great privilege and honor to be selected for this work. Along the route of this procession are lined up thousands of people; and as the god-car goes by, they shout. Some of the bystanders become so enthusiastic that they cast themselves 1lnder the god-car and are crushed by its ponderous wheels. Those who so lose t heir li~es are considered as having gone路 much farther into heaven than the ordinary person who dies a. natural death can ever hope to penetrate. 路 . The men most responsibie for these displays of fanaticism are perhaps the fakirs or dervishes, who are the holy men of India. They are consecrated to t he service of some temple and L1 t h3ir fer vor and devotion to their religion they mut ilate t heir bodies and bind their 1:mbs into grotesque shapes. Often one will tie his right or left arm above his head and lewe it in that position for a

91

number of years until it has grown into that shape and he cannot move it. Some of them will bind one of their feet up onto their shoulders until it grows in that position. Perhaps the most peculiar fes ti val of all is the Mohammedan. festival which corresponds with our Memorial Day, at least in object. It is celebrated to honor the memory of the dead heroes, who died while spreading the faith. A missionary, just re-路 turned, describes it as follows: "Early in the morning we took our places. at a window overlook-路 ing the long street that leads into the town. S0on we noticed a long line of men come down the street. They came two and two headed by the priests. The entire line was chanting a hymn in honor of the dead heroes. Soon the line parted, one row went to the one side of the street, the other row took the opposite side. There they stood facing each other, a . line of swarthy-faced men, stripped to t he waistline. The lines extended just as far as we could seeperhaps three or four miles ; these people, who, in their way and manner and in their conception of the true way of honoring the dead, were here to torture themselves in the hot Indian sun. At a given signal a chant was begun and the men hegan beating their breasts with the:r hands, just ab:>ve the heart. This they kept


92

THE

~

M. L. Q MESSENGER

up for hours at a . time until the blood began streaming down their . breasts and many of the weaker men became. exhausted." What a contrast to our Memorial Day this is! Although the people of India as a rule show a great deal of indifference toward religion, yet we find that during these festivals a great devotion toward their gods is displayed and much real, earnest religious feeling路 shown. We find generosity displayed in every direction, none of the poor are allowed to suffer during that period, great quantities of food and clothing .are distributed to the needy, and路 each one endeavors to give . to another, something to make th.e festival enjoyable and memorable. So we find . that hundreds of different festiv.als are celebrated in India, for each of the 2,100 sects has its festivals, and we can easily see the .great influence these celebrations have on the life of the people, so much of an influence that one may almost call them the life of India. Undoubtedly they are one of .. the great factors that combine to make India individual, in a class by itself, a fascinating and enthralling study. H. S. '16.

CHEERFULNESS IN SCHOOL.

THE

Cheerfulnes!> may be defined as being in harmony with all about us, and at peace with humanity. It comes not only from looking at the good, which is mixed with som~ evil, but from appreciating it when we have it.路 To be cheerful is largely in our power, altho some of us are by nature more inclined to be cheerful than others. This disposition may be developed by habit until it becomes natural to almost any person. Like a physician who can go through an epidemic and not take it, a teacher should learn to go through trouble and not take it. There is no su~h a thing as guaranteeing ourselves against troub.le. . But how can we train the pupil, who comes to us every day, to be . cheerful an.d . happy, if we, who are his teachers, do not carry thaL happy spirit with us? The pupil is but a child, and we know that in childhood diseases of all kinds are more contagious. The spirit which the teacher brings to school will be reflected by her pupils. It is easy to enter upon the duties of the teacher without preparation; it is easy to do without that lofty purpose which our own conscience ever demands; but it is not so easy to undo the mischief which one little mistake


THE D M L

may produce in the mind of the child . A certain amount of thought, energy, and time must be spent for preparation for the day's work. We cannot follow our own personal convenience, but must prepare ourselves for the work we have set out to do. How much better we feel when our work is all pre路pared, and we know just what we are going to do the next day, than we do when upon waking up in the morning we find a lot of undone work awaiting us. We can surely be more che2rful when we ha7e no 路unfinished task to worry us. It takes willpower to perform our duties as we have planned and not give up for the sake of our convenience, as it takes will power to cor, trol the mind toward cheerfulness.

H.J. V. CLASS HISTORY AND PROPHECY OF 1914.

It was on a l:eautiful si:ring morning that I four.d myself out in the woods. Weary of roving arcund, I lay d o~n for a shut nap. During these few moments 1 rnw five stars, each rei:;resenting ~ meml:er of our class. The frst sfar represented Mr. Dommer. I saw little Martin as a farmer toy trudging to school along a lone country road, with a dinner-pail in one hand and a

C MESSEKGER

primary reader and "Fibel'' under his arm. Years rolled on, and little Martin l::ecame quite a boy. Growing weary of country lire, he decided to follow the "Flowery Path of Knowledge." Thus it happened that Martin enrolled as a student at our college. Through his ambition he reached his goal. The next year found Mr. Dommer as a parochial t eacher in the near vicinity of New Ulm- which was very favorable to him, for certain reascr:s. The next star repreRented Mr. Luedtke. .I saw him as a wee 'little fellow playing marbles when 路 he really ought to have been at school. A few more . years took little Leo into school but nevertr_eless during his free time he could alwa:ys te found on the base ball diamcnd, trying his luck at curves and at the rat. But Leo, reing a whimsical boy, wanted a change. Therefore we now have tl:e pleasur.e of having Mr. Luedtke in our midst. 1914 crowned 1:oth his work in school and on the diamcnd with success. 1915 sees Mr. Luedtke a -sturdy school master en the :r:rairies of South D~kota.

The third star reprrsenteo Mr. Backer at the age of four. I saw little Emil driving home the cows on a warm summer evening, stopping here and there to cut a willow whistle, upon which he im:r:rovised strikirg little tunes.


()1

THE ]). M. L . C MESSENGER

This was his first step in the music hemisphere. .At the age of sever). Emil entered school. These · seemed lonesome days without his musical instrument. Getting tired of m:;ithematics he . would constantly drum his desk with his fingers, evidently playing the scal~s. Later he continued his studies at our college. Here he progress.ed step by step, until he became s.i. graduate of 1914. He accepted a position as teacher in New York City. The fourth star was Mr. Hohenstein. I saw him as a timid, shy couptry lad, wending his way to school with his sister. At school he was mostly studying Geography, but when at home he was never very far from his mother. Through the influence of his pastor and his parents he chose this college for the beginning of his career. Mr. Hohenstein's efforts and work were rewarded with. success. He was given a position..at Waterloo, Wisconsin. The fifth star represented- A startling n.oise brought me to my. feet to find . this onl~ a dream. But slumber took me again into the "Vale of Dreams." Many, many years seemed to have passed, since "College Days" h~d end_e~ and I was on a journey Roaming around , the . world. around .in the mountains of the westt?rn states, I unfor tunately lost my path. I wandered around and .finally meeting two children.

After an explanation, they took me to their home. To my great joy and surprise I found my old class-mate Mr. Luedtke at the head of the house. He was a missionary among the Indians in that vicinity. After spending several delightful days at his home, I continued my journey. My next long stay was at Oxford, England. I visited the "U" · at Oxford. Among the learned men I recognized Mr. Dommer, a great English grammarian. While in Berlin, Germany,' I was taken aback when I heard a very familiar song that we had so many times sung together at college. I stopped to listen- it was ·so enticing that I walked into the building. My eyes wandered to the director and at the first glance i thought it was Mr. Backer and then again I believed my eyes had ·betrayed me; but when I heard ·his ·voice and saw his movements I was convinced that it was Mr. Backer. Weary ·of my long journey, I directed my way to the states. At ·Wisconsin I made several stops and it was here that I met Mr. Hohenstein, i retired teacher. He had not left Wisconsin since £ 1914. I was again on the train going toward home, when I was aroused and found that I had but traveled through dreamland. This is the history and prophecy


THE D M. L C MESSENGER

of the "Class of 1914" as it came to me in a dream. L. K. S. '14. VALE.

Dear readers: With this issue we bid you farewell. But think not that the D. M. L. C. Messenger bids you farewell for ever, for next fall it will again come to greet you, but the greeting will come from a new staff, which consists of the following contributors: Editor-in-chief- Jacob Wirth. Business Manager- E. Treetin. Asst. Business Mgr.- P. Albrecht. Exchange Editor-H. Sitz.

College Notes Editor- A. Falde. Athletic Editor- E. Koenig. Local Editor- G. Meyer. Alumni Editor- C. Hinz. Per Jocum Editor- A. Ehlke. Let us wish this staff a full share of success in its work to come. We know that it will succeed if everyone lends a helping hand. Why should it not? There is no reason why not, for, has not the dear old D. M. L. C. been the "Alma Mater" of many? Therefore put your shoulder to the wheel and help push the good work along that has been begun. Everyone's help is needed in order to accomplish what is aimed for.

EXCHANGES . We welcome a new exchange, "Hemnica", of Red Wing, which contains two very able prohibition articles. "A Slavedriver of Civilization" compares the liquor problem today with the slave problem before the Civil War. "Liquor versus Labor" tries to show that labor today is rarboring the betrayer, liquor, in its ranks, and by so doing is not only harming itself, but also everyone it comes into contact with. We have this suggestion to make: Why not a separate joke column instead of putting jokes and locals into the same column?

The Freshmen Number of the "Lawrentian" is more or less in the form of a plea for class spirit: The joke column shows that the Freshmen have a well-developed sense of humor. The Co-ed Number of the same paper is very cleverly arranged. COLLEGE BREEZES, MARCH.

"The Vital Conservation" is a most able article, showing in a clear, concise way what an enormous wast e of human life there is in our country alone, and that it is only within the last few years that people have begun to realize


!J(j

THE D. M. L. C MESS ENGER

this and some few endeavored to remedy it. "College Breezes" is among the best of our exchanges. Lincolnian, Lincoln College. Your literary department could receive a little . more attention. Why scatter the advertisements among the literary articles? We believe that this detracts from

the appearance of the paper. Your Exchange is much too modest. Why not do a little helpful criticizing? We acknowledge with thanks the following: Gates Index, Augsburg Echo, Black and Red, Alma Mater, The Crucible, Bethany Echo.

COLLEGE NOTES "Jesu Leidensverkuendigungen"; E. Backer, "Geographie v. den On_April 31st was Arhor Day Vereinigten路Staaten"; Miss Helene at our institution. In the mornVick: "Multiplication, Wiedering, 'bright and early, the lower holung und Uebung." class members provided themMarch 28, Miss Josephine Vick: selves with rakes, spades, and "Jesus in Gethsemane"; L. Luedke axes. The different classes were "Der Thermometer"; M. Demmer: then divided up in groups, which "Multiplication and Beginning in at 8 o'clock, marched under the Decimals." management of "B" class, out to April 1, L. Luedke: "Der Therclean our park. At 10:30 "A" mometer"; E. Backer: "Division class had lunch ready, consisting of Decimals." of lemonade and sandwiches. April 29, W. Hohenstein: "Der During noon hours "A" class N amen J esu"; Miss Stephan: planted a common birch as their "Der Haselnuss Strauch"; M. class tree. Miss Stephan read Dommer: "Lesen." the class history and prophesy. 路 May 6, W. Hohenstein: "Jesu After this the band played several pie(!es. By 4 o'clock all work was Namen in Bezug auf die Gottheit." Miss Stephan: "Der Hafinished. selnussstrauch", continued. L. CATECHESES. Luedke: "Fruehlingslied." Delivered to the upper class of May 6, E. Backer: "Die Staende the local Lutheran parochial Jesu"; Miss Josephine Vick: school by members of "A" class "Robin Redbreast"; M. Dommer: March 18, Miss Leonora Stephan: "Aufsatz-Prosa eines Gedichtes.', ARBOR DAY.


TDE D .M .. L. C. ME ~SENGER

97 .

ATHLEITCS Batteries: N. U. H. S.: DurAfter weeks of arduous practice in fielding and batting, we wel- bahn and Crone. College, Luedt- . comed the day on which our "nine' and Sprenger. 路 should meet the old rivals, Sleepy May 16, our "nine" played a Eye .H . S. The two. teams met return game,. at Sleepy Eye.- This May 9, on the home diamond. was a loosely played game an Luedtke did the pitching for the around. Again the poor fielding home team. The poor support was the cause of our defeat. Score which he received lost the game. by innings: The score by innings: RHE RHE S. E. H. S. 3 6 0 0 0 3 0 0 0-12 9 2 College 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0- 2 8 7 College 1 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0--6 8 5 S. E. H . S. 0 13 10111 0- 8 6 2 Battery for S. E. H. S. :_ChristenBattery for College: Luedtke sen, Carroll and Marti. College, and Koenig. Luedtke and Sprengeler, Koenig. S. E. H.S.: Carroll and Marti. 路A return game was played May An interesting game was played 27, with New Ulm High School. May 13th against New Ulm H. S. Our boys played a splendid game '. on the town diamond. Luedtke Luedlke was on the mound and again performed the hurling for had the visitors at this mercy: our team. The support was ex- Score by innings: cellent. One man on base and a RHE timely hit gave them their only College 2 0 0 3 0 3 0 0--8 10 1 score. It was only a seven inning College 2 0 0 3 0 3-0 0--8 10 1 game. The game was ours from H.S . . 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0--5 5 6 start to finish. Following is the Hattery for College: .' Lriedtke score by innings: and Sprengeler. High School, RHE Dm~bahil, 路Schleuaer and Crone... . N.U.H.S. 0000010- 142 0 0 0 1111- 4 8 1 College


98

THE D. M. L. C MESSENGER

Dr. M. L

C. Baseball Team.

Back row from left to right: P. Westerkamp, W. Tessmann, Umpire M. Dommer, 0 . Grabow and W. Muesing. Center row from left to right: E. Koenig, L. Luedtke and F. Fuhlbrigge. Front row from left to right: D. Verenkamp and E . Pankow.


TEE D. M. L C.

MES~ENGER

!JJ

ALUMNI NOTES CHANGE IN POSITION.

was the cause of his resignation. Mr. Wm. Muesing attended Frederick Grimm, of Gibbon, this institution twenty-five years Minn., has received a call to Appleago, and is therefore one of the ton, Wis., and has accepted it. oldest teachers that have gone He graduated from this institution forth from this College. During with the class of '05. - His first these twenty-five years, he has call as teacher was to Gibbon held the position as teacher at Minn., where he has had charg~ New Ulm, Minn., it being his of the parochial school until this first and only place he 'has ocEaster. Mr. Fr. Grimm has held cupied during his vocation as his position- at Gibbon for eight 路 teacher. years and although he liked hiS school at Gibbon ~nd was closely - :That Mr. Mueslng ~;s a good attached to it, he thuught a change teaQper,--is _J)ro-ved by the fact that in his place would be desirable. the congregation was reluctant Mr. Grimm took charge of the to see him_resign his position. ~ut the Appleton parochial school as considering his reasons, they _h~d 路 second teacher shortly after to consent. He will hold his position 路until Easter. He is an efficient teacher the end. of this school year. What and will, no d~ubt, overcome all possible obstacles that may con- he expects to do then, we are not front him at his new. place. We in position to say. We regret his loss as teacher all wish him success and hope that . very much. . In his new vocation he may find his new position very we w. i sh him all possible success. agreeable. TEACHER RESIGNED.

BIRTH.

Wm. F. Muesing, of New Ulm, Minn., has resigned his position as teacher. Trouble in hearing

On March 28th, 1914, a baby girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. Otto Boerneke of Fairfax, Minn.


10)

THE D. M. L C. MESSENGER

LOC LS

Otto Netzke, who has been teaching school at Wood Lake, Minn., visited college from the 21st to t he 25th of April; he then left for Loretto, Minn., where he will continue his work as teacher. Immanuel Albrecht a student of the Springfield, Ill., Concordia Seminary, called on former _classmates and friends here on April 30th, while on his way to Balaton, Minn., where he will teach school. Prof. Bliefernicht preached at Morgan, Minn., April 26th, May 3rd, 10th and 17th. Prof. Ackermann delivered a sermon in the Trinity Church at St. Paul, May 10th. Miss Caroline Staffenhagen returned to school after being absent the first few weeks after Easter, Sunday, May 17th. G. Wachter of Stevensville,

Mich., si:;ent a few hours here, Monday, May 18th. Henry Mueffelmann, a pupil of the Mankato Commercial College came here to attend the organ-concert Sunday, May 24th. Edgar Blauert and Carl -Steinberg, bot h of New Ulm, entered college after Easter. Erich Kirschke and Paul Spaude spent Sunday, May 17th at the home of the parents of the former. Leonard Kolander, a former student of our institution and Willie Kolander, both of Lakefield, Minn., came here Saturday, May 23, to attend t he concert the following Sunday. Prof., Mosel went to St. Paul to attend the concert given by the Norwegian Band of Decorah, Ia. on the 3rd of May. Several of the band members were his


THE D. M.L. C. MESSENGER

scholars at Wittenberg Academy. He also bid them farewell before they left on their tour to Norway. Fred Dreier of Gibbon, a former student of our college, visited here Sunday, May 17th.

101

Paul Albrec}].t and L. W. Meyer spent May 16th and 17th at Sleepy Eye. Teacher R. Albrecht of Milwaukee, Wis., visited- recitation hours -Monday, May 25th.


102

THE D. M. L C. MESSENGER

1. Kock, to Geck, Was haben wir fuer heute, die grammatische? (chromatische.) 2. Im Leseunterricht. Prof.: Dommer, was sind Falken? Dommer (laechelnd ): Falken sind Seevoegel. Prof.: So, da sind Sie aber schlecht in . der Zoologie bewandert. 3. Prof.: Zu einein Studenten, der den Unterricht stoerte, Lass die kolossale Wurst igkeit. 4. Heard in a drug store: Pfeifer is all right, only when he gets "sore", he loses his temperature. (temper. I 5. Prof.: What is a sentence? Maud: A group of words expressed in thoughts. 6. Rex: (in debate) I hereby declare that ice and snow is not water. auch Falken7. Dommers

jaeger genannt, Rezension ueber eine gelieferte Ka'techese war: " Die kleine Prahl hat herhalten muessen." 8. Prof. Abt could not fall asleep the other night. The reason was- he did not have his spectacles on. 9. Prof.: (dictating) Give a boy address and accomplishments and you give him t he mastery of palaces and fortunes. C. Class member (writing): Give a boy a dress and accomplishments and you give him the mastery of palaces and fortunes. 10. Prof.: What does superior 路 and inferior mean? Oppy: Superior means down, and inferior means slow. 11. Prof.: Habt ihr im deutschen Unterricht von den Konjunktionen gehandelt ? Wilbrecht : - Ja, es gibt starke


THE D . M. L

C. MESSENGER

103

und schwache Konjunktionen. is that? How do you play that? Prof.: (in U. S. History hour) 16. Prof.: One of the greatest Now do you think a bunch of horrors of riding on the sea in the Americans could go into the olden times, was that they did British army and take the General not have any drinking water. out of bed? How did he do it? Bulldog: interrupting, Why Gehm : He chloroformed the didn't they take beer along? soldiers. 17. "Unser Abt von St. Gallen" 12. Prof.: Give me a sentence takes up, at the present time a with the word saucy. course of voice culture. He inJumper: The apple tasted tends to occl,lpy the speaker's seat in Congress in the near future. saucily. 13. Prof.: Fuhlbrigge, you may 18. Sitz: Describe the coast give me the comparison of t he line of Africa. Trettin: It is very fertile. adverb "here". 19. Prof.: Was路 mp.cht das GeFuhlbrigge: Here, more here, rauesch? most here. Blauert: In die Corner. 14. Metz: (auf sich zeigend) 20. Muehelangelo Buanarotte Habt ihr schon meines Vaters Kuh gesehen? Er meinte wohl Elsie, und Raphael Santi, Emily, Kalb. haben kuerzlich hervorragende W- - th: "Bist du denn eine Erzeugnisse der New Ulmer Renaissance Zeichnungen geliefert. Kuh? 15. Jacob: Elsie, __.,w . here have 21. Wirth freut sich ueberaus, you been? <lass er in "Minna von Barnhelms" Elsie: In room 48. Parlament reparaesentiert ist. Es Jacob: Who is playing "Red ist ihm <lessen ungeachtet leid, Wing" up there? <lass sein Name "H" geschrieben. Elsie: Schuit and Bamboo. A. M. F. Klondike: What kind of a game


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Emil F. Buenger Undertaking attended to at all times

Andrew Saffert

H.GOEDE PHOTOGRAPHER

Dealer in

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W.J. Winkelmann "Messenger" New Ulm, Minn.

ADVERTISERS

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ALFRED HELLMAN, Druggist. Olsen Block

Phone 79

New Ulm, Minn.


Pioneer Drug Store W . G . Alwin , M anage r .

E. G . Hage , Prop.

A. H e nlt:, Assistant.

E sell the HOUSTON FOUNJ'A I N PEN. The m ost pe rfect pe n in the world. An indispensable article for a student and bookkeeper . Non-leak.able, self-fi lling, a nd o ne th a t yo u can't lose . Come and see us. We w ill be pleased to show it to you.

W

PIONEER DRUG STORE

The Bee Hive Up-to-Date Dry Goods House Is offering some remarkable bargains in

SUMMER AND FALL GOODS Everything to be had in a first-class d~y goods store, prices always the lowest

J. A. 0 C HS, The Bee Hive The or ig in ator of low prices o n good goods

NEW ULM GREENHOUSES CHRIST. BOOCK, Propr. 11,000 ft. of Glass

Gr0wers of ROSES, CARI\ATIONS and Other Choice Cutflowers, as well as ornamental and bedding plants. We furnish first class, fre sb stock, and all orders entrusted to us receive ou r most careful attention. BETTER SUITS, OVERCOATS and FURNISHINGS

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E herewith beg to solicit the College Trade. Please come in and get acquainted. The things in our line, of interest to you, are musical instruments, violin strings, fountain pens, watches, jewelry, etc. When your .watch or your glasses need looking after call on us. We will give you a fair deal at all times. c. G. REIM, The Leading Jeweler

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J. M. Meyer

EUGENE KOEHLER'S Barber Shop and Bath Rooms Respectfully Solicits your patronage

20 N. Minn. St. LEADING. JEWELER

New Ulm, Minn .

G. A. OTTOMEYER Headquarters for

New Ulm,

Minn.

LADIES' READY - TO - WEAR and FINE DRY GOODS

OUNG men ought to see the smart new models in suits we have ready for them; patch pockets are quite a feature, and there's a very snappy Norfolk vest that will "get you." Hart Schaffner & Marx made it; one of the best of the new spring styles. See what we'll show you in suits at $20. We have other makes as low as $12 and up to $40.

Y

Emil Metzinger This store is the home of Hart Schaffner & Marx clothl'S


.8

EJ ·

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Optometrist a~d Optici@~ Beussmann Block New Ulm ,

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IF YOU PLEASE HE READERS OF "THE D. M. L. C. MESSENGER" • .will conf~r a great favor upon the publishers by.carefully reading the advertis~ng col~mns of this magazine · and by patronizing the merchants who so. liberally and che~rfully responde~ to our solicitati~ns. It is largely ~ue to the assistance of our business men that we are enabled to publisa "The M~s~enger. ;,

• T

THE PUBLISHERS

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m Once your BARBER always your BARBER

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1913-1914 DMLC Messenger Vol. 4  
1913-1914 DMLC Messenger Vol. 4